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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 8, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello. this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. more than a0 maternity units in england closed their doors to new admissions at some point last year. labour blames a lack of midwives. the government says it's misleading to blame staff shortages. good morning. it's tuesday the 8th of august. also this morning: sickness at the world athletics championships. yes, organisers here confirm a number of cases of gastroenteritis at one team hotel. on the track though. heartbreak for great britain's laura muir, who just misses out on a medal in the 1,500 metres by less than a tenth of a second.
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doctors say a british woman who was shot while on holiday to brazil is lucky to be alive. eloise dixon is reported to have been attacked when her family drove into a slum area. good morning. tesco has announced it's scrapping 5p carrier bags altogether in favour of the more expensive "bags for life." i'll be asking if other retailers will do the same. also this morning, the challenge of finding the right pair of shoes for the children. we'll be getting the latest advice on a problem troubling many parents at this time of year. and carol has the weather. good morning. good morning from the roof of the broadcasting house in london. grey skies. dry at the moment. rain and showers. heavy downpours in east anglia and the south—east. for the rest of the uk, it is sunshine and showers. i will have more details in 15 minutes. thank you, carol. we will start with our top story. more than 40% of maternity wards in england closed their doors to expectant mothers at least once in 2016, data obtained by labour suggests.
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42 out of 96 trusts in england that responded to a freedom of information request said they'd shut maternity wards temporarily on 382 occasions. our health correspondent, dominic hughes, has more. for dominic hughes, has more. some years, maternity been for some years, maternity units have been struggling to recruit enough midwives. the royal college of midwives says there is a shortfall of 3500. based on a freedom of information request, weather says a growing number of maternity units are closing doors to new mothers. in england, 136 nhs trust offer maternity services. last year, 42 of them closed their doors at least one. there are 382 separate locations where they close, up by 20% since 2014. it is quite right hospitals take these drastic decisions when they want to put the interests of the patient‘s first. i don't blame them. but it is happening so often and is increasing
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year on year significantly. that suggests an underlying problem. you cannot keep trying to run the nhs on a shoestring, putting them through the biggest financial squeeze in its history and not expect standards of ca re history and not expect standards of care to slip. some closures were relatively short—lived and others lasted more than 24 hours. a department of health spokesperson said they needed temporary closures to manage peaks in admissions and it was misleading to use these figures to indicate a shortage of staff because of the difficulties of planning for birth. the royal couege planning for birth. the royal college of midwives agreed it was sometimes right to close the unit by doing so ornate regular basis showed underlying problems with the number of expert staff. —— on a regular. dominic hughes, bbc news. we will talk about that later. a british woman is recovering in hospital after being shot while on holiday with her family in brazil. eloise dixon from south london was driving with her partner
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and three children when they took a wrong turn into an area controlled by drug gangs near rio. our south america correspondent, katy watson, has more. and innocent family on a summer holiday. —— an. eloise dickson made one mistake which nearly cost them their lives. it all happened about 90 miles south of rio dejaneiro. a pa rt 90 miles south of rio dejaneiro. a part of brazil that is popular with tourists and has some of the most beautiful beaches in the country. the family had rented a car, and according to local media, were looking for a place to find water when they made a wrong turn into a a slum controlled by drug traffickers. eloise dickson in the front passenger seat was shot twice. taken toa passenger seat was shot twice. taken to a local hospital, she underwent two hours of surgery. this could so easily have been fatal, but she survived. translation: the bullet passed through the abdomen and
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fortu nately passed through the abdomen and fortunately did not hit big blood vessels, important organs. she was lucky. the favela is in brazil are notorious. some can be so dangerous that even police are not welcome. translation: we have a community that we cannot enter, the press cannot enter, the public service cannot enter, the public service cannot enter. that is inadmissible. we have to take urgent measures. according to doctors, she is recovering well from surgery. awake and talking, she is expected to be transferred to hospital in the city of rio de janeiro transferred to hospital in the city of rio dejaneiro where she will continue her recovery. katie watson, bbc news. scientists are warning that systems currently used to measure greenhouse gas emissions around the world are seriously flawed. a bbc investigation has found that not all gases which are produced are actually recorded. a group of leading researchers in the field, have told the counting carbon programme, on bbc radio four, that the issue poses a major threat to the paris climate agreement. south african mps will vote in secret later on a motion
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of no—confidence in president jacob zuma. the motion was tabled by the opposition in response to mr zuma's sacking of his highly respected finance minister earlier this year, a move which sparked nationwide protests. mr zuma has survived several previous votes of no—confidence in the past. the welsh government has announced plans today, to invest over £1 million in dental health. that means, 10,000 new nhs dental places will be created, in some of the most deprived parts of wales. however, critics including the british dental association, say the welsh government took more than £6 million out of the welsh dental budget in 2016, due to missed target, and today's investment does not replace that. tomos morgan has more. for the last few years, finding an nhs dentist has been a struggle in wales. patients have found it tough to enlist, whilst children have been waiting for long periods of time for orthodontic treatment in certain areas. in an effort to improve the situation, the welsh government have announced today an initial investment of £1.3 million worth, to create extra capacity for 10,000 new places.
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there will never be a time when resources are perfect. there are challenges across the whole country. i'm announcing specific funding today where we recognise there is an issue about more money going into parts of the country. furtherfunding has been allocated the specialist children's services as well. however, the british dental association insisted this investment simply isn't enough. they say it's just a quarter of the amount that's already been taken out of the dental budget in 2016 for not meeting targets. the welsh government argued this is new funding, and they are disappointed the british dental association don't see it as such. recent reports show oral health amongst children was improving amongst wales, but even the secretary of health admits the overall situation here is farfrom perfect. bbc news, cardiff.
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more details have emerged in the case of the british model who was allegedly drugged and held captive for nearly a week by a gang in italy. the lawyer representing chloe ayling, who's 20 and from south london, says she was told by her kidnappers that she would be sold as a slave in the middle east. he says that she was acting under duress when she was seen shopping with her captor before she was freed. she was told that people were there watching her and ready to kill her if they tried anything. so she thought that the best idea was to go along with it and to, umm, be nice, ina way, along with it and to, umm, be nice, in a way, to her captor. because he told her that he wanted to release her. the organisers of the world athletics championships in london have revealed that a number of athletes have contracted
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suspected gastroenteritis. botswa na's isaac makwala, who was one of the favorites for today's 400 metres final, was forced to withdraw from the 200 metres heat yesterday. german and canadian athletes are also thought to have been affected. the organising committee says its working closely with public health england to manage the situation. today is day five of the world athletics championships in london, but yesterday left many british fans disappointed after laura muir missed out on a medal in the 1,500 metre final. it was an extraordinary race and we will see more of that later. there were high hopes for hammer thrower, sophie hitchon, who ended up in tears after she ended seventh. here are some of the highlights from our correspondent, natalie perks. scotland's very own laura muir running for great britain. it was not the day british fans had hoped for. there were tears, but not of jov- for. there were tears, but not of joy. eight talented field and the odd were stacked against us. they had never had a woman in this race. they wanted to go out hard. with a look of determination etched across
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herface, the bronze medal was in herface, the bronze medal was in her sight. buy from nowhere, 800 metres specialist katya fan speed to snatch the way at the end. seven hundredths of a second separated her from her first hundredths of a second separated her from herfirst global hundredths of a second separated her from her first global metal. hundredths of a second separated her from her first global metallj hundredths of a second separated her from her first global metal. i gave everything i could. itjust went past me. i gave everything that i could. i guess considering what happened this year, i gave it all i could and that is all i can do. there was more heartbreak in the hammer cage. sophie hutchinson's heartbreak went nowhere. she never recovered. these images are becoming all too familiar at these championships. there was at least some british success to cheer. daniel talbot, the track favourites, went all the way in the first round of the 100m to make it to the
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semi—final. hughes was one of the fastest losers. and return's second fastest losers. and return's second fastest 200 metre runner of all time also made it to the next round. with no usain bolt, there will be a new champion. could britain crashed the party? the pressure is ramping up. expectations of fans are high, especially after what happened in rio. mo farah‘s medal seems the only one for a target of six. they need to change, and soon. natalie pirks, bbc news, at the london stadium. we will talk about that more this morning. jessica is at the stadium this morning for us. amazing. the paceis this morning for us. amazing. the pace is just this morning for us. amazing. the pace isjust staggering! it is hard for steve, he is like come on, laura muir! but he has to be objective.
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after a four year stakeout by wildlife experts, footage of one of england's rarest animals, the pine mareten has finally been captured in the north york moors. the sighting is the first living record in the area for around 35 years, and it's all thanks to the yorkshire pine marten project, run by naturespy and the forestry commission who set up various camera traps around the moors in order to get a glimpse of the elusive creatures. there is the little fellow. this is very rare footage. 0h, amazing. excellent. last night, a stunning lunar eclipse was visible in many parts of the world. we will have a look. they happen when the earth passes between the sun and the moon, casting a shadow. this one can be seen on many continents, though some countries could only see part of it. a second full eclipse will have another 24th
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of august in north america, the first of its kind in nearly a century. that first one was from greece. amazing. wonderful. good morning. welcome back. i know you we re morning. welcome back. i know you were here last week and things, but... talking about beautiful things in the sky, but at this gorgeous picture of a raf tornado flying through a rainbow. you would not think it is possible. that looks like guardians of the galaxy. surely there is no filter on that. don't be such a cynic. the newspapers. the daily telegraph. interesting. we had the complete opposite of this last week. according to the former gchq boss, he is saying children must get digital skills to keep ahead of britain's rivals. parents should
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encourage their children to spend more time on line to improve cyber skills and save the country rather than mooching around on the streets. that is an interesting point of view. also they are talking about this british mother who was shot in rio after taking a wrong turn and ending up in a favela. that was a dangerous situation. according to experts, she is lucky to be alive. she was shot twice and it went around her stomach and did not hit any major organ. amazing. the times this morning. tesco will stop selling disposable plastic bags. you will talk about this this morning. the picture is of roman abramovich who were separating from his wife. zu kova, i who were separating from his wife. zukova, i think is her name. there is talk about the value of the settlement. it could be £7 billion.
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wow! i used to call him abramovich, but it is pronounced different, according to a friend who knows. lots of details on the daily mirror about this model who says she was kidnapped, saying the captor slept in the same bed as her. she is now backin in the same bed as her. she is now back in the uk after six days. the front page of the sun, lots of fallout over channel 4 broadcasting these tapes of diana talking about prince charles. what have you got, steph? holidays. i really like every year looking at where people are going and what is on the up and what is on the down. we love cruises. i talked about this not long ago. we are going on four times as many as
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20 years ago but it's interesting the countries on the up in of ones we are visiting. dubai, a lot of people going to dubai. poland, croatia, iceland, romania. on the wane, turkey, tunisia, egypt, kenya, nobody will be shocked given what's happened there recently but interesting to see more people going on cruises. i don't know about cruises, being stuck on a boat with the same people for that long, i think i would go a bit loopy! i'm with you on that! ijust spent a week ona with you on that! ijust spent a week on a boat and it was all white. everyone get all right? year. a very small boat and it went all right —— all right —— year. —— yeah. i have signed you up, you are in! would you like to see a big plant?|j love would you like to see a big plant?” love this story. julia and the
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beanstalk. you've often heard these stories about plants that lay dormant for many years and this is an agaba eight americana, planted 18 yea rs an agaba eight americana, planted 18 years ago by the previous owners in this lady's garden. she once put a blanket over it in a harsh winter, she never watered it, then it grew 30 foot in four weeks. you can see houses next to it. she is down there. tiny little lady. then it's a massive plant. is surely a borrower? she isn't, she is average size i believe. that's amazing! let's all go on holiday, steph! you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: a number of athletes competing at the world championships in london more than 40 maternity wards in england closed their doors to expectant mothers at least once last year according to data obtained by the labour party. carol is out on the roof of our
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london newsroom this morning to have a look at the weather. not looking fantastic as yet? no, for some it's not looking fantastic unless you like the rain because there's the chance of heavy downpours today, especially in east anglia and south—east england. there's also showers in the forecast, some of those will be heavy and thundery. if we take a look at the whole of the uk at 9am running to the afternoon, we can see where we've got rain in a curl coming in across parts of england and down to the south coast. in the centre of that there's a lot of cloud, brightening up for a bit, but raining quitea cloud, brightening up for a bit, but raining quite a bit too. out to the west, some showers, and also in the north, but in between those we could see sunshine but even some of those could be heavy and possibly
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thundery. 4pm in scotland, it's the mix of sunshine and showers and again some of the showers will be thundery but not all of them. as we come into north—west england, similar scenario, sunshine and showers but north north—east england heading to the pennines and east anglia, the south—east, the midlands and the south coast, that's where we've got the rain and we could see large rainfall totals especially in norfolk and suffolk in a short period. there could be some surface water issues. as we go further west in the direction of south—west england and wales, you can see again we're looking at the mixture of sunshine and showers, some of those are likely to be heavy and thundery, especially across wales. as we go across the irish sea into northern ireland again we're looking at the mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers. as we head through the course of the evening we will still have some of that rain sweeping in across parts of northern england, through the midlands and down towards dorset for example and heading over to somerset as well.
