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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  August 8, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, today at five: 30 athletes and support staff at the world athletic championships have been hit by gastroenteritis. the bug forces 400 metre favourite isaac makwala to withdraw.” the bug forces 400 metre favourite isaac makwala to withdraw. i felt heartbroken yesterday. i was ready for this, i worked heartbroken yesterday. i was ready for this, iworked hard heartbroken yesterday. i was ready for this, i worked hard for this. nadeem muhammad, who was stopped at manchester airport with a pipe bomb in his hand luggage, has been convicted of possessing explosives with intent to endanger life. south african mps are holding a secret ballot on whether to oust the country's president, jacob zuma. the pass rate for scottish higher exams has dipped slightly but the total number of passes remained above 150,000 for a third successive year. we'll be asking the scottish education secretaryjohn swinney to explain why he is introducing a
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series of reforms and to explain the drop. the other main stories on bbc news at 5: a woman has escaped serious injury after appearing to be pushed by a jogger into the path of a bus in west london. and the national games begin in sheffield for competitors with a learning disability. 2,500 people are taking part. coming to these games actually gives them a chance to express themselves and to really show, not about what they can't do, but about what they can, can do. good evening and welcome. our main story: the organisers of the athletics world championships
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of the athletics world championships in london are working with public health england to try to contain an outbreak of gastroenteritis which has affected 30 athletes and support staff. botswa na's isaac makwala, who was one of the favourites for today's 400 metres final, was forced to withdraw from the 200 metres heat yesterday. our sports correspondent natalie pirks is at the london stadium for us now. public health england have confirmed that in two samples they have taken the cause of the gastroenteritis is the cause of the gastroenteritis is the norovirus, the winter vomiting bug. it struck down around 30 people including athlete and backroom staff. the most high profile is botswa na's staff. the most high profile is botswana's isaac staff. the most high profile is botswa na's isaac makwala. staff. the most high profile is botswana's isaac makwala. i caught up botswana's isaac makwala. i caught up with him earlier. his is a strange tale because he thinks he is fine, he feels fine, and was looking forward to racing tonight in the men's 400 metres final against a
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world record—holder. isaac makwala is the world number one this year in the 200 metres and was hoping to emulate michaeljohnson by doubling up emulate michaeljohnson by doubling up in the 200 metres and the 400 metres. we have had confirmation he has been pulled from that raised by the governing body. they say he has been withdrawn due to a medical condition on the instruction of the iaaf delegate. let's have a look now at what he had to say to me earlier when i could up with him at the tower hotel which is affected by the gastroenteritis. it was supposed to be the start of his bid for world domination, isaac ma kwa la his bid for world domination, isaac makwala ranked number one in the world in the 200 metres this year was aiming to double up in the 400 metres final tonight. but yesterday he vomited before his 200 metres heat, seemingly a victim of the bug sweeping around the tower hotel.
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despite feeling 0k, he said officials pulled him out of the race asa officials pulled him out of the race as a precaution. today he also feels fine. this is bad. sometimes i feel heartbroken. i was ready for this, i worked hard for this, i was top of my game to come here. i was ready to make everything possible. i came here for a medal. if some people force you to withdraw, i don't know, that i can 0k to run and someone is saying no, you cannot run. it is not nice, it is a bad thing. he is not the only one struck down at the worst possible time. the german team have been particularly affected. four of their athletes and several others in their support staff were taken ill at the weekend and many athletes have moved hotels. we understand the outbreak is isolated, but the tower hotel released a
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statement confirming the hotel was not the source. they said strict hygiene protocols have been put in place and all public areas have been thoroughly sanitised. gastroenteritis causes vomiting and diarrhoea and is usually caused by norovirus, believed to be the cause in these cases. it is unpleasant and easily spread, a toxic combination for a hotel full of athletes. the important thing is if people have it to stay away from other people so they are at not risk of passing it on and to be very scrupulous about washing their hands when they have been to the toilet or vomited. the london organising committee says they are doing everything they can to get the illness in hand. when you have got 20,000 people minimum accredited coming from every corner of the world, there is a possibility someone of the world, there is a possibility someone might come in with a bug. we have taken all the steps we need to do and on first indication a member ofa do and on first indication a member of a team had symptoms was as early
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as friday and we were straight in with medical experts and public health england and they had been working with the teams and the hotel to make sure we have all the right processes in place. athletics governing body says guidelines have been issued to team doctors and those affected have been quarantined in the hotel. this is an occupational hazard. 20,000 accredited people coming into one place and in contact with each other and these bugs can spread quickly. an irish athlete was forced to pull out of the 100 metres hurdles semifinals because he was struck down on sunday. it is not just germany, we have also had problems with canada. this is what their team physician had to say about the situation their team is in. we have had nine athletes that have been affected in total and more than half of those are staff and no new athletes have been affected for
