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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 10, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. police defend a decision to pay a convicted paedophile £10,000 to become an informer. the payment was made as part of an investigation that led to the prosecution of a grooming gang operating in newcastle. the nspcc says it's appalled by the actions of northumbria police. the force insists its priority was keeping children safe. good morning, it's thursday the 10th of august. also this morning: north korea says its plan to fire missiles towards an american military base in the pacific will be ready within days. here at the london stadium, it was a magical moment for makwala finally allowed to race in the 200m,
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the botswana athlete came out of quarantine and powered his way into tonight's showpiece. good morning. when it comes to household bills, people with money problems are likely to end up on the worst deals, so says the boss of one of the uk's biggest comparison sites, who i'll be talking to a little later. our very own 0re hotstepped his way to the strictly crown last time around, but who will be trying to take the title when the series returns in september? we'll reveal the fourth contestant in the line—up live on the programme when theyjoin us just after 08:30am. and carol has the weather. good morning. after yesterday's deluge in the south east we have the dregs left in the far south—east corner, that will clear with a few showers behind it, cloud and result in the north but in between a lot of dry weather and a lot of sunshine. more in 15 minutes. carol, thank you. good morning. first, our main story. northumbria police has defended
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paying thousands of pounds to a convicted child rapist to gather information in an abuse investigation. the force has defended its actions after 17 mostly asian men and one woman were convicted of grooming vulnerable girls in newcastle. critics said it could have put victims at greater risk. dan johnson reports. the faces of just some of those who abused young women across newcastle's west end. vulnerable girls are given drinks and drugs and passed around for sex. the gang was caught in one of the biggest child abuse investigations the north of england has seen. but now there are questions, outrage even, oversome of the police tactics. was it right to pay a convicted child rapist £10,000 to be an informant?” to pay a convicted child rapist £10,000 to be an informant? i get entirely that for some people it would be morally republican, the
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very very thought that we would, but if you put it in the context of we have paid money to somebody and as a result of that we know that we have safeguarded vulnerable women and girls and we know that there are dangerous men behind bars that would not be behind bars for lengthy terms of imprisonment, that would not have happened were it not for the information that we have gathered. still, some of those helping abused children feel it's unacceptable, even dangerous. perfectly reasonable to resume this individual presented an ongoing risk and the police didn't know what he was doing when he was out there providing information to them, he could himself be involved in grooming and abusing those vulnerable children. northumbria police have stressed that the informant was not sent to gather direct evidence of abuse. the force's police commissioner said she was uneasy about playing the rapist but old she was satisfied everything was done properly. visa complex
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cases and difficultjudgements have to be made. danieljohnson, bbc news —— these are. we're joined now by allison freeman, who is at northumbria police's headquarters this morning. the force facing difficult questions? it does and they have been overshadowed by the use of this informant, which you have heard has been defended robustly by the chief constable but the force is saying this has been very significant in a numberof this has been very significant in a number of ways, not least because it sends a message that these vile crimes by evil men were simply not tolerated. the force said the largest investigation it ever carried out, so out, so much so it has grown the kitchen sink at it resource wise since the first complaints were made at the end of 2013. they're saying they spoke to more than 700 potential complainants,
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arrested more than 450 people and this investigation is very much ongoing. they're also saying it has created a cultural shift within the force and the way they deal with these kinds of crimes. 0ne officer was in fact sacked during the investigation for not investigating one of the suspects correctly. 0ne of the girls involved in this was actually in the care of the local authority when she was being abused, so authority when she was being abused, so now a authority when she was being abused, so now a safeguarding review is going to be carried out to ensure or to find out whether these girls could have been protected much sooner. could have been protected much sooner. allison, for the moment, thank you. we'll be speaking to northumbria police chief constable steve ashman later in the programme. north korea has dismissed president trump's warnings that it will face fire and fury as a load of nonsense in the latest escalation of tension between the two leaders. last night, pyongyang said it was drawing up plans to launch four ballistic missiles towards the sea off the coast of guam. 0ur correspondent yogita limaye has more. a show of strength in pyongyang.
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north korean state television showed a mass of people marching in support of the leadership in the country, even as the government made more threats. visa details of its plan to attack guam. four rockets will fly overjapan and land in the pacific 0cean near the island, it says. ‘s drills by us bomber aircraft like these which are stationed at once that have angered pyongyang —— it's. while a fierce reaction from north korea is expected, this time it is matched by a aggression from the us president. after saying pyongyang would be met by fire and fury, donald trump boasted about america's nuclear arsenal, a message which will be perceived as another threat by north korea. it's making people around the world nervous and many countries have urged restraint. our strong wish is the united states keeps calm and referring is from any
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moves that would provoke another party into actions that might be dangerous. the border isjust dangerous. the border is just about 50 kilometres from here, but things on the streets are not tense. this country has dealt with threats from its neighbourfor a country has dealt with threats from its neighbour for a long country has dealt with threats from its neighbourfor a long time now and that's why perhaps now people here are unlikely to believe just yet that this war war of words is likely to turn into something more. yogita limaye, bbc news, seoul. police hunting a jogger who knocked a pedestrian into the path of a london bus say they have received a good response to their appeal for information, and they are following up several lines of enquiry. cctv footage of the incident, on putney bridge, show the man appear to barge into the 33—year—old woman without warning. she escaped serious injury thanks to the quick reactions of the bus driver. a new trial in the treatment for type—1 diabetes has displayed
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encouraging results, according to scientists in london. the therapy aims to slow down the advance of the disease by retraining the immune system and so far tests show the treatment is safe. it's now hoped the therapy could lead to a cure for type—1 diabetes and free people from taking daily insulin injections. a widow has spoken of her shock and horror after a private gp who treated her late husband admitted failings in the case. doctor peter wheeler, who was princess diana's doctor, has acknowledged he failed to properly monitor his patient by not arranging the recommended blood tests. 0ur health correspondent, jane dreaper, has the details a mother and son seeking answers. stefanos vavalidis died from liver failure after spending the last eight months of his life in hospital. his widow is suing the private gp who was the family's trusted doctor over the prescribing of a drug mr vavalidis took for a skin condition for over a decade. it's heartbreaking enough to lose your partner of 45 years. but the complete shock and horror
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when we found out that it had been totally avoidable. that last period of his life was horrifying, so we'd like to prevent it from happening to other people. dr peter wheeler continues to practise at this private surgery, which was declared safe when audited four years ago. but he's since admitted in legal papers for this case that there were no systems at the time for flagging up the need for regular blood tests in cases like this, and that he failed to properly monitor mr vavalidis. had he done so, his patient could have lived up to two years longer. the lawyer working on the family's legal claim says it is one of the worst cases he has known. private healthcare does have certain advantages over the nhs. it's more convenient, generally, and it is more comfortable.
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but it certainly is not better care. dr wheeler states in legal papers that stefanos would still have died from liver failure because of his diabetes and obesity. the doctor is under investigation by the general medical council. jane draper, bbc news. facebook is to launch a new service that will compete with tv networks and online platforms like youtube and netflix. social media users will soon see a watch tab on their feeds, which will offer a range of shows, some of which have been funded by the social network. it will also allow people to see what their friends are watching and start conversations with others who are interested in the same videos. can you imagine doing that, charlie, sitting there while we're both on facebook, watching the same programme and commenting every evening. i don't know but i try to keep an open mind about new technology. we could try. it's not
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going to happen, though! the botswa nan athlete, isaac makwala, has qualified for the final of the world athletics 200m after running his heat alone against the clock. he was unable to take part in the heats on monday night because the athletics authorities said he had the norovirus. meanwhile, mo farah qualified for the 5000m final. andy swiss has more. 24 hours ago his dream seemed —— tonight he could be world champion. isaac makwala's remarkable evening began with a race against the clock after the athletics authorities said he could finally run his 200 metres heat two days after his rivals. after meeting his qualifying time he hardly seemed to be suffering. and barely two hours later he roared through on the inside to reach the final with britain's athlete also threw. afterwards makwala thanked the authorities for his chance but
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said the crowd also inspired him.|j wa nt to said the crowd also inspired him.|j want to thank the iaaf for giving me another chance and the crowd is so amazing. they didn't need to believe, the crowd being british, just want to thank this crowd, so amazing! also a good evening for sir mo farah as he is through his 5000 metres heat in second place. he'll bejoined in metres heat in second place. he'll be joined in saturday's final by fellow briton andrew prichard. but tonight, the focus here will be on the men's 200 metres and four isaac makwala, after an extraordinary few days, there just might bea extraordinary few days, there just might be a fairytale finish. andy swiss, bbc news, at the london stadium. it really was good to watch yesterday. all the rain on the track and they were constantly moving it away. it might get better tonight! is that an official term? squuegy?
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squeegy to me means a little bit wonky. a whole new meaning for it! this morning we are off to a fine start, in rural areas it is quite chilly but for many parts of the uk it will be dry with some lengthy sunny spells and where we have the torrential rain yesterday, it's going to be much drier. you can see this weather front in the south—east, this is the dregs of the rain yesterday, a bit more cloud and also spots of light rain and drizzle but that will move away through the morning. across the far north of scotland, more cloud, in the northern isles, a bit damp with a few showers flirting with the north and west but a lot of dry weather and west but a lot of dry weather and sunshine. in northern ireland you can see we are also looking at a dry and sunny start to the day, as we are across the bulk of england and wales. a little bit of mist and fog first thing but that will lift readily and here's our weather front, the remnants of that rain yesterday. through today that will
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continue to weaken and move away, clearing kent probably last. could catch a few heavy showers around kent, essex, sussex, but they will be the exception rather than the rule. for most, dry and fine. temperatures, 20 or 21, what a different day it's going to be today for the south—east compared to yesterday and that holds true for the athletics. it should stay dry, we should see some decent amounts of sunshine with temperatures 20 or 21. through the evening and overnight, again there will be a lot of dry weather around but we've got a more active weather front coming in across the north—west, bringing in some rain and some strengthening winds. move away from that and there is some cloud around and clear skies and in towns and cities, temperatures falling to around 11 or 13. as we head into tomorrow, we start on this dry note across central and eastern areas, you can see our weather fronts coming in, look at the squeeze on those isobars again, telling you it's going to be windy. the rain is going to advance
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from the north—west in the direction of the south—east. it will always be heaviest in the west with height and ahead of it the cloud will continue to build, so parts of the south—east during daylight hours getting away with a dry day and highs once again up with a dry day and highs once again up to about 21. but as we go further north, still 17 to 19 so temperatures roughly where they should be at this stage in august. then friday into saturday, we still the weather fronts cross us taking the weather fronts cross us taking the rain to the south—east and clearing away. things settle down with a ridge of high pressure across us on with a ridge of high pressure across us on saturday so again the weekend looking pretty fine, a lot of dry weather, fair bit of sunshine, just a few showers dotted around here and there with the breeze coming in from there with the breeze coming in from the north—west and again temperatures up to 21. a very quick look at sunday, again a lot of dry weather with high pressure still across us weather with high pressure still across us and a few showers with temperatures around 17 to 21 but worth noting it will be chilly first thing, and surely if you're heading
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out in the evenings this weekend, charlie and lagat. jacket on, jacket off. thank you. shall we look through the front pages? the front of most of the papers today is our lead story, northumbria police's actions in the case of investigating a paedophile gang. they were grooming young girls, and also the police's use of an informant who was a convicted paedophile as well. we will discuss that through the programme. and the picture you see here is supporters of the kenyan presidential candidate raila 0dingo protesting in nairobi after he said he was hacked and the election result currently under way has been manipulated. the u nsuccessful has been manipulated. the unsuccessful prosecution of the gang on the sunday mail, asking how many more lives will be torn apart. and
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the summer money paid to a child rapist who was an informant to the police, £10,000 paid for information without enquiry. another story is on korea, we have seen this escalation in words when it comes to president trump and kimjong—un as in words when it comes to president trump and kim jong—un as well. the trumpet —— trump administration warning to de—escalate. kim jong—un threatening his missile capability could reach guam, which is american territory. sean, what have you got? the front of the times, going more in—depth. the front of the times, going more in-depth. this one here? yes, the hosts attacking the clampdown on airbnb. if you own a flat in majorca, one of those islands, you need a licence to be able to put the flat on airbnb, which makes it more complicated. those that own it are kicking off because they say it will
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limit the amount of business they can do. it is a higher standard required, that kind of stuff. airbnb said it has brought loads of tourism to these islands. they have helped bring people in, more affordable, more competition, so that is changing things are little bit. if you wanted to go on airbnb and get some of those things, that will change over the next 12 months. quite interesting. 0ne change over the next 12 months. quite interesting. one in the ft which has been going along the last couple of days, disney, at the moment, on netflix, something like that platform, you can get disney films, they have said no, we are keeping it to ourselves and we will have alan platform because content is king at the moment. if you have content at the moment, it is worth a lot. charlie and i are going to start sharing thoughts as we watch tv together in our separate places. the goggle box kind of thing. group
