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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 8, 2017 4:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the head lineds at lipm: —— headlines. 30 athletes and support staff at the world athletic championships have been hit by gastroenteritis. team ca nada's doctor says the worst is over we've had nine athletes and staff that have been affected in total, more than half of those are staff. there's no new athletes affected for a couple of days. we're hoping we're coming through the other side of this. new figures reveal more than a0 maternity units in england closed their doors to new admissions at some point last year. a man's been found guilty of trying to smuggle a pipe bomb onto a plane at manchester airport. the family of a seven—year—old boy with a rare condition wins a high court challenge over a nhs decision not to fund a life saving drug. the national games of the special olympics gets under way in sheffield. 2,500 competitors, each with a learning disability, are taking part in 20 different disciplines. coming to these games
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gives them a chance to express themselves and to really show not about what they can't do, but about what they can do. google sacks an employee for saying there were fewer women at the company due to biological differences. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the organisers of the athletics world championships in london are working with public health england to try to contain an outbreak of gastroenteritis, which has affected 30 athletes and support staff. botswa na's isaac makwala, who was one of the favourites for today's 400 metres final, was forced to withdraw from the 200 metres heat yesterday. our sports correspondent natalie pirks reports. it was supposed to be the start
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of his bid for world domination. ranked number one in the world for the 200 metres this year, he would aim being to double up in the 400 metre final tonight. but yesterday, botswa nan isaac makwala vomited before his 200 metre heat. a victim of the bug sweeping around the tower hotel. despite feeling okay, officials pulled him out as a precaution. today, he feels fine but has not been told if he is allowed to run in tonight's 400 metre final. his dream hangs in the balance. this is bad. sometimes, ifelt heartbroken yesterday, i was ready for this, i worked hard for this. i was on top of my game to come here. i was very ready to make it possible. i came here for a medal, so if some people force you to withdraw,
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i don't know, without... i feel okay to run, but somebody says no, you cannot run, it's not nice, it isn't a bad thing. he's not the only1 struck down at impossible time for other support starts starts to build for the weekend. the german team have been particularly affected. many of their athletes have now moved hotels. we understand the outbreak is isolated, and the tower hotel released a statement saying the hotel was not the source. they said that strict hygiene protocols have been put in place, and all public areas have been thoroughly sanitised. gastroenteritis causes vomiting and diarrhoea and is normally caused by norovirus, believed to be the cause in these cases. it is unpleasant and easily spread. a toxic combination for a hotel full of athletes. the important thing is, if people have
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it, to stay away from other people. so they're not at risk of passing it on. and to be very scrupulous about washing their hands after being to the toilet or if they have vomited. the london organising committee says they are doing everything they can to get the illness in hand. when you have got 20,000 people minimum, there is a possibility that the bug will spread. we have taken all steps, we have an indication that a member of the team has had some symptoms, as early as friday, we were straight in. we have been working with the team and the hotel to make sure we have got all the right processes in place... athletics's governing body has said that guidelines have been protected. those affected have been car an teened in the hotel quarantined in the hotel. more than 40% of maternity wards
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in england closed their doors to expectant mothers at least once last year — according to data obtained by the labour party. 42 out of 96 trusts in england which responded to a freedom of information request said they'd shut maternity wards temporarily, on a total of 382 occasions. labour has blamed staffing shortages — but the government says closures are ‘well rehearsed' safety measures. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports. midwives provide specialist care to some of the health service's most vulnerable patients. but a shortage of staff, combined with a rising birth rate, means some units are struggling. andrew canter campaigns for improved maternity services. he and his wife lost a baby when their local centre was closed. the impact can be quite distressing. you're in a situation when you been looking forward to the birth of your child for nine or ten months, and that is really taken away from you. so it takes a long time to get back on track and the ramifications are that it goes right across the family, whether it's the parents or
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grandparents, brothers or sisters, it can be awful. in england, 136 nhs trusts offer maternity services. last year, 42 of them closed their doors to new admissions at least once. there were 382 separate occasions where units were closed, up by 70% on 2014. the truth is, you cannot keep trying to run the nhs on a shoestring, putting them through the biggest financial squeeze in its history and not expect standards of care to slip. the royal college of midwives said sometimes it is right to close a unit, when the safety of mothers and babies is threatened. but that doing so on a regular basis is the sign of a health service under pressure. it's very rare for maternity units to be closed, and the fact that we have seen a 70% increase in how often that is happening, i think should give us cause for serious concern.