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a couple of days and we are hoping we are coming through the other side. initially what was the reaction from the athletes? how concerned are they? with all the time you spent preparing for these things, even stubbing your token going at the door can cause banks. when we understood there was some concern most athletes are doing their best and taking it in their stride and we are looking for a great rest of the week. this must be devastating to those athletes who have been affected, as you heard from isaac makwala. he was heartbroken to pull out of the 200. athletes train all year to be in peak condition for the world championships and peak condition for the olympics and to have to pull out for something that is beyond their control is incredibly hard to take. rule 113 is what he has been pulled out for by the governing body of the sport. the medical delegate should
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have ultimate authority on all medical matters and should ensure adequate facilities for medical examination, treatment and care are available at the side of the competition. he has gone against what the botswana medical team told him and what the athlete is saying and the iaaf have taken the decision with this norovirus spreading around that they cannot take the risk of him bringing it to a stadium full of other competitors and fans and run the risk of it spreading further. although he felt very much that he was able to raise, they have taken the decision he is not over him that must be devastating. 0ur sports correspondent at the london stadium and the athletics championships continue. a man found with a pipe bomb in his hand luggage at manchester airport has been found guilty of possessing explosives with intent to endanger life. the jury heard that nadeem mohammed, who's 43, wanted to board a ryanairflight to italy. the device was made from the tube of a marker pen. let's ta ke
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let's take a look at the timeline of events in this case. let's take a look at the timeline of events in this case. the crude improvised explosive device was found in nadeem muhammad's carry—on luggage as he went through security on 30th january. he told airport staff that someone else had put it there. he was attempting to board the flight to northern italy when the item was discovered. he was questioned by police but not arrested. 0n the 5th february he returned to the airport and flew to italy. after being questioned by italian police, he was released and boarded a flight back to the uk on 12th february. he was arrested by uk officers shortly after it landed. his home in italy was searched. muhammad wept as the majority verdict of ten to two was given in court. muhammad will be sentenced on 23rd august. let's speak to our correspondent dan whitworth who joins us from leeds. explain more about what happened in
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court today. this case is centres around nadeem muhammad who is 43 and from bury. at manchester crown court today he was found guilty of possessing explosives with intent to danger life. it was a ryanair flight and it was a boeing 737 and it can carry up to 200 passengers and crew. nadeem muhammad wept in the dock as thejury read nadeem muhammad wept in the dock as the jury read out the verdict of guilty. he will be sentenced later this month. in your timeline there are serious questions about airports are serious questions about airports are security which surround this case. it was not until after boarding a second flight that the
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explosive device was examined by an expert. i have a quote from that expert. i have a quote from that expert and exactly what that expert said is this. the device was crude but potentially viable. it was an improvised explosive device. serious questions over airport security and greater manchester police have responded today. superintendent graham 0penshaw had this to say about the case. we accept there were some errors with our assessment of the device on the day and we have already reviewed our practices, however this incident has demonstrated the effectiveness of airport security where the item was successfully detected and the passenger intercepted. nadeem muhammad will be sentenced later this month. many thanks. many thanks. south africa's parliament is holding a secret ballot on a motion of no confidence in the country's president, jacob zuma. he has survived seven similar votes although all were public. 0pposition parties believe that mps
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from the governing anc would be more likely to vote against the president if the ballot is secret. the move was granted yesterday by the parliament's the move was granted yesterday by the pa rliament‘s speaker. the move was granted yesterday by the parliament's speaker. we can speak to our africa correspondent milton nkosi. if this goes against him, what does this mean fundamentally? so if president zuma is voted out of power tonight in the building behind me, the parliament in cape town, it means he will have to step down as head of state and the speaker of parliament, baleka mbete, will have to step in for 30 days as interim president while the majority party decides who should replace president zuma. but they have not actually come to any agreement as to who would replace him. also there are many of them within the african