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temperature wise we're looking at ten to 13. those are indicative of towns and cities. in rural areas in the north it will feel quite chilly. that's how we start the day tomorrow, with that arm of rain, that big curl, and if anything it will pull back to the south—east. again there's the chance of some torrential downpours, particularly across east anglia and the south—east, again leading to the risk of issues with surface water flooding. but moved to the west and the north, brighter skies with some sunshine with fewer showers. them for thursday we've got the dregs of that rain across the south—east, that rain across the south—east, that will eventually clear awake and for most of us we're looking at a dry day and make the most of it, because if you look to the north—west of scotland there's something else waiting in the winds —— clear awake. if you're in east anglia or the south—east, make sure you have a sturdy brolly at hand because you're going to need it.
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i'm going to put the normal brolly away and bring out the sturdy one!” don't think i have any sturdy ones! teenagers across scotland will be waking to their highers results this morning, the scottish equivalent of a—levels. the country has traditionally had a strong education system, but in recent years standards have declined. as the scottish government admits things need to improve, john maguire has been to find out what's being done to improve the situation. tonight these youngsters are practising their stop frame animation skills. who knows, a future macro three all wallace and gromit might be created right here in cambuslang on the outskirts of glasgow —— morph. this youth cloud, one of nine centres called universal connections, are funded by south lanarkshire connections, are funded by south la narkshire council's budget. qualifications here are offered that aren't offered in other schools. there's a duke of edinburgh awards
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and rebecca has been training for her gold expedition. this morning she is receiving the results of her highers and she believes the school has prepared her well for the future. teachers are there to prepare you for what you need so you just have to aim for that. at the same time some subjects like pse, they can get you ready for going out in the world. her mum, cheryl, is a member of the national parent forum and has a keen interest in scottish education. she says children can succeed if they're supported.” appreciate education is going through so many changes, but it's now about narrowing it and working with the parents of the schools and local authorities and government to bring everyone together to make it more attainable. but recent years have seen standards decline. so what's been going on? there's certainly no single cause. i think the introduction of scotland's
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national curriculum, which has been going on for some 13 years now, has been badly organised and has led to a numberof been badly organised and has led to a number of serious adverse consequences, a number of serious adverse consequences, not least of them being excessive teacher workload and loss of morale as a result of that. the deputy first ministerjohn sweeney is in charge of education. today he's visiting a community enterprise in kilmarnock that works with everyone from the elderly, ex— prisoners to children struggling at school. he accepts improvements need to be made, he wants children from poorer backgrounds to do better and he believes schools and teachers are the best people to affect change. it's at the heart of the reforms i wa nt to ta ke it's at the heart of the reforms i want to take into the curriculum, to make sure a generation of young people today can have access to the best quality of education and the best quality of education and the best opportunities available to them. we want to make sure we do that in consort with the education
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profession to make sure that is able to be deployed in every single school, the length and brett favre scotland. and the main teaching union wants more support for staff —— length and breadth. union wants more support for staff -- length and breadth. teachers need to spend their time working on the improvement of the learning of young people. we need more thanjust promises in these areas, weenie actually need action from government and educational agencies —— we actually need. at the youth cloud the band is in full swing and full volume as teenagers the band is in full swing and full volume as teenagers across the band is in full swing and full volume as teenagers across scotland tear open envelopes or are informed via text, anxious to discover how they've done. this morning was past results aren't just important they've done. this morning was past results aren'tjust important to them but also to the government and to the country. john maguire, bbc news. i thought there was going to be another one! we will be speaking to another one! we will be speaking to a student in that piece live later
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on to see how they're doing. a student in that piece live later on to see how they're doingm you're getting your results this morning then good luck! you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: do you remember being taken to buy your first pair of school shoes? well, it seems these days, more than half of parents don't get their children properly measured. in the next half—hour we'll find out why that could mean big problems for little feet. did you know that you're meant to wait until the end of the summer to buy shoes? i did not know this and this could explain a lot. because your feet grow more because... this is where i have been going wrong. you should wait right before school to buy school shoes. i am so disorganised! i normally do buy them late but i didn't know that was the reason! time for the news, travel where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armah. a 19—year—old man has died after being stabbed in south east
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london earlier this morning. police were called to the old kent road where they found a man suffering from stab wounds. four people have been arrested. the metropolitan police says it's committed to tackling all forms of hate crime against ethnic minorities after figures revealed there's been a year on year rise in hate crime since records began. it followed terror attacks in london and manchester earlier this year. well, a dedicated unit set up to tackle the problem has been out in east london and says work is also being done to deal with online abuse. they are equally unacceptable. i think you can be online and increasingly we're seeing online activity for hate crime because of the fact nowadays you have social media, you have a lot more people that have activity online and presence and a digital footprint online. you're seeing that increase in hate crime but equally it can happen everywhere. a scheme which creates the illusion of speed bumps on london's roads to slow down drivers is being extended across the city. it was first piloted last year
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when the black and white patterns were painted on a number of busy roads including on southwark street. since then, transport for london has painted the virtual bumps in 45 undisclosed locations. the aim is to bring traffic down to speeds of below 20mph. let's have a look at the travel situation now. of course there is one main issue on the trains, south west trains has a special timetable for that upgrade at waterloo station. on the roads, on the a13, a bit of traffic is building up into town through barking. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. were in for a rather wet couple of days here in the south—east. heavy outbreaks of rain, some slow—moving potentially thundery showers as well and the met office has issued a yellow a weather warning for the heavy rain. not only for today but also for wednesday as
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well. there may be a dry spell or two first thing this morning but that rain moving in, the wind is fairly light so any heavy showers will be slow—moving and that could lead to maybe some localised flooding. it's going to feel quite cool as well, maximum temp 17 or 18. overnight tonight we could get a bit of rain but some drier spells as well. the minimum temperature quite warm, not drifting down too far from today's maximum, around 13 or 14. you may get a dry start first thing on wednesday but another band of very heavy rain moving in and the met office, as mentioned, has another weather warnings in place for that so maximum temperature again tomorrow cool and around 16 or 17. as we head through thursday, that rain clears out of the way and by the time we get to friday it is a drier picture. you could still get a shower here or there and you should see some glimmers of brightness later on, as for thursday also. as we head to the weekend it is going to stay rather unsettled. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. also on breakfast this morning. it's been revealed contaminated eggs from europe have been distributed in the uk. we'll be asking the food standards agency how concerned we should be. bucket and spade beach holidays are booming in foreign travel. at 7:50, steph will be here to explain how holiday habits have changed. i was struggling to read the time there. i felt like we
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needed a fresh start, so, here i am. and from being confirmed as the next dr who, to "doctor who? " after 8:30, we'll find out about actress jodie whittaker‘s new role in the bbc thriller, where she's definitely not what she claims to be. i have to apologise for perhaps the worst reading of the time in bbc history. all that is still to come. but now, a summary of this morning's main news. more than 40% of maternity wards in england closed their doors to expectant mothers at least once in 2016, data obtained by labour suggests. 42 out of 96 trusts in england that responded to a freedom of information request said they'd shut maternity wards temporarily on 382 occasions. our health correspondent, dominic hughes, has more. for some years, maternity units have been struggling to recruit enough midwives. the royal college of midwives says
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there's a shortfall of around 3,500. now, based on a freedom of information request, labour says a growing number of maternity units are closing doors to new mothers. in england, 136 nhs trusts offer maternity services. last year, 42 of them closed their doors to new admissions at least once. there were 382 separate locations where units were closed, up by 20% since 2014. i think it is quite right hospitals take these drastic decisions when they want to put the interests of the patient‘s safety first. i don't blame them for doing that. but the fact it is happening so often and is increasing year on year significantly suggests an underlying problem. you cannot keep trying to run the nhs on a shoestring, putting them through the biggest financial squeeze in its history, and not expect standards of care to slip. some closures were relatively short—lived but others lasted more than 24 hours.