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watch session. what should we watch next? sean is taking it seriously. i am just trying to work out if he realises that is something that won't ever happen. come on, charlie. we will get you a smartphone one—day! we will get you a smartphone one-day! thank you. tensions have been increasing between north korea and the us and kim jong—un has dismissed between north korea and the us and kimjong—un has dismissed president trump's warning as a load of nonsense. pyongyang said it was drawing up plans to launch ballistic missiles towards guam. let's speak to our correspondent yagita limai. is it to our correspondent yagita limai. isita to our correspondent yagita limai. is it a war of words, or is it some physical action that might be taken soon rather than later? let me start with the reaction in south korea. just a short while ago we heard a military spokesman who said they are
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sending out a stern warning to north korea that if there is any provocation there will be a strong response from the joint forces of the us and south korea. at the same time the spokesman said that across the border in north korea there is no indication of anything unusual. they say there doesn't seem anything out of the ordinary, or any provocation. analysts say this kind of sharp rhetoric from pyongyang is not new. during august the us and south korean forces conducted joint military drills. during august experts studying north korea for a long time say that you hear these strong words coming out of pyongyang. now you also have a us president making aggressive remarks. that is making things more tense. if you go out on the streets of seoul things are normal. people are going about their lives as usual. i spoke to people here to ask what they think about the situation. a couple of people said they are worried and
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that this is a scary, intense situation. 0thers that this is a scary, intense situation. others said they had heard these threats from pyongyang for so long now that they don't actually think anything is going to play out on the ground. 0ne actually think anything is going to play out on the ground. one man said he thinks north korea is bluffing. yogita, i know it is difficult to get insight into what is happening in north korea as well. the ide is, as we've been told, kim jong—un wa nts to as we've been told, kim jong—un wants to make sure that he makes it clear that the us wants to exterminate the country —— idea is. that is exactly right. their defence of the missile programme, the nuclear programme has been that it is our defence against invasion. they have said that time and again. what has changed in the last month is they say they have the capability of hitting the us, the mainland of the us and that is perhaps why america is sitting up, taking notice of it. that is why we have heard
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such strong reactions coming from the us. it is in no one's interest for there to be all—out war on the korean peninsular. north korea doesn't want it — having this nuclear programme is a defensive measure. south korea doesn't want it. china, an important player, does not want instability right next to it. obviously this is not something that the us wants as well. at the moment, when i speak with analysts about what they think will happen in the next few days or weeks or months, they say they believe this is just months, they say they believe this isjust a war of months, they say they believe this is just a war of words at the moment and they don't think they are going to see anything happen. let's hope it stays that way. thank you, yogita. now, in an exclusive interview with bbc breakfast, michael palin has told us more needs to be done to support the families of prisoners. new research published today shows that prisoners who receive visits from a family member during their time inside are 40% less likely to reoffend. jayne mccubbin reports. this is cairo. how are you? very
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nice to meet you. come in. michael pailin isa nice to meet you. come in. michael pailin is a household name and kyra isa pailin is a household name and kyra is a 12—year—old daughter of a convicted criminal. they are here to create an animation for the support group pact. the film you are about to watch tells the story of kyra. the film tells the story of her stepdad's conviction and howard first she didn't know her stepdad was injail, how much it helped to visit and how much it hurt when he was eventually moved away. there are some bits i want to talk to him about but i can't because i can't really choose when i want to call him, when! really choose when i want to call him, when i want to meet up with him, when i want to meet up with him, when i want to meet up with him, when! him, when i want to meet up with him, when i want to meet up with him, when i want to meet up with him, when i want to go on a visit, so it is really hard. do you miss him? yeah, a lot. today in a report commissioned by the ministry of
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justice highlights the important link between prisoners and families. inmates who receive family visits are, the report says, 39% less likely to reoffend. i love the question on their little noses. reoffending, rehabilitation, issues michael palin has felt strongly about. from what one reads in the press, prison numbers are higher than ever, people just keep the lid on rather than being able to do any decent work in helping these people improve their lives afterwards. there is no point sending someone out into the world if they are going tojust be the same again, there has tojust be the same again, there has to be some change either inside or with the family. the reality of the prison service right now is this — funding and staffing levels down, serious assaults and drug use up, a prison population which has almost doubled in 25 years, reoffending rates which stubbornly hover around
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the 25% mark. children of prisoners have three times the incidence of mental health issues, much likelier to suffer poverty, homelessness, educational problems, one study said six out of ten boys with a father in prison are likely to go to prison themselves in later life. the ministry ofjustice told us this... kyra, still a long way from her stepfather, feels punished for his crime. kind of upset, it gets me wondering sometimes. how he is doing? yeah, if he is fine and if he is ok. do you know when you are going to see him? no. access to pa rents going to see him? no. access to parents in prison is clearly something that is important to children like kyra. the report says
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it is important to prisoners too. when i saw my step that i was so happy. it is not about being soft on prisoners. it is about a calculated social and economic benefit. because if report recommendations bring down reoffending rates, they also help bring down the £15 billion annual cost of the reoffending. how is that, all at? applause. laughter. i laughter. , lovely girl. still to come: it's tv‘s biggest show, but game of thrones is the latest victim of hackers, who are demanding millions of dollars to not leak plots. sean will be looking at whether tv is a new target for cybercriminals. target anyone. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will see you soon. good morning, from bbc london news. i'm alice salfield. the new operator of south west trains has told the bbc that it will commit to a second member of staff on every service. but the operator has hinted the driver, not the guard,
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may operate the doors on all new trains. south western railway will take charge in just over a week's time. it also plans to halve the number of direct trains between london and weymouth. people living on the canals near tottenham say more needs to be done to protect them after a spate of violent attacks. there have been at least eight thefts in just over a week, some of which saw people threatened with knives or assaulted. police are asking anyone with information to come forward. the victims were punched and kicked while they were on the floor, even having to relinquish property, and that shows and demonstrate the people we are dealing with here. an east london cinema, which has been derelict for over 30 years, will soon become a major new arts centre. plans to transform the former savoy cinema in hackney have been given the green light after residents wrote hundreds
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of letters in support. let's have a look at the travel situation now. it's all looking good on the tubes at the moment. no reports of any problems there. but southeastern trains are disrupted via lewisham for emergency engineering works. and as you probably know by now, south west trains are running a severely reduced service in and out of waterloo until the end of the month for major engineering works. 0nto the roads then, as you can see here we've got the usual traffic building up on the a13, westbound into barking. in tulse hill, the a205 south circular at thurlow park road is part blocked at avenue park road because of an accident. and there's a lane closure on the elephant & castle roundabout at the junction with the new kent road. let's have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. hello, good morning. aftera hello, good morning. after a cool a wet day yesterday we have something dry and bright on the cars today. plenty of sunny spells around as we
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move through the day and a little bit more in the way of sunshine, our temperatures are little warmer. so with the detail on the map you can see the fund clearing out of the south—east. you the outbreaks of drizzle this morning. good spells of sunshine developing. lots of dry weather around and our temperatures reaching a maximum of 20 celsius. yesterday we struggled in the mid— king. feeling pleasantly warm in the sunshine. through this evening and overnight, plenty of clear whether an dry spells. there is the chance of one or two batches of mist falling through the early hours with overnight lows of 11— 14 degrees. a bright start to the day tomorrow. high—level cloud turning sunshine hazy. then into the afternoon you can see the next weather front here in from the north—west, bringing more in the way of cloud, showery outbreaks of rain. temperatures reaching a maximum of around 19 degrees. as we move into the weekend, showers through the beginning of saturday but brightening to provide good spells
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of sunshine. sunday looking largely dry with sunny spells and temperatures of a maximum of 19 degrees. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. headlines in a moment, but coming up this morning: was it right that northumbria police paid a convicted sex offender thousands of pounds for evidence in a grooming case? we'll ask their chief constable. is it's not often we get speak to a former us vice president, but this morning al gore will give us his view of the trump white house. and we'll reveal the third celebrity who'll be doing sequins and spray tans in this year's strictly. all that still to come. but first, this morning's top stories: northumbria police has defended paying thousands of pounds to a convicted child rapist to gather information in an abuse investigation. the force has stood by its actions after 17 mostly asian men and one woman were convicted of grooming vulnerable
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girls in newcastle. critics said it could have put victims at greater risk. dan johnson reports. the faces of just some of those who abused young women across newcastle's west end. vulnerable girls are given drinks and drugs and passed around for sex. the gang was caught in one of the biggest child abuse investigations the north of england has seen. but now there are questions, outrage even, over some of the police tactics. was it right to pay a convicted child rapist £10,000 to be an informant? i get entirely that for some people it would be morally repugnant, the very very thought that we would, but if you put it in the context of we have paid money to somebody and as a result of that we know that we have safeguarded vulnerable women and girls, and we know that there are dangerous men behind bars that would not be
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behind bars for lengthy terms of imprisonment, that would not have happened were it not for the information that we have gathered. still, some of those helping abused children feel it's unacceptable, even dangerous. perfectly reasonable to assume this individual presented an ongoing risk and the police didn't know what he was doing when he was out there providing information to them. he could himself have been involved in grooming and abusing those vulnerable children. northumbria police have stressed that the informant was not sent to gather direct evidence of abuse. the force's police commissioner said she was uneasy about playing the rapist but ultimately she was satisfied everything was done properly. these are complex cases and difficult judgements have to be made. danieljohnson, bbc news. north korea has dismissed president trump's warnings that it will face the fire and fury of the united states as "a load will face the fire and fury
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of the united states as a load of nonsense, in the latest escalation of tension between the two leaders. north korea has said it was drawing up plans to launch four ballistic missiles towards the sea off the coast of guam, a us territory and a major strategic hub in the south pacific. police hunting a jogger who knocked a pedestrian into the path of a london bus say they have received a good response to their appeal for information and they are following up several lines of enquiry. cctv footage of the incident on putney bridge appears to show the man barging into the 33—year—old woman without warning. she escaped serious injury thanks to the quick reactions of the bus driver. is everytime i see that i am still shocked someone would do something like that! a new trial in the treatment for type—1 diabetes has displayed encouraging results, according to scientists in london. the therapy aims to slow down the advance of the disease by retraining the immune system and so far,
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tests show the treatment is safe. it's now hoped the therapy could lead to a cure for type—1 diabetes and free people from taking daily insulin injections. facebook is to launch a new service that will compete with tv networks and online platforms like youtube and netflix. social media users will soon see a watch tab on their feeds, which will offer a range of shows, some of which have been funded by the social network. it will also allow people to see what their friends are watching and start conversations with others who are interested in the same videos. there we go, that's what's going to happen! we will watch the same tv programmes and talking to each other online. quite a few hurdles of that happening. we will overcome them, charlie! it was marvellous yesterday evening watching isaac makwala run alone to qualify for the next heat in the 200 metres. jess, you are on the track, you are alone but at least you don't
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have to run 20.2 seconds at least?|j have to run 20.2 seconds at least?” think i might do! it would warm me i think i might do! it would warm me up! good morning, we've been talking a lot recently about the botswana athlete isaac makwala, he's gone from thinking his world championships were over to being given a remarkable second chance. it was here in lane seven at the start of the 200 meet a line that he was given the opportunity to run a solo time trial. incredible, just makwala against the clock, no rivals around him at all to spur him on. to give you some background on this, he was one of a number of athletes affected bya one of a number of athletes affected by a stomach bug and removed on medical grounds on competing. he missed the chance to run in the 400 metres but after his quarantine period ended yesterday afternoon. he was given the chance to run a solo time trial in the 200 metres. he had to achieve the qualifying time and roared on by the crowd, he did and took his place in the semi—finals. remarkably, makwala came second in his semi—final, and just behind him in third was
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britain's nathaneel mitchell—bla ke, who also made the final. the 400 metre champion wayde van niekerk also secured a place. for makwala though it was all about the chance to race again and show the world what he could do. i wish to thank the iaaf for giving me another chance. and the crowd is so amazing. they didn't need to believe, the crowd being british, i just want to thank this crowd, so amazing! mo farah will go for double gold in these championships again after he qualified for the final of the 5,000 metres. he'll also bejoined by fellow briton andy butchart after he qualified as a fastest loser from the second heat. farah is retiring from track racing at the end of these championships and says he wants to go out on a high. you can't dream of something unless you do something about it. i've been given a chance in life and i work