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national congress who want president zuma to stay on because he is about to step down in december as head of the african national congress. they wa nt to the african national congress. they want to do this at their own pace without the pressure from the opposition because this motion of no confidence was brought by the opposition. the anc wants to control the situation even though some of their mps have publicly called for him to step down. the decision to hold this vote, one of many, it is this latest vote about the parlous state of the country, the economy? is it about his own corruption? what are the key drivers to this point? yes, indeed, that is correct. that is everything, corruption allegations which have dogged president zuma for many years. the
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most prominent one is that he had used public funds to renovate his private home in his village in z naphtali. but also there are corruption allegations that hassan isa corruption allegations that hassan is a director and a partner with very prominent family here and they have been having dodgy government contracts have been having dodgy government co ntra cts to have been having dodgy government contracts to profit themselves. that is what the public and particularly the opposition have found president zuma guilty of, even though he denies the charges and the family denied the charges as well. but all of those allegations are what have brought us here. south africa has been downgraded to junk status by credit ratings agencies and it is in a technical recession. a lot of people in the anc and outside the anc have said enough is enough. but
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remember president zuma still commands a considerable amount of support within his party. that is what makes this whole decision a very difficult thing to predict. of course, thank you. it may well be that we have the result of that vote before six o'clock. if we get those details through from cape town, we will bring it to you. now it is quarter past five, the headlines: 30 athletes and support staff at the world athletic championships have been hit by gastroenteritis. it has forced the 400 metres favourite, isaac makwala, to withdraw. nadeem muhammad, who was stopped at manchester airport with a pipe bomb in his hand luggage, has been convicted of possessing explosives with intent to endanger life. south african mps are holding a secret ballot on whether to oust the country's president, jacob zuma. and in sport, five gold medals up
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for grabs at the world championships. can wayne vanni kirk at the gold to his 0lympic championships. can wayne vanni kirk at the gold to his olympic gold in the 400 metres tonight? jose mourinho wants to see gareth bale backin mourinho wants to see gareth bale back in the premier league. he said he would fight other coaches to sign him. and england's world cup star anya shrubsole will miss the start of the super league. she has a side strain injury. more on those stories just after half past. norfolk police are running extra patrols in the village of east harling, after an 83—year—old man was murdered at the weekend. he was stabbed in the head and neck, while walking his dogs in woodland. 0ur correspondent adina campbell is in east harling. this afternoon police have revealed
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they need the public‘s help to assist them with this investigation. they still have not formally identified the man who was murdered in woodland on saturday morning, something they have described as a brutal attack and something that has shocked members of the local community here. the woodlands in east harling, now the centre of a murder investigation. an 83—year—old man, who had been walking his two dogs here, was stabbed to death multiple times on saturday morning. people are shocked and hurting because of the place where people go to enjoy their own leisure time with theirfamilies. not only because it was an elderly gentleman walking his dogs, but the randomness and brutality of the attack as well. randomness and brutality of the attack as well. the pensioner‘s body was discovered near the five ways junction by a member of the public. the woodlands here in east harling is a popular part of norfolk, used by walkers, runners and bike trails. his body was found just over there where police have set up their forensic tent.
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he had been repeatedly stabbed in the neck and head. the pensioner is described as a family man from the east harling area. three days on, police are continuing their murder investigation and say the motive is still unclear. people will be shocked in relation to this and anybody shocked by this brutal murder, we have got our major investigation team investigating this matter, we have visible police at the scene. they are progressing the investigation and they will be briefing me in due course and if there is any further information to release i will do that in due course. release i will do that in due course. police are now urging people who use these footpaths to get in touch, particularly if they were in this area and saw some unusual activity on saturday morning. uniformed officers remain at the scene. and local police patrols
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have also now increased. adina campbell, bbc news. in the last few minutes police have held a press conference and they say they still need the public‘s help and they still need those vital clues to get to the bottom of this. they have not revealed the identity of the victim, but they have given a detailed description. we believe the public are key to this investigation and we are appealing to the members of the public for their help. the man is described as white, slim build, five tall with grey hair and glasses. he was wearing blue — grey trousers, a black t—shirt and brown walking boots. he was also with his two dogs, a ten—year—old foxhound cross and a 13—year—old hound cross. he also travelled to the location in his red skoda. if you noticed something out of the ordinary in the area between 9am and 11am on