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more midwives are being trained, and the department of health says hospitals need to use temporary closures to manage peaks in admissions, but it is misleading to use these figures to indicate a shortage of staff, because of the difficulties around planning for births. dominic hughes, bbc news. a mab has died after being stabbed at plymouth train station. emergency services were called to the scene at 10am. the victim, said to be in his 40s, was taken to hospital for treatment, but later died. a 29—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. a lawyer for suspicion of murder. a lawyerfor a suspicion of murder. a lawyer for a british suspicion of murder. a lawyerfor a british model, allegedly held cap tiff by a gang in italy, has been giving more details about the case. . francesco peshey says chloe ayling was told by her
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kidnappers that she would be sold as a sex slave in the middle east. he's been talking to our correspondent gavin lee. this story appeared to be incredible. she was kidnapped and then taken to the consulate by the same kidnapper and she had to be sold online at an auction. this organisation, which apparently is called the black death, was about to send her to the middle east. she had no idea what was happening. tell me about chloe and what she's going through. at first, she was quite upset. i do understand that. as long as we manage to speak with the da, who promised her that she would been immediately let go, she wasn't held here in italy, but they needed her presence. so we convinced her to
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stay here for the greater good. chloe apparently went shopping with the suspect before she was taken to the suspect before she was taken to the consulate and was handed in. what's your sense of that? she was told that she was going to be sold told that she was going to be sold to somebody in the middle east for sex. she was told that people were there watching her and ready to kill her if she tried anything. so she thought that the best idea was to go along with it and to be nice, in a way, to her ca ptor. along with it and to be nice, in a way, to her captor. because he told her he wanted to release her somehow and some time. she thought that the best thing to do was not to go in conflict with him. she abided to his request, let's go and buy groceries and you need shoes, let's go buy shoes. she didn't try to flee. but
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at least she was terrified at the moment. even if she could have asked for help, she didn't because she was subjegated to this person. that must have been even worse than being physically held hostage. more information there coming from the lawyer of the model who is said to have been kidnapped by a gang in italy. much more on that throughout the day here on bbc new. the family of a 7 —year—old autistic boy with a rare condition that puts him at risk of severe brain damage, has won a high court challenge against a decision by the health service to refuse funding for a potentially life changing drug. nhs england had said the effectiveness of the drug, which would cost £100 a day, hasn't been proved.
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today a judge ruled that decision must be reconsidered. a little ealier my colleague jane hill spoke to our legal correspondent clive coleman who gave us the latest. this little boy, known only as a, to protect his identity, has a condition called pku. he can't me tab lies protein. if —— metabolise protein. he is severely autistic too. he doesn't have speech or language. managing his diet is incredibly difficult for his pa rents. incredibly difficult for his parents. his nhs consultant wanted him to have a drug, which is very expensive. it costs £100 per day. nhs england turned that request down saying that it wasn't, it clinically effective or efficacy hadn't been proved. today mrsjustice andrews looked at that decision. she dismissed the case on two of the grounds that they brought, but what she did find was that decision was irrational. she said that the clinical efficacy was beyond question. so what that means is that nhs england will now have to look at that decision again. it doesn't guarantee he will get this drug. but
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with this strong judgment behind him there's a good chance of that. nhs england have acknowledged that the case failed on two grounds but that they will now look at this funding decision in his case again. i'm joined by two guests via skype. charlie box, who suffers from pku, and his mum mandy. hello, thanks for joining us on the bbc. i'm going to speak to you first mandy. a lot of oui’ speak to you first mandy. a lot of our viewers will never have heard of this drug and perhaps never heard of this drug and perhaps never heard of this condition as well. can you tell us this condition as well. can you tell usa this condition as well. can you tell us a bit about it and what the condition is meant for charlie sat next to you? basically, charlie has got severe pku, very severe. what that means is he can only have three grams of protein a day. so he was on three exchanges of protein. it's quite a difficult disease to explain to the general public because of the complicated diet, but basically, charlie cannot eat any normal food 01’ charlie cannot eat any normal food or drink. if you told people that
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charlie couldn't have protein, they would immediately think he was a vegetarian, because they would assume it was just meat he couldn't eat. people didn't realise that actually this is all food and drink is off limits, if you have got pku. the only safe food is fruit. charlie's been taking medication now for this. what difference has that made for charlie? for charlie? it's made for charlie? for charlie? it's made a lot of difference because i've gone from three grams of protein a day to 15. it means that i can have a lot of the food that my friends are having. i'm not that, like the different kind of kid any more. ican like the different kind of kid any more. i can eat the same kind of food as them. what's your favourite food as them. what's your favourite food now? what's your favourite food? erm...... i like potatoes. they're good. basically charlie can 110w they're good. basically charlie can now eat potatoes, rice, pasta, ice—cream, vegetables, like peas and sweet corn. everything that normal
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people take for granted. he can now eat. before, if we went into a supermarket there was nothing he could eat except for fruit, except for bananas, because they have protein. now he can have vegetarian products. you have spicy bean burgers, nut cutlets, all of these 110w burgers, nut cutlets, all of these now he can eat and basically this has opened up a world of food to charlie and we're very happy. and crisps of course! that's the most important thing. you can't be a kid and not eat crisps. no, that's true. in all seriousness, though, how did you manage to get this drug available for charlie? was it a fight for you as well? yes. it wasn't easy. basically, it took me about two years to fight for a one—month free supply, given by the drug company. i was told that it wouldn't work for charlie because he has severe pku, it was unlikely to work. however, isaid has severe pku, it was unlikely to work. however, i said you has severe pku, it was unlikely to work. however, isaid you know, as the drug is being given away for