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a department of health spokesperson said that trusts need to use temporary closures to manage peaks in admissions and it was misleading to use these figures to indicate a shortage of staff because of the difficulties around planning for birth. the royal college of midwives agreed it was sometimes right to close a unit, but that doing so on a regular basis showed underlying problems with the number of expert staff. dominic hughes, bbc news. after 8am, we'll be speaking to the royal college of midwives about the closures. a british woman is being treated in hospital after being shot while on holiday with her family in brazil. eloise dixon from south london was driving with her partner and three children when they took a wrong turn into an area controlled by drug gangs near rio. she was shot twice and the medics treating her say she's lucky to be alive. more details have emerged in the case of the british model who was allegedly drugged and held captive for nearly a week by a gang in italy. the lawyer representing chloe ayling, who's 20 and from south london, says she was told by her kidnappers
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that she would be sold as a slave in the middle east. he explained that she was acting under duress when she was seen shopping with her captor before she was freed. scientists are warning that systems currently used to measure greenhouse gas emissions around the world are seriously flawed. a bbc investigation has found that not all gases which are produced are actually recorded. a group of leading researchers in the field, have told the counting carbon programme on bbc radio4 that the issue poses a major threat to the paris climate agreement. south african mps will vote in secret later on a motion of no—confidence in president jacob zuma. the motion was tabled by the opposition in response to mr zuma's sacking of his highly respected finance minister earlier this year, a move which sparked nationwide protests. mr zuma has survived several previous votes of no—confidence in the past. a victim of the 9/11 attack in new
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york city has been identified 16 yea rs york city has been identified 16 years on. the man's identity was uncovered when dna was retested with new technology. the welsh government has announced plans to invest more than £1 million in dental health. it says the move will create 10,000 new nhs dental places, including in some of the most deprived parts of wales. however, critics, including the british dental association, say the welsh government took more than £6 million out of the welsh dental budget last year and the investment announced today does not replace that. after a four—year stakeout by wildlife experts, footage of one of england's rarest animals, the pine mareten, has finally been captured in the north york moors. the sighting is the first in the area for more than 30 years. the yorkshire pine marten project managed to capture the footage after setting up camera traps around the moors. there it is. i am speaking quietly
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because i don't want to scare it but it is on the television... ajob in spring watch beckons, surely. last night, a stunning lunar eclipse was visible in many parts of the world. eclipses happen when the earth passes between the sun and the moon, casting a shadow. this one could be viewed on several continents, although many countries could only see part of it. a second full eclipse will occur on the 21st of august over north america, the first of its kind in nearly a century. the pictures are stunning, aren't they? shall we talk about the athletics again? last night saw one of the most dramatic races of the world athletics championships so far as laura muir missed out on a medal in the 1,500 meters by the smallest of margins. but what might today hold in store? jessica is at the london stadium
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for us this morning. she is in lane numberfive. good morning. good morning. as you said, one of the best races i have ever seen. that is exactly why we love elite sport. i am standing on the finish linejust to elite sport. i am standing on the finish line just to highlight the fine margins between winning a medal and missing out. laura muir was just, just beaten, but it was a brave run by the 20 foyer rolled. it was a tough field. it included the olympic champion. she was in the mix right until the end but was just hit on the line by south africa's kasta semenya. i gave it everything i could. just that last 50 metres i was tied up. i
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gave everything that i could. considering what has happened this year, i gave it all i could and that is all i can do. disappointment, too, for the olympic bronze medallist, sophie hitchon, she couldn't quite match her achievements at rio last year. her best effort of 72.32 in the hammer final wasn't enough for a medal as she finished in seventh place. yeah, ijust, umm... icouldn't quite find the rhythm that i had in qualification. i was disappointed. i did not produce it tonight, yeah... better news for team captain eilidh doyle, was one of two british women who made it into the semi finals of the 400 metres hurdles. megan beesley also made it through. there was a great performance by britain's danny talbot
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in the 200 metres. he qualified for the semi—finals, with a lifetime best of 20.16 seconds, finishing just behind the reigning olympic champion wayde van niekerk in the heats. fellow britsons, zharnel hughes and nethaneel mitchell—bla ke, also made it through. we were expecting to see the fastest man in the world over 200 metres, botswa na's isaac makwala, run last night. but he was absent from his heat and it later emerged he was one of a number of athletes suffering from gastroenteritis at one of the team hotels. and now a round—up of the rest of the day's sport. moeen ali was england's hero once again, as he and his teammates secured a 3—1 series win over south africa. ali took 25 wickets over the course of the series. he helped england claim a 177—run victory in the fourth test, and also ensured that the team climbs to third in the international cricket council's test rankings, above australia. it's a first home test series win against south africa since 1998. and a first forjoe root as england captain. it is great to see moeen ali in
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particular step up and put in some unbelievable performances to win games for us. hopefully that can be something that is repeated on a number of occasions in the future. but i think throughout the whole series the squad has performed very well. could gareth bale be heading back to the premier league? manchester united manager jose mourinho says he will "fight with other coaches" to sign the 28—year—old welshman. the two clubs play each other tonight in the uefa super cup in macedonia. bale joined the spanish champions from tottenham in 2013, for a then—world record fee of £85 million, and has since won the champions league three times. mourinho says he'll be waiting for bale if he doesn't figure in real‘s future plans. no morning sessions today at the
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world athletics championships. but kyle langford is going on the 800 metre final. his parents owned a fish and chip shop, interestingly, and say if he wasn't going to be and could be a potato peeler in the family business. —— an athlete.” find peeling potatoes very therapeutic. that is one of my pet hates. perfect. there we go, dinner‘s on! as we have been hearing, lots of action on the track and field at the world athletics championships and lots more to come. this is what's in store today. britain's kyle langford finished second in the semi—final to take an automatic one slot. he is just 21 and got the junior title
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automatic one slot. he is just 21 and got thejunior title in automatic one slot. he is just 21 and got the junior title in 2014. this is the 400 metre olympic champion. he cruised into the 400 metre final and is expected to go further. he is hoping to do the 200 and 400 metre double. next up, the european champion from 2014, a two—time commonwealth silver—medallist. she was also voted the british team champion. she says she is in good shape coming into the event. she races at 835 tonight. this frenchman won the olympic title here in 2012. he is hoping to win again. he only started training in may this year after a foot injury disqualified him from the final. if you want to keep up with the day's action, tune in to bbc two from 6:30pm to 10:30pm tonight.
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that is a bit of a rave tune, that, isn't it? might have to get my whistle out. waking everyone up. the main stories. more than 40% of maternity wards in england closed their doors to expectant mothers at least once in 2016, data obtained by labour suggests. a number of athletes competing at the world championships in london have fallen ill with suspected gastroenteritis. we have already had a sturdy umbrella alert from carol. what else? good morning. it may be dry for you now, but rain and showers are in the forecast. in london, it is quite thick. the cloud is breaking in places. rain later
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on, but sunshine first of all. it will be heavy. some of them will be thundery. today, a chance of some downpours. especially so across east anglia and also south—east england. it may well lead to some surface water issues. something to consider. this morning, a lot of dry weather around as well. sunshine to start the day and showers in the north and west. also a bit of rain rotating around an area of low pressure. it will continue to be with us through the day and temperatures rise bringing with it downpours with showers in the south—east. sunshine and showers in scotland this afternoon. some could be heavy as well. north—east england, sunshine and showers. north—east england is where we start to run into the rain to be some will be heavy and thundery. that extends through the pennines, east anglia, the south—east, kent, in the direction
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of the isle of wight. keep that in mind. as we go further west, what we are looking at is again a mix of sunshine and showers. the west country, wales, some showers heavy, some will be thundery. temperatures will come down under those. northern ireland, sunshine and showers. not as heavy. also not as frequent as in some parts of the uk. as we go to the evening and overnight, where we have the rain today it will drift further north. again, we have it in north—east england heading down to the midlands, east wales, dorset, somerset as well. temperature—wise, looking at10— somerset as well. temperature—wise, looking at 10— 15 in towns and cities. in rural areas, looking at 10— 15 in towns and cities. in ruralareas, especially in the north of the country, it will feel quite chilly. so, we start tomorrow again with this rain moving around an area of low pressure driving our weather. and through the course of the day it drags it down
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once again towards the south—east. once again tomorrow there is the risk of downpours across east anglia and south—east england which, again, may well lead to surface water issues. moving away from this area and for the rest of the uk we are looking at dry conditions with some sunshine. by the time we get to thursday, we have the last of the rain in the south—east. that eventually will pull away leaving many of us with a dry day with sunny spells. however, take a look at what is happening in north—west scotland. a weather front not too far away. that is coming our way as well. in the next few days, especially across south—east england and east anglia, it is going to be rather wet. the 5p carrier bag charge was introduced in 2015, but now one major supermarket is taking it a step further by scrapping single use bags altogether. steph is here to explain why.
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prices probably going up? you are right. tesco have announced this is. from the end of this month tesco will stop the sale of 5p carrier bags. shoppers will have to bring their own or buy a bag for life for 10p. we've had the 5p charge for single use carrier bags in england since october 2015. when it first came in obviously it was a bit of a shock because we're not used to paying for bags but i really think, a lot of the supermarkets put their money into good causes rather than keep it for themselves. if i have good causes rather than keep it for themselves. if! have to pay good causes rather than keep it for themselves. if i have to pay the mp it's my own fault sol themselves. if i have to pay the mp it's my own fault so i don't mind, it's my own fault so i don't mind, it's reasonable, yeah. if you can rememberto take the it's reasonable, yeah. if you can remember to take the bag, that's the biggest problem. i've got one in the car now. james lowman is the chief executive of the association of convenience stores, which has over 30,000 members.
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good morning. good morning. what are your thoughts? the carrier bag charge has been released accessible, it's seen a reduction in usage of plastic bags. as bagai said on the film, retailers can put that towards local good causes —— as that guy. when it came in in england and wales all retailers were covered and smaller retailers had to charge. smaller businesses are example from the charge. a third choose to do it voluntarily so we think it would be easierfor voluntarily so we think it would be easier for everyone covered by the charge so everyone knew what was going to happen when they turn up. why is there a difference in terms ofa why is there a difference in terms of a lot of your members not having to charge? there's an exemption that has been brought in when the legislation came in in england, other parts of the uk the charging cove rs eve ryo ne . other parts of the uk the charging covers everyone. it would be simpler
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for everyone and it would reduce carrier bag use, in wales and we talked to members there, they say it's been good, they've reduced the number of bags they are using and they are generating money to give to local good causes and that works well. usually we often ask for exemptions for small businesses, in this case we are asking for the opposite. how has it gone down with customers? we heard from a couple of shoppers there, what are people telling your members? generally well. the vast majority like the charges being in place. as we heard there, people get used to carrying a bag with them when they go shopping. we were concerned about inconvenience stores because often it's an unplanned and people might not remember to bring bags, but in reality talking to members in wales especially they say that hasn't been a problem and they like having the opportunity to charge and give the money to local causes and reduce plastic use. why do you think now
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tesco think we should move to the 10p carrier bags? they are saying they are bags for life but there's still a lot of people that won't use them for life. the point of bags for life is you can take them back and have them replaced. tesco is simply saying they have still got a lot of 5p bags they are charging for and giving away and the purpose of the policy from the government is to reduce plastic bag usage, single use usage, so it is quite brave for them to go this extra step, that's great, the government could do more by bringing small businesses in as well. will we see more supermarkets doing that? possibly, many of our members use bags for life and try to make a feature of that, some have charges above 5p for that reason for longer lasting bags so we will see changes i think but fundamentally we need to get the clarity and consistency across all retailers of the 5p bag charge. we've seen from the 5p bag charge. we've seen from the figures plastic bag usage for
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them, great news, environmental groups very happy about that but what about the money made from selling them, what does it go into? it was mentioned briefly by yourself and one of our vox pops? it will be used for a local school or local charities. in wales there's been an emphasis on environmental charities. when we talk to members and we ask if they voluntarily charge, a third of them do so, if they voluntarily charge, or in wales if you are part of the compulsory charge, where does the money go, it is normally local good causes and it's a great focal point for people to give their extra support to local causes. are you one of those people like me who has bags all over the house ready to take to the shops? i always have a bag in my bag i take to work. people are now prepared in that way and they have got used to it, which is great. james, thanks for your time. we've had lots of messages? elaine says
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i've i would be more inclined to buy if they were black. i object to the advertisement. this woman says i do one online shop each week and my choices to help the delivery guy load six crates of individual groceries, taking ten minutes, rather than pay for plastic bags so he can dump them in the kitchen. it depends on how quickly tesco want their drivers to deliver the groceries. their choice, not mine. sometimes they let you give back the bags. richard says why not return to paper bags and resize them? and this woman talks about the amount of plastic being used around vegetables —— read cycle them. plastic being used around vegetables -- read cycle them. that's my favourite message of the day. —— recycle them. thanks very much for your messages on that. keep those in. we will read them later.
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—— coming in. when was the last time you had your children's feet measured? probably six months ago. are you trying to make me feel guilty? well, according to the college of podiatry, more than half of kids in the uk have suffered foot damage because of ill fitting or unsuitable shoes. so if you're preparing to buy new shoes your little ones before they go back to school, you might want to watch this next report. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been to meet one family and get advice that could help avoid big problems for little feet. ready? ready. steady? yeah. go! we are with the kelly family in whitby and we are on the hunt for... shoes. shoes. expensive definitely. feet grow into all the age of 21 and with three children and two stepchildren, amy has a lot of shoes to buy. their feet stepchildren, amy has a lot of shoes to buy. theirfeet seemed stepchildren, amy has a lot of shoes to buy. their feet seemed to grow so fast! definitely! chase's do
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especially, he has a super massive big to that's got a mind of his own! when was the last time you had your kids' feet measured? i'm going to have to be honest, i don't think i've ever had any of them measured ever. so this is it, this is the lot? this is it. let me ask you, these all fit? i hope so. let's find out! because today we are bringing in the big guns to check out the small feat which reside here. i hope you're not going to tell me off! are you going to show me your feet? emma supple going to tell me off! are you going to show me yourfeet? emma supple is from the college of podiatry. a nice good heel, that is too small, isn't it? a survey from the college of
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podiatry found 29% of british children could be wearing shoes that are completely the wrong size. can you see how your toes are all switched? 5696 of parents admitted buying kids' shoes without having their feet measured and 55% of children have suffered damage to their feet because of shoes that are too small or simply unsuitable. feels comfortable. yeah, feels comfortable but getting to the edge. your feet have grown but you haven't noticed. i guess what we're talking about our crimes against kids' feet. yes, we are. worst culprits please? crime one, ill fitting shoes. get the... crime two, slip on shoes. if they are wearing slip on shoes it should be temporarily, holidays and high days and everything else should be a fastened on buckled on hsu. crime three, floppy heels. if it collapses
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in like a slipper, unsupported, put it back on the shelf. the shops that don't have a fit measurement, where you buy the cheaper ones, is there anything wrong with buying cheaper shoes? nothing to do with price, all to do with style. some people go and feel awkward about going into the shops that measure feet and leaving without buying anything. independent shoe fitters are a wonderful group of professionals and they don't have any problem with you going in and having your feet measured and leaving without having bought a pair of shoes. because bad shoes cause bad problems, corns, calluses, hammer toes. am i going to get told off? you are, the recommendation is to go every six months to get your feet measured and that's a really good yardstick. definitely. kids' feet grow fast, they don't need a lot of money throwing at them but they do need protecting. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. possibly inappropriate footwear!