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saturday the 5th of august and could help us to build a bigger picture and identified the suspect, please let us know. in the press conference police have also told us that bins within the five mile radius of these tiling will not be collected over the next few days and hopefully that will lead to them getting more clues and more clues from the public. they are asking the public to check their bins, to come forward with any information they have. they are asking drivers who may have been in the area on saturday morning between 9am and 11am to get in touch, that includes —— cam footage and mobile phone footage. the identity of this man has not been revealed. he had a wife and two children and was a respected member of the local community. the investigations are ongoing in norfolk. police have stepped up local police patrols but the investigations are still ongoing. the investigations
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are still ongoing. a man has died after being stabbed at plymouth train station. emergency services were called to the scene at 10 this morning. the victim, said to be in his forties, was taken hospital in his forties, was taken to hospital for treatment but later died. a 29—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. students in scotland have been receiving their long—awaited exam results. there has been a slight fall in the number of passes in higher exams this year. 77% achieved grades a to c, down very slightly on last year. more than a third of students signed up to an e—mail or text alert to get their results, rather than waiting for the post. 0ur scotland correspondent lorna gordon reports. after all the hard work, the wait is over for these pupils at the eastbank academy in glasgow, as they find out how they have done in their exams. i got the results i needed so that's really good. how are you feeling? really, really happy. i got one a, two bs and cs, i know i know i lost maths i got one a, two bs and a c,
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i know i know i lost maths but that's what i'm expecting. i happy with that and i can come back and take maths next year if i want. i failed maths but i was expecting that so i'm 0k. i got an a in classics, how did that happen? across scotland, the pass rate this year in the higher exams sat by 16 and 17—year—olds, was broadly in line with last year. there was, though, is a significant drop in the number of candidates there was, though, a significant drop in the number of candidates entered for national four exams, down from 123,000 last year to 116,000. it was all good news for these pupils but the scottish education system is facing wider issues. exam results don't themselves tell us much about the standards of scottish education of a whole. to do that, we need to look at international evidence, standards of literacy are declining in scotland, and numeracy also. and in some respects, more worryingly, inequality of attainment is getting worse in scotland, especially compared with other countries.
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the scottish government has made closing the attainment gap between pupils from richer and poorer backgrounds a priority. and there is targeted extra funding. this school has spent the money they have received on trying to increase the proportion of pupils who passed their highers. and then go on to further or higher education. the scottish education secretary, today meeting other students getting their results, said the government had a relentless focus on improving education. to these results give us enormous confidence about the strengths that exists in scottish education. we are determined to build on that. the investment we are making in people equity funding, which is supporting the measures that are designed to close the attainment gap in scottish education, will be a fruit education, will bearfruit in the years to come. for now, the aim for many, to celebrate their results and plan their future. and the scottish education secretary john swinneyjoins me from dundee. good evening. how swiftly will
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changes bear fruit to good evening. how swiftly will changes bearfruit to pick good evening. how swiftly will changes bear fruit to pick up on what saying in that story? we have tremendous strength in the scottish education system and it has been demonstrated by the results achieved by pupils at the length and breadth of the country. for the third year ina row of the country. for the third year in a row we have had over 350,000 passes at higher rates and that is a tremendous vindication of the education system. but we are determined to do more to ensure young people are able to pursue the opportunities they wish to pursue. further data shows there has been a 13% increase in the number of young people from deprived backgrounds in scotla nd people from deprived backgrounds in scotland going to university as a consequence of their exam results. all of that effort to close the attainment gap is bearing fruit within the education system today. but the changes you have been talking about recently, is that to
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your mind purely about closing that attainment gap? is that the key point of it? you will have heard the gazprom edinburgh university st bees exa m gazprom edinburgh university st bees exam results do not tell us anything about scottish education because of international comparison is far behind. our approach is driven by the values of delivering excellence and equity, so we are determined to improve standards right across the board within scottish education, but we are determined to close the attainment gap which has persisted for many years, throughout my adult life, in scottish education. our focus is on making sure we co nsta ntly focus is on making sure we constantly work to improve standards, but we give young people regardless of their background the chance to prosper through education. what we see from these results is a strong performers right across the board within the system. we see young people achieving that very high level of success at higher levels, but we also see a breath of