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free for a month and it wouldn't hurt to try it, if it doesn't work he hadn't wasted money. basically that was obstructed. every time we did an individual funding that was obstructed. every time we did an individualfunding request to get the one—month free supply, which was available to all pku patients, nhs england kept rejecting our application. eventually, my mp helped me, he was brilliant. without him we wouldn't be having this discussion. we had a parliamentary adjournment debate in the house of commons. the health minister at the time said the drug is available around the world, throughout europe, even the poorer countries like romania are now paying for the drug. it's a well established, effective drug that's been on the market in the uk since 2008 and as the judge pointed out, the clinical effectiveness is overwhelming. so it was very unfair that pku patients are being denied this treatment. after the debate, nhs england then
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approved our individual funding request and charlie was then allowed to have the one—month free supply. it worked very well for him. they've looked into charlie's case the nhs and can see that, for him, it works. yeah. brilliant. he's been on the drug now for three—and—a—half years. it took a couple of months from him to go from three exchanges to 15. over a couple of months he went up every week, every couple of weeks, the dietician would say put his exchanges up. his protein level is too low, he would have to have more food. we never thought we'd get to 15 exchanges. does charlie have to ta ke 15 exchanges. does charlie have to take the drug for the rest of his life? yes. i do need to. it's worth it for you. obviously. yes. you can pretty much eat whatever you like. do you still have to be careful with certain foods? yes. for some patients that have got moulder or more moderate pku, charlie is very severe, some patients on the trial
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can go onto a normal diet. some of the children or adults that can have this treatment, if it works for them, could actually go on a normal diet completely. thank you both for taking time out to speak to the bbc and charlie, sorry to interrupt your summer holidays as well. you can go back to what you were doing before. you are free. thank you very much. just to let you know that the nhs did issue a response to today's ruling saying we note the judge accepted that nhs england had met its statutory duties under the children's act and rejected the assertion that nhs england was acting in breach of the human rights act. they go on to confirm that they will now review their decision regarding the funding of this treatment in this particular case in light of any further information thatis light of any further information that is provided to them. much more on that story on the bbc news website, by the way. it's one of our headlines today, which includes also the fact that 30 athletes and
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support staff at the world athletics championships have been hit by gastroenteritis. new figures reveal more than 40 moo ternts units in england closed their —— maternity units closed their doors at one point last year. a man has been found guilty of trying to smuggle a pipe bomb onto a plane at manchester airport. day five at the world championships in london. five gold medals up for grabs tonight. karl lackford is among britain's best hopes in the 800m. could gareth bale be heading back to the premier league? manchester united manager, jose mourinho, says he would fight other coaches to sign the wales forward. england's women's world cup star will miss the start of the super league. she's had a side strain injury. more on those stories just after half past. let's get you more now on that pipe
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bomb case. a man from bury has been found guilty of trying to smuggle a pipe bomb on to a plane at manchester airport. the device — described as crude and improvised — was found in nadeem muhammad's carry—on luggage as he went through security injanuary — trying to board a flight to italy. let's get more from our correspondent dan whitworth in leeds. you've been following this case. what did you hear in court today? well, effectively as you say this case is about a 43—year—old from bury. what happened in manchester crown court today is that the jury read out its verdict as found him guilty of possession of explosives with intent to endanger life. essentially what happened is he tried to carry a pipe bomb on board a plane that was going to italy. he sobbedin a plane that was going to italy. he sobbed in court as the jury read out its verdict and he'll be sentenced later this month. just give us a few details on the
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background of this case, because it didn'tjust background of this case, because it didn't just highlight his intentions. it highlighted some security issues as well. huge issues. this goes back to january 30. mohammed tried to board the flight, 30. mohammed tried to board the flight, ryanair to northern italy. the plane he was trying to get on can hold up to 200 passengers and crew. what happened, going through security, security officials did find a potential device in his carry—on luggage, something made of batteries, masking tape and wires. they swapped it or exwlosives. they didn't find they swapped it or exwlosives. they didn'tfind any they swapped it or exwlosives. they didn't find any and mohammed wasn't detained or arrested, he was allowed to leave. a week later, he did successfully manage to fly to italy, it was only three days after he had flown out of the country that an explosives expert examined the device and i have a quote, they described it as "a crude but
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potentially viable improvised explosive device." potentially viable improvised explosive device. " can potentially viable improvised explosive device." can you imagine the effect that might have had in the effect that might have had in the tight confines of a plane. serious questions about security. i have another quote from superintendent graham openshaw from greater manchester police. he said, "we a cce pt greater manchester police. he said, "we accept there were some errors with our assessment of the device on the day. they've already reviewed their processes, however this incident has demonstrated the effectiveness of airport security checks, where the item was successfully detected and the passengers was ultimately intercepted. " passengers was ultimately intercepted." he will be sentenced later this month. thank you. norfolk police are running extra patrols in the village of east harling after an 83—year—old man was murdered at the weekend. he was stabbed in the head and neck, while walking his dogs in woodland. our correspondent adina campbell reports from east harling. the woodlands in east harling, now the centre of a murder investigation.