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possibly inappropriate footwear! possibly too big. sending your thoughts. —— send in your thoughts. i bought trainers for my two girls a few months ago and i bought the £1 insoles, bought them big and then you take them out later. you've got to remember to take them out, though! i can dealwith to remember to take them out, though! i can deal with that! other ideas, please send them in. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armah. a 19—year—old man has died after being stabbed in south east london earlier this morning. police were called to the old kent road where they found a man suffering from stab wounds. four people have been arrested. the metropolitan police says it's committed to tackling all forms of hate crime against ethnic minorities after figures revealed there's been a year on year rise in hate crime since records began. it followed terror attacks in london and manchester earlier this year.
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well, a dedicated unit set up to tackle the problem has been out in east london and says work is also being done to deal with online abuse. they are equally unacceptable. i think you can be online, and increasingly we're seeing online activity for hate crime because of the fact that nowadays you have social media, you have a lot more people that have activity online and presence and a digital footprint online. you're seeing that kind of increase in hate crime, but equally it can happen everywhere. a scheme which creates the illusion of speed bumps on london's roads to slow down drivers is being extended across the city. it was first piloted last year when the black and white patterns were painted on a number of busy roads including on southwark street. since then, transport for london has painted the virtual bumps in 45 undisclosed locations. the aim is to bring traffic down to speeds of below 20mph. let's have a look at the travel situation now.
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on the tube, there's no service on the overground from euston to kilburn high road. of course there is one main issue on the trains. south west trains has a special timetable for that upgrade at waterloo station. on the roads in surrey quays, bestwood street is closed at evelyn street that's because of a serious assault overnight. traffic is being diverted through the mcdonald's car park. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. we're in for a rather wet couple of days here in the south—east. heavy outbreaks of rain, some slow—moving potentially thundery showers as well, and the met office has issued a yellow weather warning for the heavy rain. now, not only for today but also for wednesday as well. there may be a dry spell or two first thing this morning but that rain moving in, the wind is fairly light so any heavy showers will be slow—moving and that could lead to maybe some localised flooding. it's going to feel quite cool as well, maximum temp 17 or 18. overnight tonight we could get a bit of rain but some drier
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spells as well. the minimum temperature quite warm, not drifting down too far from today's maximum, around 13 or 14. you may get a dry start first thing on wednesday but another band of very heavy rain moving in and the met office, as mentioned, has another weather warnings in place for that so maximum temperature again tomorrow cool and around 16 or 17. as we head through thursday, that rain clears out of the way and by the time we get to friday it is a drier picture. you could still get a shower here or there and you should see some glimmers of brightness later on, as for thursday also. as we head to the weekend it is going to stay rather unsettled. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello.
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good morning. this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. more than 40 maternity units in england closed their doors to new admissions at some point last year. labour blames a lack of midwives. the government says it's misleading to blame staff shortages. good morning. it's tuesday the 8th of august. also this morning: sickness at the world athletics championships. yes, organisers here confirm a number of cases of gastroenteritis at one team hotel. on the track though. heartbreak for great britain's laura muir,
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who just misses out on a medal in the 1,500 metres by less than a tenth of a second. doctors say a british woman who was shot while on holiday to brazil is lucky to be alive. eloise dixon is reported to have been attacked when her family drove into a slum area. good morning. we're going on more foreign holidays than ever before, but our holiday habits have changed a lot in the last 20 years according to official stats out today. i'll be having a look. also this morning, the challenge of finding the right pair of shoes for the children. we'll be getting the latest advice on a problem troubling many parents at this time of year. and carol has the weather. sunshine and showers, i think. good and carol has the weather. sunshine and showers, ithink. good morning. add in some rain as well. the heaviest rain today will be in east anglia and the south—east. torrential downpours later on. for the rest of us, sunshine and showers, though some will be heavy and thundery. not all of us will
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catch one either. i will have all of the details and 15 minutes. more than 40% of maternity wards in england closed their doors to expectant mothers at least once in 2016, data obtained by labour suggests. 42 out of 96 trusts in england that responded to a freedom of information request said they'd shut maternity wards temporarily on 382 occasions. our health correspondent, dominic hughes, has more. for some years, maternity units have been struggling to recruit enough midwives. the royal college of midwives says there's a shortfall of around 3,500. now, based on a freedom of information request, labour says a growing number of maternity units are closing doors to new mothers. in england, 136 nhs trusts offer maternity services. last year, 42 of them closed their doors to new admissions at least once. there were 382 separate locations where units were closed, up by 70% since 2014.
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i think it is quite right hospitals take these drastic decisions when they want to put the interests of the patient‘s safety first. i don't blame them for doing that. but the fact it is happening so often and is increasing year on year significantly suggests an underlying problem. you cannot keep trying to run the nhs on a shoestring, putting them through the biggest financial squeeze in its history, and not expect standards of care to slip. some closures were relatively short—lived but others lasted more than 24 hours. a department of health spokesperson said that trusts need to use temporary closures to manage peaks in admissions and it was misleading to use these figures to indicate a shortage of staff because of the difficulties around planning for birth. the royal college of midwives agreed it was sometimes right to close a unit, but that doing so on a regular basis showed underlying problems with the number of expert staff. dominic hughes, bbc news. a british woman is recovering
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in hospital after being shot while on holiday with her family in brazil. eloise dixon from south london was driving with her partner and three children when they took a wrong turn into an area controlled by drug gangs near rio. our south america correspondent, katy watson, has more. an innocent family on a summer holiday. eloise dixon together with her partner and three young children made one mistake which nearly cost them their lives. it all happened about 90 miles south of rio dejaneiro, a part of brazil that's popular with tourists and has some of the most beautiful beaches in the country. the family had rented a car, and according to local media, were looking for a place to buy water when they made a wrong turning into a favela, or slum, controlled by drug traffickers. men fired at the car after the family failed
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to understand their orders. eloise dixon, in the front passenger seat, was shot twice. the bullet marks, clearly visible. taken to a local hospital, she underwent two hours of surgery. this could so easily have been fatal, but she survived. translation: the bullet passed through the abdomen and fortunately did not hit the big blood vessels or the important organs. she was very lucky. the favelas in brazil are notorious. some can be so dangerous that even police are not welcome. translation: we have a community that we cannot enter, the press cannot enter, the public service cannot enter. that is inadmissible. we have to take urgent measures. according to doctors, eloise dixon is recovering well from surgery. awake and talking, she's expected to be transferred to hospital in the city of rio dejaneiro where she'll continue her recovery. katie watson, bbc news. more details have emerged in the case of the british model who was allegedly drugged and held captive for nearly a week by a gang in italy.
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the lawyer representing chloe ayling, who's 20 and from south london, says she was told by her kidnappers that she would be sold as a slave in the middle east. he says that she was acting under duress when she was seen shopping with her captor before she was freed. she was told that people were there watching her and ready to kill her if they tried anything. so she thought that the best idea was to go along with it and to be nice, in a way, to her captor. because he told her that he wanted to release her. scientists are warning that systems currently used to measure greenhouse gas emissions around the world are seriously flawed. a bbc investigation has found that not all gases which are produced are actually recorded. a group of leading researchers in the field, have told the counting carbon programme on bbc radio4 that the issue poses a major
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threat to the paris climate agreement. a victim of the 9/11 attack on the world trade centre in new york city has been identified 16 years on, according to the city medical examiner. the man's identity was determined after dna recovered in 2001 was retested using new technology. south african mps will vote in secret later on a motion of no—confidence in president jacob zuma. the motion was tabled by the opposition in response to mr zuma's sacking of his highly respected finance minister earlier this year, a move which sparked nationwide protests. mr zuma has survived several previous votes of no—confidence in the past. the organisers of the world athletics championships in london have revealed that a number of athletes have contracted suspected gastroenteritis. botswa na's isaac makwala, who was one of the favorites for today's 400 metres final, was forced to withdraw from the 200 metres heat yesterday. german and canadian athletes are also thought to have been affected. the organising committee says its working closely with public health england to manage the situation.
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today is day five of the world athletics championships in london, but yesterday left many british fans disappointed after laura muir missed out on a medal in the 1,500 metre final. there were high hopes for hammer thrower, sophie hitchon, who ended up in tears after she ended seventh. here are some of the highlights from our correspondent, natalie perks. commentator: scotland's very own laura muir running for great britain. it was not the day british fans had hoped for. there were tears, just not ofjoy. the odds and a talented field were stacked against her. britain had never had a woman in the 1500 metres. the tactic, they wanted to go out hard. with a look of determination etched across her face, the bronze medal was in her sights.
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but from nowhere, 800 metre, specialist, katya semenya, found speed to snatch the way at the death. seven hundredths of a second separated muirfrom her first global metal. i gave everything i could. she just went past me. i gave everything that i could. i guess considering the disruptions i had this year, i gave it all i could and that is all i can do. there was more heartbreak in the hammer cage. sophie hitchon's heartbreak went nowhere. she never recovered. these images are becoming all too familiar at these championships. there was at least some british success to cheer. daniel talbot track the favourite all the way in the first round of the 100m to make it to the semi—final.
