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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 11, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. arrests as the contaminated egg scandal spreads to more european countries. it's now known that 700,000 eggs have been sent to the uk from farms caught up in the scare. some processed foods have been pulled from supermarket shelves, but officials insist it's unlikely the public is at risk. good morning. it's friday the 11th of august. also this morning: the us defence secretary says war with north korea would be catastrophic. james mattis insists diplomacy is delivering results. a friendship forged through football. one month on from the death of bradley lowery, premier league striker, jermain defoe, tells us how he's been inspired by his "best mate." he loved his football. he loved me.
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i loved him. for me, every time i saw him it was a special feeling. good morning. and i'm live here at the london stadium. it's day eight of the world athletics championships and all morning here on bbc breakfast. i'll be rounding up the action for you. and there was no fairy tale ending for isaac makwala in the men's 200 metres last night. he finished sixth while britain's nethaneel mitchell—bla ke was fourth. should the locals get to decide on what happens in the rough neighbourhood? is people—power the answer to our housing crisis? a new campaign says locals should get more say over planning applications. it would speed up construction, but critics say it could ruin the greenbelt. i'll have the details. it isa it is a beautiful start to the day. will the weather remain this way? i will have the full forecast in 50
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minutes. thank you. —— 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the scandal over contaminated eggs continues to spread across europe, with denmark the latest country to be affected. 20 tons of infected eggs have been sold in denmark where authorities said boiled and peeled eggs were found to contain traces of fipronil, an insecticide commonly used to rid animals of fleas, lice, and ticks. two eastern european countries, romania and slovakia, have also reported tainted consignments. police investigating the european egg contamination scandal have millions of eggs destroyed. supermarkets scrambling to clear shelves. and now, arrests. two men have been arrested.
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a pesticide commonly in use to kill lice and fleas has made its way into the food chain. earlier this week, the food standards agency says they've been imported to the uk. the agency said you would have to eat 10,000 contaminated eggs to see an effect. there is no reason people should avoid it. it is unlikely there is any public health risk. we thing people deserve good they can trust. that means not having food that has a substance that should not be there. so far, some salads and sandwiches sold by these four supermarkets have been withdrawn, but whole eggs are safe. despite those assurances, it is spreading through europe. millions of eggs will be destroyed, as will hundreds of thousands of hens. four years ago, horsemeat was found in burgers and ready meals. 0nce ago, horsemeat was found in burgers and ready meals. once again, questions are being raised about what goes in processed foods and where it comes from. officials hope that the contaminated eggs will be out of the food chain soon, but the investigation into europe's latest food scandal is likely to go on for some time. bbc news. the us defence secretary,
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james mattis, says america is still trying to use diplomacy to resolve the growing tension with north korea. he has been speaking after pyongyang announced plans to fire four missiles near the american territory of guam. president trump says the regime should be "very, very nervous" if it does anything to the us. my my portfolio, my mission, my responsibility, is to have military options should they be needed. however, right now, secretary rex tillerson and nikki haley, you can see the american effort is diplomatically lead and has diplomatically lead and has diplomatic traction and is gaining diplomatic traction and is gaining diplomatic results. and i want to stay right there in right now. the tragedy of war is well enough known and does not need another characterisation beyond the fact that it would be catastrophic.
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robin brant is in seoul for us this morning. what's the feeling there? good morning. we are hearing more of the war of words from both sides. what is the feeling over there? life goes on, frankly. people herejust after lunchtime are facing the idea of conflict. only 35 miles away is where a barrage is facing the country. you are hearing the words from the president and the defence secretary. the south koreans here would like to hear president trump reminding the world he does not want to see north korea threatening united states and its allies, japan and south korea as well. that reminds people hear of the military alliance they have with the united states. that is so important for protecting this country. that diplomatic effort you heard before, we don't know what mattis is getting
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at. the new president of south korea, he is more conciliatory in his tone than his predecessor. they we re his tone than his predecessor. they were talking about ending the sabre rattling from pyongyang and trying to get negotiations back on to bring some lasting peace for the peninsula. hundreds of people are going to be moved out of their high—rise flats after an investigation has revealed they are not safe. 2a2 flats in south—east london are affected. the issue with the gas supply was discovered during an investigation into fire safety prompted by the grenfell tower tragedy. dan johnson is there with the latest. iam assuming i am assuming those ones behind you are the flats in question. good morning. yes. there are four blocks of them. more than 240 flats which have had gas cuts already and residents have been told they will have to move out so structural work can be done up it is not immediate evacuation. it is something that will take time to plan. the council says with the gas cut off people
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will be safe. they provided electric heaters so people can keep warm and get hot water. they will have to undertake serious structural work. this all goes back to a disaster at another tower block more than 45 yea rs another tower block more than 45 years ago when a small gas explosion prompted a collapse that killed four people. tower blocks like these were supposed to have been strengthened to guard against that sort of explosion causing a similar collapse. the investigations that took place here in the wake of the g re nfell tower took place here in the wake of the grenfell tower fire have took place here in the wake of the g re nfell tower fire have revealed that strengthening work was never actually carried out. that is why the council is going to have to take action. we are seeing even more broad rough percussions from the g re nfell tower broad rough percussions from the grenfell tower fire rippling out. this does not involve the cladding. it is potentially a whole other issue that will have to be explored. 0k. issue that will have to be explored. ok. thank you very much. donations made to the victims of the grenfell tower fire are not reaching survivors fast enough, according to campaigners in west london.