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qualifications being achieved in skills for life and work, which makes sure that more and more young people, over 50,000, makes sure that more and more young people, over50,000, equip young people, over50,000, equip young people with the skills and the tributes for their future. but not in comparison to their international competitors and you must recognise that otherwise you would not be bringing through all these changes. we recognise in literacy and numeracy assessments there have been declined in performance, but we have put in place the measures to ensure teachers are equipped with the resources and schools are equipped with the approaches and support to ensure they can improve those levels of performance. what these results today give us confidence about is we have a really robust examination system, it stands up to rigorous scrutiny in the levels that are to be achieved by young people and the consistency and strength and the robustness of those examination results demonstrate that scottish
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education has strong foundations, but there is always room for us to improve the performance in that system. what is your preferred timescale for this? scotland was in yea rs past timescale for this? scotland was in years past doing incredibly well and it has slipped back. how long before you get young people back to the standards they were once at? the first sight of a decline in performance was in 2015 and the scottish government intervened to ensure we had the resources and skills in place to address those issues. we want to tackle that as quickly as we possibly can do. 0ver the course of this parliamentary term we want to make significant progress in closing the attainment gap and to complete that exercise over a 10—year period. that is what we are working to deliver. john swinney, thank you very much for joining us tonight from glasgow. the family of a 7—year—old autistic boy with a rare condition that puts him at risk of severe brain damage has won a high court
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challenge to a decision by the health service to refuse funding for a potentially life changing drug. the child suffers from a condition called pku which inhibits his ability to digest protein. nhs england had said the effectiveness of the drug, which would cost £100 a day, hasn't been proved, but the court ruled today that the decision must be reconsidered. 0ur legal affairs correspondent, clive coleman, has been following the case. his nhs consultant wanted him to have a drug which is very expensive drug costs £100 a day and nhs england turned that request down, saying it was not clinically effective, its efficacy had not been proved. today mrsjustice andrews looked at that decision and dismissed the case on two grounds, but she found the decision was irrational and she said that clinical efficacy was beyond question. that means nhs england will have to look at that decision
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again. it does not guarantee you will get this drug, but with the strong judgment behind him, there is a chance of that. they will now look at this funding decision in his case again. let's talk about what this rare genetic condition pku is, and the impact that this drug could have on this child's life. i'm joined now by suzanne ford, dietician advisor to the nspku, a national society that helps and supports people with the condition. thank you so much for your time. a lot of people watching have perhaps never heard of this until this particular case. can you explain what it is. yes, many people will not know about it, but if you have children, your children will have probably had their blood tested at about ten days after birth and what is being looked for is high levels
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ofan amino is being looked for is high levels of an amino acid in the blood. what is missing in people who have this is missing in people who have this isa is missing in people who have this is a fully active enzyme that processes this. the levels build up and they are toxic to the brain, so if it is not treated, the child affected, or person affected, can go on to develop brain damage and there isa on to develop brain damage and there is a whole continuum, or sprecher, or problems that can result. this means they can only the smallest amount of protein and therefore you can imagine the practical implications of that. you are right. this is a highly restrictive diet, not like any other type. we are docking about 3—4 g of protein, or 8—9 g a day. one gram is
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one the stars spin —— is one desert spoon of big teams. some children can only have one slice of bread a day. they have to replace all the starchy foods with artificially made foods. it is very complicated. it ta kes foods. it is very complicated. it takes people around 19 hours a week to administer this dietary treatment. not treating the disorder is not an option. it must be so restrictive on your whole life. you could not let your child it at a friend's house or eat out at a cafe because the risk is too great. the dietary treatment is lifelong and it
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has to start as soon as the diagnosis is made and then continue for the entire life. it impinge is on every aspect of someone's life. planning everything is essential. there is no spontaneity. everything needs to be done with great care and attention. if a child needs four grams of protein, they must have that. the drug does what? in about 30% of people in the uk it activates any residual enzyme they have an it allows them to double or triple the amount of natural protein they can have, having a huge effect on the food they can eat. thank you for yourtime, it food they can eat. thank you for
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your time, it was interesting to talk to you. police are asking for help to identify a jogger who appeared to finish a pedestrian into the path of a bus. if you watched the path of a bus. if you watched the man on the right of the screen here, this is cctv footage of the event. the man is in south—west london and he appears to push the woman into the road and that oncoming bus has to swerve into the next lane to avoid hitting her. the bus was able to stop and passengers got off the bus and went to help the woman who suffered minor injuries. the police are appealing for information. now we can post to catch up with the weather. we have seen some quite dramatic