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hughes was one of the fastest losers. and mitchell—blake, britain's second fastest 200 metre runner of all time also made it to the next round. with no usain bolt, there will be a new champion. could britain crash the party? the pressure is ramping up. expectations of fans are high, especially after what happened in rio. britain's sir mo farah‘s medal seems the only one to achieve anything in the target of six. they need to change, and soon. natalie pirks, bbc news, at the london stadium. you can see it is a murky day above the stadium. in five minutes we will have more for you. we will be live inside the stadium withjessica as well. we were looking at the same shot yesterday and it was a
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different scene, based in sunshine. —— bathed. after a four year stakeout by wildlife experts, footage of one of england's rarest animals, the pine mareten has finally been captured in the north york moors. here is that rare footage. the sighting is the first living record in the area for around 35 years, and it's all thanks to the yorkshire pine marten project, run by naturespy and the forestry commission who set up various camera traps around the moors in order to get a glimpse of the elusive creatures. i have been promising some facts. they are not fascinating animals. they are not fascinating animals. they are not fascinating animals. they are rare so we don't know much. they are rare so we don't know much. they are rare so we don't know much. they are territorial. that is why we don't see them that much. they travel a long way to find territory. but you don't see them. interesting. and now for another story this morning for you. contaminated eggs imported from the netherlands have been
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distributed in the uk, according to the food standards agency. they were found to contain the toxic insecticide, fipronil, which can be harmful to humans. health officials say only a "very small number" of the affected eggs have reached uk shores and the risk to the public is low. so, how concerned should we be about eating them? let's speak to steve wearne, who's director of policy at the food standards agency. thank you very much indeed for talking to us. we will talk about this insecticide. what is it used for? it is authorised for use in the eu as an agricultural pesticide. it is also licensed for use as a medicine to treat ticks and fleas on cats and dogs. but it is not authorised for use on food animals like chickens. why has it been used and what effect does it have? the
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belgian and dutch authorities are still investigating. we understand criminal charges may be pending. what we are talking about is a small number of eggs, other than bags, which sounds like a large number, but remember, in the uk, we eat about 20 billion eggs a year, 1.8 billion of which are imported. we just talking about just billion of which are imported. we just talking aboutjust one egg in every million we will eat this year. they were imported between march and june so the vast majority of them will have already been consumed. we have not identified any products they have been used in that still have time before expiry. tell us about the potential impact on human health. why is it not allowed to be used, for example? it is not allowed not because of any particular concerns about toxicity and the extent it has to poison us. there are very few reports of acute
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effects at low doses we know when there have been poisonings, deliberately drinking insecticide, there has been noisier and seizures. —— nausea. but at the levels found, it is highly unlikely there will be any impacts. some of them have been sold in the uk. from your point of view, even if you had one of them, you should be fine. that is right. we don't think there is any reason people should avoid bags or change the way they cook or consume them. —— eggs. the vast majority of them have been eaten already. any still on the market will be taken off sale. and you will go back down the food chain as it were, will you, and follow what is happening with the investigation? we are doing that now as a matter of
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emergency. we learned on saturday that of eggs have in imported, some have gone into retail and have in consumed. some would have gone into catering and been incorporated into products such as sandwiches. we are checking through to make sure we know where every last one of them has gone to. in the uk, we are very sensitive to food safety. do you test them all the time? there is a robust programme of testing. we have a number of substances that we will be testing for. thank you very much for your time this morning. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. more than 40 maternity wards in england closed their doors to expectant mothers
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at least once last year, according to the labour party. it blames staffing shortages, but the government says that's misleading. a number of athletes competing at the world championships in london have contracted suspected gastroenteritis. if you have just turned on your television, you would have missed a sturdy brolly warning from carol. you are quite right. the forecast todayis you are quite right. the forecast today is full sunshine, showers and some rain. in london, grey skies. some sunshine before the rain, but when the rain hits, the chance of some heavy downpours. some of those could eat sunbury. in east anglia and the south—east, a lot of rain in and the south—east, a lot of rain in a short amount of time. this morning, showers in the forecast. some bright skies, some of us starting with some sunshine. you can
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see the cloud of rain rotating around an area of low pressure. where we have got grey skies and it is dry, we could see some sunshine. showers developing. in scotland, some showers, some heavy and bunbury. the same for northwest england. in north—east england, across the pennines and south through the midlands into the home counties, east anglia and the south—east, down to hampshire and the isle of wight, we are looking at rain, some of which will be heavy, especially in east anglia and the south—east. we could have some surface water issues. drifting further south towards wales, looking ata mix further south towards wales, looking at a mix of sunshine and showers. some heavy and sunbury. especially across wales. in northern ireland, sunshine and showers. here, showers not as heavy and frequent. as we head through the evening and
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overnight, you can see we have the rain moving slightly north across england, through parts of the midlands, east wales, gloucestershire and somerset. a fair bit of cloud, chilli in rural areas. in towns and cities, temperatures 10-13. in towns and cities, temperatures 10— 13. starting with an arc of rain tomorrow through the day. gliding down into the south—east. once again tomorrow in east anglia in south—east england, in for some torrential downpours. that could lead to some surface water issues. away from this, some brighter skies with some sunshine. thursday, the dregs of the rain in the south—eastern corner. through the day, starting to drift away onto the near continent, leaving a largely dry day with some bright spells and sunshine. look at what is lurking in the wings off the coast of north—west scotland. more rain. that
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will also be coming our way. u nsettled, will also be coming our way. unsettled, changeable and went with some sunshine probably sums it up quite nicely. carrier bags, hotels and holidays, steph is here with the latest business news. good morning, tesco is scrapping 5p carrier bags, which means anyone wanting a bag their shopping will either have to bring their own or pay for a 10p once. tesco says it's to cut down on plastic bag usage. a lot of you have been in touch about this. john said, well done, this is a good idea. people need to get better organised. nicola works in one of the supermarkets and she said it is ha rd to the supermarkets and she said it is hard to check that everyone pays for
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their bags. she said that the majority do, and she does think it isa majority do, and she does think it is a good idea to get rid of them. aaron says that it is good to stop damaging the environment by plastic. david says, to tesco keep a percentage of the bags? a lot of them give the money they make to a good cause, but not all of them —— do. the owner of the hotel chains like holiday inn, crowne plaza and indigo has announced a rise in profits. the hotel group has three quarters of a million rooms around the world and serves over 150 million guests each year. it has said they are focusing more on the boutique side of the business. and we are taking more foreign holidays than ever before — we did 45 million of them last year — that's up 70% compared to 20 years ago.
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but one of the biggest chages is that we're doing more shorter trips rather than one long holiday. i will be looking more at how our habits have changed in about half an hour. a lot of people used to take a two—week trip in summer, there seems to bea two—week trip in summer, there seems to be a change? yes, there is. a lot to be a change? yes, there is. a lot to do with the cheaper airlines and the fact that we can get away more easily. people like to split up their holidays so that you are just waiting for that one holiday. when you finally get to it, you are tired and you might get six. i think it is better, you can properly relax. otherwise you never have a break! regarding carrier bags, andy says
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10p won't make a difference, and we have a reader in the netherlands who has said that you can't purchase any of these bags in the netherlands, and people always bring their own. you rarely forget to take a bag, just keep one in the car is what she said. ——a listener. ——a teenagers across scotland will be waking to their highers results this morning — the scottish equivalent of a—levels. the country has traditionally had a strong education system, but in recent years standards have declined. as the scottish government admits things need to improve, john maguire has been to find out what's being done. tonight these youngsters are practising their stop frame animation skills. who knows, a future morph or wallace and gromit might be created right here in cambuslang on the outskirts of glasgow. this youth club, one of nine centres called universal connections, are funded by south lanarkshire
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council's education budget. qualifications can be gained here that aren't offered in other schools. for example, there's a duke of edinburgh awards group and rebecca has been training for her gold award expedition. this morning she is receiving the results of her highers and she believes the school has prepared her well for the future. teachers are there to help you get the grades you need so if you know what you want to do and what you need and you just have to aim for that. at the same time, some subjects, like pse, they can get you ready for going out in the world. her mum, cheryl, is a member of the national parent forum and has a keen interest in scottish education. she says children can succeed if they're supported. i appreciate education is going through so many changes, but it's now about narrowing it and trying to work with the parents of the schools and local authorities and government to bring everyone together to make it more attainable. but recent years have
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seen standards decline. so what's been going on? there's certainly no single cause. i think the introduction of curriculum for excellence, which is effectively scotland's national curriculum, which has been going on for some 13 years now, has been badly organised and has led to a number of serious adverse consequences, not least of them being excessive teacher workload and loss of morale as a result of that. the deputy first ministerjohn swinney is in charge of education. today he's visiting a community enterprise in kilmarnock that works with everyone from the elderly to ex—prisoners to children struggling at school. he accepts improvements need to be made, wants students from poorer backgrounds to achieve better results and believes schools and teachers are the best people to affect change. it's at the heart of the reforms i want to take into the curriculum, to make sure a generation of young
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people today can have access to the best quality of education and the best opportunities that are available to them. we want to make sure we do that in consort with the education profession to make sure that is able to be deployed in every single school, the length and bredth scotland. and the main teaching union wants more support for staff. i think if we could remove the bureaucracy so that teachers can spend their time working on the improvement of the learning of young people then that will make a difference. but we need more thanjust promises in these areas, we actually need action from government and educational agencies. back at the youth club in cambuslang, the band is in full swing and full volume as teenagers across scotland tear open envelopes or are informed via text, anxious to discover how they've done. this morning's results aren'tjust important to them but also to the government and to the country. john maguire, bbc news.
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i think every report should end like that. we hope to speak to one of those students later. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning, do you remember being taken to buy your first pair of school shoes? well it seems, these days, more than half of parents don't get their children properly measured. in the next half—hour, we'll find out why that could mean big problems for little feet. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armah. four men have been arrested after a teenager was stabbed to death in south east london earlier this morning. police were called to the old kent road at 2 oclock where they found a 19 year
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old man with stab wounds following a disturbance. police say he died at the scene. the metropolitan police says it's committed to tackling all forms of hate crime against ethnic minorities after figures revealed there's been a year on year rise in hate crime since records began. it followed terror attacks in london and manchester earlier this year. well, a dedicated unit set up to tackle the problem has been out in east london and says work is also being done to deal with online abuse. i think you can be online, and increasingly we're seeing online activity for hate crime because of the fact that nowadays you have social media, you have a lot more people that have activity online and presence and a digital footprint online. you're seeing that kind of increase in hate crime, but equally it can happen everywhere. a scheme which creates the illusion of speed bumps on london's roads to slow down drivers is being extended across the city. it was first piloted last year when the black and white patterns were painted on a number of busy roads including on southwark street. since then, transport for london has painted the virtual bumps in 45 undisclosed locations.
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the aim is to bring traffic down to speeds of below 20mph. on the tube, there are a few issues. first up, the overground is partly suspended between euston and kilburn high road. also from romford to upminster. and there are minor delays on the bakerloo line and district line. of course there is one main issue on the trains. south west trains has a special timetable for that upgrade at waterloo station. on the roads in surrey quays, bestwood street is closed at evelyn street that's because of a serious assault overnight. traffic is being diverted through the mcdonald's car park. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. we're in for a rather wet couple of days here in the south—east. heavy outbreaks of rain, some slow—moving potentially thundery showers as well, and the met office has issued a yellow weather warning for the heavy rain. now, not only for today but also for wednesday as well. there may be a dry spell or two first thing this morning but that rain moving in, the wind is fairly light so any heavy showers will be slow—moving and that could lead to maybe some localised flooding. it's going to feel quite cool as well, maximum temperature
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17 or 18. overnight tonight we could get a bit of rain but some drier spells as well. the minimum temperature quite warm, not drifting down too far from today's maximum, around 13 or 14. you may get a dry start first thing on wednesday but another band of very heavy rain moving in and the met office, as mentioned, has another yellow weather warnings in place for that so maximum temperature again tomorrow cool and around 16 or 17. as we head through thursday, that rain clears out of the way and by the time we get to friday, it is a drier picture. you could still get a shower here or there and you should see some glimmers of brightness as well later on, as for thursday also. as we head to the weekend it is going to stay rather unsettled. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello.