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figures from the charity commission show that less than 15% of the 18.9 million raised has been given to people affected. they claim that early difficulties in identifying and contacting those who need help are being overcome. cctv cameras will be compulsory in all abattoirs in england, under new plans announced by the environment secretary, michael gove. vets working for the food standards agency will be given unrestricted access to footage from all areas containing livestock. abattoirs with failing standards of care could face a criminal investigation or lose staff licences. a six—week consultation will now be held on how to implement the measures. i think this is a very important animal welfare measure and it gives even greater confidence to the consumer, both at home and abroad, that british produced reddish meat is at the highest possible standards during the life of the animal and
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that its death. —— british. the airports and airlines with the worst summer flight delays have been revealed. ben is here with the details. i will name and shame them. it is a bbc investigation. we are looking at delays from last summer and the one before. those are the latest figures. there are some interesting findings. some will come as a surprise. there have been record numbers of strikes for air—traffic patrol, especially in france, spain, italy, greece. lots of bad weather has affected air travel as well. and congested airspace, which makes it difficult. you might have to wait even longer. the numbers. one in five flights to and from the uk are 110w five flights to and from the uk are now delayed by more than 30 minutes according to the bbc. you won't mind too much. but that is increasing in frequency. easyjet was named and shamed as the worst offender. the
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average summer shamed as the worst offender. the average summer flights delayed by 24 minutes. if you take one of those flights, expect that the late. gatwick airport is the one that has been noted as having the worst, with an average waiting time of 27 minutes. easyjet operate the most flights in gatwick airport. they carry millions of passengers each year. they are congested and have many planes that go to europe. that is why they have the most congested aerospace and they only have one runway. but if you are travelling from a small regional airport you will have less to late. bradford is seeing the least delays. there are many reasons why it will not be welcome reading for those tried to get away this summer to be and now there are calls once again for compensation. we should not have to ask for compensation, they should
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offer it automatically. if you are trying to figure out what your area is like, go to the website. the addresses on your tv screen. you can find out where you are most likely to face a delay. there was a surprise result in the 200—metre men's final last night. turkey's ramil guliyev won, dashing the hopes of botswana's isacc makwala, who had run a solo time trial to get this far after his initial controversial exclusion on medical grounds. british athletes failed to win any medals, but there were some promising performances in the london stadium. our sports news correspondent, andy swiss, reports. he urged to a hero's welcome. after beating illness, could isacc makwala beating illness, could isacc makwala beat his rivals? but his remarkable
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story did not have a happy ending. south africa's wayde van niekerk looks on course for his second title. but it was an unheralded name that grabbed the headlines. ramil guliyev of turkey grabbing gold. with mitchell blake forced and isacc ma kwa la with mitchell blake forced and isacc makwala back in six. —— fourth. it was not meant to be. it was not meant to be. i had two trial runs yesterday. earlier, there were hopes of success for a lay doyle, but she finished last in herfinal, with america's corey carter taking gold. today's hopes for britain will be led by dina asher—smith. after six days without a british medal, the fa ns days without a british medal, the fans will be crossing their fingers. andy swiss, bbc news, at the london stadium. it's not unusual to find
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some flotsom orjetsom washed up on a beach in british summertime, but the coast of norfolk has seen some unusually large debris make itself at home on the shore. i love those words. the maritime and coastguard agency confirmed two large plastic pipes measuring eight feet in diameter have washed up on beaches at winterton and sea pallling, with the largest segment reaching 1,500 feet. you get a sense because you can see the person close by. they came loose while being towed to north africa and another ten segments are still at sea. of that
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size! they will pop—up! how will they deal with it? what do they do? they don't have holes in them. you can run through them. they are giant pipes to run liquid through. there isa pipes to run liquid through. there is a hollow area in the centre. you can see it, that bit in the middle. that is the pipe bit where stuff goes through it and comes out the other end. but the other end? and red. and it was old... look, i can't explain that. if you have seen something bigger than that washed up ona something bigger than that washed up on a beach... if you have seen a bigger pipe than charlie's... on a beach... if you have seen a
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bigger pipe than charlie's. .. 0k. .. sarah is that the balloon festival. it is the 39th bristol balloon fiesta and the pilots are getting ready. throughout the four days, we are set to see about 130 and it is a nice start to the day. , and we will see some rain at times today said this morning here in bristol and across much of southern and central england, a fine start. quite fresh. and the south—east, some more cloud
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and mr dennis. there is sunshine this morning across the midlands. some rain across parts of cumbria and northumberland. a better brightness for the east of scotland. rain in the west, which could be quite heavy. also cloud in town. a blustery start to the morning of those outbreaks of rain. some of that rain edging into the west of wales but the central and east wales, fine and dry to start the day and some sunshine into the south—west of england. rain across the isles of scilly. through the course of the day, that rain, edging its way further eastwards. a spell of rain and some strong winds. the south of england and east anglia should avoid the wet weather. temperatures around 22 degrees. moving through the course of this
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evening, that band of rain and brisk wind will move its way across the south—east of england and east anglia and it will be followed by showers across the rest of the country. by saturday morning, temperatures around 13— 15 degrees but most places are going to be dry. the weekend is not looking bad. a bit of breeze in the sunny spells scilly should see fine weather. those temperatures will range between 16 and 22 degrees. the high pressure stays with us into the second half of the weekend. it looks dry once again. sunday to most of us is looking like a fine day. still the chance of one or two showers. we should see the temperatures about
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16,20 should see the temperatures about 16, 20 two degrees. fairly fine weather on the cards. we are going to look at the papers. the scare over eggs is on the front pages. our lead story this morning, we've been reassured there was almost no risk at all in terms of public health to people. we hope to get some more clarification. you would have to eat 10,000 of them to become ill, actually. remarkable pictures here on the front page of the time. holidaymakers were in southern
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spain, in cadiz, and this dinghy appeared on the beach carrying 30 african migrants, swept into shore and passengers leap off and sweep into the sand. on the front page of the daily telegraph, this is the image from the us court, the case involving taylor swift and ‘s portrait in which she is accusing a radio dj of groping her and the main story is harking back to the asian sex gangs who have been targeting young women. the tension is ratcheting between north korea and the united states. the us defence secretary james mattis says diplomacy is going to be used but the mirror says that british planes are going to be used to spy on north korea. a fascinating story. and if
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you have ever applied for planning permission, , you have ever applied for planning permission,, you know you have to go to local council. your neighbours will decide whether or not you can get that planning permission to do whatever it is. they are suggesting it could boost the economy. about £10,000 better off. you could do all sorts of extensions. people will just agree to all sorts of things. there is a big question as well. may be happy for it to go elsewhere. but it's a brilliant story here on the times. i'm not sure which one i would move my desk next to. we love this story. this is a study in the
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times which says if you move your desk at work next to someone who is really good in the office, you would do well served by the halo effect. why did think both of our —— both of us are why did think both of our —— both of us are sitting next to c? that is so not true. c, don't underestimate yourself. if you have office politics going on, who'd do you sit next to? it stands to reason. politics going on, who'd do you sit next to? it stands to reasonlj think next to? it stands to reason.” think the logic works the other way... least capable all the worst behaved. if you are sitting next to the swot... behaved. if you are sitting next to the swot. .. you got to think about these things. we gravitated towards you because you are the swot. the safety of the uk food chain is
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being questioned after eggs were found to be contaminated with the pesticide fipronil. but as the investigation in europe spreads, the number of eggs affected could rise. heather hancock is the chairman of the food standards agency. good morning to you. i wanted of all ask what you can say to people who are concerned about the eggs they may be eating. good morning, c. iwant to reassure people about the eggs they might be eating. the risk to public health from this very small —— this very small proportion of eggs, the risk is very low. people do not need to worry about any impact on them from eating these eggs. even though
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700,000 eggs, they sound like a lot. it's in the context of a seating more than 10 billion eggs per year so more than 10 billion eggs per year so it helps to put that in proportion. this is a very low risk issue. when you say the risk, can you quantify? we are talking about a grown adult, someone like me would have to weed one of these eggs every day to the rest of our lives to face any serious potential health risk. the latest figures we are being told, some 700,000 eggs that were affected. earlier, the first emerged, it wasjust affected. earlier, the first emerged, it was just 20 1000. affected. earlier, the first emerged, it wasjust 20 1000. can you account for white rose so swiftly a nd you account for white rose so swiftly and why the initial figure was so swiftly and why the initial figure was so wrong? —— why it rose. swiftly and why the initial figure was so wrong? -- why it rose. we we re was so wrong? -- why it rose. we were made aware that there were no known eggs that made it in but we
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all recognise this has been a fast—moving incident in holland and belgium. over the weekend, fast—moving incident in holland and belgium. overthe weekend, ourfirst notification that they thought 21,000 eggs had got to the uk and that prompted us to launch our investigations and as a result, the industry coming forward, we've established the number is currently 700,000 eggs. that is the nature of these things. there are about 150 farms affected in the netherlands. they are uncovering more evidence as time has gone on and we've been reacting to that. how confident are you the 700,000 figure is correct given what you said about the number escalating so quickly? new information may still come forward. we can't say that's it. there may well be more eggs. the risk issue will remain the same. a lifetime
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consumption is needed. we are still expecting a very small proportion of the total number of eggs in the uk. we produce something like 85% of the eggs we eat here in the uk and there is no evidence that substance has been wrongly used in the uk. with the agency, giving what you said about this being imported, would you recommend, seeing as there are a number of supermarkets, should they only be using uk eggs in all products? there is nothing to suggest that eggs from elsewhere have the same problems. we would not say that. the reason we've asked the supermarkets to withdraw from the shelves is not because they are a risk to public health, it's more an
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issue of trusting food. these eggs have something in them which should not be there and that is why we are asking for the eggs be withdrawn. heather hancock, thank you for your time. now, it's the time of year when lots of us will be heading here — to the beach. going on that holiday? it's the perfect location to take lots of photos as we lounge around in the sun. well, earlier this week, the now ex—editor of vogue published this photo on social media, sparking a frenzy of debate about selfies. should we edit our pics? and do summer selfies lead to increasing body anxiety? we asked a group of young people what they thought. test is a filter, clean your skin.