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weather in places with downpours and thunderstorms, particularly in the south—east of england. this is from southend, an impressive lightning strike. you can see that we have had a lot of wet weather with big downpours and thunderstorms in the south—east and east anglia and showers across wales and the south—west. this evening we will see wet weather across england and wales, but northern ireland and scotla nd wales, but northern ireland and scotland are not doing too badly. it isa scotland are not doing too badly. it is a little cold in the north, 10—14 degrees. there is more wet weather to come across the midlands and the south—west. very slow—moving rain which could cause flash flooding and travel disruption. in the north—west there will be plenty of sunshine and temperatures in glasgow of 20
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degrees. this is bbc news at 5pm. the headlines: 30 athletes and support staff at the world athletic championships have been hit by gastroenteritis. the bug forces 400 metre favourite isaac makwala to withdraw. a man who was stopped at manchester airport with a pipe bomb in his hand luggage, is convicted of possessing explosives with intent to endanger life. south african mps have been voting on whether to oust the country's president, jacob zuma. counting of those votes is under way and the result is expected shortly. we will talk more about said africa later in the sour. but first we have the sport news. there are five gold medals up for
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grabs this evening but the focus today has been on a virus that has affected around 30 athletes. we can go live to lee foster at the london stadium. we have been hearing that isaac is one of those who had his eye on one of the gold medals. he is very upset that he had to pull out of the 200 metres yesterday because he had the pirates. he had to pull out the 400 metres final tonight. he is the highest profile casualty on the track of the moral virus that has hit several athletes here. they are going to be an man down in the 400
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final. for other finals we are going to see as well. it is going to be a very lea n to see as well. it is going to be a very lean night for great britain on the metal front. there very lean night for great britain on the metalfront. there is only one race are capable of winning a medal. he rana race are capable of winning a medal. he ran a personal best in the semifinals but he is still the slowest man in the final, for the 800 metres. so unless he can smashes personal—best began we feel it is going to be a learning experience for the 21—year—old. it is going to be another lean night for great britain, but the main news is that virus that has hit the 400 metre final hard. jose mourinho says he will fight with other coaches to sign gareth bale if they are willing
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to sell the foreword. he has been left out from the line—up against manchester united this evening. as the winners of last year's champions league. it is said to be the biggest women's rugby world cup. sarah hunter, the captain, is in the next. ireland face is surely in their opening match. the irish have named a former winner. heather 0 opening match. the irish have named a former winner. heather o brien will start in number eight for her first game since the six nations. the regular skipper is ruled out due to injury. wales have named their tea m to injury. wales have named their team ahead of their opening game against new zealand. that is all for now but you can keep
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up—to—date on all of the stories on the bbc sport website. we will have sports day at 6:30pm. now we will return to get the latest on everything that is happening inside africa. votes are being counted in south africa's parliament after a secret ballot was held on a motion of no confidence in the country's president, jacob zuma. he has survived seven similar votes — although all were public. 0pposition parties believe that mps from the governing anc would be more likely to vote against the president if the ballot is secret, a move which was granted yesterday by the parliament's speaker. with me now is lebo diseko from bbc world's focus on africa. we can see the scene from inside the
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parliament building while the counting is underway. we have been in this situation so many times. why are looking at this again today? this time all the mps are able to vote in secret and the opposition are hoping this will allow anc mps who may be fed up with the president to vote against him. there have been seven previous attempts to remove him. they have all failed. this vote came about because he sacked berry respected finance minister, and then there was an allegation that president zuma removed him because he would not turn a blind eye to less tha n he would not turn a blind eye to less than 0k deals that the
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president wanted to push through. there has also been a lot of anger about allegations that he wealthy family from india are bankrolling the president and influencing politics in south africa. the president denies all of this. those are the things that have led to this incident. strange seems we are witnessing inside the parliament building in cape town. if he was to lose, what does that mean? building in cape town. if he was to lose, what does that mean7m building in cape town. if he was to lose, what does that mean? it is uncharted territory. i am looking at the pictures and it has been like this all day in parliament. it is very bizarre. it has been very theatrical all day. the opposition framed this as a fight for nelson
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mandela's legacy and marcus said. —— and democracy. these theatrics are typical in south african politics. if he loses it is uncharted territory. i willjust push it there and listening. 177... 0rder, order. 0rder, honourable members. cani 0rder, order. 0rder, honourable members. can i finish? applause the no, 198.