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ha rd given a chance in life and i work hard for it and i achieve what i've achieved through hard work and keep grafting. to all the kids out there common youngsters, you can be like me and we've got to start thinking about how we can get the next—generation to leave a legacy behind. the bad weather here in london yesterday caused problems for athletes both on the track and field. particularly hard for the long jumpers and in the women's qualifying, lorraine ugen was the only one of three british athletes to make it into tomorrow's final. britain's nick miller is into friday's final of the men's hammer. he made the qualifying distance with his very first throw. he'll more than likely need to better his british record distance if he is to medal here. there was late drama in the women's 400m. the bahamas runner shaunae miller—uibo looked to have the race
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won but pulled up in the last 20 metres and finished fourth, missing out on a medal. the american phyllis francis won gold, her compatriot allyson felix took bronze. away from the athletics, england made an impressive start to their defence of the women's rugby world cup, crushing spain 56—5 in dublin. wales lost to new zealand. and the hosts ireland won a nail—biting opener against australia. they were leading by nine points after sophie spence's try but the australians fought back and ireland went through 19—17. andy murray looks set to lose his world number one ranking after withdrawing from the cincinnati masters with the hip injury that hampered his wimbledon campaign. he's also a doubt for the us open, which starts at the end of this month. and rory mcilory says he has nothing to prove ahead of the uspga championship, which starts this evening in north carolina. he's among a top—class field trying to stop the americanjordan spieth becoming the youngest player to complete a career grand slam. there's coverage across the bbc, including live coverage via the red button, from 6pm and
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on bbc two from 11:15pm no morning session here today, things much drier after the weather yesterday, more favourable conditions when they get under way in the evening session hopefully. back to our main story now. yesterday, it emerged that 17 mostly—asian men and one woman have been convicted of targeting vulnerable girls in newcastle as part of a child sex gang. as part of the operation to catch the gang, northumbria police paid a convicted child rapist thousands of pounds to act as an informant, a decision the police is being forced to defend. helen westerman is from the nspcc. the nspcc has come out clearly saying you don't think this was the
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right move, to pay a convicted rapist, paedophile, to be part of the operation? absolutely not. we wa nt to the operation? absolutely not. we want to acknowledge the bravery and courage of the young women coming forward and speaking in court and helping security, this is a start for their recovery journey helping security, this is a start for their recoveryjourney but we don't support the police. we think it was a misguided action, putting a person who had a track record against abusing girls into this situation with other vulnerable girls and perpetrators. and then paying for the privilege of doing that. the police services involved have been clear about what they saw as the difficult moral and ethical situation, they understand some people will criticise, but if you're in the middle of an investigation and you believe the only way you can progress that investigation to get what you want is to do this, to pay this man. what do you do in that
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situation? they presented this very clearly, they say this is what needed to be done to get the result. we would argue it shouldn't have been a person who has a record against children, this man was a child rapist, had gone to court and being prosecuted for that. putting that man into a situation with other vulnerable girls and men they similar ilk, we don't know what the outcome could have been for those young people. we don't know really what happened in this situation and why can they have used a different informant, one that didn't have a track record. is the issue about how they used him? we understand he was put back... he was taking as we understand, we will find out more later, he was taking vulnerable girls back into some of those situations. is it that or that he was used at all? at all, we fundamentally disagree with the use of someone who is convicted against
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sexual offences against children in this situation. without being blase at all, he was convicted, he did his time, he was done and then willing to how the police in this situation. he was proven to be dishonest throughout this case and even the judge throughout some of his comments against the police, calling him very dishonest. yet the evidence was used in the case that he provided, that was used. this case is about gathering evidence from those people who have been affected by this abuse at the hands of those perpetrators. it's really important those women are listened to, believed and supported. there have been criticisms, i'd be interested to hear your view on this, about the length of time it took to gather evidence, the length of time these vulnerable girls were in this situation. around 21 months for that sequence. do you understand what the police needed to do in order to gather enough evidence to conflict 18 people? we absolutely recognise
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how difficult it is for police forces across the country trying to tackle the issue of child sexual exploitation. it's an absolute nightmare and we praise the police for their tactics in bringing these people to justice but it's never right to use a known sex offender to go intoa right to use a known sex offender to go into a situation like this with vulnerable young women. is the payment the issue? the principle of policing would be clearly in any investigation you need someone who has a link to the crime to get the information. yeah. is it the payment or the use of someone that's been previously convicted? it's the use. if you can't approach those or try to get those people to give you information, who do you talk to? you have to talk to someone involved unnecessarily, given the circumstances here, child sex abuse... these are all people you don't want to do business with. absolutely, but this is not a bank
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job or a drug scam, this is a robe of vulnerable young people under 16 who have been plied with alcohol and drugs and forced to have sex with people against their will —— group of. putting them with a known sex offender and you can't manage the risk. we had no idea what would happen and what the man would do. this is a different argument, you're saying they couldn't guarantee the person they were using for information wasn't himself perpetrating war crimes? wasn't a risk to those young people, yes —— more crimes. who is to save the victims, we are prepared to use a child rapist, by paying them, to gather the evidence —— to say. thank you very much. we will speak with the chief constable from northumbria police at 7:10am a little later this morning. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: northumbria police has defended paying thousands of pounds
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to a convicted child rapist to gather information in an abuse investigation. north korea has accused donald trump of being "bereft of reason" as it gave more details about its threat to an american military base in the western pacific. time to talk to carol to take a look at the weather — there was a divide in terms of weather yesterday because we were watching their championships in london and they we re championships in london and they were squeegying the track and then it was glorious elsewhere. that's right, naga. surrey had almost two inches of rain in 24 hours and we have the dregs inches of rain in 24 hours and we have the dregs of inches of rain in 24 hours and we have the dregs of that inches of rain in 24 hours and we have the dregs of that in inches of rain in 24 hours and we have the dregs of that in the south—east, which will clear, and for most of us we have a mainly dry day with lengthy sunny spells, and it will feel pleasant in the sunshine with highs of around 20— 21. this is what is left of the
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rain, affecting essex, kent, sussex as well, with patchy rain that will clear. at the other end of the country another weather front here is producing more clout, rain and drizzle across the northern isles, also affecting northern scotland. the rest of scotland has a fine start to the day. chilly in rural areas. temperatures around braemar currently four. northern ireland, england, into the south—west, a lot of dry weather and a lot of sunshine. there is the rain. this rain will slowly move away, clearing essex and kent last. and in doing so it will leave a little cloud, one or two showers, but the sun will come out and for most of the uk away from the north—west we are looking at a dry and sunny day. temperatures around where they should be for this time in august with a range of 14 in the north and 21 in the south. so, naga mentioned the athletics yesterday. today it should be dry with a fair bit of sunshine around
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too. so as we head through the evening and overnight period we hang onto a lot of dry weather, some clear spells as well, and is active weather front comes in across northern and western scotland and northern ireland. the wind strengthening about it as it moves southwards. some clear skies, strengthening about it as it moves southwards. some clearskies, chilly in rural areas but generally in towns and cities we stay in double figures. tomorrow you can see the weather fronts and squeezed isobars, the combination tells us we have rain and windy conditions coming in from the north—west, spreading south eastwards. the heaviest rain with height in the west. as the front moves south it will weaken and fragment and parts of the south—east will stay dry until early evening, hanging on to the brightness the longest, the sunshine across east anglia and kent. and then as we head into the weekend, well, first of all, the fronts come south, we will see rain overnight, then this high pressure builds in, settling things down nicely, not just
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pressure builds in, settling things down nicely, notjust on saturday but also into sunday. so, on saturday, a chilly start, sunshine, one or two showers in the north of the country and we have highs of 13— 21. as we head into sunday it is a chilly start with a fair bit of sunshine around, mostly dry, just one or two showers. temperatures 14— 21. and before i go it is worth mentioning that although we have dry and sunny weather during the day with respectable temperatures, if you are heading out in the evening it will feel quite nippy, charlie and naga. thanks very much, carol. i a lwa ys and naga. thanks very much, carol. i always think you are very savvy. when was the last time you switched energy or insurance provider to make sure you got the best rates? two yea rs sure you got the best rates? two years ago. gosh! i should do it every year. most people wouldn't be able to save two years ago. i think i was about one and a half years
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ago. sean is always telling us we should be doing this. there are have been mixed messages with more people switching, as we have heard, then the energy secretary greg clark said he has never switched, it is too much hassle, the industry needs to change, so what is better for people? morning. despite the abundance of — some might say annoying — adverts trying to get us to switch, it seems a quarter of us still have never shopped around when it comes to those household bills, like car and home insurance or our gas and electricity. and those with financial problems are the ones likely to end up on the worst deals. this research was commissioned by the comparison site gocompare, and its chief executive is matthew crummack, who's with me now. good morning. those with the most financial distress often end up with the poor deal. lots of us use these deals, why can you not help those people? the report looks at why
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consumers are essentially not making the most of the information available to them, and reducing their household bills. we looked at their household bills. we looked at the amount of money on the table that could be saved, and why they we re that could be saved, and why they were not taking that opportunity. some of the behaviours behind that as well. we teamed up with a professor who looked into behaviours. what he found was that people who could benefit most from switching and reducing energy bills sometimes under financial stress we re sometimes under financial stress were not doing that. why is that? what could you do more of? less information is better. people in the financial stress don't want to look at bills. yeah, yeah. the professor rana at bills. yeah, yeah. the professor ran a test and gave people two bills, one person underfinancial stress and one not under financial stress. the person underfinancial
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stress. the person underfinancial stress spent half the time looking at the bill then the person that wasn't because they don't want to look at that. so simplifying the information. interesting - when you say simplify down, i did a comparison this morning, you know, you're used to filling in the forms. i got to the end and it wanted details that i didn't think i needed to give, my mobile phone number, and it wouldn't give me a quote without giving it. people are worried they will be bombarded with e—mails. can't you simplify your website? we're constantly looking to simplify that process. at the very heart of it is where someone has already taken out a policy, gas and electricity provider, car and home insurance, the three main ones, they have done that and then they get a renewal notice, and we have set, let's simplify the process. what am
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i paying today, and went away have to make a decision? it is about transparency and comparison sites we re transparency and comparison sites were not be ten years ago. now they are huge. there are lots around. people want to know more about how you make. how much would you make on a switch, on average, roughly? you would get a fee from the insurance pushing people towards — what would you get from them? let me tell you how it works. when a person comes onto the website and does a search, then they go through and they might choose to switch and they take out a contract or switch provider, at the end of the process, as a rule, people save money. then we get paid from that. we are a business. we get paid from that. we don't disclose the number on that. what i can tell you is we don't have advertising on the website. we don't make money from advertising. we don't sponsor people through the sites. we get paid for that. when i search this
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morning, it was all about cheap, cheap, cheap, that was the filter, but is there an argument to say your industry has forced people to look at the cheapest price, when the policy details are crucial for people? we couldn't agree more. you say that, but everything is done according to price. naturally, people want price of first and foremost. they say they want products, but they want price of. foremost. they say they want products, but they want price ofm they claim, there could be problems. we are keen to make sure people have the content. the team who started the content. the team who started the business in newport started the business because they wanted the detail on the policy provisions, what you get for your money. we spent a lot of time internally looking at how to present the information simply. and that is the challenge, how to simplify this, as we said, to make it clearfor people ata we said, to make it clearfor people at a good price. the balance between cheap and detail. thank you. can i
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have a quick question, sorry, matthew, can you be punished for switching to much, as in, you are not seen as a loyal customer?” don't think you can be punished for that in the products we are talking about. i think there is a perception that the longer you stay with someone the better it is. certainly the maths we have done suggest the longer you stay with someone the more you pay. 0k, good advice. matthew, sean, thank you very much. as the world athletics championships carries on in london, there's another huge sporting event happening in sheffield this week, the uk special olympics. around 2,600 competitors are taking part in the games, featuring athletes with a variety of learning disabilities. hayley hassall has been to watch some of the action. yeah! this year's special olympics has had more interest than ever
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before and more athletes have taken to the track. kyra is the current women's world champion in cycling for women with intellectual abilities and she has been cycling for three years in the special 0lympics. not long until the race. how are you feeling? nervous, i am not going to lie. there are a some great writers here, so the competition is going to be high. do you think you're learning ability fracture your training, does it make it difficult? yes, i struggle with direction and time as well —— riders. this 0lympics gave me a place where i can be myself with everybody else. it is just amazing. kiera's that has taken her around the world to compete, but lack of financial support from the games makes things difficult. in terms of funding, it is an ongoing battle all the time, it is doing whatever from raising what you can do to help with the cost of getting to the events and things. so unlike the olympics you have to find yourself?