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and 83—year—old man, who had been walking his two dogs here, was stabbed to death multiple times on saturday morning. people are shocked and hurting because of the place where people go to enjoy their own leisure time with theirfamilies. the pensioner‘s body was discovered near the five ways junction by a member of the public. the woodlands here in east harling is a popular part of norfolk, used by walkers, runners and bike trails. his body was found just over there where police have set up their forensic tent. he had been repeatedly stabbed in the neck and head. the pensioner is described as a family man from the east harling area. three days on, police are continuing their murder investigation and say the motive is still unclear. people will be shocked in relation to this and anybody shocked of this brutal murder, we have got our major investigation team investigating this matter, we have visible police at the scene. police are now urging people who use
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these for paths to get in touch, particularly if they were in this area and saw some unusual activity on saturday morning. uniformed officers remain at the scene. and local police patrols have also now increased. adina campbell, bbc news. britain's most seniorjudge has told the government it must provide more clarity about how uk law will be developed after britain leaves the eu. currently, uk legislation is subject to rulings made by the european court ofjustice. lord neuberger, who steps down as president of the supreme court in october, said parliament must be "very clear" in telling judges how to interpret eu law after brexit. the justice secretary, david lidington, has approved the transfer of the murderer kenneth noye, to an open prison. the move follows a recommendation from the parole board. noye, who's 70, was given a life sentence in 2000,
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for the murder of stephen cameron in a road rage attack on the m25 four years earlier. a former police officer who used the force helicopter to spy on nudists and a couple having sex has been jailed for a year. adrian pogmore, who's 51 and from rotherham, was sacked by south yorkshire police after he admitted misconduct in a public office. the judge at sheffield crown court told him he had quite literally considered himself above the law. a software engineer working for google says he's been sacked for questioning the company's diversity policy. james damore says he'd suggested there might be "biological causes" for men and women having different interests and abilities. google itself says that it can't comment on individual cases, but in an email to employers it said that; portions of the memo violated its code of conduct and cross the line by advancing harmful gender stereotypes in its workplace. it went on to say that to suggest
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that a group of colleagues have traits that make them less biologically suited to that work is offensive and not ok. our technology correspondent rory cellanjones explained google's response. it's important to stress how seriously google took this, to such an seriously google took this, to such a n exte nt seriously google took this, to such an extent that its chief executive broke off his holiday, came back, wrote that memo, in which he said it was fine for people to express themselves, but there were limits and this particular software engineer had gone beyond those limits by basically saying to women that you're not on the same level as men. you've got these biological differences which make you unsuitable for work as an engineer. there's been two levels to this debate. yeah, there's been the free speech question. a lot of people are pointing out that in america in particular, you have a perfect right to express yourself, but a company's got a perfect right to sack you with
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or without reason. that's the game. in law google have probably done nothing wrong. but the big debate is what it says about the nature of the work of software engineering. i've been reading a fascinating blog post bya been reading a fascinating blog post by a former google manager, who supported the action taken against this man by saying he didn't understand what it was to be a softwa re understand what it was to be a software engineer. he thought it was all about sitting alone in a room coding, not working with people, not having those collaborative skills. and there are a lot of technology companies and telecommunication companies and telecommunication companies trying to encourage more women to take up those roles as well. women often think it's not the job for them. there's nothing in it for them and there is a lot of recruitment drive. this comes at a sensitive time in the industry. yes, there's been all sorts of concern in silicon valley and on this side of the atlantic about the lack of diversity in the workforce. a lot of
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people pointing out about the history of computing, that the early softwa re history of computing, that the early software programmers were largely women. it was seen as a kind of fairly humdrumjob, a women. it was seen as a kind of fairly humdrum job, a sec retear job, oh —— sec retearialjob, oh, the women can do that. then the men took over. google have made bold attem pts took over. google have made bold atte m pts to took over. google have made bold attempts to promote diversity. the softwa re attempts to promote diversity. the software engineer said it was a left—wing company, there was bias in the company. it was politically correct. he's getting some support in that view from certainly right—wing media outlets in america. police in south west london are asking for help to identify a jogger, who appeared to push a pedestrian into the path of a bus. keep an eye on the man on the right of your screen — this cctv footage of the incident shows him running along
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putney bridge, and appearing to push the woman into the road. the oncoming bus has to swerve into the next lane to avoid hitting her. thank goodness for a good driver there. the bus stopped and passengers went to help the woman — who suffered minor injuries. police are appealing for your help to identify thatjogger. the latest headlines on the way. but we're going tojoin ben on the the latest headlines on the way. but we're going to join ben on the other side of the newsroom. there he is, with the latest on the weather. how's it looking — where's with the latest on the weather. how's it looking — where's summer gone? it's gone somewhere far, far away. dramatic weather out there at the moment. big down pours and thunder storms. though that can be a feature of the summer weather. a lot of instability in the atmosphere today. you can see from the radar picture we've had rain from yorkshire, down the midlands. these big storms that got going this afternoon have been giving a lot of rain ina