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0rder, order. 0rder, honourable members, i have not finished. there we re members, i have not finished. there were nine abstentions. therefore, the motion of no confidence in the president is accordingly negative. vote jacob zuma survives again. he survives the no—confidence vote. vote jacob zuma survives again. he survives the no-confidence vote. he
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is the ultimate political survivor. there will be discussions within the anc about how to move forward. this isa anc about how to move forward. this is a fight for the future of the anc. president zuma will step down as anc president in september and they will elect a new president, but he will stay on as the president of the country for the next couple of yea rs. the country for the next couple of years. there is an election in 2019 and that is what the anc will be thinking about. how did they can give themselves the best chance of winning that. do they negotiate a way for him to step down or do they keep him on as the president of the countries? while all of this goes on, none of this is solving the economic problems and the issues that this ordinary people. we saw
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the people in red, in more left—wing political opposition party and that is their point. there are thousands of people in south africa who are disenfranchised and very pure. thank you. if you are just disenfranchised and very pure. thank you. if you arejustjoining us, jacob zuma has survived a vote of no—confidence in parliament in cape town. more reaction to that through the evening. more than 40% of maternity wards in england closed their doors to expectant mothers at least once last year — according to data obtained by the labour party. 42 out of 96 trusts in england which responded to a freedom of information request said they'd shut maternity wards temporarily, on a total of 382 occasions. labour has blamed staffing shortages, but the government says closures are "well
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rehearsed" safety measures. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports. midwives provide specialist care to some of the health service's most vulnerable patients. but a shortage of staff, combined with a rising birth rate, means some units are struggling. andrew canter campaigns for improved maternity services. he and his wife lost a baby when their local centre was closed. the impact can be quite distressing. you're in a situation when you been looking forward to the birth of your child for nine or ten months, and that is really taken away from you. so it takes a long time to get back on track and the ramifications are that it goes right across the family, whether it's the parents or grandparents, brothers or sisters, it can be awful. in england, 136 nhs trusts offer maternity services. last year, 42 of them closed their doors to new admissions at least once. there were 382 separate occasions where units were closed, up by 70% on 2014. the truth is, you cannot keep trying
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to run the nhs on a shoestring, putting them through the biggest financial squeeze in its history, and not expect standards of care to slip. the royal college of midwives said sometimes it is right to close a unit, but that doing so on a regular basis is the sign of a health service under pressure. it's very rare for maternity units to be closed, and the fact that we have seen a 70% increase in how often that is happening, i think should give us cause for serious concern. more midwives are being trained, and the department of health says hospitals need to use temporary closures to manage peaks in admissions, but it is misleading to use these figures to indicate a shortage of staff, because of the difficulties around planning for births. dominic hughes, bbc news. there have been long queues at polling stations in kenya —
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where security is tight — as voters cast their ballots in the country's general election. it's expected to be a close race between the incumbent president, uhuru kenyatta, and his longstanding rival, raila 0dinga. but there are fears the result could spark ethnic violence. tomi 0ladipo reports from nairobi. in the darkness before dawn they waited. they were hoping to be the first in line. they go to vote. here in nairobi people have been queuing in the cold and the rain to exercise their right to vote. was this process is done all eyes will be watching the results. it is the race for the presidency that is attracting the most interest. the
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incumbent president uhuru kenyatta is seeking re—election. hoping to replace him is raila 0dinga, a better and opposition candidate. the winner would need more than half of the votes to avoid a run—off. competition is also fears that the lower levels of government, but it will be down to what the people decide. we are hoping for a successful election, because no matter who wins we will still be kenyans. i like to exercise my democratic right and i want to vote for the right people, for the next government and for the government off our country. for the future of my children. i have been voting since the first president of kenya. lam here since the first president of kenya. i am here whether it rains or shines. we are very happy. the electoral authority has been under
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pressure to deliver a fair and transparent poll. the stability of the country hinges on the success of this process in the canyons hope that they trust the system be rewarded. we can go there now. 0ur correspondent, anne soy, is in nairobi for us now. how would you describe the mood as polls are coming to a close? there was a lot of enthusiasm and people queuing in the polling stations for hours before the open. there was calm in most parts of the country but there were some delays in far—flung areas and voting is still underway and if you polling stations. in the majority of polling stations. in the majority of polling stations the counting is going on and it is streaming live to the electoral commission's website and people are able to monitor the votes
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as they come in. kenyan elections in the past have been marred with violence, especially after the results have come in. so to analyse the events of today and the potential for violence is an electoral expert. what assessment of how the electoral commission performed today? it was good. things we re performed today? it was good. things were a little bit different but today i am mixed cited because you can see the electoral body is working. it was surely prepared. from now the results have already started coming in, which is a sign of good things to come. do you think