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completely. that is a lot of pressure. yes. is it worth it? at the end of the date, it you wouldn't change a thing with the success and the experiences that she has had, it you know. and, as i say, it develops us as people. there is no age limit in the special olympics and ian has been training with the special 0lympics for the last 17 years. he has autism, which he used to find that stopped him joining in things like sports, but now it is the com plete like sports, but now it is the complete opposite. i used to be nerve racked in the beginning, i would shy away and all of that. then suddenly i got hooked on it for life. we're not only competing, we are also doing other things behind the scenes as well to try to make it more accessible to the other athletes with intellectual disabilities. but for athletes like kiera, has all of that hard work paid off? i havejust found out the
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results and i can tell you that you came second. yay! well done, how do you feel? really good. silver medal, well done! thank you. good on them, wish them all luck. good morning, from bbc london news. i'm alice salfield. people living on the canals near tottenham say more needs to be done to protect them after a spate of violent attacks. there have been at least eight thefts in just over a week, some of which saw people threatened with knives or assaulted. police are asking anyone with information to come forward. the victims were punched and kicked while they were on the floor, even having to relinquish property, and that shows and demonstrates the people we are dealing with here. two 19—year—olds have been charged with murder after a teenager was stabbed to death in barking. 16—year—old joshua bwalya was killed just over a week ago.
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kareem lashley—weekes and ayrton ambrose are due in court later today. the new operator of south west trains has told the bbc that it will commit to a second member of staff on every service. but the operator has hinted the driver, not the guard, may operate the doors on all new trains. south western railway will take charge in just over a week's time. it also plans to halve the number of direct trains between london and weymouth. an east london cinema, which has been derelict for over 30 years, will soon become a major new arts centre. plans to transform the former savoy cinema in hackney have been given the green light after residents wrote hundreds of letters in support. let's have a look at the travel situation now. it's all looking good on the tubes at the moment. but southeastern trains are disrupted via lewisham for emergency engineering works. and as you probably know by now, south west trains are running a severely reduced service in and out of waterloo until the end of the month for major engineering works.
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as you can see here the blackwall tunnel is looking slow on the southern approach — heading northbound from blackwall lane. and in tulse hill — the a205 south circular at thurlow park road is part blocked at avenue park road because of an accident at the local rail bridge. let's have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. hello, good morning. after a cool and wet day yesterday we have got something dryer and brighter on the cards today. plenty of sunny spells around as we move through the day and with a little bit more in the way of sunshine our temperatures are a little bit warmer. so with the detail on the map you can see the fund clearing out of the south—east. a few outbreaks of drizzle this morning. good spells of sunshine developing. lots of dry weather around and our temperatures reaching a maximum of 20 celsius. yesterday we struggled in the mid—teens. feeling pleasantly warm in the sunshine. through this evening and overnight, plenty of clear
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weather and dry spells. there is the chance of one or two batches of mist falling through the early hours with overnight lows of 11—14 degrees. a bright start to the day tomorrow. quite quickly seeing high—level cloud turning sunshine hazy. then into the afternoon you can see the next weather front here in from the north—west, bringing more in the way of cloud, showery outbreaks of rain. temperatures reaching a maximum of around 19 degrees. as we move into the weekend, some showers through the beginning of saturday but brightening up to allow good spells of sunshine. sunday looking largely dry with sunny spells and temperatures at a maximum of 19 degrees. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. police defend a decision to pay a convicted paedophile £10,000 to become an informer. the payment was made as part of an investigation that led to the prosecution of a grooming gang operating in newcastle. the nspcc says it's appalled by the actions of northumbria police. the force insists its priority
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was keeping children safe. we'll speak to their chief constable in the next few minutes. good morning. it's thursday, the 10th of august. also this morning, north korea says its plan to fire missiles towards an american military base in the pacific will be ready within days. here at the london stadium it was a magical moment for makwala. finally allowed to race in the 200m, he came out of quarantine and stormed his way into tonight's showpiece. as the makers of game of thrones face a ransom demand from hackers. i'll be asking why tv is a target for cybercriminals. naga was among the contestants tangoing their way around the strictly dancefloor last time around.
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but who will be trying to take the title when the series returns in september? and carol has the weather. good morning. a chilly start in some rural areas. for most of us it will be dry and sunny. there are some showers to get rid first of all in the south—east and a bit more cloud in the far north of scotland, with spots of rain. i will have all the details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. northumbria police has defended paying thousands of pounds to a convicted child rapist to gather information in an abuse investigation. the force has stood by its actions after 17 mostly asian men and one woman were convicted of grooming vulnerable girls in newcastle. critics said it could have put victims at greater risk. dan johnson reports. the faces of just some of those
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who abused young women across newcastle's west end. vulnerable girls were given drinks and drugs and passed around for sex. the gang was caught in one of the biggest child abuse investigations the north of england has seen. but now there are questions, outrage even, over some of the police tactics. was it right to pay a convicted child rapist £10,000 to be an informant? i get entirely that for some people it would be morally repugnant, the very very thought that we would, but if you put it in the context of we have paid money to somebody and as a result of that we know that we have safeguarded vulnerable women and girls, and we know that there are dangerous men behind bars that would not be behind bars for lengthy terms of imprisonment, that would not have happened were it not for the information that we have gathered.
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still, some of those helping abused children feel it's unacceptable, even dangerous. we do not support the police in doing this. we think it was a misguided action, putting someone with a track record of abusing girls into this situation with other vulnerable girls and perpetrators, and paying them for the privilege of doing that. northumbria police have stressed that the informant was not sent to gather direct evidence of abuse. the force's police commissioner said she was uneasy about playing the rapist but ultimately she was satisfied everything was done properly. —— paying. these are complex cases and difficultjudgements have to be made. danieljohnson, bbc news. we will be speaking to the chief co nsta ble of we will be speaking to the chief constable of northumbria police in just a few minutes. we'll be speaking to
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northumbria police chief constable north korea has dismissed president trump's warnings that it will face "fire and fury" as "a load of nonsense" in the latest escalation of tension between the two leaders. last night, pyongyang said it was drawing up plans to launch four ballistic missiles towards the sea off the coast of guam. 0ur correspondent yogita limaye has more. a show of strength in pyongyang. north korean state television showed a mass of people marching in support of the leadership in the country, even as the government made more threats. these are details of its plan to attack guam. four rockets will fly overjapan and land in the pacific ocean near the island, it says. it's drills by us bomber aircraft like these, which are stationed at guam, that have angered pyongyang. while a fierce reaction from north korea is expected, this time it is matched by aggression from the us president. after saying pyongyang would be met by fire and fury, donald trump boasted about america's nuclear arsenal, a message which will be perceived
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as another threat by north korea. it's making people around the world nervous, and many countries have urged restraint. 0ur strong wish is that the united states keeps calm and refrains from any moves that would provoke another party into actions that might be dangerous. the border is just about 50 kilometres from here, but things on the streets are not tense. this country has dealt with threats from its neighbourfor a long time now, and that's why perhaps now people here are unlikely to believe just yet that this war of words will turn into something more. yogita limaye, bbc news, seoul. miscarriages and birth defects could be significantly reduced if women take vitamin b3 supplements. scientists at a research institute in sydney believe the vitamin can
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prevent embryos and babies' organs developing incorrectly inside the womb. the discovery has been called the most significant breakthrough in pregnancy research, and will transform the way mothers—to—be are cared for. police hunting a jogger who knocked a pedestrian into the path of a london bus say they have received a good response to their appeal for information, and they are following up several lines of enquiry. cctv footage of the incident on putney bridge appears to show the man barging into the 33—year—old woman without warning. she escaped serious injury thanks to the quick reactions of the bus driver. facebook is to launch a new service that will compete with tv networks and online platforms like youtube and netflix. social media users will soon see a "watch" tab on their feeds, which will offer a range of shows, some of which have been funded by the social network. it will also allow people to see what their friends are watching and start conversations with others who are interested in the same
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videos. the botswa nan athlete, isaac makwala has qualified for the final of the world athletics 200m, after running his heat alone against the clock. he was unable to take part in the heats on monday night, because the athletics authorities said he had the norovirus. meanwhile, mo farah qualified for the 5000m final. andy swiss has more. 24 hours ago his dream seemed dashed, tonight he could be world champion. isaac makwala's remarkable evening began with a race against the clock after the athletics authorities said he could finally run his 200 metres heat two days after his rivals. after meeting his qualifying time he hardly seemed to be suffering. and barely two hours later he roared through on the inside to reach the final with britain's nethaneel mitchell—bla ke also through. afterwards makwala thanked the authorities for his chance but said the crowd also inspired him. i want to thank the iaaf
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for giving me another chance and the crowd is so amazing. they didn't need to believe, the crowd being british, i just want to thank this crowd, so amazing! also a good evening for sir mo farah as he is through his 5000 metres heat in second place. he'll be joined in saturday's final by fellow briton andrew prichard. but tonight, the focus here will be on the men's 200 metres and four isaac makwala, after an extraordinary few days, there just might be a fairytale finish. andy swiss, bbc news, at the london stadium. back to this morning's main story. it is 7:10am. returning to our main story. northumbria police has been forced to defend its decision to pay thousands of pounds to a convicted
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sex offender as part of an investigation into a child grooming gang. we can speak live to northumbria police chief constable steve ashman now. good morning. thank you for your time. i wonder if first, i could read out the quote from the nspcc, which encapsulates what many people are thinking at this stage. this is their statement. "we are appalled to learn that police paid a child rapist and planted him in the midst of vulnerable young children. it jaegar ‘s belief that it would ever have been considered, let alone approved". —— beggars belief. can you respond to that? yes, it does beggar belief, because it didn't happen. it is disappointing that the nspcc has adopted the stance that they have. this is an well—informed position they have taken. the fact of the matter is that we absolutely
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did not plant the informant, who is referred to as xy in this case, in the midst of vulnerable women and girls. that didn't happen. he was never tasked to go to these parties, all sessions, as they are being referred to in the trial. so not only did we not asked him to do it, there is no evidence that he did, it is if you look in detail at the judge's assessment and the legal finding in this case, there is no evidence whatsoever he was involved or engaged in offending against these victims or indeed anybody else. so it does beggar belief, it didn't happen. just by way of clarification, is it true that the handlers of your informer asked him to ta ke handlers of your informer asked him to take vulnerable children to parties? is that true? i cannot go into detail about what we did didn't do with deployments. what i can say is that we absolutely did not tasked him to go to parties with vulnerable
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women and girls. —— task him. we are very clear and very specific about that. has been a drawing away from the central point here. the use of the central point here. the use of the informant was principally about finding out who might be involved, the cars they were driving, the addresses they were living out, who might be using drugs and supplying dogs. it was very much the case that this was the starting point for the investigation. it is never resulted in xy being exposed to any offending whatsoever. had it done so, they would have been only one of two outcomes. he either would have in giving evidence against the people who were convicted, which he didn't, or he would have in the dock alongside them, which she wasn't. so i need to be very clear about that point. it was the gathering of information we could not get from any other source. things like who they were, where they lived, the ca rs they were, where they lived, the cars they were driving. it was nothing to do with him being placed close to vulnerable women and girls. i really must stress that one. many