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you just do little filters on instagram. would you put in unfiltered picture up? yes. if! ta ke unfiltered picture up? yes. if! take it picture, as long as i'm co mforta ble, take it picture, as long as i'm comfortable, i don't care what anybody things. is there pressure to a lwa ys anybody things. is there pressure to always be edited and looking your best? sometimes it makes you look nicer and are not really self—conscious if i'm using a filter. it makes you feel better that you can have a picture that everyone else can, not appreciate, but like as well as you do. and celebrities, when you see them, do you presume they are filtered? sometimes you hope they are because they look that good and you don't look like that sometimes so it gives you a bit of relief to note that is not real. i like it when they do natural photos but then again, you know they have make—up, it's not a surprise. i'm going to make your legs a bit longer. a lot longer. skinnier waists? yes. i
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legs a bit longer. a lot longer. skinnierwaists? yes. iwill legs a bit longer. a lot longer. skinnier waists? yes. i will put some make up on you. wow, i look so much better in the fake me. i could get used to that. ido get used to that. i do think she should have changed a single thing. she looks fabulous. i find this quite bizarre, quite worrying. i don't know if you adjust your settings when you take a photo. ijust your settings when you take a photo. i just try to make my face bigger. everybody is doing it all the time. what do you think? do you prefer being enhanced by a filter? should we stay natural? we would love to hear your thoughts and see your pictures. send us an email. after 730, we will be joined pictures. send us an email. after 730, we will bejoined by pictures. send us an email. after 730, we will be joined by reality television star cady mcdermott. she tells us how she uses social media
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to promote her business and brands at how much enhancement she uses. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. for tower blocks in pack are due to be evacuated following the grendel tower fire. cracks were found in the walls. our last night the council issued letters to 242 our flats in ledbury towers— explaining the gas and water supplies will be turned off. leaving them unable to cook and with no hot water or heating. the authority says it's putting the safety of residents first. i'm going to have to move up to 16 yea rs. i'm going to have to move up to 16 years. were you say to you? a p pa re ntly years. were you say to you? apparently not. assistance for disabled passengers at london's busiest airport is among the worst in the country,
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according to a new report. the civil aviation authority rated the service at heathrow as poor or very poor by more than 60% of disabled passengers. heathrow says it's extremely disappointed" with the findings and says it will address them. film footage of the so—called battle of lewisham that was lost for decades has been rediscovered. it shows the national front march that took place in south london 40 years ago this weekend. up to 5,000 local people and activists stopped the march through the town centre. the footage features in an exhibition at goldsmith's this is how it looks in hackney.
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there was an accident there earlier. lots of dry and bright weather in the forecast. it will stay largely dry through much of the day of the cloud will increase later. with the detail onto the map, perhaps a touch more cloud. the litter the cloud bubbling up into the afternoon. we will see the next weather front pushing up. ——a little bit of cloud. that cloud, some bricks of rain, pushes in from the north—west. —— outbreaks. the cloud around, temperatures not falling too far. we start the day tomorrow with some cloud first thing. that will break to allow some good spells of sunshine, just the odd isolated
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shower, particularly in the morning. as move into sunday, it looks like a largely dry day. plenty of brightness around. a maximum of 19. fairly settled through monday. that ofa fairly settled through monday. that of a wet and windy again is to move into tuesday. i will be back soon. and you can go to the website. hello. this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. also on breakfast this morning. in his first interview since the death of six—year—old, bradley lowery, from a rare form of cancer, footballer, jermain defoe, tells us about the impact their friendship still has on his life. also this morning, badly injured in the manchester bombing, robbie potter and his partner were waiting to collect their daughters from the ariana grande concert when the blast went off.