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this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. more than 40 maternity units in england closed to new admissions at some point last year, according to data obtained by labour. 42 out of 96 trusts in england that responded to a freedom of information request said they'd shut maternity wards temporarily on 382 occasions. the government says the numbers are misleading. in just over half an hour, we'll be getting the thoughts of the royal college of midwives on this. a british woman is being treated in hospital after being shot while on holiday with her family in brazil. eloise dixon from south london was driving with her partner and three children when they took a wrong turn into an area controlled by drug gangs near rio. she was shot twice and the medics treating her say she's lucky to be alive. more details have emerged in the case of the british model who was allegedly drugged and held captive for nearly a week by a gang in italy. the lawyer representing chloe ayling, who's 20 and from south london, says she was told by her kidnappers that she would be sold
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as a slave in the middle east. he explained that she was acting under duress when she was seen shopping with her captor before she was freed. the organisers of the world athletics championships in london have revealed that a number of athletes have contracted suspected gastroenteritis. botswa na's isaac makwala, who was one of the favorites for today's 400 metres final, was forced to withdraw from the 200 metres heat yesterday. german and canadian athletes are also thought to have been affected. the organising committee says its working closely with public health england to manage the situation. that is a particularly sunny shot. that is a particularly sunny shot. that is a particularly sunny shot. that is the london stadium. we will be there in a few minutes' time with jessica and a 400 metre runner as well, looking forward to the fifth
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day of the games. it is only on bbc one tonight. no channel hopping. don't worry about that. contaminated eggs imported from the netherlands have been distributed in the uk, according to the food standards agency. they were found to contain an insecticide which can be harmful to humans. health officials say only a "very small number" of the affected eggs have reached uk shores and the risk to the public is low. we don't think there is any reason why people should avoid eggs or change how they cook or eat them. the vast majority have been eaten already. if we find anything on the market with those eggs in them we will take them out as well. the welsh government has announced plans to invest more than £1 million in dental health. it says the move will create 10,000 new nhs dental places, including in some of the most deprived parts of wales. however, critics, including the british dental association,
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say the welsh government took more than £6 million out of the welsh dental budget last year and the investment announced today does not replace that. last night, a stunning lunar eclipse was visible in many parts of the world. eclipses happen when the earth passes between the sun and the moon, casting a shadow. look at that picture from greece! isn't it stunning? this one could be viewed on several continents, although many countries could only see part of it. a second full eclipse will occur on the 21st of august over north america, the first of its kind in nearly a century. just so you know. i believe that is a monday. do you? great knoiwledge. i think you are off on that day. you don't care because it is a monday and you aren't working. we will have the weather soon. it was an amazing 1500 metres last night with laura
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muir just 1500 metres last night with laura muirjust missing out on a medal. jessica is there for us this morning. good morning. good morning. as you said, one of the best races, that 1500 metres final last night. just why we love to sports. a fine margin. missing out on seven hundredths of a second. it was so, so close. facing such a car field, the olympic champion and the world champion. —— tough field. caster semenya just beat her to it. agonisingly close. i gave it everything i could. just that last 50 metres i was tied up. i gave everything that i could. considering what has happened this year, i gave it all i could and that is all i can do. disappointment, too,
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for the olympic bronze medallist, sophie hitchon, she couldn't quite match her achievements at rio last year. her best effort of 72.32 in the hammer final wasn't enough for a medal as she finished in seventh place. yeah, ijust, umm... icouldn't quite find the rhythm that i had in qualification. i knew! quite find the rhythm that i had in qualification. i knew i was in bad shape. disappointed i didn't produce tonight. better news for team captain eilidh doyle, was one of two british women who made it into the semi—finals of the 400 metres hurdles. megan beesley also made it through. there was a great performance
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by britain's danny talbot in the 200 metres. he qualified for the semi—finals, with a lifetime best of 20.16 seconds, finishing just behind the reigning olympic champion wayde van niekerk in the heats. we were expecting to see the fastest man in the world over 200 metres, botswa na's isaac makwala, run last night. but he was absent from his heat and it later emerged he was one of a number of athletes suffering from gastroenteritis at one of the team hotels. and now a round—up of the rest of the day's sport. moeen ali was england's hero once again, as he and his teammates secured a 3—1 series win over south africa. ali took 25 wickets over the course of the series. he helped england claim a 177—run victory in the fourth test, and also ensured that the team climbs to third in the international cricket council's test rankings, above australia. it's a first home test series win against south africa since 1998. and a first forjoe root as england captain. it is great to see moeen ali in particular step up and put
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in some unbelievable performances to win games for us. hopefully that can be something that is repeated on a number of occasions in the future. but i think throughout the whole series the squad has performed very well. could gareth bale be heading back to the premier league? manchester united manager jose mourinho says he will "fight with other coaches" to sign the 28—year—old welshman. the two clubs play each other tonight in the uefa super cup in macedonia. bale joined the spanish champions from tottenham in 2013, for a then—world record fee of £85 million, and has since won the champions league three times. mourinho says he'll be waiting for bale if he doesn't figure in real‘s future plans. you might have noticed i am in the
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bbc tv sports studio. this is where the likes of gabby logan and michael johnson, the legend, and paula radcliffe six. —— sit. i want to introduce you in this seat, logan. next door is the japanese broadcasters. lots of branding in the studio. even a unionjack flag. this is a special touchscreen which you have seen if you are watching the coverage. it is very expensive. iam not the coverage. it is very expensive. i am not going to touch it. ijust thought i would give you a behind—the—scenes. you don't see this much. what a night of drama it was in that 1500 metre final. a
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brave run by laura muir. a tough field. the olympic champion was there. you spoke to her after the race. did she take any positives? the fact she left everything on that track. you come to the world championships and you have to give your best. every time she races, she leaves everything, blood, sweat, and he is, everything, on that field. so close. —— tears. everyone was cheering for her to get that medal. it is tough, very tough, a fine margin. and tough for sophie hitchon in the hammer final. margin. and tough for sophie hitchon in the hammerfinal. she margin. and tough for sophie hitchon in the hammer final. she was fighting back tears in her interview. where does she go from here now that she finished so far down in the field? she was olympic bronze medallist last year. she expected to at least equal that. she
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was winning at one stage in the first round. the crowd loved it. i thought, come on, the crowd wants it. you don't just thought, come on, the crowd wants it. you don'tjust turn up and compete, you train all year. everything has to be completely right on the night. if you don't get a medal, you are heartbroken. but next issue will come back bigger and better and stronger. you have heard about the gastroenteritis that has got around. some athletes have been affected. as a former athlete yourself, when you are dealing with diarrhoea and vomiting, how does that affect you? it affects everything, not just that affect you? it affects everything, notjust physically but psychologically as well. the human body, everything has to be perfect when you come to a championships. you have to get back on board and keep everything down. but psychologically, you go to the next race and you know you are not 100% perfect. you don't know the effect it will have on the performance. the
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last thing you want to have is a tiny chink in your armour. you have to be 100 ready to compete. not only will they have felt weak and drained, mentally, they will feel bad as well. such a special night on the track tonight for the 400 metre men's final. wayde. what a special talent. you must be feeling good to see him. normally this is all i see of michaeljohnson. the back of him. he isa of michaeljohnson. the back of him. he is a supremely great athlete. he has done so much to get through. he has done so much to get through. he has not left third gear. he is saving energy for the 200. he will do something good tonight. he won't smash the record. he has a 200. he has the talent to do it. thank you. a pleasure to have you on bbc brea kfast. a pleasure to have you on bbc breakfast. if you want to join eve ryo ne breakfast. if you want to join everyone on the sofa, the coverage gets under way on bbc two from 730 tonight. i love them. thank you. and
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we will speak to steve batley, four—time european champion. he never got a gold. he is part of the commentary team. also, we are keeping up—to—date with the weather. so much is going on. good morning. yes. good morning. i am in london. the sky is grey. a bright start. we could see sunshine. later, torrential showers. excuse me. the pollen levels are up. for some of us, we are looking at sunshine. especially in the north and west. heavy downpours. possibly thundery. the highest chance of that combination in the south—east and east anglia, especially later on. this morning, we have sunshine. bright spells. showers. in the north
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and west of the uk, that is. some rain as well rotating around an area of low pressure. some of that will be heavy as we go through the morning. behind that, carrying on with sunshine and showers in scotla nd with sunshine and showers in scotland in the north—west england. some thundery. north—east england this afternoon, rain. that extends across the pennines, the midlands, east anglia, the south—east, hampshire, the home counties, down towards the isle of wight as well. cool temperatures. the other thing you will find us we could see large rainfall totals in east anglia and the south—east in a small amount of time. towards the south—west, a mixture of bright spells, sunshine, showers. wales, more frequent showers. wales, more frequent showers. some will be heavy and thundery. in between them, brightness. northern ireland, sunshine and showers as well. they will be not as heavy and less
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frequent. through the evening and overnight we still have that rain. if anything, it goes north. extending from north—east england through the midlands to east wales down towards dorset and somerset. temperature—wise, we are looking at overnight lows and 13. in rural areas, especially in the north, it will be a chilly north. tomorrow, that rain once again starting off. through the day it will be dragged by the low pressure in the direction of the south—east as temperatures rise. further showers will develop. some will be thundery and slow—moving. especially, once again, in east anglia and the south—east. we could be looking at issues with surface water flooding. away from that, for the rest of the uk, more dry and more bright with fewer showers and sunshine. by thursday, the rest of that rain in the south—east. that will clear away leaving us with a dry day once again with sunny spells. but you can see what is waiting in the sides of
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scotland. more rain coming our way. fairly unsettled for the next few days. thank you very much. it's no secret, us brits have a long history of seeking out the sun — and we're going on more foreign holidays than ever before. but new figures suggest it's increasingly a case of bye—bye to the booze cruise. steph‘s been looking into our changing holidaying habits. i've been off for the last few weeks, what has happened to this chair? we are waving goodbye to the booze cruise? yes, let's have a look at the research. the good news is,
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we are taking more foreign holidays. 45 million last year, up nearly 70% from 1996. the biggest changes that we am not going to wait for one long break as often, instead, we are opting for a week—long break or a long weekend. statisticians say this is probably because of the rise of the low—cost carriers. passengers have risen by 85% at uk airports. something a lot of people have been noticing with all the long queues this summer. with me is emma coulthurst, is from travelsupermarket.com it is amazing how holidays have changed. i used to go on a two—week
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holiday, you would go off on the to france, you would probablyjust take one holiday per year. now, we are buying for one—week holidays, but trying to have more. shorter holidays, but more frequently. a city break never really existed 20 years ago, but now we are going to places in eastern europe. as low as £69 this september, three star accommodation and your flight, it is difficult to get a hotel in the uk for £69 for one night. so we are really expanding our holidays, trying to spread them across the year. i think there are a lot of reasons for this. if we look at the advent of low—cost airlines, it has really opened up the sky above our
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heads. we have got easyjet, ryanair and many others. so it is easy to get a low—cost flight. holidays are our prized possessions. a lot of countries can just stay at home, but we need the sun. we've got to get on the plane and experience that lovely mediterranean vibe. they are asking us for our cost. the prices this summer, 70 quid, 80 quid for a week. the holidays are actually cheaper than they were 20 years ago. the interesting thing about this is how much we used to like our cruises. there has been a quadrupling in people going on cruises? yes, it has expanded about fourfold. the booze
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cruise, it has vanished. it is not cost efficient to bother doing it. cruising is very popular, notjust with older people. i also think when you look at this information, it is good to look at the countries people are going to and how that changes. unsurprisingly, you've got places like egypt and tunisia which have fallen out of popularity. poland, croatia err... the whole of eastern europe has opened up in the last 20 years —— croatia... you can get breaks to these places for under £100 each. poland has entered the european union in 2004. now you can have breaks their in some beautiful places, warsaw, krakow. there are so
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many new destinations. the best thing about going abroad is how expensive the uk is. when you go abroad, the cost of living is nearly half that of eastern europe. eating out is really cheap and so our drinks. despite the fact that the pound is not great in the markets. yes, it has been volatile, but you can balance that out with the cost of living abroad if you pick the right destination to go to. the cost of living increase is 60% than the uk, 40% less in turkey. croatia has opened up, the balkan war ended in 1995. croatia, dubrovnik is a very popular destination. and don't forget iceland. since 1998 and the enormous crash to their dollar, you can go to iceland for about half the price it used to be. i think the
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news le sommer also had something to do with it. we found that breaks in iceland were incredibly popular.” wish we could go on, this is making me veryjealous! very interesting. warsaw is a very nice place to go for the weekend, by the way. when he asked me this earlier, i was not sure. when was the last time you had your children's feet measured? be honest! well — according to the college of podiatry — more than half of kids in the uk have suffered foot damage because of ill fitting or unsuitable shoes. so if you're preparing to buy new shoes your little ones before they go back to school, you might want to watch this next report. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been to meet one family and get advice that could help avoid big problems for little feet. ready? ready. steady? yeah. steady.
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go! we are with the kelly family in whitby and we are on the hunt for... shoes. expensive? definitely. feet grow into all the age of 21 and with three children and two stepchildren, amy has a lot of shoes to buy. their feet seem to grow so fast! definitely! chase's do especially, he's got like a super massive big toe that's got a mind of its own! when was the last time you had your kids' feet measured? i'm going to have to be honest, i don't know if i've ever had any of them measured ever. so this is it, this is the lot? this is it. let me ask you, these all fit? i hope so. laughter let's find out! because today we are bringing in the big guns to check out the small feat which reside here.
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i hope you're not going to tell me off! are you going to show me your feet? emma supple is from the college of podiatry. i like these shoes. these pass for me because they've got a nice good heel. that's too small, isn't it? a survey from the college of podiatry found 29% of british children could be wearing shoes that are completely the wrong size. can you see how your toes are all squinched? 56% of parents admitted buying kids' shoes without having their feet measured. these are the ones i don't like. 55% of children have suffered damage to their feet because of shoes which are too small or simply unsuitable. feels comfortable. yeah, feels comfortable but it's getting to the edge, though, isn't it?