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of those who may comment on the way you conduct of the investigation have said that what they are confused by this that the police's first responsibility, surely, in these situations, is to safeguard children. what appears to have happened is that you have prioritised gathering evidence, over quite a long period of time, while knowing that children were being abused. no. charlie, that is really not true. 0ur abused. no. charlie, that is really not true. our primary role is to protect, it is to preserve life and protect, it is to preserve life and protect people from harm. many years ago, a more esteemed police officer they myself that the primary object ofa they myself that the primary object of a efficient police force is the prevention of crime. that is what we we re prevention of crime. that is what we were looking to do. this was about the protection of vulnerable people from harm. i know this is difficult. it isa from harm. i know this is difficult. it is a challenging moral dilemma that we were faced with, that i was faced with, that the officers involved had to content with and wrestle with and reassess every step
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of the way. but i have to be content that what we ended up doing here was putting dangerous men behind bars in protecting vulnerable women and girls, and that we simply wouldn't have been able to do that if we didn't have that jumping have been able to do that if we didn't have thatjumping off point that we got from an informant who was able to tell us who was involved, where they were likely to be, the cars they were driving and the people they were associating with. it is a fact that in other investigations of a similar nature, andi investigations of a similar nature, and i understand that every investigation is different, but in rochdale, 0xford investigation is different, but in rochdale, oxford and cambridge, they we re rochdale, oxford and cambridge, they were able to secure prosecutions of sex gangs abusing young children without the need to pay money to convicted child rapists. how is it that you were not able to do that and felt the necessity to turn to what a lot of people think is an unacceptable practice? we were clear from the outset that what we were not faced with here and northumbria was a long list of people who were
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claiming that public services, that the police and social services, had let them down. that they had been making these allegations for many yea rs. making these allegations for many years. this was not about allegations of historic abuse that had gone unaddressed and had not indulged with professionally. this was about pro at ridley searching and trying to find victims of child sex exportation. —— proactively searching. we have thrown every single tactic and resource we have at this, and there is not a single tactic in the book, overt or covert, that we have not employed, but we did not have at our disposal in doing this. you know, it is not about our satisfaction. we have to be content with what we have done, but i absolutely understand that this is challenging for some people. iam this is challenging for some people. i am left with the question that a throwback, not to try to be clever or repaid the issue, what would you do in those circumstances? —— ebay it the issue. —— evade the issue. if by and listing a child sex offender,
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paying a child sex offender, we can protect people we would not otherwise be able to, you have to ask if you would take that risk, and it is under carefully managed circumstances which does not expose him to vulnerable women and girls. if you can gather that information that ultimately might be too prosecutions, morally, is it the right thing to do? i believe it is. you are under great scrutiny. help us with the process. was part of accepting the difficult decision, and some people have said unacceptable decision, to use this man in this way, was it the scale of the abuse that made you choose a path that you may not have otherwise done. i am trying to work out... you said it was a difficult decision. were there some people in your group saying we cannot do this and it is
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too far? did others argue a different way? no, ithink it is too far? did others argue a different way? no, i think it is a professional process for the management and the handling of any individual informant. in this case, i will point to some milestones. in the outset, it would have been impossible to investigate reactively and move on. we did not have to throw resources at this that we did. we thought there was something out there and we went to look for it and find it because it was the right thing to do. if you move the clock forward to the next milestone, coming forward to make the allegation, the allegations dismissed by thejudge, there allegation, the allegations dismissed by the judge, there was an opportunity for us then to dismiss the cases and not reveal the identity of xy. but girls needed to see justice and they trusted us and
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we respect of that and we have done that. why did we do that? it was the right thing to do. there are many moral dilemmas, notjust right thing to do. there are many moral dilemmas, not just for me right thing to do. there are many moral dilemmas, notjust for me as a co nsta ble, moral dilemmas, notjust for me as a constable, but for the staff who are committed to the efforts for those victims. and why is that? it is the right thing to do. some people disagree. i understand. we have to think about it as well. but with all of my experience, we could not do this without what we did. this was the right thing to do.” this without what we did. this was the right thing to do. i appreciate it. but one more thought. many people this morning are thinking about it. one of the things we cannot know, and i am not sure you cannot know, and i am not sure you can know, is good you have prosecuted these people without using a convicted paedophile? —— could. you don't know it, do you? or are you certain it could not have
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happened any other way?” are you certain it could not have happened any other way? i am probably as certain as i can be to be one of the criteria for the registering and handling of an individual informant would be we cannot get that information from elsewhere. the time we registered him, we had no idea about the sort of information he could give us and whether we could get it from elsewhere. you have to have a suspicion and it is a jump off point foran suspicion and it is a jump off point for an investigation and it leads you to evidence. it could have taken a whole lot longer to get the information. that would have exposed many more women and girls to unacceptable risk. that does not sit co mforta ble unacceptable risk. that does not sit comfortable you with me either. thank you so much for your time this morning. thank you. we will talk to carol and find out what is happening with the weather today. i hope it is getting better than the last week. good morning. good morning. it won't
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be as wet as yesterday. many parts of the uk today, sunny spells and mainly dry. i say mainly dry because there are some flies in the ointment in the shape of this weather front to the south. some cloud and rain. patchy rain and drizzle. at the other end of the country in northern scotland, another weather front producing cloud and also some rain and drizzle, especially in the northern isles. the rest of scotland, a dry start in rural areas. a bright start. in the morning sunshine, temperatures picking up rapidly. wales in south—west england, the midlands, down towards hampshire, the isle of wight, a beautiful sight to the day. in the south—east, a bit more cloud. splashes of rain, though light. that will clear away. behind that, splashes of rain, though light. that will clearaway. behind that, one splashes of rain, though light. that will clear away. behind that, one or two showers in the afternoon. some
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of us will mist them all together and have a largely dry day away from the finals of scotland. the temperatures are aware they should be. roughly 21. the athletics today should be dry. as we go through the evening, hanging on to the sunshine. through the course of the night, we have a weather front coming in across scotland and northern ireland. england and wales, remaining largely dry. some clear spells. variable cloud. temperatures dipping in towns and cities to 11— 13 degrees. weather fronts coming our way tomorrow morning. cloud and rain. this is the first one overnight. that will all be slipping steadily south—east. the heaviest rain will be on the west with height. as it goes south—east, the cloud will be old. the far south—east of england, hanging onto
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the bright skies and sunshine for the bright skies and sunshine for the longest. getting here during the evening. temperatures tomorrow, 13— 21. and then as we move through the course of friday evening and overnight, there are the fronts. then a ridge of high pressure building infor then a ridge of high pressure building in for the weekend. not just saturday, also sunday. that settle things down quite nicely. saturday, a chilly start to the day, especially in rural areas. a lot of dry weather. a few showers in the north and the highlands in particular. again, not everyone will see them. similar on sunday. a lot of dry weather. chilly in the evening. in the daytime, 21 is not too bad at all, naga and charlie. about time. i must confess i am sick of the rain and i prefer the sunshine as well. you are a ray of sunshine as well. you are a ray of sunshine but even you are not enough when it is raining this much. thank
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you. scientists in australia say simply taking a common vitamin could significantly reduce the number of miscarriages and birth defects. the research, which has been described as ground—breaking, has found that vitamin b3 can cure molecular deficiencies in pregnant women. we can speak now to the leader scientist on this professor sally dunwoodie who joins us on skype from sydney this morning. thank you very much for your time this morning. can you explain... 0bviously, time is limited. but can you explain how you got to the conclusion that b3 is the key to all this. we were studying families who had multiple miscarriages and babies with multiple birth defects, heart defects, kidney defects, a cleft palate, club fought. we were sequencing baird genes. we found mutations. —— foot. this led to nad,
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it is an energy source. this showed babies born with defects had reduced levels of nad. so then we moved into preclinical studies and we realised we could raise those nad levels with niacin, which is b3. we put it into the drinking water and then we had babies born completely normally. b3 had bypassed the genetic mutation we re had bypassed the genetic mutation were found in the human.” apologise, there is some microphone noise. if women are trying to get pregnant or are noise. if women are trying to get pregnant orare in noise. if women are trying to get pregnant or are in early pregnancy, what is the advice with taking b3? at this stage, we would say take the recommended amount that appears in a pregnancy multivitamin. we cannot advise more than that because we have not done the research. but we
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are embarking on that research so we can identify women who do have low nad levels at risk of having babies with birth defects, and we will do more work to see what sort of levels of the vitamin, b3, would be safe to the event birth defects and multiple miscarriages. how can you get 33 if you are not taking supplements? what food? you probably won't get enough just from food. but you can get niacin from red meat, poultry, fish, legumes, his and lentils, and vegetables. —— peas. supplements are important. but for the moment, we are working towards identifying other and better ways to supplement pregnant women with higher doses of niacin. thank you very much for your time this morning. in a couple of minutes,
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we'll be speaking to former us vice president, al gore, about everything from current tensions with north korea, to donald trump pulling the us out of the paris climate change accord. that is coming up in around ten minutes. iam that is coming up in around ten minutes. i am looking forward to that. time now to get the news, travel, and weather where you are. good morning, from bbc london news. i'm alice salfield. people living on the canals near tottenham say more needs to be done to protect them after a spate of violent attacks. there have been at least eight thefts in just over a week, some of which saw people threatened with knives or assaulted. police are asking anyone with information to come forward. the victims were punched and kicked while they were on the floor, even having to relinquish property, and that shows and demonstrates the people we are dealing with here. two 19—year—olds have been charged with murder after a teenager was stabbed to death in barking. 16—year—old joshua bwalya was killed just over a week ago. kareem lashley—weekes
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and ayrton ambrose are due in court later today. the new operator of south west trains has told the bbc that it will commit to a second member of staff on every service. but the operator has hinted the driver, not the guard, may operate the doors on all new trains. south western railway will take charge in just over a week's time. it also plans to halve the number of direct trains between london and weymouth. an east london cinema, which has been derelict for over 30 years, will soon become a major new arts centre. plans to transform the former savoy cinema in hackney have been given the green light after residents wrote hundreds of letters in support. the three million pound project will be led by owners of village underground, an art gallery and music venue in shoreditch. it's all looking good on the tubes at the moment. but southeastern trains are disrupted via lewisham for emergency engineering works. and as you probably know by now, south west trains are running
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a severely reduced service in and out of waterloo until the end of the month. let's have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. hello. good morning. after a cool and wet day yesterday we have something dry and bright on the cars today. plenty of sunny spells around as we move through the day and a little bit more in the way of sunshine, our temperatures are little warmer. so with the detail on the map you can see the fund clearing out of the south—east. you could see outbreaks of drizzle this morning. good spells of sunshine developing. lots of dry weather around and our temperatures reaching a maximum of 20 celsius. yesterday we struggled in the mid—teens. feeling pleasantly warm in the sunshine. through this evening and overnight, plenty of dry weather and dry spells.
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there is the chance of one or two batches of mist falling through the early hours with overnight lows of 11—14 degrees. a bright start to the day tomorrow. quite quickly seeing some high—level cloud turning sunshine hazy. then into the afternoon you can see the next weather front here in from the north—west, bringing more in the way of cloud, showery outbreaks of rain. temperatures reaching a maximum of around 19 degrees. as we move into the weekend, showers through the beginning of saturday, but brightening up to provide good spells of sunshine. sunday looking largely dry with sunny spells and temperatures of a maximum of 19 degrees. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to naga and charlie. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. let's bring you up—to—date with the main news of the day. northumbria police has defended paying thousands of pounds to a convicted child rapist to gather information in an abuse investigation.