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he'll be here to tell us about his long road to recovery. and heavier than ten adult african elephants and longer than three london buses. could this dinosaur be the biggest creature ever to have walked the earth? all that still to come. but now, a summary of this morning's main news. police investigating the european egg contamination scandal have arrested two company directors following raids in the netherlands. here, the food standards agency has revealed that 700,000 contaminated eggs have been imported from dutch farms, but it insists it is "highly unlikely" they pose any risk to human health. sandwiches and salads are among the foods that have now been removed from uk supermarket shelves. the us defence secretary james mattis says america is still trying to use diplomacy to resolve the growing tension with north korea and that war would be catastrophic. he said diplomatic efforts were yielding results, though military options were ready if needed. he made his remarks shortly after president trump had stepped up his rhetoric, saying his threat to unleash "fire and fury"
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on north korea might not have been tough enough. my portfolio, my mission, my responsibility, is to have military options should they be needed. however, right now, secretary rex tillerson and ambassador haley, you can see the american effort is diplomatically led, it has diplomatic traction and is gaining diplomatic results. and i want to stay right there right now. the tragedy of war is well enough known and does not need another characterisation beyond the fact that it would be catastrophic. donations made to the victims of the grenfell tower fire are not reaching survivors quickly enough, according to campaigners in west london. figures from the charity commission show that less than 15% of the £18.9 million raised has been given to people affected almost two months
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after the tragedy, but it says that early difficulties in identifying and contacting those who need help are being overcome. american singer, taylor swift, has told a us court how she was sexually assaulted by a radio dj four years ago, during a photo shoot. yesterday, the singer took the stand in the trial, which began in denver earlier this week. the 27—year—old, who is suing dj, david mueller, over the incident, told the court he had grabbed her as she met fans ahead of a concert in the city. mr mueller denies the claims. we will get the weather a little later on. now for the sport. there we re later on. now for the sport. there were some shocks last night at the athletic championships. jessica is at the stadium in london. good morning. we will have a morning session today. finally. the last few
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days we have not had anything. i wa nt to days we have not had anything. i want to show you that the engineers have done everything for us this morning. let me tell you about one of the stars of the championships, isaac. there is talk from politicians in botswana there may be a national holiday in his honour. can you imagine? settler, there was no fairy tale ending for him last night. it's been an incredible few days for isaac makwala but there was to be no fairy tale ending for him in the final of the 200—metres last night, as he finished 6th. you'll remember makwala was forced to miss the final of the 400—metres due to illness and had to run a time trialjust to get through in the 200. having made the final he was in contention around the bend but couldn't hang on. turkey's ramil gulyev won the race ahead of wayde van niekerk. great britain's nathaneel mitchel blake finished fourth. makwala blamed his performance on having to run two races the day before. 200 yesterday. it has cost me a lot.
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it took it out of you. it took everything out of me. running alone in the semi—final. running in the rain. it took all of my energy. so i can hear... but i am happy that i ran and! can hear... but i am happy that i ran and i did my best. dina asher—smith will be the sole british runner in tonight's final of the women's 200 metres. she was an automatic qualifier after she finished second in her semi—final. i completely broke my third read. i had to spend six weeks not doing anything. putting weight on it. and then gradually putting weight on it for the next six weeks. i was out of walking. then i learned how to walk. and then i am here. it was not that bad. iamjoking, and then i am here. it was not that bad. i am joking, i would and then i am here. it was not that bad. iamjoking, iwould not recommend it. it was not that fun. there was disappointment for the british team captain eilidh doyle in the 400—metres hurdles.
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she came last in the final which was won by the american kori carter. there will be three british women in the semi—finals of the women's 800 metres this evening. lynsey sharp, adelle tracy, and shelayna oskan—clarke, all through. and there will be two british men in tonight's 1,500 metres semi—final. meanwhile, an exhausted laura muir qualified for the final of the 5,000 metres. she was one of the fastest losers in her semi—final, with the exertions of finishing fourth in the 1,500 metres earlier this week looking like they've taken their toll on her. eilish mccolgan looked impressive as she also made it through, running a personal best time. icame into i came into this really positive. i felt like i recovered from the 1500. but last night the legs just went. i have not run a 5000 since january. it is just getting used to it. i
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know what to expect now more for the final. katarina johnson—thompson has made it the final of the high jump after failing in that event in the heptathlon. she will be joined by morgan lake who also cleared the qualifying height. there was talk the american christian taylor could rakejonathan edwards' 22—year—old record. —— break. he did not. but he still got 17.6 metres. let's have a quick look at what's been going on away from the athletics. rory mcilroy said "the course played tricky," after his opening round at the uspga championship. he dropped three shots in two holes to finish the day five shots off the pace. and the premier league returns tonight with arsenal playing host to leicester city. arsenal haven't won their opening game since 2014 and manager arsene wenger knows they need to change that.
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the squad looks good. we need to transform the quality of the preparation in the points. that is a pragmatic view, of course. what matters is the next game and winning it and starting in a strong way which we did not do last year. that is what we want to achieve this year. the start of the premier league seasonis the start of the premier league season is coming along quick. mo farah and usain bolt will be back on the track this weekend. it will be action packed! we will be looking forward to that. it always looks magnificent over there. that track. the grass looks great! the british athletics team are back in action on day eight of the world championships. here's a quick look ahead to some of the moments you won't want to miss.
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there is a morning session today. so the ones to watch starts with tiffa ny the ones to watch starts with tiffany porter. and bronze medallist in 2013. she wants to make it to the semi—final. robbie grabarz should breeze through this preliminary stage. he wants to replicate london 2012 when he got bronze only one british woman made it through to the final. lorraine ugen. she hopes to back up her european indoor medal in march with a podium place. next up, britain's lynsey sharp. she competed in 2016 in rio when she came sixth. nick miller qualified automatically for the final. the gold—medallist made it with his first throw. dina
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asher—smith made it into the 200 metre final. she broke herfoot in february and the prognosis was grim. but her comeback has been incredible. can she get a medal? she goes at 9:50. if you want to keep up with the action, tune in to bbc two at 9:30am this morning. and then hop over to bbc one until 10pm. and finally, bbc two four the last hour of coverage. —— for. hundreds of flights will be evacuated after structural problems we re evacuated after structural problems were found in four tower blocks were . they had their gas cut off with immediate effect. yesterday, the gas supply to 242
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flats in ledbury towers, south london was cut off with immediate effect. a letter was sent to residents saying officials would distribute electric hotplates and that residents could take showers at a local leisure centre. councillor stephanie cryan is deputy leader and cabinet member for housing at southwark council, shejoins us from our london newsroom. thank you very much for talking to us thank you very much for talking to us this morning. good morning. good morning. can you tell us, we have explained the number of flats in the process , explained the number of flats in the process, how long has it taken to get to this point? what was found in terms of what was structurally wrong with these flats? after the aftermath of grenfell tower, we had aftermath of grenfell tower, we had a resident come to us worried about cracks in the properties. we did a full structural report on the state of the properties. and yesterday we heard that actually there was a potential issue with the gas supply and we made the decision to cut it off immediately. just to be clear, we spoke a lot about cladding and fire risks. this is not an issue with cladding. this is an issue with
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gas. what are the risks posed by the gas? the structure of the tower block are similar to rogue point. if there was a gas explosion that could be in locations. that is why we took this decision when we found out to cut it off. as a member of suffolk council, you will be familiar with the criticism in terms of organisation of residence. what can you do to make the lives of those who live there easier and as little inconvenienced as possible? there will be some inconvenience but we wa nt to will be some inconvenience but we want to minimise it as much as possible. we want people to stay in their flats. we cut the gas supply off but we are giving hotplates to those who need them. there was some protesting when we found out there was an issue with the cracks in the building. anyone who wants to move out, we will get them accommodation.