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afternoon have been giving a lot of rain in a short space of time. also a scattering of showers across wales and the south—west. not as many showers for northern ireland and scotla nd showers for northern ireland and scotland as we end the day here. it will be dry overnight here as well. in england and wales, we continue to see clumps of wet weather, thundery rain at times moving across. temperatures around 11 to 14 degrees. we're most concerned tomorrow about this line of rain here. because watch as we run through the day. the rain does not move southwards very quickly. we will see the odd heavy burst running along it as well. this could cause issues, flash flooding and travel disruption across east anglia and the south—east. best of the sunshine to the north west. highs of 20 degrees. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines at 4.30pm: public health england has confirmed that 30 athletes and support staff at the world athletics championships in london have been affected by an outbreak of gastroenteritis including botswa nan athlete isaac makwala. new figures suggest that more than 40% of maternity wards
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in england closed their doors to expectant mothers at least once in 2016. the parents of a boy with a rare genetic condition have won their legal challenge against a decision by the health service to refuse funding for a potentially life—changing drug. norfolk police have stepped up patrols after an 83—year—old man was stabbed to death while out walking his two dogs. the victim's body was found on saturday. we have got more details on those top stories. first, here is the sports news. it's day five of the world athletic
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championships. a virus has affected 30 athletes and officials from several countries taking part. let's go live to olly foster at london stadium for the latest. yes, that's all the talk, that norovirus which kicked in on the eve of the championships last thursday and affected the canadian team and the german team and the irish team and the bot swannan team. 30 in all. public health england making sure it doesn't spread more. they think it is passed from athlete to athlete. they all happened to be in the same hotel. one has withdrawn from his 200 meters and he is one of the big hopes in tonight's 400 meters final. we do not know whether he will be passed fit. iaaf doctors will have to pass him fit because they don't wa nt to pass him fit because they don't want him, if he is still suffering
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from the norovirus to risk any other athletes getting it. we caught up with him earlier and he really wasn't happy at being asked to pull out of the 200 meters. i feel heartbroken. yesterday i was ready for this, i worked hard for this. if it myself it would have been good for me. i was at the top of my game. i was ready to come here and make everything possible. i came here for a medal. so if some people force you to withdraw, i don't know, someone tells you you are ok to run, that i can't run, it is not nice. the last event on the track, the
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world record holder, the olympic champion will see if he can live up to that billing as the favourite in that, but watch out for stephen gardener and fred curly from the usa they are looking comfortable. as far as british hopes, we have got the men's pole vault, the women's javelin and the men's staple chasement only one brit in a final and that's in the men's 800 meters. kyle langford, but he is the slowest man in that final. so he is going to have to set another personal best and some which it took to get into that final if he's going to get anywhere close to the podium. olly foster, we will be looking out for that one. thank you very much. manchester united manager jose mourinho says he will fight with other coaches to sign gareth bale if real madrid are willing to sell the wales forward. mourinho is ready to make his move if bale is left out of real‘s line—up. the two clubs face each other in the annual clash between the winners
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of the europa league and champions league. it's set to be the biggest women's rugby world cup and it starts tomorrow with defending champions england naming their squad ahead of their opening match against spain. captain sarah hunter is in the mix along with forwards abbie scott and heather kerr. while making her fourth world cup appearance, full—back danielle waterman has been called up too. wales have named their team ahead of their opening game against australia so along with captain carys phillips. there's call ups for scrum—half keira bevan and fly—half elinor snowsill. let's return to one of our main stories this hour, the case of chloe ayling, the model who was allegedly held captive by a gang in italy. chloe said she was held for nearly a week at a remote house near turin and was told by her kidnappers that she would be sold as a sex
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slave in the middle east. earlier i spoke to model jacqui ryland who has years of experience in the industry. she told me this case exposes the potential dangers of modelling. 100% i think as a glamour model, like girls come into the industry thinking that they're going to be the next katie price and the industry changed a long time ago. even when i first started modelling, we are talking about seven or eight yea rs, we are talking about seven or eight years, there were things like that happening, even in this country. you know you don't need to go abroad for things to happen. you have got to think as a glamour model 99% of the time you're stripping down in your under wear, if not more than in front of a stranger and you don't necessarily know who that person is. they can pose as a photographer. it doesn't moon they are and it is very difficult to, you know, make sure you are, especially if you have got no experience, to make you are shooting with a reputable photographer. it is not guaranteed.