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in the last few minutes, the chief co nsta ble in the last few minutes, the chief constable told us that while the decision to pay £10,000 to the registered sex offender was understandably difficult for some people, not using the anonymous informant could have left the 18 people convicted of grooming newcastle abuse victims for longer. the time that we registered him, we had no idea about the sort of information he would give us, and whether or not we could get it from elsewhere. so you have a suspicion, it isajumping elsewhere. so you have a suspicion, it is a jumping off point for an investigation which leads you to evidence. yes, you might have got that evidence through other means, and it could have —— but it could have taken longer, and that in itself would expose vulnerable women and girls to an unacceptable level of risk. and that wouldn't sit co mforta bly of risk. and that wouldn't sit comfortably with me, morally, either. let's talk more about one our other top stories this morning. the tensions between america and north korea. jean lee is a former pyongyang bureau chief for the associated press and is in seoulfor us. thank you for your time today. we
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have obviously been talking about the tensions that are ratcheting up between us resident donald trump and kim jong—un of north between us resident donald trump and kimjong—un of north korea. what is your reaction, at what stage do you think we are outcome in terms of how worried we should be? we have definitely seen an escalation in the rhetoric between the us and north korea. frankly, we are used to hearing this rhetoric from north korea, but what we are not used is seeing this fiery language from the us president. that has certainly raised tensions. the question is, how much are they bluffing, and how much will they be able to back down from some of these very strong and specific threats they have made? i should point out nobody in this region wants another war. but we have more than 80,000 us troops in this region. the north korean sub tens of thousands of troops lined up
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on the border, and theirforces ready to fire. could there be a false move i want these military ‘s, which would force or trigger a military complex? —— conflict? that is what china and south korea do not want, they bought a north korea and have the most to lose. it is important to remember that this is somewhat seasonal and somewhat cyclical. south koreans are not too ruffled by this. but the question is, if you keep ratcheting up attention and talk a big game, how do you back down peacefully? for all intents and purposes, kim jong—un do you back down peacefully? for all intents and purposes, kimjong—un is very mindful of the indo and, being on the world stage and being recognised. how much is this about making sure that north korea stays at the forefront of people's mines and is not forgotten or dismissed? —— minds. and is not forgotten or dismissed? -- minds. extremely important to him. he takes a lot of pride in
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being such a small nation which commands the world's attention. i have to say, for the us president to address north korea directly is something of a coup for pyongyang. that is something to keep in mind. that is something to keep in mind. that is something that experienced leaders understand as well, so they try to limit the kind of attention they give north korea. that said, there is no denying that the acceleration of the buildup of the nuclear weapons and blistered missile programme in north korea needs to be addressed. —— ballistic missile. there are competing interests you. you don't want to give them more attention than they deserve, but it does deserve prompt attention. so it is a complicated dance with north korea. good to talk to you. thank you. police hunting a jogger who knocked a pedestrian into the path of a london bus, say they have received a good response to their appeal for information, and they are following up several lines of enquiry. cctv footage of the incident on putney bridge, appears to show the man barging into the 33—year—old woman without warning.
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she escaped serious injury thanks to the quick reactions of the bus driver. facebook is to launch a new service that will compete with tv networks and online platforms like youtube and netflix. social media users will soon see a "watch" tab on their feeds, which will offer a range of shows, some of which have been funded by the social network. it will also allow people to see what their friends are watching and start conversations with others who are interested in the same videos. what are we going to watch together? really, there are so many issues around about... at this stage, we are not at that stage. i will bring are not at that stage. i will bring a list of suggestions and tomorrow so we can start planning our evenings. some of them are purely practical things, about the ability to do those things. 0thers practical things, about the ability to do those things. others are about whether you want to do it. there are all sorts of bombs. we will talk about it later. but not online. all sorts of bombs. we will talk about it later. 3ut not online. we can think of a way. time to talk sport. it has been so
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exciting. we had isaac makwala go it alone, just to show he was running his race. yes, good morning. it was incredible last night. i have come up incredible last night. i have come up into the stands just to show you where the fans are sitting during the athletics. because so many of the athletics. because so many of the athletes have raised them. capacity crowds here of about 60,000 for pretty much every session. they have really been getting behind the athletes. that was especially true for one athlete, isaac makwala, who was roared on by the crowd. what a special and emotional night it was for him. to give you some background, he was given a second chance to compete after he was one of the athletes found to be a fact to buy the stomach bug outbreak that happened here at the championships. —— affected by the stomach bug. he was removed on medical grounds. so
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he was given the chance to run a solo time trial in the 200 metres. he had to achieve the qualifying time. he was cheered on by the crowd. he did it, which means he has booked his place in the semifinals. remarkably, makwala came second in his semi—final, and just behind him in third was britain's nathaneel mitchell—bla ke, who also made the final. the 400 metre champion wayde van niekerk also secured a place. for makwala though it was all about the chance to race again and show the world what he could do. i wish to thank the iaaf for giving me another chance and the crowd is so amazing. they didn't need to believe, the crowd being british, i just want to thank this crowd, so amazing! mo farah will go for double gold in these championships again after he qualified for the final of the 5,000 metres. he'll also bejoined by fellow briton andy butchart after he qualified as a fastest loser from the second heat. farah is retiring from track racing at the end of these championships and says he wants
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to go out on a high. you can't dream of something unless you do something about it. i've been given a chance in life and i work hard for it and i achieve what i've achieved through hard work and keep grafting. to all the kids out there, youngsters, you can be like me and we've got to start thinking about how we can get the next—generation to leave a legacy behind. the bad weather here in london yesterday caused problems for athletes both on the track and field. particularly hard for the long jumpers and in the women's qualifying, lorraine ugen was the only one of three british athletes to make it into tomorrow's final. britain's nick miller is into the men's hammerfinal. he made the qualifying distance with his very first throw. he'll more than likely need to better his british record distance if he's to win a medal tomorrow. there was late drama in the women's 400 metres. the bahamas runner shaunae miller we—bo looked to have the race won but pulled up in the last 20 metres
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and finished fourth, missing out on a medal. the american phyllis francis won gold, her compatriot allyson felix took bronze. away from the athletics, england made an impressive start to their defence of the women's rugby world cup, crushing spain 56—5 in dublin. wales lost to new zealand. and the hosts ireland won a nail—biting opener against australia. they were leading by nine points after sophie spence's try but the australians fought back and ireland just clinched it, 19-17. andy murray looks set to lose his world number one ranking after withdrawing from the cincinnati masters with the hip injury that hampered his wimbledon campaign. he's also a doubt for the us open, which starts at the end of the month. no action here this morning but
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preparations are already under way. the lawnmowers are out for the start of the evening session. it is the man's javelin tonight and the field will be in pristine condition for that. —— men's javelin. so, day seven of the championships, three gold medals up for grabs, including the man's 200 metres. let's see what is in store for us later. britain's laura muir is in her second event at these championships. she finished fourth in the 1500 metres. she won the european indoor title in the 1500 and 3000 metres in march but has only run twice before in the 5000 metres distance. britain's lynsey sharp will be hoping to better sixth—place finish in rio. also competing in this race is the 0lympic 800 metre champion caster semenya. britain's katarina
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johnson—thompson will be competing in this single event, traditionally her strongest event in the heptathlon. she struggled at the weekend, which affected her chances of winning a medal. british team captain a—league oil took one of the fastest qualifying slots in the semifinals to make it through to the final. it is the fourth consecutive globalfinal. dina asher—smith breezed through her heat to qualify despite having struggled for much of the season, after breaking her foot backin the season, after breaking her foot back in february. also through as the fastest qualifier is bianca williams. nethaneel mitchell—bla ke is representing britain in the 200 metres final. he will be up against botswa na's metres final. he will be up against botswana's isaac mcquire and south africa's wade vanni kirk. —— issac makwala. al gore served in bill clinton's white house for eight years before becoming an oscar—winning documentary maker with his film about climate change,
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an inconvenient truth. it was described as a global warming wake—up call and won him a nobel peace prize. now, he's releasing a sequel, at a time when president trump has reset america's commitments to climate change. we'll speak to mr gore in a moment, but first here's a clip. some stuff negotiations going on. what would it take to shift to renewables? i am talking about breaking the impasse. virtually every nation in the entire world has agreed to get to zero greenhouse emissions. it is unprecedented. agreed to get to zero greenhouse emissions. it is unprecedentedfi is time to put america first. that includes a promise to cancel billions on climate change spending. 0ur billions on climate change spending. our plan will lend the epa. —— end the epa. the next generation would be justified in looking back at us and saying, what we thinking? couldn't you hear what the scientists were seen? couldn't you
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hear what mother nature was screaming at you ? joining us now from central london is former us vice—president, al gore. thank you very much the joining us. it isa thank you very much the joining us. it is a pleasure having you with us on the programme. thank you. so much to talk to you about. we were looking at your film there. your passion for tackling climate change is unabashed. how do you feel now about hazard and trump has made clear that the us is coming out of the paris climate accord? —— president trump. i was concerned when he made that announcement but i was relieved the next day when the rest of the world redoubled their commitments to the paris agreement. and in the us, our largest states and hundreds of cities and business leaders said, we are still in the paris agreement. it now looks as if the us is going to meet our commitments in spite of donald trump. how do you meet they are going to meet the commitments if they are going to pull out? i don't think they can pull out until 2019, but there are still efforts being
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made to withdraw the us. yes, well, the cost of renewable energy is coming down so quickly and cost. many cities are now shifting in the us to 100% renewable energy. the first date on which the legal withdrawal could take place, in any case, is the day after the next presidential election in 2020. more importantly, the state governments and local governments and businesses are moving forward with reductions in spite of donald trump. do you know what i would love to see, and i am sure many would as well, is a conversation between you and donald trump. has that happen? is it scheduled at all? i went to see him after the election and continued my conversations with him after he went into the white house. i thought there was a chance he would come to his senses, but i was wrong. yes, if i may, al gore, that is a very glib answer. people will be fascinated. 0ne answer. people will be fascinated. one of the phrases you use a lot in the film is "speaking truth to power". it is a great phrase and one
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that some people might hope al gore, meeting donald trump, that is a situation where speaking truth to power possibly might have an effect. do you get the sense that he nods and listens and probably shakes your hand, and you talk about the old days, and then he ignores everything you said? well, he has surrounded himself with a rogues gallery of climate deniers, controlled by the large carbon polluters. this is well known. i had reason to believe that he might stay in the paris agreement, but i think they control his thinking on this. the truth about the climate crisis is still inconvenient for these large polluters and the politicians they control. you will excuse us for asking 12 questions about donald trump more generally, and you will understand the interest we have been hearing views. —— one or two questions. once or twice in the documentary you talk about your despair, to do with issues to do
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with climate change. i wonder if some of that despair revolves around the president that you now have and the president that you now have and the way that he goes about his business? what can you tell us about that? this is a challenging time for my country. congress seemed to be fed up country. congress seemed to be fed up with him. in the next few months it may be challenging. i have no insight as to how it might come out. we will get through this and we will work around donald trump to solve the climate crisis. this new movie shows the solutions are advancing rapidly. sometimes we listen carefully to what politicians say. you still are one, though not officially. from what you are saying about donald trump, you think there isa about donald trump, you think there is a possibility he is in serious trouble to the point where he may no longer be president? you are seeing the same developments i am, charlie,
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andi the same developments i am, charlie, and i have no insight into what the special investigator is finding, but there was a predawn raid yesterday on the home of his campaign manager. we will all have to wait and see what develops and whether there is fire with all this smoke. but in the meantime, we have to move forward. all these distractions have interfered with the ability of the us to provide the kind of leadership the world has a right to expect from the world has a right to expect from the us. but luckily, as i said, governors, mayors, others, they are stepping up to fill the gap and move forward without trump. that must be very brighter —— reassuring for you. by very brighter —— reassuring for you. by in donald trump, not afraid of increasing rhetoric and escalating tensions between the us and north korea, do you feel secure? do you
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think americans feel secure under his leadership? i think he's comments a few days ago did not help matters. —— his. but to be fed to donald trump, he inherited this impasse and it is difficult to solve. —— to be fair. i hope china will enforce the sanctions the un authorised. it is a very difficult situation. i would say this. his secretary of defence and national security advisor are universally race record. there are some cool hands around him during this crisis andi hands around him during this crisis and i hope he listens. there are criticisms he inherited it from administrations like your roman and bill clinton that failed to get a
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grip on 03. —— your own. bill clinton that failed to get a grip on 03. -- your own. the obama administration and so on as well. south korea has a capital cityjust a few miles from the border, and they are our allies. it is a very difficult situation. diplomacy is the best chance to resolve this. it has not worked for decades now and they have continued with their testing of long—range missiles and nuclear testing. i will take you back to climate change. it is a personalfilm. back to climate change. it is a personal film. you talk about your family. is that a driving force, thinking about the legacy, what will be left behind by your generation and others? i will also point out we are feeling the effects of the climate crisis now. you have had all—time record downpours here in the united kingdom in the last couple of years. just this week