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they can bid on the top band of housing if they want to move. we will find accommodation for those who want to. we also understand some will want to stay in their homes. therefore, we want to make sure we offer hotplates for cooking. the situation will last until we can make the electrical switch over. they can have hot water and cooking facilities. all of the leisure centres a re facilities. all of the leisure centres are available for anyone who needs to show as well. can you guarantee that they will be safe if they stay? —— shower. because the gas has been switched off, the risk of gas has been taken away from them. we have a fire safety issue, but there are wardens on every floor. we have talked to the london fire brigade to make sure people can stay safe in their homes. tell me, do you think that the examinations
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of these powers would have happened without the grenfell tower issue? -- towerds. we will we were looking at the cracks. the residents have flagged that up. people need to look around and take things more seriously. g re nfell tower and take things more seriously. grenfell tower is the catalyst. however, if the cracks —— cracks have been reported, we would have looked into them. i could not say one way or the other but i think g re nfell tower one way or the other but i think grenfell tower has put things into the spotlight. i tell you what has come to mind is that if residents are not flagging up these things they have flagged the past and have not been followed up, it feels like it is up to them to push councils like yours to check on safety and without that, these checks would not ta ke without that, these checks would not take place. is that fair? we took the decision after grenfell tower,
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we have 174 sour —— tower blocks in southwark and we have made the highest level of fire risk assessment. for residents in southwark, i want to reassure them, we are working to make sure residents are we are working to make sure residents a re safe we are working to make sure residents are safe as possible. thank you very much for your time. sarah is bringing us the weather. she has the bristol international balloon festival. has something blown up behind you? good morning. we have a window of fine weather in bristol for the 39th international balloon fiesta and it's quite some spectacle this morning. lots of balloons have already taken off. slowly drifting
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off into the distance. this is europe's largest annual gathering. the balloon fiesta runs over four days. there will be about half a million visitors. watching 130 balloons taking part in this incredible event. it is quite a tranquil start to the day. elsewhere across the country, it will be changing a bit today. outbreaks of rain at times. this morning, across bristol, sunshine, fairly light. quite fresh. a bit more cloud in the south—east of england. as we had our way northwards, sunshine across the morning. a bit of rain for the likes
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of cumbria, northumberland. quite windy with the outbreaks of rain. a bitter brightness across the east of scotland. cloudy, windy, with rain over the higher ground. for northern ireland, some clouds and outbreaks of mainly light and patchy rain. the rain pushing into western parts of wales. relatively light wind. some rain into the far south—west of england. as we head through the course of the day, that rain, strong wind, will move its way slowly further south—east. showers to the south—east of england. yet, temperatures will reach around 22 degrees. elsewhere, around 17— 19 celsius. into the evening hours, that rain through south—east england. clear spells and showers
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across much of the country and overnight, those showers ease away. the wind will fall as well. by the time we get to saturday morning, temperatures around 13, 15 degrees. saturday shaping up to be mainly fine day. some sunshine on offer. showers lingering. many of us will avoid any of those showers. lighter winds then we will see today. we will see those temperatures about 16,20 will see those temperatures about 16, 20 two degrees. but high—pressure nudging in through the course of the weekend, another largely dry day on sunday. the charts of a few showers here and there. the most of us, and other dry day with lighter winds and temperatures around 16, 20 two degrees. and improving picture through the weekend. you're watching breakfast from bbc news.
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ben is go to talk to us about what happens if you are going to change your house. many people have been through this know it is tedious. we've talked about the housing shortage. the government says 250,000 new homes need to be built in england every year to meet demand. but last year, the figure was nowhere near that. just 150,000 new homes were actually built. but there were nearly half a million planning applications in england last year — which suggests there is demand to build and extend homes, but the process can be slow and bureaucratic. so today — the free—market think tank
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the adam smith institute has a radical solution. he says you and your neighbours should decide on planning permission, not your local council. john myers is one of the lead campaigners and wrote this report. nice to see you. i said that you and your neighbours will be able to decide on planning permission. it's not quite as simple as that but nonetheless, it would be quite a departure from the current system. we set out to create an effective reform that is reallyjust a tweak to the existing system. it makes life easierfor to the existing system. it makes life easier for councils and planners. that is what they care about. where a whole street is in favour of a proposal, why shouldn't they be able to let that go through? ifi they be able to let that go through? if i want to extend the council says no, what can i do? the proposal is not aimed at individual applications. if the street would
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like to add a story or an extension, why not give them a vote? what concerns the neighbours is, what is going to look like at the end? with two thirds of the would like to do that, and they should have the ability to do it. let us say the entire street would get a blanket permission to build that extra story. or more ambitious, if they wa nt story. or more ambitious, if they want to. they don't have to do. they canjust sit want to. they don't have to do. they can just sit on it. in want to. they don't have to do. they canjust sit on it. in peak want to. they don't have to do. they can just sit on it. in peak demand, often a homeowner could be better off so there is a powerful incentive. adding value to the house, so it would make homeowners better off. how is it solve the housing crisis? it doesn't mean there are more homes to solve it? housing crisis? it doesn't mean there are more homes to solve it7m many cities, a lot of homes have been created by splitting houses into flats. that is one easy way. if
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the street wants to give them permission to knock down basic terraces. they should be allowed to do that. and people agreeing. getting neighbours to agree on anything is difficult. we share it should require a two thirds majority. really good to talk to you. after seven o'clock, i will talk more about the airport delays. more on that later. it's just over a month since six—year—old bradley lowery died after battling a rare form of cancer. the sunderland fan won a legion of supporters across the country, including footballerjermain defoe. now, in his first interview since bradley's death, jermain told the bbc how he's been inspired by his best mate. they were best friends and it was a friendship which captured the hearts of everyone. have a nice picture in
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the house of me and bradley at the england game. it's a special story. my england game. it's a special story. my best friend, he was genuine. he was a kid who knew... hejust loved his football. he loved me, i loved him and after seeing his eyes, it was genuine because he was a child. there was nothing i could give him apart from just being a friend. there was nothing i could give him apart from just being a friendm was an instant connection. even towards the end, when he was really struggling and you couldn't really move, i would walk into the move anti— fashion the room and he would justjump up and his mum said, he hasn't moved all day certainly, it was a special feeling. the emotion is still raw but the impact the little boy has had on dafoe has been
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striking. the bournemouth striker says it is a gift and he will be forever grateful. i always wake up thinking, you know, if you don't feel well, you feel tired, snap out of it. because i can see little kids suffer like that and still fight, to me, there is no bigger motivation. i could go through anything. you walked out within 70 times. could go through anything. you walked out within 70 timesm could go through anything. you walked out within 70 times. it was the best. he was looking down the tunnel. i came down the tunnel, gave him a cuddle. for him to do that, that was special. and we walked out, standing now, singing the national anthem. being involved in the squad and actually playing, and scoring... for me, it's one of the best moments of my career. you can see the whole
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of my career. you can see the whole of that interval —— interview on football focus. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. four tower blocks in peckham are due to be evacuated today after structural problems were found during a survey ordered in the wake of the fire at grenfell tower. more people are due to leave after a survey more people are due to leave after a survey was more people are due to leave after a survey was carried out in the way of the tower fire. southwark council says the building could collapse. the gas and water will be switched off. i'm going to have to move. i found out two hours ago. after how many years? 16 years. assistance for disabled passengers at london's busiest airport is among
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the worst in the country, according to a new report. the civil aviation authority rated the service at heathrow as poor or very poor by more than 60% of disabled passengers. heathrow says it's extremely disappointed" with the findings and says it will address them. film footage of the so—called battle of lewisham that was lost for decades has been rediscovered. it shows the national front march that took place in south london 40 years ago this weekend. up to 5,000 local people and activists stopped the march through the town centre. the footage features in an exhibition at goldsmith's all lines are running normally. with lucy martin.