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your feet have grown but you haven't noticed. i guess what we're talking about our crimes against kids' feet. yes, we are. worst culprits please? crime one, ill fitting shoes. get the child's shoes fitted and at least keep the information in your back pocket. crime two, slip—on shoes. if they're wearing slip—on shoes it should be temporarily, holidays and high days and everything else should be a fastened—on, buckled—on shoe. crime three, floppy heels. if the heel collapses in like a slipper, very unsupported at the heel, put it back on the shelf. the shops that don't have a feet measurements in where you buy the cheaper shoes, is there anything wrong with looking for cheaper shoes? nothing to do with price, it's all to do with style. some people feel awkward about going into the shops that measure feet and then leaving without buying anything. independent shoe fitters are a wonderful group of professionals and they don't have any problem with you going in and having your feet measured and leaving without having bought a pair of shoes. because bad shoes cause bad problems, corns,
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calluses, hammer toes. yeah, i am going to get told off? you are going to get told off. the recommendation is to go every six months to get your feet measured and that's a really good yardstick. definitely. kids' feet grow fast, they don't need a lot of money throwing at them but they do need protecting. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. i like ilikea i like a golden slipper. and we've got some comments about this story. someone has britain in who used to work for a shoe department. their tip is to shake talcum powder into the shoe, empty out the access and ask your child to walk in them. take off the shoe, and then a footprint will appear so you can see where their toes go to. they say that there should be one centimetre between the end of that of and the
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end of the shoe. it can be quite ha rd to end of the shoe. it can be quite hard to look into the shoe! salang has said that nobody measures their children's beat any more. she works ina children's beat any more. she works in a school, and she has said that often children have shoes that i'll much too big or small, but parents don't listen —— shalane. much too big or small, but parents don't listen -- shalane. my children love a slip on. shalane has said there should be a law against ill fitting shoes. possibly a little bit too far, but interesting. you're watching breakfast. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armah. four men have been arrested after a teenager was stabbed to death in south east london earlier this morning. police were called to
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the old kent road at 2 oclock where they found a 19 year old man with stab wounds following a disturbance. police say he died at the scene. of hate crime against ethnic minorities after figures revealed —— the metropolitan police says it's committed to tackling all forms of hate crime against ethnic minorities after figures revealed there's been a year on year rise in hate crime since records began. it followed terror attacks in london and manchester earlier this year. well, a dedicated unit set up to tackle the problem has been out in east london and says work is also being done to deal with online abuse. i think you can be online, and increasingly we're seeing online activity for hate crime because of the fact that nowadays you have social media, you have a lot more people that have activity online and presence and a digital footprint online. you're seeing that kind of increase in hate crime, but equally it can happen everywhere. a scheme which creates the illusion of speed bumps on london's roads to slow down drivers
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is being extended across the city. it was first piloted last year when the black and white patterns were painted on a number of busy roads including on southwark street. since then, transport for london has painted the virtual bumps in 45 undisclosed locations. the aim is to bring traffic down to speeds of below 20mph. on the tube, there are a few issues. first up, the overground is partly suspended between euston and kilburn high road. because of a sewage leak on the overground platforms at euston, and also from romford to upminster. and there are minor delays on the bakerloo line and district line. minor delays between earls court and wimbledon because of a signal failure at west brompton because the train is faulty. on the roads in surrey quays, bestwood street is closed at evelyn street that's because of a serious assault overnight. traffic is being diverted through the mcdonald's car park. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning.
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we're in for a rather wet couple of days here in the south—east. heavy outbreaks of rain, some slow—moving potentially thundery showers as well, and the met office has issued a yellow weather warning for the heavy rain. now, not only for today but also for wednesday as well. there may be a dry spell or two first thing this morning but that rain moving in, the wind is fairly light so any heavy showers will be slow—moving and that could lead to maybe some localised flooding. it's going to feel quite cool as well, maximum temperature 17 or 18. overnight tonight we could get a bit of rain but some drier spells as well. the minimum temperature quite warm, not drifting down too far from today's maximum, around 13 or 14. you may get a dry start first thing on wednesday but another band of very heavy rain moving in and the met office, as mentioned, has another yellow weather warnings in place for that so maximum temperature again tomorrow cool and around 16 or 17. as we head through thursday, that rain clears out of the way and by the time we get to friday, it is a drier picture. you could still get a shower here or there and you should see some glimmers of brightness as well later on, as for thursday also.
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as we head to the weekend it is going to stay rather unsettled. hello this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. more than 40 maternity units in england closed their doors to new admissions at some point last year. labour blames a lack of midwives; the government says it's misleading to blame staff shortages. good morning it's
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tuesday 8th august. also this morning; sickness at the world athletics championships organisers have confirmed a number of athletes have been affected by a stomach bug at one of the official tea m stomach bug at one of the official team hotels. on the track, heartbreak for britain's laura team hotels. on the track, heartbreakfor britain's laura muir, she misses out on a medal in the 1500 metres. doctors say a british woman who was shot while on holiday in brazil is lucky to be alive. eloise dixon is reported to have been attacked when her family took a wrong turn. tesco is scrapping 5p carrier bags and replacing them with 10p bags for life. i'll be looking at why and whether other retailers will do the same. jodie whittacker will soon be the new face of dr who but her latest drama sees her playing someone who definitely isn't
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a doctor despite what she claims — we'll speak to the writer behind the series. and carol has the weather. good morning. it's a mild start to the day. temperatures 16 at the moment. we are looking at sunshine and showers today, some showers will be heavy and thundery. also rain in the forecast. particularly heavy in bedfordshire and buckinghamshire. further heavy rain for east anglia and the north—east. more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. more than 40% of maternity wards in england closed their doors to expectant mothers at least once in 2016, according to data from the labour party. 42 out of 96 trusts in england that responded to a freedom of information request said they'd shut maternity wards temporarily on 382 occasions. the government says the numbers are misleading. our health correspondent, dominic hughes has more. for some years, maternity units
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have been struggling to recruit enough midwives. the royal college of midwives says there's a shortfall of around 3,500. now, based on a freedom of information request, labour says a growing number of maternity units are closing doors to new mothers. in england, 136 nhs trusts offer maternity services. last year, 42 of them closed their doors to new admissions at least once. there were 382 separate locations where units were closed, up by 70% since 2014. i think it is quite right hospitals take these drastic decisions when they want to put the interests of the patient‘s safety first. i don't blame them for doing that. but the fact it is happening so often and is increasing year on year significantly suggests an underlying problem. you cannot keep trying to run the nhs on a shoestring, putting them through the biggest financial squeeze in its history, and not expect standards of care to slip. some closures were relatively
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short—lived but others lasted more than 24 hours. a department of health spokesperson said that trusts need to use temporary closures to manage peaks in admissions and it was misleading to use these figures to indicate a shortage of staff because of the difficulties around planning for birth. the royal college of midwives agreed it was sometimes right to close a unit, but that doing so on a regular basis showed underlying problems with the number of expert staff. dominic hughes, bbc news. a british woman is recovering in hospital after being shot while on holiday with her family in brazil. eloise dixon from south london was driving with her partner and three children when they took a wrong turn into an area controlled by drug gangs near rio. our south america correspondent, katy watson, has more. an innocent family on their summer holidays. eloise dixon together with her partner and three young children made one mistake which nearly cost them their lives. it all happened in angra dos reis, about 90 miles south of rio de
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janeiro, a part of brazil that's popular with tourists and has some of the most beautiful beaches in the country. the family had rented a car, and according to local media, were looking for a place to buy water when they made a wrong turning into a favela, or slum, controlled by drug traffickers. men fired at the car after the family failed to understand their orders. eloise dixon, in the front passenger seat, was shot twice, the bullet marks, clearly visible. taken to a local hospital, she underwent two hours of surgery. this could so easily have been fatal, but she survived. translation: the bullet passed through the abdomen and fortunately did not hit the big blood vessels or the important organs. she was very lucky. the favelas in brazil are notorious. some can be so dangerous that even police are not welcome. translation: we have a community that we cannot enter,
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the press cannot enter, the public service cannot enter. that is inadmissible. we have to take urgent measures. according to doctors, eloise dixon is recovering well from surgery. awake and talking, she's expected to be transferred to hospital in the city of rio dejaneiro where she'll continue her recovery. katie watson, bbc news. more details have emerged in the case of the british model, who claims she was drugged and held captive for nearly a week by a gang in italy. the lawyer representing chloe ayling, who's 20 and from south london, says she was told by her kidnappers that she would be sold as a slave in the middle east. he explained that she was acting under duress, when she was seen shopping with her captor before she was freed. she was told that people were there watching her and ready
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to kill her if she tried anything, so she thought that the best idea was to go along with it and to be nice, in a way, to her captor. because he told her that he wanted to release her. a victim of the 9/11 attack on the world trade centre in new york city has been identified sixteen years on, according to the city medical examiner. the man's identity was determined after dna recovered in 2001 was retested using new technology. south african mps will vote on a motion of no—confidence in presidentjacob zuma later today. the motion has been tabled by the opposition in response to the sacking of the finance minister earlier this year. the organisers of the world athletics championships in london have revealed that a number of athletes have contracted suspected gastroenteritis.
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botswa na's isaac makwala, who was one of the favorites for today's 400 metres final, was forced to withdraw from the 200 metres heat yesterday. german and canadian athletes are also thought to have been affected. the organising committee says its working closely with public health england to manage the situation. meanwhile, its day five of competition. yesterday saw heartbreak for laura muir who narrowly missed out on a medal in the 1500m final. there were also high hopes for hammer thrower, sophie hitchon, who ended up in tears after finishing seventh. our correspondent natalie pirks was following the action. commentator: scotland's very own laura muir running for great britain. it was not the day british fans had hoped for. there were tears, just not ofjoy. the odds and a talented field were stacked against her. britain had never had a woman in the 1500 metres. the tactic, they wanted to go out hard. with a look of determination etched across her face, the bronze medal was in her sights.
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but from nowhere, 800 metre, specialist, katya semenya, found speed to snatch the way at the death. seven hundredths of a second separated muirfrom her first global metal. i gave everything i could. she just went past me. i gave everything that i could. i guess considering the disruptions i had this year, i gave it all i could and that is all i can do. there was more heartbreak in the hammer cage. sophie hitchon's jubilation was one of the highlights of the games. but this went nowhere. she never recovered. these images are becoming all too familiar at these championships. there was at least some british success to cheer. daniel talbot track the favourite all the way in the first round of the 100m to make it to the semi—final. hughes was one of the fastest losers. and mitchell—blake, britain's second
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fastest 200 metre runner of all time also made it to the next round. with no usain bolt, there will be a new champion. could britain crash the party? the pressure is ramping up. expectations of fans are high, especially after what happened in rio. britain's sir mo farah‘s medal seems the only one to achieve anything in the target of six. they need to change, and soon. natalie pirks, bbc news, at the london stadium. this is the scene at the london stadium this morning — we'll have more on all the action there yesterday and today from jessica in about 20 minutes. carol will also have the weather. we'll speak to her and steve
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backley. after a four year stakeout by wildlife experts, footage of one of england's rarest animals, the pine mareten, has finally been captured in the north york moors. after a four year stakeout by wildlife experts, has finally been captured in the north york moors. the sighting is the first in the area for more than 30 years. the yorkshire pine marten project managed to capture the footage after setting up camera traps around the moors. after a four year stakeout by wildlife experts, footage of one of england's rarest animals, the pine mareten, has finally been captured did you know there was a sighting earlier on injuly did you know there was a sighting earlier on in july in did you know there was a sighting earlier on injuly in shropshire and it was thought they died out over a century ago but they've been migrating. they're just hiding so people can't stare at them. there you go. i guarantee you will never
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repeat that fact. let's return to our top story. more than 40% of maternity wards in england closed their doors to expectant mothers at least once in 2016. that's according to data from the labour party, which blames staffing shortages for the closures. though the government says the numbers are misleading. jacque gerrard from the royal college of midwives joins us now. your reaction first of all to the figures. is this a surprise to you? it's absolutely not a surprise, it's something the royal college of midwives are hearing on a daily basis from those that work in the system. they‘ re basis from those that work in the system. they're telling us the pressures that they're up against and they're working against on a daily basis, things like staffing levels with 3500 short. we have an increase in the birth rate,
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2005-2016, 50,000 more increase in the birth rate, 2005—2016, 50,000 more births increase in the birth rate, 2005—2016,50,000 more births in england for example, so we have got a real worry there in terms of trying to meet the demands of the service with enough midwives and staff. can you talk about the practicalities of it. it says half of england's maternity units almost closing to new mothers at some point. what does that mean in a practical level, because presumably people can turn up at any time of day or night? yes. i think that is the nature of the issue. we know roughly how many mums are booked and given maternity units for a given of time. we don't know when they're going to go into labour. sometimes the pressure is that a whole lot of women go into labour at one time. if you couple that with not enough midwives, for example if there are a lot off or if there are vacancies, illnesses, actually on the grounds of safety, the maternity manager or the head has to make a decision, it's not safe for women to come in.