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there were record fires and high temperatures in southern europe. you could go right around the world. every weather forecast is like a nature hike in the book of revelation. many people might not see this as a political controversy, it is about the survival of our civilisation. we have the solutions now. the movie, opening this friday, in 300 some odd theatres in england, it everything you need to know about the crisis and the solutions to fight yes. —— solutions. the crisis and the solutions to fight yes. -- solutions. how is the view in london? i am optimistic we are going to solve this climate crisis, but we need to move forward more quickly. thank you very much, al gore. he has an ending passion to
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solve climate change —— unending. there will be some sun in the forecast. good morning. for many of us today, the forecast is a dry one and one of sunny spells. as always, and one of sunny spells. as always, a few exceptions. parts of the south—west of england had a lot of rain courtesy of this area of low pressure still dragging across the south—east. in the shape of showers and patchy rain and cloud, that is. we will move away. the bulk of the uk will be dry and sunny. northern scotland, a weather front producing more cloud, some rain and drizzle, especially in the northern isles. the rest of scotland, it will be dry. dry in southern counties of england and the isle of wight to be
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dorset, somerset. in the wind, pleasant. call on the coast. wales, a dry start. some sunshine. sunny spells across northern ireland is cloud coming our way. dry with sunny spells. cloud and spots of rain at times. as we come across north—east england, north—west england, dry weather and sunny spells. the same for most of the midlands. a little bit of cloud and the odd showers the south—east to be staying dry for the athletics in london today. highs of 21 in the sun. the evening and overnight. the weather front will go away. brightening up in the evening. most of england and wales will be dry. scotland and northern ireland,
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a weather front coming our way introducing rain. also some strengthening wind. this is the first one going south. another one behind that. it is more week. the space between the isobars shows it will be windy. dry and bright with sunshine. the rain is already in northern ireland in scotland and it goes south. as it does that, it will start to turn more patchy in nature and it will start to bring rain to the west. this rain will not make it to the south—east until even in time. eventually it will. overnight, both weather fronts will go south. high pressure building in. that is it for this weekend, settled and chilly in the morning and evening with sunshine between. saturday, showers to the north. temperatures getting to 21. sunday. almost the same thing. dry weather. chilly in
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the morning and evening. temperatures up to 21 in the sunshine. it will feel quite nice. have you started watching game of thrones? no. us either. 3ut it is one of the most successful tv shows. you don't want to give away the plot. they have been hacked. scripts are out. ra nsoms plot. they have been hacked. scripts are out. ransoms are being required. good morning. game of thrones is undoubtedly one of the most talked about shows on tv at the moment. but this week it's also hit the headlines as the latest victim of cyber hackers. everyone except us was talking about the seventh series. i was born to
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rule the seven kingdoms, and i will. your brothers and father are gone, but yet eu stand. the last defence against the coming storm. millions of viewers. so millions of viewers can mean millions in profits, and that's caught the eye of hackers, who stole scripts of future programmes from hbo along with sensitive data about how the company is run. they've leaked some of the scripts and demanding a ransom to stop any more revelations. how serious an issue is it for the show, the industry, the viewers? let's speak to media analyst richard broughton from ampere analytics. good morning. good morning. we have heard of other companies suffering these kinds of things. sony had a
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huge one a few years ago. what is it about hbo and game of thrones that has brought this to them? they are high—profile targets in the public eye. they are making huge sums of money. hbo turns over $6 billion a year. people also want access to the show. it is known to be housed in a database for months or is in years before release. —— even. database for months or is in years before release. -- even. what is the big threat? some scripts were released. the latest episode still had unbelievable viewing figures for hbo. is it affecting the business? in terms of some of the leaks of scripts and videos for other hbo shows leaked pre—release, ultimately, they are set up well as a business to weather that. in the uk, we know hbo through sky
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atlantic. provided people keep paying the monthly fee, it doesn't matter if one episode in one week as a drop in viewing figures. financially, the impact of any lea ked financially, the impact of any leaked videos or scripts will be minimal. the bigger risk is the contents minimal. the bigger risk is the co nte nts of minimal. the bigger risk is the contents of leaked e—mails. at the moment, hbo is indicating it is still conducting investigation into what has been taken and how. it is not clear yet what may have been taken. thank you very much, richard. there you go. the viewers are not being put off by the fact the scripts are out there. when you read it on line, everyone is staying together to not reveal what is going on, which will help hbo in the short—term, but in the longer term, if it gets out there, it could cost
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them a bit of money is a pipe thank you very much. we are back in a couple of minutes. —— money. time for the news, travel, and weather, wherever you while. —— are. good morning, from bbc london news. i'm alice salfield. people living on the canals near tottenham say more needs to be done to protect them after a spate of violent attacks. there have been at least eight thefts in just over a week, some of which saw people threatened with knives or assaulted. police are asking anyone with information to come forward. the victims were punched and kicked while they were on the floor, even having to relinquish property, and that shows and demonstrates the people we are dealing with here. two 19—year—olds have been charged with murder after a teenager was stabbed to death in barking. 16—year—old joshua bwalya was killed just over a week ago. kareem lashley—weekes and ayrton ambrose are due in court later today. the new operator of south west trains has told the bbc that it will commit to a second member of staff on every service. but the operator has hinted the driver, not the guard,
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may operate the doors on all new trains. south western railway will take charge in just over a week's time. it also plans to halve the number of direct trains between london and weymouth. an east london cinema, which has been derelict for over 30 years, will soon become a major new arts centre. plans to transform the former savoy cinema in hackney have been given the green light after residents wrote hundreds of letters in support. the three million pound project will be led by owners of village underground, an art gallery and music venue in shoreditch. let's have a look at the travel situation now. let's have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. hello.
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good morning. after a cool and wet day yesterday we have something dry and bright on the cards today. plenty of sunny spells around as we move through the day and a little bit more in the way of sunshine, our temperatures are a little bit warmer. so with the detail on the map you can see the fund clearing out of the south—east. you could see outbreaks of drizzle this morning. good spells of sunshine developing. lots of dry weather around and our temperatures reaching a maximum of 20 celsius. yesterday we struggled in the mid—teens. feeling pleasantly warm in the sunshine. through this evening and overnight, plenty of dry weather and dry spells. there is the chance of one or two batches of mist falling through the early hours with overnight lows of 11—14 degrees. a bright start to the day tomorrow then. quite quickly seeing some high—level cloud turning sunshine hazy. then into the afternoon you can see the next weather front here in from the north—west, bringing more in the way of cloud, showery outbreaks of rain. temperatures reaching a maximum of around 19 degrees celcius. as we move into the weekend, showers through the beginning of saturday, but brightening up
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to provide good spells of sunshine. sunday looking largely dry with sunny spells and temperatures of a maximum of 19 degrees celcius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. police defend a decision to pay a convicted paedophile £10,000 to become an informer. the payment was made as part of an investigation that led to the prosecution of a grooming gang operating in newcastle. the nspcc says it's appalled by the actions of northumbria police. the force insists its priority was keeping children safe. the chief constable has told us his priority was keeping children safe. i've got to be content that what we've ended up doing here is putting dangerous men behind bars, and protecting vulnerable women and girls, that we simply wouldn't have been able to do.
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good morning, it's thursday 10th august. also this morning. north korea says its plan to fire missiles towards an american military base in the pacific will be ready within days. here at the london stadium it was a magical moment for makwala, finally allowed to race in the 200 metres, he came out of quarantine and stormed his way into tonight's showpiece. co—op bank is still making a loss and losing customers. i'll have more on what's going wrong at the troubled bank. michael pailin tells breakfast why he is backing a new campaign to get more support for the children of prison inmates. naga was among the contestants tangoing their way around
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the strictly dance floor last time around. but who will be trying to take the title when the series returns in september? we'll reveal the fourth member of the 2017 line up when theyjoin usjust after 8:30am. and carol has the weather. good morning. today we are looking ata good morning. today we are looking at a largely dry day with sunshine. it'll feel pleasant in the sunshine. however we've got some showers to get rid of, first of all across south—east england. also cloud across northern scotland with some spots of rain. more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. northumbria police has defended paying £10,000 to a convicted child rapist to gather information in an abuse investigation. the force has stood by its actions after 17 mostly asian men and one woman were convicted of grooming vulnerable girls in newcastle. critics said it could have put victims at greater risk. dan johnson reports. the faces of just some of those who abused young women
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across newcastle's west end. vulnerable girls were given drinks and drugs and passed around for sex. the gang was caught in one of the biggest child abuse investigations the north of england has seen. but now there are questions, outrage even, over some of the police tactics. was it right to pay a convicted child rapist £10,000 to be an informant? we don't support the police in doing this. we think it was a misguided action, putting a person who had eight track record of abusing girls into a situation with other vulnerable girls and perpetrators, and then paying them for the privilege of doing that. northumbria
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police has strongly defended the payment. it's surprising and disappointing for the nspcc to adopt the stance they have. this is an ill informed position they have taken. the fact is we absolutely do not plant xy the informant in the midst of vulnerable girls, that did not happen. the force says this information to get convictions and stopped other girls being abused. northumbria's police commissioner says she was uneasy about paying a rapist but ultimately she satisfied everything was done properly. these are complex cases and difficult judgments have to be made. dan johnson, bbc news. we're joined now by alison freeman, who is at northumbria police's headquarters this morning. the chief constable is criticising the nspcc in turn for what he said
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and he's been categorical and still defending the way they went about this investigation. yes, it's been a very robust defence. the chief constable saying you have to bear in mind that they used this informant as a starting point. he wasn't tasked with going to parties. if he had been there when any abuse was taking place he would have ended up in the dock as a defendant or have had to give evidence against the other defendants. he said he found vital evidence that could not have been got from anywhere else. he was able to give names, addresses, details about cars, whether they were dealing drugs or not. he said there was a possibility of doing it another way but it would have taken much longer. during that time, more young women could have ended up becoming victims. he said it was a moral question and he still thinks they made the right decision using that informant. as a result of the
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initial complaints at the end of 2013, northumbria police carried out the largest investigation they say they've ever carried out. they say they've ever carried out. they say they've spoken to more than 700 women who were potential victims, they've arrested more than 460 men in that time. the investigation is still very much on going. he said it's also led to a cultural shift in the way the force deals with these type of crimes. one officer was sacked for failing to do his duties in terms of investigating one of the suspects. there is now going to be a safeguarding reviewed to see if anything could have been done to try to help these young women and girls any sooner. thank you. north korea has dismissed president trump's warnings that it will face the "fire and fury" of the united states as "a load of nonsense" — in the latest escalation of tension between the two leaders. north korea has said it was drawing up plans to launch four ballistic missiles towards the sea — off the coast of guam, a us territory and a major strategic hub in the south pacific.
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earlier on breakfast al gore told us that the stand—off with north korea existed long before trump's presidency began. to be fair to donald trump, he'd inherited this. it's a very difficult one to solve. he did achieve a unanimous security council resolution earlier in the week. i hope china will follow up by in forcing the sanctions the united nations authorised. it's a very difficult situation. i would say this, his secretary of defence and national security adviser are universally respected. there are some cool hands around him and i hope he listens to them. our correspondentjoins us. our correspondent yogita limaye is in seoul this morning. cool hands but the hotheads and hot
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language between him and kimjong—un are obviously at the front of people's minds. that's right. what a nalysts say people's minds. that's right. what analysts say is that every year in august when the us and south korean forces are about to conduct military training exercises and joint drills, you hear this sharp language coming from pyongyang. this year you also have a us president making aggressive remarks. as far as this country is concerned, south korea, it has made them nervous to an extent. there is a niche meeting of the national security council that started an hour ago and we are hoping to hearfrom started an hour ago and we are hoping to hear from that scene. we also heard a military spokesperson saying earlier in the day that this country is sending a stern warning to north korea but if there is any provocation there will be a strong response from us and south korean forces. this country adopts two tracks in dealing with pyongyang. it ramps up its defence on the one
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hand. on the other hand it also says it's open to talks. that is an offer that has been reiterated by the country's foreign ministry today. it was an offer first made country's foreign ministry today. it was an offerfirst made in country's foreign ministry today. it was an offer first made injuly. thank you. miscarriages and birth defects could be significant reduced if women take vitamin tea supplements. researchers in sydney vitamin can prevent babies organs developing correctly. they say it will transform the way mothers to be are cared for. the botswa nan athlete, isaac makwala has qualified for the final of the world athletics 200m — after running his heat alone, against the clock. and in the rain! he was unable to take part in the heats on monday night, because the athletics authorities said he had the norovirus. meanwhile, mo farah qualified for the 5,000m final.