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before we get into that, how to protect yourself and what safeguards are ifany protect yourself and what safeguards are if any are in place, you say things happen. what are you talking about? are you talking about exploitation? all sorts of things happen. i once had a photographer come to my house and he turned up with cheesecake and wine and this is when i first started modelling and i thought that's really a bit bizarre. why has he come with that? i thought maybe it is the normal thing. as the shoot progressed this guy was getting drunk. i thought he has turned up in a car, how is he going to get home? i had to ask him to leave because it was inappropriate and that was in my own home. you never know what you're going to get. it does happen and other girls had photographers try and drug them. i have been abroad on trips, but i have been abroad on trips, but i have always gone with photographers that i know really well from over here, i would that i know really well from over here, iwould never go that i know really well from over here, i would never go with somebody that i had just met. here, i would never go with somebody that i hadjust met. it
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here, i would never go with somebody that i had just met. it does sound quite nigh he have to let a strange man come over to your house and take photographs of you ? man come over to your house and take photographs of you? well, the thing is, there is websites that you used to use back then and i think girls still use them now where you basically say you are available to shoot and as a young girl starting out, you are eager to make a name for yourself. you are eager to get money coming in and get your pictures on the internet so you put yourself available. a lot of photographers will contact you and say they don't have a location, can you provide? a lot of shoots are donein you provide? a lot of shoots are done in models home, believe it or not, even when the big magazines, they would go to homes to do the shoots. so it's not unheard of. so what's your suggestion? from the sounds of it, it sounds like what you are saying just about any young girl who wants to get into the glamour modelling industry can get photographs ta ken of glamour modelling industry can get photographs taken of themselves, put them on a website and have direct contact with men advertising work for models without really knowing what they are getting themselves
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into? it does happen. when i first started, it is like a minefield and you don't know, and it is a case of experience, but for young girls starting, if you're going to do it yourself, you make sure that whoever you're shooting with, you get references from other models first. don't just let somebody references from other models first. don'tjust let somebody in your home or essentially go abroad and shoot because anybody can book a studio. just because they've booked a stewed dwro doesn't mean they are a photographer. i have had photographers turn up with the most basic camera. you need to make sure they have a professional set—up and get references. if you can go via an agency even better because the agency even better because the agency will do a lot of that work for you. it is hard to get assigned to agencies and then you have got to think about the fee that you will lose. the industry has changed a lot. a lot of stuff is done online. it is hard. be really, really careful who you're shooting with. if you need to take a chaperone with you, a lot of photographers would
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prefer you didn't and you wouldn't ta ke prefer you didn't and you wouldn't take one to work with you on a normaljob, if you're going abroad, do not go alone. especially if it is somebody you've never ever met before. students in scotland have been receiving their long—awaited exam results. there has been a slight fall in the number of passes in higher exams this year. 77% achieved grades a to c, down very slightly on last year. more than a third of students signed up to an email or text alert to get their results, rather than waiting for the post. our scotland correspondent lorna gordon reports. after all their hard work, the wait is over for these pupils at the eastbank academy in glasgow, as they find out how they have done in their exams. i got the results i needed so that's really good. how are you feeling? really, really happy. i got one a, two bs and a c, i know i know i lost maths but that's what i'm expecting.
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i happy with that and i can come back and take maths next year if i want. i failed maths, but i was expecting that so i'm 0k. i got an a in classics, how did that happen? across scotland, the pass rate this year in the higher exams sat by 16 and 17—year—olds, was broadly in line with last year. there was, though, is a significant drop in the number of candidates entered for national four exams, down from 123,000 last year to 116,000. it was all good news for these pupils, but the scottish education system is facing wider issues. exam results don't themselves tell us much about the standards of scottish education of a whole. to do that, we need to look at international evidence, standards of literacy of declining in scotland, and numeracy also. and in some respects, more worryingly, inequality of attainment is getting worse in scotland, especially compared with other countries. the scottish government has made closing the attainment gap between pupils from richer and poorer backgrounds a priority. and there is targeted extra funding.
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this school has spent the money they've received on trying to increase the proportion of pupils who passed their highers. and then go on to further or higher education. the scottish education secretary, today meeting other students getting their results, said the government had a relentless focus on improving education. to these results give us enormous confidence about the strengths that exists in scottish education. but we are determined to build on that. the investment we are making in pupil equityfunding, which is supporting the measures that are designed to close the attainment gap in scottish education, will be a fruit in the years to come. for now, the aim for many, to celebrate their results and plan their future. well done to you all. we're going to head to nor follow. well done to you all. we're going to head to norfollow. an
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well done to you all. we're going to head to nor follow. an 83—year—old man was murdered at the weekend while walking his dogs in woodland. it was in the village of east harlg. we have been hearing from the choupt with an update on the murder inquiry. let's listen to what he had to say. i'm here to further brief you and the wider public following the murder in east harlg on saturday, 5th august 2017. ing on saturday, 5th august 2017. ing on saturday, 5th august 2017. the victim is described as white, of a slim build, of 57" inches tall, with grey hair and dresses. glasses. he was also with his two dogs. a ten—year—old foxhound cross and a 13—year—old trail hound cross. he also travelled to the location in his red skoda
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fabia. if you noticed something out of the ordinary in the area between 9am and 11am on saturday, 5th august, you could help us to build a bigger picture and identify a suspect. the initial call to the police was made at approximately 10.45am on saturday, 5th august 2017. after a member of the public found the deceased in woodland near the five ways junction near east harling. the home office postmortem examination carried out on sunday, 6th august, concluded that the victim, who was walking his two dogs, died from multiple stab wounds to his neck and head. we remain in the early stages of the investigation and whilst carrying out extensive inquiverries, we believe a member of the public could hold a vital clue. i would therefore like to appeal to locals, visitors or people who frequent the area to contact us if they think they may have important information. the victim is described as being white, of slim build, approximately 57"
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inches tall with grey hair and glasses. he was wearing blue stroke grey trousers, a black t—shirt and brown walking boots. he also travelled to the location in his red skoda fabia. if you notice something out of the ordinary in the area between 9am and 11am it could help us between 9am and 11am it could help us build a bigger picture and identify the suspect. the residents in east harling and in other local village know their community better than anyone else and it is these people i really want to appeal to. have you seen people or a vehicle which looks out of place? at the time it may have seemed insignificant, but please contact my officers and let us decide if it's releva nt or officers and let us decide if it's relevant or not. as a result of standard police inquiries, some residents will not have their bins collected over the coming days, but they maybe picked up later than usualment i would like to encourage people within a mile five radius of the street which is off the a 1066
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and near the five ways junction near to east harling to check their bins and gardens for any items which may have been discarded by the suspect. this could include clothing, which maybe blood stained, or a knife, or other similar item which shouldn't be there. i would like to thank residents for their patience while this is carried out. i would also like to ask that all residents and businesses in the area who have cctv systems to preserve any footage that relates to saturday, 5th august. similarly motorists who were travelling in the area on saturday and have any dash cam footage recorded by 6am and 9pm are asked to save the footage and con stact norfolk constabulary. as it is an area that people go cycling and running, some people may have other video footage from mobile devices and we would ask this is saved and contact norfolk constabulary to see if it can assist the investigation.