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that can last for maybe 24 hours or a few days or could run into weeks and centres, small birth centres for example, sometimes may have to close for six or more weeks. it depends on the situation where you are in the country. i'm sure you know that expectant mothers will be watching and may be concerned because there is that strict birthing plan where you plan where you are going to go, you plan where you are going to go, you know the route, you have a snack bag with you and that nightmare scenario is you turn up and you are told, sorry we have no room here. let me reassure women that that will not happen. this is planned. when services close the doors, they plan it. there is an escalation policy in place. the heads of midwifery in each region have an escalation plan. so as soon as things start to look a little tricky, they're on the phone to each other to say how many beds have you got, we are approaching crisis, can you help us out et
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cetera. a plan will be put in place, midwives will be told to tell women in the community, no women will turn up in the community, no women will turn up and will be turned away. if a woman turned up, she'd be assessed and cared for then a decision to tra nsfer and cared for then a decision to transfer out would be made then so please don't worry about it, we will look after you but we have to plan and we have to be really careful and make sure that we are providing high quality safe care, safety is most important. it may be that you won't be having the baby in the hospital that you planned to have it though? that is correct. so therefore you have got a big disappointment and you have to manage that situation so you have to manage that situation so you need to support the women and look and see where we can deliver their baby. you will be aware, we have asked the department of health for a response, they say we want the nhs to be one of the safest places in the world to have a baby and patients should be reassured we continue to have enough midwives in the nhs. they go on to say, to use the nhs. they go on to say, to use the figures as an indication of safe
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staffing issues particularly when a number could have been for a matter of hours is misleading because maternity services are unable to plan the exact time and place for all of the women in their care. they are saying this is in some ways having to be the way it is? 9/11 well, we would disagree with that because we know that we are 3500 midwives short. 2500 midwives don't come into the system because it takes three years to train a midwife, when we have looked closely at the figures and the data we're year—on—year basis only putting into the system 104 more midwives so that's not going to help the situation. we need to look at this closely and look closely at the maternity services that are closing ona maternity services that are closing on a regular basis. where a service is closing once a year, a couple of times a year, we understand that and we support the heads of midwifery, but where they are closing it
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regularly, there is a pressure on that system and we have to look why. is it staffing levels? is it about the number of maternity beds? what's wrong in the system? we have to look closely and take this seriously so we would disagree with government that we have enough in place. we need to drive this and please listen to this government, we do need 3500 more midwives and we need them today and that will keep us treading water. we have an ageing midwifery workforce. we have one—third of our midwives who are over 50 and some are over 60. thank you for explaining your case. it's 8.17am. carol has the weather. in parts of three counties we have had up to nine millimetres of rainfall in the last hour. here in london on the roof of broadcasting
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house, it's fine and mild and it's brightening up. but don't be fooled because there is the chance of torrential downpours today particularly so across the south east and east anglia which may well lead to surface water issues. something to bear in mind. this morning as well as the rain and you can see where we have got that great big arc of rain, it is retating around an area of low pressure. we have got showers in the north and the west. in between the showers, sunshine. this scenario will carry on into the afternoon. where we have got the cloud is where temperatures rise, it will spark off the heavy and thundery downpours. in scotland, you're looking at sunshine and showers. some of the showers will be heavy and thundery, but there will bea heavy and thundery, but there will be a lot of dry or sunny conditions. it is the same for cumbria and lancashire, sunshine and showers, but for north—east england we are back into the rain fal and the rain extends across the pennines, towards the midlands, into east anglia, through cambridgeshire, the home
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counties, kent, all the way down towards the isle of wight. in that rain, temperatures will come down and it will feel cool. but as we drift further west, in the direction of south—west england, we're back into bright spells, sunshine and showers and for wales, some of the showers and for wales, some of the showers will be heavy and thundery. some will be slow moving, but again in between them, we will see some brighter skies. for northern ireland, you will have sunshine and showers today, but the showers won't be as heavy and won't be as frequent, so a bit more sunshine for you. as we head through the course of the evening and overnight, we will have that rain. if anything, it will have that rain. if anything, it will move a little bit further north. so extending across northern england, through parts of the midlands, through parts of wales, into gloucestershire and also somerset. temperature wise tonight, ten to 13 celsius in towns and cities. but in rural areas, we're looking at a chilly night. so we start off with that rain tomorrow and if anything, it's dragged by the low pressure back down towards the south east. and through the day.
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again it is east anglia and the south east of england that are likely to see heavy downpours. so again, there is the risk of surface water flooding. but for the again, there is the risk of surface waterflooding. but for the rest again, there is the risk of surface water flooding. but for the rest of the uk, we're back into a drier day with fewer showers and some sunshine. and by the time we get to thursday, well, we have got the dregs of the rain, it won't be as heavyin dregs of the rain, it won't be as heavy in the south east, continuing to be pulled away on to the near continent by the low pressure. so, most of us will have a dry day. there will be sunny spells. take a glance at what's happening across the north—west of scotland just off the north—west of scotland just off the coast. another weather front is coming our way the coast. another weather front is coming ourway and the coast. another weather front is coming our way and that's going to be sinking south—east wards as well. so it is going to be fairly wet for some of us over the next couple of days, but particularly so in east anglia and the south east, dan and lou. carol, thank you very much, see you later. thank you for your comments including carrier bags. steph has the details. people have lots of
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opinions about paying for carrier bags. good morning. tesco is scrapping 5p carrier bags, which means anyone wanting to bag their shopping will either have to bring their own or pay for a bag for life which start at 10p. tesco says it's to cut down on plastic bag usage. a lot of you have been in touch about this. sue says "we managed without plastic before. why do we need it now? it is do—able and the planet is worth it." gaz says, "the bags can be recycled and reused." rob says, "why not get rid of the environmentally damaging plastic bags?" rid of the environmentally damaging plastic bags? " peter says, rid of the environmentally damaging plastic bags?" peter says, "since the introduction tesco has donated its profits from the bags." we have seen the supermarkets donate the
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money that they have made from it, but they don't have to do it. the owner of the hotel chains like holiday inn, crowne plaza and indigo has announced a rise in half year profits to nearly £0.3 billion. the chain has 750,000 rooms around the world and serves over 150 million guests each year. it has said this morning it's focusing more on the boutique side of the business and reduce the budget hotel rooms. we are taking more foreign holidays than ever before. we did 45 million of them last year — that's up 70% compared to 20 years ago. one of the biggest changes is that we're doing more shorter trips rather than one long holiday. more common is for us to do weekends away and then have a week away. holidays, bags, hotels, you name it! i feel exhausted by it all! thank you, steph. first came phileas fogg,
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then michael palin and now it's the turn of cyclist, mark beaumont. he's aiming to travel around the world in 80 days, but on two wheels. the challenge has seen him cover 240 miles a day, pedalling for 16 hours at a time. in a moment, we'll speak to mark to find out how he's getting on, but first let's take a look at his journey so far it's great to get the first day in and put miles in the bank. it's great. i thought it was just a bit of sitting water and my front wheel in and it was just of sitting water and my front wheel in and it wasjust a of sitting water and my front wheel in and it was just a huge hole. of sitting water and my front wheel in and it wasjust a huge hole. the first thing i felt was broken tooth in my mouth. i've chipped a good amount of my ka nine tooth there. i wasn't loving the last couple of daysin wasn't loving the last couple of days in russia because of the trucks and the rough roads and the storms and the rough roads and the storms and the rough roads and the storms
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and the head wind, but days like today make up for it. this is back on tarmac. oh, the end of day 26. that is the chinese border. and it's closed! this is the end of leg one. 6675 miles from paris in 28 days. i'm in australia! i have to say, that's not sunk in yet. it all feels a little bit weird. ijust weird. i just felt it go weird. ijust felt it go uneven like, it wasn't pedalling level and that's when i shouted stop and change the pedals. today was a good day because i clocked over 8,000 miles. i'm here with my hot—water bottle and food andi with my hot—water bottle and food and i will be asleep in about 20 minutes. markjoins us now. we are on a skype line. it could go
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down any time. where are you? i'm between adelaide and melbourne so i'm in victoria. it is later in the day for me. i'm already about 300 kilometres into my day. most people here in the uk, they are getting to grips with the new day. tell us about the harder times you have had. there was that awful crash you had in russia, wasn't there? that was day nine. i got through europe in six days. i was flying and got east of moscow. i was on such a high and putting in huge days and then early morning rain, crashed and i thought it was all over. i really did, day nine. breaking my tooth was annoying and we had to get emergency dental repairs done on the roadside literally, but what ended up being a more long—term issue is the damage
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i've done to my left elbow. a month later and it's still giving me a lot of grief. it looks like there is a hairline fracture or an issue there. i'm on the bike for 16 hours a day so there is no time for the body to recover. i mean there has been many highs and lows. some preting unforgiving weather as you might imagine. it's winter down here so the graveyard shift, the early morning shifts are incredibly cold and the battle in australia is a lwa ys and the battle in australia is always the wind. sometimes it's with me. sometimes it's against me and that's incredibly tough. so 240 miles a day with a broken arm as well. you're nearly at the half—way point. mentally, how are things going, mark? massive highs and lows. anyone involved in endurance sport will know that. there is wonderful moments, riding through dawn every day is exciting. completing a big day is exciting. completing a big day knowing... the mental battle every day. i will never be able to
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put into words where your mind goes on the bike. i'm only sleeping five hours a night. i'm on the bike from 4am. iget hours a night. i'm on the bike from 4am. i get off the bike at about half nine at night, but there is enough milestones along the way to keep the focus short. by the end of today i should behalf way around the world and that's massive, you know, that will be about 37 days and 18 hours since i left from paris and i've gone 9,000 miles. i cycled around the world ten years ago and it took me a lot longer than that. well, listen, all the best with it mark, and we'll catch up with you again. keep pounding the pavements and we will see you later on. good luck, mark. a broken arm. 240 miles a day. he's eating 8,000 calories. incredible. good luck to him. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. heavy showers confined to the far north of england today.
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one or two showers disturbing the dry weather. eastern england has thundery downpours. top temperatures 16—21. this evening, the heavy showers will continue, slowly fading from the west. a dry night for scotland and northern ireland largely. that will continue into wednesday and it will dry out for much of northern and western areas of england and wales. towards the south and east, still some heavy rain fall around during wednesday. torrential rain in places and highs of about 16—20 in glasgow. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and ben thompson. in the next few hours, south africa's president could be voted out of office. we'll tell you what it means for one of africa's biggest economies. live from london, that's our top story. it's tuesday 8th august.
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corruption, recessions and unemployment have dogged south africa in recent years and today the man at the top president zuma could be forced to go in a secret parliamentary vote. and money—laundering allegations that could lead to a theoretical fine of close to $800 billion have lead to the boss of
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