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andy swiss has more. 24 hours ago his dream seemed dashed, tonight he could be world champion. isaac makwala's remarkable evening began with a race against the clock after the athletics authorities said he could finally run his 200 metres heat two days after his rivals. after meeting his qualifying time he hardly seemed to be suffering. and barely two hours later he roared through on the inside to reach the final with britain's nethaneel mitchell—bla ke also through. afterwards makwala thanked the authorities for his chance but said the crowd also inspired him. i want to thank the iaaf for giving me another chance and the crowd is so amazing. they didn't need to believe, the crowd being british, i just want to thank this crowd, so amazing! also a good evening for sir mo farah as he is through his 5000 metres
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heat in second place. he'll be joined in saturday's final by fellow briton andrew prichard. but tonight, the focus here will be on the men's 200 metres and four isaac makwala, after an extraordinary few days, there just might be a fairy tale finish. andy swiss, bbc news, at the london stadium. more now on our top story. the chief constable of northumbria police has defended his force's decision to pay a registered sex offender to act as an informant in a child grooming investigation. yesterday, 18 people were convicted of systematically abusing vulnerable girls in newcastle as part of that investigation. chief constable steve ashman spoke to breakfast an hour ago. he challenged the nspcc‘s criticism of the case. the fact of the matter
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is, we didn't plant xy the informant in the midst of vulnerable women and girls. that did not happen. he wasn't tasked to go to these parties or sessions as they were referred to in the trial. there is no evidence he did that. if you look in detail at thejudge's he did that. if you look in detail at the judge's assessment and he did that. if you look in detail at thejudge's assessment and his ruling and legal finding, at thejudge's assessment and his ruling and legalfinding, there is no evidence whatsoever that he was involved or engaged in offending against these victims or anybody else. it does beggar belief, it didn't happen. is it true you or informers handlers asked him to take from rubble children to parties? —— vulnerable children.” from rubble children to parties? —— vulnerable children. i can't go into the detail of what we did or didn't do with deployments. what i can say is that we didn't tasked him to go to parties with vulnerable women and
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girls. that didn't happen. we are very specific about that. i think there has been a drawing away from there has been a drawing away from the central point, that the use of the central point, that the use of the informant was principally about finding out who might be involved, the cars they were driving, the addresses they were living at, who might be using or supplying drugs. it's very much the case this is the starting point for an investigation. it never resulted in xy being exposed offending. had it done so that there would have been one of two outcomes. he would either have been giving evidence against the people convicted, which he didn't, or he would have been in the dock alongside them, which he wasn't. this was the gathering of information that we couldn't get from any other source. things like where are they, who are they, what car that they driving. it's nothing to do with him being placed close to vulnerable women and girls. many of those who made comments on the way
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you conducted the investigation have said that what they are confused by is that the police's first responsibility is surely in these situations is to safeguard the children. what appears to have happened is you prioritised gathering evidence over quite a long period of time, whilst knowing children were being abused. no, charlie, that is really not true. our primary role is to protect, it is to preserve life and protect people from harm. many years ago, a more esteemed police officer they myself said the primary object of a efficient police force is the prevention of crime. that is what we were looking to do. this was about the protection of vulnerable people from harm. i know this is difficult. it is a challenging moral dilemma that we were faced with, that i was faced with, that the officers involved had to contend with and wrestle with and reassess every step of the way. but i have to be content that what we ended up doing here
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was putting dangerous men behind bars in protecting vulnerable women and girls, and that we simply wouldn't have been able to do that if we didn't have thatjumping off point that we got from an informant who was able to tell us who was involved, where they were likely to be, the cars they were driving and the people they were associating with. and that was northumbria police's chief constable. former chief prosecutor nazir afzal, who was instrumental in convicting the rochdale grooming gang, joins us now. good morning. you have an understanding of what northumbria police was dealing with when it comes to this gang, that was a very robust and there is justification of the tactics that were used there. using a convicted paedophile to go undercover, paying him £10,000, using evidence to convince 17 man and a woman of grooming a gang of young women. your opinion on the tactics used? first, the good news,
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we have brought that the traders to justice, and the victims have been givenjustice. justice, and the victims have been given justice. the justice, and the victims have been givenjustice. the bad news, i think, is the decision—making in this case, and i don't know the inns and outs, and even the chief prosecutor did not know about the presence of this paid informant until very late on. my concerns are around how you manage the risk. it would never have occurred to me, when i dealt with rochdale, and i lead nationally on these cases, there are so many other options, and i would like to know what other options were considered. putting a predator, you know, ithink options were considered. putting a predator, you know, i think we all appreciate, more than anybody else, that you should use informants when you are tackling organised crime, because they have credibility. when it comes to child sexual abuse, i prosecute them in their 70s and 805, they prosecute them in their 705 and 805, they don't change their behaviour, so putting a predator with other predators in the company of their prey is really dangerous, and i can't think how you could manage that risk. you are not there to
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protect them in real—time, and that i5 protect them in real—time, and that is the issue for me, why that happened. to be fair, he made clear in the interview that this convicted paedophile was not put in those situations. he said he didn't ask him, so he didn't tell them to do that. listen to the words. the chief co nsta ble that. listen to the words. the chief constable says, we received the information from him, and we paid him to carry on collecting. we didn't ask him to go to these parties. he clearly did, i mean when he gave evidence before the judge a couple of years ago, key did say that he went to further parties, as he calls them, and saw what was happening and left, as he said it. thejudge 5aid happening and left, as he said it. thejudge said he happening and left, as he said it. the judge said he was totally dishonest, unreliable, and he decided that the prosecution could not rely upon his evidence at all. it needs to be said, how do you manage that risk? i can't think of how you can manage that risk. i would ask what other options are available. the chief constable laid out very clearly, during the course
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ofan out very clearly, during the course of an investigation, you have access to someone who could give you what they considered to be hugely important information — he is a convicted child rapist, can you say categorically that you would not do that if you thought that was the avenue to get there two he is quicker than waiting for other informants to come forward? well, we don't know that. it is the position he outlined. i would happily receive his information and advice the officers to say, thank you very much indeed, we don't need any more from you, now it is our turn to investigate this matter. we have used other options across the country, surveillance, technology, you don't have to have him in the room, you don't have to have him in the room , you you don't have to have him in the room, you can have listening devices in the room, in cars, and undercover officers. we are viewed them frequently, and we continue to use them frequently. when i was the first contact for the paedophile unit at scotland yard, i met the brilliant undercover officers, i could not do theirjob. my concern is that i do not know what options
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we re is that i do not know what options were considered before they ask this individual to do this. were undercover officers available for this? because this was specific, 17 asian men and a woman were convicted from newcastle, so the basic question, is there a profile that would fit? that is an interesting question, one i have been thinking about for the last three or four macro hours. we haven't had a major increase in undercover offices in our country, we are asking more of them, we are dealing with terrorism, extremism, harmful practices in certain communities. was there someone from a minority background available, and if not, maybe this is why this particular individual was so attractive. the point is, i don't know the answer that question, but i would not have put this individual into the position that he was put m, into the position that he was put in, and as we discovered, thejudge would not allow his evidence to be used. an undercover officer, we could have used this evidence. as it happens, we relied on the victims to
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obtain these convictions, and we could have had more evidence. as i said to you, i am second guessing, i don't know what the decision—making was. but it is important to have some understanding of what other options were considered. nazir afza l , options were considered. nazir afzal, thank you very much for yourtime, a your time, a former chief prosecutor. let's find out what is happening with the weather. a chilly start for some of us this morning, temperatures are now rising, and for many a day of sunny spells and mostly dry. across south—east england, the jags of yesterday's rain will continue to push away with a few showers following behind this afternoon, and across northern scotland and other weather front is producing a fair bit of cloud, some patchy rain and some drizzle, more especially across the northern isles. you can see in between, all this dry weather and a fair bit of sunshine. even as we head through the course of the afternoon, we hang on to a fair bit
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of sunshine across the bulk of the uk. that can be said from the midlands, hampshire, the isle of wight, gloucestershire, down through somerset, devon and cornwall, the isles of scilly and the channel islands. for wales, you off to a bright start that will continue through the day with some sunshine, healing very nice in gentle breezes. northern ireland has sunny spells, areas of cloud at times, but equally some sunshine too. northern scotland hanging on to more cloud courtesy of that weather front with patchy light rain, but mainland scotland largely dry with sunshine. northern england dry with sunshine. northern england dry with sunshine. northern england dry with some sunshine, through the midlands a similar story. east anglia, heading down towards surrey and sussex, a wee bit more cloud with just the risk of a shower. it should stay dry for the athletics in london, temperatures up to 20, maybe 21 in the afternoon sunshine. through the well, most of us will
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start and a dry not, early evening sunshine, but then a weather front arrives across northern scotland, and whooping southeastwards it will ta ke and whooping southeastwards it will take this rain with it, the wind strengthening. temperatures are indicative of towns and cities, a little bit lower in the countryside. tomorrow, that weather front, little bit lower in the countryside. tomorrow, that weatherfront, this one is a weak bicik coming in behind it, and you can see the isobars. quite windy in the north—west. we will start off dry in central and eastern parts, but as the weather front sinks southwards, the cloud will build. the rain will not get into the far south—east until later in the evening, and the heaviest rain will be in western areas, anywhere with a bit of height. through friday night, there go both weather fronts crossing us, patchy rain, then this ridge of high pressure building, settling the weather down for the weekend. not just saturday — this may look gloomy and that it is going to be. ——
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gloomier than it is going to be. some showers in the highlands, but most of us will miss them all together. a chilly evening on saturday, chilly start to the day on sunday, but a lot of dry weather, just a few showers, up to 21 celsius, and again chilly in the evening, but we will not talk about monday just yet! what is going to be happening? it is looking like it will be turning a wee bit more unsettled again. michael palin has told us that more needs to be done to support the families of prisoners. new research published today shows that prisoners who receive visits from family members during their time inside 40% less to reoffend. michael palin is a household name
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and kyra is the 12—year—old stepdaughter of a convicted criminal. they are here to create an animation of kyra's story for the prisonerfamily support group, pact. the film you are about to watch tells the story of kyra. the film tells the story of her stepdad's conviction, how at first she didn't know he was injail, how much it helped to visit, and how much it hurt when he was eventually moved away. there's some bits i want to talk to him about, but i can't, because i can't really choose when i want to call him, when i want to meet up with him, when i want to go on a visit, so it is really hard. do you miss him? yeah, a lot. a lot. today a report commissioned by the ministry ofjustice highlights how important the link between prisoners and theirfamilies can be. inmates who receive family visits are, the report says, 39% less likely to reoffend. i love the question mark on their little noses. reoffending, rehabilitation —
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all issues michael palin has long felt strongly about. from what one reads in the press, prison numbers are higher than ever, people just talk about keeping the lid on, rather than being able to do any decent work in helping these people to improve their lives afterwards. there is no point sending someone out into the world if they are going to just do the same again. there has to be some change, either inside or with the family. the reality of the prison service right now is this — funding and staffing levels down, serious assaults and drug use up, a prison population which has almost doubled in 25 years, reoffending rates which stubbornly hover around the 25% mark. children of prisoners have three times the incidence of mental— health issues, much likely to suffer poverty, homelessness, educational problems. one study said six out of ten boys with a father in prison are likely to go to prison themselves
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in later life. the ministry ofjustice told us this... kyra, still a long way from her stepfather, feels punished for his crime. kind of upset, it gets me wondering sometimes. how he is doing? yeah, if he is fine and if he is ok. do you know when you are going to see him? no. access to parents in prison is clearly something that is important to children like kyra. the report says it is important to prisoners too. when i saw my stepdad, i was so happy. it's not about being soft on prisoners. it's about a calculated social and economic benefit. because if report recommendations help bring down reoffending rates, they also help bring down the £15 billion annual cost
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of that reoffending. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. we are building up to that moment, the strictly season, we have the fourth contestant to be revealed here on breakfast. but now it is time to get the news where you are this morning. good morning. after yesterday's heavy rain and incessant rain across the south—east, things are looking
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much better. the weatherfront the south—east, things are looking much better. the weather front is clearing away. we are still seeing a few showers across the far south—east for a time. elsewhere a ridge of high pressure building in, plenty of dry and bright weather. in that sunshine and light winds, feeling pleasant. temperatures getting up into the high teens and low 205. breezy conditions with outbreaks of light rain and drizzle across the northern and western isles. that will increase as we go into friday. weatherfronts moving south and east, staying dry in east anglia and the south—east. elsewhere cloudy and breezy with some showers as well. for the weekend, things are improving. largely dry with some sunny spells and feeling quite pleasant. bye—bye. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. embattled electronics giant toshiba has finally reported its long—awaited earnings, but with losses mounting does the firm have a future?
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live from london, that's our top story on the 10th of august. analysts warn the 140—year—old iconicjapanese firm is still facing serious challengers. we'll talk you through toshiba's latest revelations. and facebook versus youtube. the social media giant goes all out to woo tv viewers.
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