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it will deliver a credible vote? the voting all went well. but now when it comes to the transmission of the results, so far there has not been an issue in terms of anyone doubting the whole process. if they find any anomalies then perhaps we can start hearing them raising those issues but so far we have not heard anyone raising any issue in terms of the credibility or malpractice and so forth. the results are coming in and we can monitor that. you can watch the results from wherever you are. we estimate that by tomorrow we will have a pretty good idea who is leading, especially the presidential poll. the electoral commission has seven days within which they will
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declare the results and they said they are not in a hurry and they are going to validate the results. thank you. as the athletics world championships continue in london, another sporting event starts in sheffield today, bringing together two and a half thousand competitors. every competitor at the special 0lympics national games has a learning disability. in sheffield this week there is sport everywhere. 20 different disciplines and 2500 competitors. but they all have a learning difficulty which commit like the daily challenge. getting around and travelling, everyone being nasty to me and billy in me. has that happened to you ? me and billy in me. has that happened to you? has that happened
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-- it happened to you? has that happened —— it has. happened to you? has that happened -- it has. many people feel they are being left out from the community when coming to these games gives them a chance to express themselves and to really show not what they cannot do but what they can do. and more. to stage of the sport takes money and for the first time this national games for the special 0lympics has received direct treasury funding, £2 million. when the band stops at the weekend, so does the money. we're hoping that this event will show the benefit of sporting special olympics. the 0lympic movement was about friendship and camaraderie and achieving 1's best, so perhaps that has got lost. participation is
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everything. today competitors are classified so they can be matched against others of this similar standard later this week. each local clu b standard later this week. each local club has had to raise £400 for each could just to enter. james thorpe and his dad are exploring the athlete's village. the father tries to find opportunities for his son to do athletics. how many different disciplines that you do? at high horse and the rings and the people hours and the bolt. there is one place where he is accepted. he is struggling forfunding. place where he is accepted. he is struggling for funding. by sheffield united host the opening ceremony of the olympics this evening with some
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special guests. there are 1.5 billion people in this country with a learning disability. we should put the spotlight on them and give them a chance. that is what this is about. that spirit cannot overcome a lack of funds. there is no certainty if they will be another games. a little reindeer for those games, let's find out what the picture is elsewhere in the country. many of us have seen a lot of rain with thunder and lightning. funnel clouds reported off the coast of essex. the statue of lightning from essex. the statue of lightning from essex. the statue of lightning from essex. the most mattered weather has been the south—east. you can see showers and thunderstorms which got going this afternoon. some of these
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delivered a lot of rain, but many parts of england and wales have seen somewhere weather through the day. it has been different for scotland and northern ireland, where there we re and northern ireland, where there were only a few showers. areas of wet weather continued to circulate around england and wales and there are heavy bursts of rain and flashes of lightning with temperatures of ten — 14 degrees. tomorrow two sides to the weather story, low pressure and more rain but as this area tries to build on from the west that will start to settle things down. scotla nd start to settle things down. scotland and northern ireland will have a good start to the day tomorrow with sunny spells and blue skies. some extra cloud for northern england and wales but things should brighten up through the day. in the south—west you can see some heavy rain and you can follow the wet
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weather through the midlands towards london and across to east anglia and lincolnshire. in these areas the rainbow keep coming through the day. watch this rain put the clock for word, it hardly moves. some places will see hours of heavy rain and they may be some flash flooding and travel disruption. all the while different in the north with sunny spells and temperatures of 17—20. on thursday the south—east will hang on to the wet weather but issued he is awake and then things do not look so bad on thursday. high pressure will be in charge. by the end of the week we will see low pressure to the north and a weather front that will bring outbreaks of rain from the west. not as much rain getting into the south—east but blustery winds with skills in north—west scotland and temperatures of 17—19d. there is
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some hope for the weekend. it will not be completely jibe some hope for the weekend. it will not be completelyjibe but it will get drier and will be some spells of sunshine. that is all from me. tonight at six. athletes at the world championships hit by norovirus — officials try to contain the outbreak. 30 athletes and support staff are affected — botswana's track star is a casualty — he's out of the 400 metres final. i was top of my game coming here. i was ready to make everything possible. i came here for a medal. several athletes have ended up in hospital. also on tonight's programme. guilty — the man who tried to board a flight to italy with a pipe—bomb in his hand luggage. the seven—year—old boy denied a potentially life changing drug — a judge tells nhs england to think again. a narrow escape — police look for the jogger who seemed to push a pedestrian into the bus lane. and coming up in world athletics
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sportsday on bbc news.

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