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lots of dry and bright weather in the forecast. it will stay largely dry through much of the day of the cloud will increase later. with the detail onto the map, perhaps a touch more cloud. the litter the cloud bubbling up into the afternoon. we will see the next weather front pushing up. a little bit of cloud. that cloud, some outbreaks of rain, pushes in from the north—west. the cloud around, temperatures not falling too far. we start the day tomorrow with some cloud first thing. that will break to allow some good spells of sunshine, just the odd isolated shower, particularly in the morning.
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as move into sunday, it looks like a largely dry day. plenty of brightness around. a maximum of 19. fairly settled through monday. that of a wet and windy again is to move into tuesday. i will be back soon. and you can go to the website. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. arrests as the contaminated egg scandal spreads to more european countries. it's now known that 700,000 eggs have been sent to the uk from farms caught up in the scare. some processed foods have been pulled from supermarket shelves, but officials insist it's unlikely the public is at risk. good morning.
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it's friday, 11th august. also this morning, the us defence secretary says war with north korea would be catastrophic. james mattis insists diplomacy is delivering results. a friendship forged through football. one month on from the death of bradley lowery, jermain defoe speaks for the first time about his best friend. he loved his football. he loved me. i loved him. for me, it was how i saw him, it was a special feeling. good morning. iam saw him, it was a special feeling. good morning. i am live at the london stadium, on day eight of the world athletics championship. here on bbc breakfast we are getting excited about one british athlete in particular. six months ago she wrote herfoot particular. six months ago she wrote her foot at the beaming smile said it all. dina asher—smith is back and
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tonight she will line up against the world's vest in the 200 metres final. good morning. congestion, air traffic control strikes in bad weather or cause flight delays. but which airports and airlines are the worst offenders? i will have the details. and sarah has the weather. good morning. iam good morning. i am airborne at the balloon fiesta in bristol. i will bring you the weather details in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. police investigating the european egg contamination scandal have arrested two company directors following raids in the netherlands. here, the food standards agency has revealed that 700,000 contaminated eggs have been imported from dutch farms, but it insists it is "highly unlikely" they pose any risk to human health. sandwiches and salads are among the foods that have now been removed from uk supermarket shelves, as natasha emerson reports. millions of eggs destroyed, supermarkets scrambling to clear their shelves.
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and now, police raids and arrests. two men have been held by dutch police over batches of poisonous eggs sold across europe. fipronil, a pesticide commonly used to kill lice and fleas on pets, has made its way into the food chain. earlier this week, the food standards agency said 21,000 contaminated eggs had been imported to the uk. now, it thinks it could be as many as 700,000. but that's still only a fraction of the 34 million we eat each day. and the agency said you would have to eat 10,000 contaminated eggs to see any effect. there's no reason people should avoid eating eggs. our assessment is it is unlikely there is any public health risk. we think people deserve food they can trust. that means not having food that has a substance that should not be there. so far, some salads and sandwiches sold by these four supermarkets have been withdrawn from sale, but whole eggs are safe. despite those reassurances,
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the scandal continues to spread through europe, millions of eggs will be destroyed, as will hundreds of thousands of hens. four years ago, horsemeat was found in burgers and ready meals. once again, questions are being raised about what goes in processed foods and where it comes from. officials hope that the contaminated eggs will be out of the food chain soon, but the investigation into europe's latest food scandal is likely to go on for some time. we will be speaking to a global food security expert about what can be done to protect the uk food chain from this kind of contamination in just under ten minutes. the us defence secretary james mattis says america is still trying to use diplomacy to resolve the growing tension with north korea and that war would be catastrophic. he said diplomatic efforts were yielding results, though military options were ready if needed. he made his remarks shortly after president trump had stepped up his rhetoric, saying his threat
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to unleash "fire and fury" on north korea might not have been tough enough. my portfolio, my mission, my responsibility, is to have military options should they be needed. the american effort is diplomatically led, it has diplomatic traction and is gaining diplomatic results. and i want to stay right there right now. the tragedy of war is well enough known and does not need another characterisation beyond the fact that it would be catastrophic. let's see what he does with guam. he does something in guam, it will be an event the likes of which nobody has seen before, what will happen in north korea. robin brant is in seoul for us this morning. you heard the president's reaction, pretty strong words. how are all there reacting to this escalating tension? —— how are people there
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reacting. what a contrast in tone from those two men. people in south korea have lived with the prospect of conflict with their northern neighbourfor decades. of conflict with their northern neighbour for decades. there has been no change in the alert here. we're not seeing more of military presence. they were prepared for swift action yesterday. in terms of people on the streets they would need more assurance to hear other comments coming from president trump when he reminded north korea that they cannot go around threatening they cannot go around threatening the us,japan and they cannot go around threatening the us, japan and south korea, because that military alliance between south korea and the us is crucial diplomatically, but also in terms of protecting this country. south koreans have elected a new president relatively recently, president moon, who is more conciliatory in his tone. he wants pyongyang back at the negotiating table to negotiate a lasting peace on the peninsula. i think that tally is much more with the tone of what james mattis was seen, in terms of
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this primarily eating a diplomatic effort. —— tallies much more. hundreds of people are going to be moved out of their high rise flats after an investigation has revealed they are not safe there. 242 flats in south east london are affected. the issue with the gas supply was discovered during an investigation into fire safety prompted by the grenfell tower tragedy. dan johnson is there with the latest. dan, what is the nature of the problem? quite complicated. let's make it clear, this is not about cladding, although this investigation started after the g re nfell tower. investigation started after the grenfell tower. it is not even primarily about fire safety. this is about the structure of the towers and whether or not they are strong enough to endure something like a gas explosion. there was supposed to be worked on these towers in the 19605 be worked on these towers in the 1960s after a similar block collapsed when there was a gas explosion. but now the council has
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uncovered that it looks like that work was never done, so it cannot guarantee that those towers would the safe if there was a gas explosion. that is why they have called for the gas supply to be switched off immediately. gas engineers have just arrived. switched off immediately. gas engineers havejust arrived. it switched off immediately. gas engineers have just arrived. it is not a problem with the gas supply itself, it is the structure of the building that they need to make safe. to do that work they will have to move residents out. they will have to reinforce the building and convert the heating and hot water to electric. so residents will have to be relocated at least temporarily. lots of work to do here. this is potentially a big issue which could affect many other tower blocks constructed at the same time. it is another big issue that is developing, another worry for people living in high—rise blocks. the airports and airlines with the worst summer flight delays have been revealed. if they are on this list they might not want to listen to you now? no, we are going to name and shame them. this is a bbc investigation looking at the data, airports and airlines