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i would like to reassure the public that dedicated team are investigating this incident whilst uniformed officers remain on scene and in the local area to provide a visible policing presence. we have set—up a mobile police station at the scene and created a dedicated phone line should you have further information that could assist us. the police seal remains in place at the woodlands whilst specialist search officers continue with their inquiries. anyone with information should contact norfolk police immediately quoting operation graduate. other visit the police mobile station or alternatively, contact crimestoppers on 0800555111. i'm happy to take questions. i'm from channel 4 news. are you alive to the possibility that the attacker, the murderer in fact, may have been known to the victim?” don't nou that information at this
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moment in time and our officers within the major investigations team are looking at all avenues of inquiry. any other questions. martin from the daily mirror. is there any reason why you're not naming the victim at this stage? we need the agreement of the coroner's office to release the information, formal identification and we can't get that today at this moment in time. you gave a description of the victim, but people don't know. we do know. we have an identity, but i'm not in a position to release that at this moment in time, sorry. that's a news conference that just moment in time, sorry. that's a news conference thatjust began in the last few moments. that was a recording of the news conference just a few minutes behind. the choupt giving an update and basically appealing to the public to come forward with any information about the victim and his potential
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attacker. much more information available on the bbc news website and of course, bbc norfolk as well will be covering that story in greater detail too. some more breaking news now coming into the bbc. at the world athletic championships an athlete has been forced to withdraw. he was one of the favourites for the 400 meters. olly foster who is following the championshipsjoins olly foster who is following the championships joins me now. olly foster who is following the championshipsjoins me now. this bug is having a profound horrible effect on these championships now, olly, even though it's small in scale?e yes. over 2,000 athletes, even though it's small in scale?e yes. over2,000 athletes, but even though it's small in scale?e yes. over 2,000 athletes, but 20 athletes and support staff have been laid low with the norovirus. it kicked in on thursday night on the eve of the championships. we are into day five and the highest profile of the athletes who has been affected by this virus. he was
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forced to withdraw from the 200 meters heats yesterday. against his wishes. he thrown up. this was spotted by an iaaf official and they decided he wasn't well enough because they were aware this virus was sweeping through one of the team hotels affecting the germans and canadians. an irish hurdler had to pull out of the 400 meters hurdles. a canadian marathon runnerfailed to finish the marathon because he was affected as well, but isaac makwala was due to go in the 400 meters final. he was expected to push very close. he was unhappy at having to withdraw from the 200. he said he was fine to run and told us on the bbc that he was good to go for the 400 and he was over it and still
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very unhappy about the not sprinting in the shorter distance, but now, an iaaf official and an official medical official said he is clearly infected by the norovirus and they will not let him race. so that's as much as we know at the moment. we will get some reaction from makwala and the team. he is the highest casualty of this virus. gosh, our thoughts are with isaac as you can imagine what he's going through. olly, thank you. much more from the sports team throughout the evening on bbc news. reaction as well coming in. we have been hearing from the doctorfor team in. we have been hearing from the doctor for team canada saying that he felt the worst of it was over, but still having effect on those athletes struck by the virus. you probably feel like a drink. a few years going to a beer festival
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meant going to the church hall to drink some scrumpy. the beer festival has been reinvented and reinrig rated. joining us is the chair from the campaign for real ale. what is it that's drawing us to the beer festival? well, it's not just about the beer. people like an event. so we've got, i don't know if you can hear the atmosphere behind me. it is really buzzing. we have got entertainment and music and lots of different kinds of beers. 300 british beers and american beers and beers from germany, czech republic, the netherlands and belgium. does it only attract a certain crowd though? just looking behind you, you can see it is mainly men, with maybe a few
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beer bellies there as well. is it just a certain crowd? not really. of course, beards have become very hip. when it is an event, people will come to the great british beer festival who are not necessary i will beer drinkers because they enjoy the atmosphere. once you have a beer, you can have a chat and have a beer, you can have a chat and have a wander around and to see what is going on and look at the different beer us because i'm sure you can appreciate with over 300 beers, there is no danger you can try them all! what do people do with the beers? do they take them home? we have had reports that show that pubs are have had reports that show that pubs a re really have had reports that show that pubs are really struggling, not one of these that turned into a restaurant that charge you a for ture. i'm talking about a proper a pubment they are few and far between. the festival doesn't quite make sense? well, it's interesting that you
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know, a lot of people do drink at home, but pubs have had to change their offering over the last 30 or 40 yea rs their offering over the last 30 or 40 years and there are still a lot of back street boozers. i was in kentish town last night which is mainly beer sales, but these days pubs have to offer everything. they have to offer, there has to be a food offering both at lunch and evening meals and it is notjust about the beer. so there is plenty to keep people going. if all you've got is two beers and soggy crisps and pickled eggs people aren't going to come along. the pubicans have upped their game over the last 15 or 20 years because they know it is a difficult market and they have to do something toen sure people come to their pub rather than sit—in the house drinking cheap supermarket vodka. with so many pubs closing,
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they have got to offer more. are you not worried about the fewer tu for the search for great ale. is it a worry that people tend to drink at home rather than at the pub? there is two things we're calling on the government to do which is rate relief for pubs. some pubs in the rates revaluation, where their rates have doubled and one particular pubican said he would have to sell another 30,000 pints a year to cover the cost of his rates increase. what we have in this country is the 0.5% of the economy is taken up by the pubs industry, but pubs pay 2.8% of the total rates. so we are not looking for favours for publicansment we are looking for fairness. we call on the chancellor to freeze beer duty for the lifetime of this parliament. that would mean the price of a pint wouldn't go up as much. it is cheaper to drink at
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home, but it is better to drink in the pub. thank you for that. we won't drag you away from it for any longer. ian hill there. celebrating its 40th year. jane hill will be here with you for the bbc news at 5pm. just time to tell you about an or rang you tanning. an orang—utan, who was one of the first apes to learn sign language, has died in atlanta in georgia at the age of 39. chantek lived with an anthropologist at the university of tennessee for nine years and learned to clean his room, make tools, and memorise a route to a fast—food restaurant. he spent his later years in atlanta zoo where he was treated for heart disease. chantek was one of only a few apes who could communicate using the american sign language. zoo officials said he had an engaging personality and would be deeply missed. they are fantastic animals. if you get to see one, go for it. jane hill
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is here from 5pm. ben has the weather for you. ben, is here from 5pm. ben has the weatherfor you. ben, where is the sunshine? scotla nd scotland and northern ireland had decent sunshine today and will tomorrow. a lot of dry weather in northern and western areas tomorrow, but things have been more dramatic today across the south east. that was essex. a couple of funnel clouds. you can see from the radar picture we had a band of rain stretching from yorkshire down towards the midlands and then the showers got going across eastern areas through this afternoon and these have been lively giving a lot of rain in a sport space of time. during this evening and tonight, these clumps of heavy, thundery rain will continue to circulate around over the top of england and wales. but for northern ireland and scotland, largely dry through the night. some clear spells. scotland, largely dry through the night. some clearspells. chilly
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scotland, largely dry through the night. some clear spells. chilly in some rural spots, but temperatures of ten to 14 celsius. so tomorrow's weather charts, there are two sides to the story really. low pressure to the east. bringing more rain epegsly in the south east. high pressure out west. beginning to build its way in and it's that that will give a largely dry day across scotland and northern ireland. certainly, a pleasa nt start northern ireland. certainly, a pleasant start to the day here. this is 8am. 14 celsius in belfast. sunny spells and 13 celsius in glasgow. cloud for england and wales. it should brighten up. you can see the wet weather as we start the day across the south—west, up into the midlands and lincolnshire, east anglia and these areas are going to keep the rain for a good part of the day. dry initially in the far south—east, but watch this rain band as we run the clock through the day. it does not move very quickly at all and some of the rain along it will be quite heavy. so this combination of slow moving, heavy downpours could give some travel disruption and possibly some flash flooding for the likes of east anglia, but look up the likes of east anglia, but look up to the north—west. mainly dry.
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some spells of sunshine. 20 celsius in cardiff and glasgow. that is not too bad at all and for thursday, there is an area of high pressure builds. more of us will get into the fine weather. as we get towards the end of the week, we are back to the wet weather. a band of cloud and rain will spread its way in from the west. a weather front here sinking its way in from the picture. there could be gales for a time up to the north—west. temperatures around 16 to 20 celsius. but after that decidedly mixed week, i can't promise a dry weekend. there is hope. it should turn drier with spells of sunshine at times. that's all from me for now. this is bbc news, today at five:
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30 athletes and support staff at the world athletic championships have been hit by gastroenteritis. the bug forces 400 metre favourite isaac makwala to withdraw.|j the bug forces 400 metre favourite isaac makwala to withdraw. i felt heartbroken yesterday. i was ready for this, i worked heartbroken yesterday. i was ready for this, iworked hard heartbroken yesterday. i was ready for this, i worked hard for this. nadeem muhammad, who was stopped at manchester airport with a pipe bomb in his hand luggage, has been convicted of possessing explosives with intent to endanger life. south african mps are holding a secret ballot on whether to oust the country's president, jacob zuma. the pass rate for scottish higher exams has dipped slightly but the total number of passes remained above 150,000 for a third successive year. we'll be asking the scottish education secretaryjohn swinney
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