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over the past two summers. it is interesting. it is caused by all sorts of things. their congestion, obviously. too many planes in the skies. what sort out traffic control strikes in france, italy and spain over the past few years. —— lots of air traffic control strikes. and bad weather. the investigation found one in five flights to and from the uk had a delay of more than 30 minutes. if it is just 30 minutes you don't mind too much. this evidence suggests it is becoming increasingly common. the worst airline, the worst offender, easyjet. an average flight delay in the summer of 24 minutes. easyj et, delay in the summer of 24 minutes. easyjet, for its part, it says that is because they carry more passengers. they are a bigger airline, they have 78 million passengers every year. the airport thatis passengers every year. the airport that is the worst offender is gatwick. the average weight there is 27 minutes after your scheduled departure time. —— wait. gatwick
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says they only have one runway, they are very congested and they fly lots to europe, which is most susceptible to europe, which is most susceptible to congestion and air traffic strikes. there is good news. if you travel from a local, smaller, regional airport, they tend to do better. leeds bradford and belfast airport hosted well. they had the shortest delays. if you are delayed, does it necessarily mean you arrive late? no, this is interesting. this is what the trains have been caught up is what the trains have been caught up on. they give themselves more time in the arrival time. they say that they will arrive a bit later than they do, which means they a lwa ys than they do, which means they always arrive on time. so even if you take off late, you might make up that time in the air, all the scheduled arrival time is late anyway, so it looks like you arrive on time, they don't have to pay compensation and nobody is unhappy. but the train companies were caught up but the train companies were caught up with that. one word on the airports, if you want to check where
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you regularly travel to and from you can check it out on our website. thank you. let's look at sport. and there were some shocks at the world athletics championship in london last night in the men's 200 metres. the favourites missed out but they we re the favourites missed out but they were safe there is a lending for botswa na's were safe there is a lending for botswana's isaac mcqualter, who ran a solo time trailjust to get there. —— there was a fairytale ending for botswa na's —— there was a fairytale ending for botswana's isaac mcqualter. he emerged to a great crowd. after beating illness, could he beat his rivals? it did not have a happy ending. south africa's wade vanni kirk looked on course for his second title, but it was an heralded —— and unheralded name which grabbed the headlines. ramil guliyev taking gold, from turkey, ahead of wade vanni kirk and isaac mcqualter back in sixth. for the botswanan it was
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not to be. it was not to be. i had a crazy day yesterday. 200 metres yesterday. earlier, there were hopes of reduced success for aily doyle in the hurdles, but the team captain finished last in herfinals, with america's corey carter taking gold. today, the uk's hopes will be led by dina asher—smith in the women's 200 metres and lorraine ugen in the long jump. after six days without a british medal, the fans will be crossing theirfingers. there it is, the london stadium, where all the action will take place through the programme. after eight o'clock we will be speaking to colin jackson, and he will tell us who he thinks he has his eye on for success later today. everybody is fascinated by things that get washed up on the beach. little things, big things. look at
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this. this is the coast of norfolk. you get a sense looking from a distance that there is some really big stuff that has washed up here. the maritime and coastguard agency confirms two large plastic pipes, and when we say large, you can see those people near them. they are eight feet in diameter.” those people near them. they are eight feet in diameter. i was concerned about this yellow and red thing on the end of the pipes. if they are eight feet in diameter you would think you would be able to run through them. they are, apparently, are the plug—ins. you could get an anchor on to that as well. you could tell it and link it to other pipes. i was concerned, because if you wait ina minute, i was concerned, because if you wait in a minute, you can see the other end of the pipe, which is hollow. anyway, what we are asking you today is, have you seen things washed up on the beach that are unusual? a p pa re ntly on the beach that are unusual? apparently there are ten more of these which are missing. they were being heard, and came loose, and they were just drifting around, and lo and behold they have ended up in norfolk. —— they were being towed.
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if you have seen anything like that wash up on the beach, send us a picture. now it four years ago british shoppers were horrified to find there could be traces of horse meat in the food they were buying from supermarkets. now another food scandal has forced retailers to pull products from their shelves. this time it's eggs contaminated with the pesticide fipronil. professor chris elliott is director of the institute for global food safety. he led an investigation into the uk food industry after the horsemeat scandal and joins us from belfast. thank you very much forjoining us this morning. good morning. what do you make of these eggs getting into the food chain, into the supermarkets — at one point they thought it was 21,000, now up to 700,000 contaminated eggs in our foodchain — how has this happened?
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the information points towards a legal practice that has happened —— illegal practice that has happened in holland and further across europe. the number of eggs that have come into the uk is not known for sure. started with a small number, rose to 700,000, and i would not be surprised if it reaches several million by the end of next week. ok, several million contaminated eggs. will they be in our system still? what about the extra eggs? what is emerging is this illegal practice and the use of this insecticide could have been going on for a considerable period of time. most of those egg products have now been consumed. the products we know our contaminated in the uk, the retailer is selling the product are undertaking voluntary recall is as a
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precautionary measure at the moment. the implication is for many supermarkets that we buy and eat british eggs. how clear, how where are we as consumers as that non— british eggs are in sandwich fillings, which is what these eggs have been used for? on a broader context we don't know what we are eating and we don't know where it comes from. specifically on eggs we are 85% self—sufficient. we import over1 billion eggs per year, which end up in heavily processed foods like mayonnaise and sam burgess. you don't really know where the material comes from. why do you think that is, whose fault is it, is that the supermarkets, the food standards agency? i am not sure we blame
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anybody about this. it would be virtually impossible to name the country of origin of all of the ingredients in processed foods. you could have 25— 30 ingredients and it would be impossible to put those on labels. it is a clear message here that those people who have been implicated in this in the uk, that they are not involved in scandal in any way. the fact that they have imported materials from another part of europe means that they have become vulnerable now. there is a clear message, purchase local when you can. we have a fantastic industry in the uk. we should support it much more. we are hearing that the european commission has called an emergency meeting of ministers from the countries affected by this scandal. what are the key issues that they will discuss next? action needs to be taken. consumers need to be made safe. and this cannot happen again.
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even more significant than the work of the european commission is europol and the police force. they are conducting a european wide investigation to see how far this illegal use has spread. there is the potential that other member states may become embroiled in this scandal over the next few days. what eve ryo ne over the next few days. what everyone is trying to do is find out the level of the amount of abuse that has gone on, where have the products, and, and can they be withdrawn from supermarket shelves? not only across europe, right across the world. could this affect chicken flesh itself? the likelihood of that is not known. i am aware there is a government laboratory in the netherlands testing the meat from the affected flocks. we should have the affected flocks. we should have the results of their testing at the end of today or tomorrow. good to talk to you this morning. thank you
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very much. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. we are going to have a look at the weather. is it ratherforlorn, watching a balloon lying on its side? it will be pumped up soon. pumped up? well, air is going to be pumped into it, like a bicycle tyre. iam not pumped into it, like a bicycle tyre. i am not sure that is the technical term. good morning. yes, the balloons will be inflated this morning. i want to show you this special balloon. this red and yellow striped balloon is known as the bristol bell, and it was the first modern hot air balloon anywhere in europe, designed and built by don cameron, the founder here. the bristol bell is one of 130 balloons taking part in the festival over the course of four days, it is a free
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event and we will see around 500,000 people taking part, coming to spectate. it is really quite a spectacle, watching these balloons taking off and completely filling the sky. so, this morning it is fine and tranquil to start the day with some blue skies, relatively light wind, so ideal conditions for balloons. elsewhere across the country, rain at times. a weather front is heading west to east across the country. this morning in bristol and across central and southern england it is a fine morning and dry with sunshine. more cloud and misty weather in the south—east. as we head through the north, clear skies and sunshine through the midlands and sunshine through the midlands and northern england. there is rain across cumbria, northumberland, into southern scotland. for eastern scotla nd southern scotland. for eastern scotland around murray first we will see brightness this morning. western scotla nd see brightness this morning. western scotland will stay cloudy with outbreaks of rain —— firth. and also quite windy with the arrival of the
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rain. northern ireland is cloudy and breezy and some of the rain heading into the west of wales. central and east wales remains fine and dry. it will be dry in the south—west. the rain across the isles of scilly into western parts of cornwall. through the course of the day the rain in northern and western parts of the uk, accompanied by the strong wind, moves further east. the south—east of england and east anglia should be dry for of england and east anglia should be dryfora of england and east anglia should be dry for a good part of the day. in the sunshine temperatures set to reach 22 degrees. elsewhere, typically 17— 19 degrees. this evening and overnight, the rain will move evening and overnight, the rain will m ove a cross evening and overnight, the rain will move across the south—east of england. it is followed by clear spells and showers across the country. through the course of tonight most of the showers will ease and the wind wilful lighter. heading through the second half of the night into the early hours of saturday temperatures down to 13— 15 to start the weekend. it is not
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looking too bad with high pressure in charge and some showers across wales, northern england and scotland. elsewhere, most of us will avoid the showers. there will be spells of sunshine. the wind will ease through the day with temperatures around 16— 22 degrees and the high pressure will hold on through saturday evening and overnight into sunday. on onto the second half of the weekend, sunday will be another largely dry day. some spells of sunshine. it should bea some spells of sunshine. it should be a little bit less breezy than saturday. the chance of one or two rogue showers around but most of us will stay dry with temperatures around 16— 22 degrees. rain today but the weather isn't looking decent through the weekend. very good. thank you. it looks magnificent. lovely. thank you. the number of primary school children in england being excluded and sent to specialist schools known as pupil referral units has risen sharply.
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research by bbc breakfast has found more than 1,300 young children are now being taught in this way, a rise of 66% in five years. although overall pupil numbers have gone up, that doesn't account for the increase. breakfast‘sjohn mcguire visited a specialist centre in norfolk. which surface will the car travel over. engaging lessons, artwork on the wall and positive measures everywhere — typical of a school. but brooklyn's is different, a pupil referral unit, or a shortstay school, children in norfolk come here if they have been excluded or are deemed to challenging to be taught by the original primary. we spoke to some of out why they left their old school and we are protecting their identity. their old school and we are protecting their identitym their old school and we are protecting their identity. it didn't make me comfortable. it was horrible. the teachers were not that nice. i like it here. the teachers are kind. i have been thought a lot
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about maths. it is really fun. latest figures show 1306 e eight are being taught in similar schools in england, an increase of 66% over the last five years, although the number of children overall has risen. here at brooklands they believe one reason is the pressure on mainstream head teachers. you have a challenging young person. at the same time they have teachers told, we don't have the money to support the young person. i don't think any young teacher wants to do that. faced with the culture that we have at the moment, many don't have any choice. norfolk county council says exclusions have dropped but are still too high and continue to create pressure locally and nationally. it is working with schools to address the issue. this pa rent schools to address the issue. this parent is happy with the education and support her son receives at
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brooklands but believes they should have been a better understanding of his condition at his old primary, and a place for him at a special school. he has autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.” was upset because he was being classed as a naughty child. but he wasn't. he had learning difficulties. when they were restraining him he would have bruises on his arms when he finished school. sometimes he would be locked ina room school. sometimes he would be locked in a room kicking the walls and head—butting. i felt like every day i was sending my child to a prison. not school. experts believe cuts in the help for families who need extra support is one of the reasons for an increase in the use of pupil referral units. those support services are not there either in helping teachers cope with some of thoseissues helping teachers cope with some of those issues that exhibit themselves in the classroom, or some other feelings young people have about schools, or some feelings they about themselves, then i think we need to look at this quite seriously. the
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government says children in referral units represent 0.03% of the primary population. these schools ensure children receive a high quality education. as a shortstay school, brooklyn's is designed to teach children from just two terms but now has some for up to two years. it is highly effective in returning pupils to mainstream or special schools and here they believe every child deserves a second chance and must be given every chance to succeed. martin thacker, is head teacher at calow primary school, near chesterfield. hejoins us now. good morning. good morning. it is harrowing to hear those stories of a mother talking about the circumstances that her child found themselves in at a mainstream school that led to the exclusion. what is your experience from your school?” have been head teacherfor 17
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your experience from your school?” have been head teacher for 17 years. my have been head teacher for 17 years. my experience is in that time i have permanently excluded three children. the number of children who have been excluded on a fixed term basis has increased over the last two or three yea rs. increased over the last two or three years. and can you see a pattern - what have you put that down to? budget cuts. the number of schools experiencing difficulties with managing budgets has led to issues like staffing, so the actual pupil — staff ratio has increased. the typical ratio is one teacher to every 35 students and we have had to put teaching assistants back and they are the members of staff to support students experiencing difficulties. the implication is you will be put in a situation where you need to exclude students more frequently? i predict that. when you exclude them, what do you think is the best... the best way to help
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them through this exclusion, is it to be sent home, or a pru? in the first instance, every teacher tries their hardest not to exclude. you try to work with a range of agencies, behavioursupport, try to work with a range of agencies, behaviour support, teams and so on, to try to implement strategies to help children stay in mainstream education. when it comes to the point that the child is disruptive, maybe violent, putting safety at risk, and others, then you have to look at a fixed term exclusions and leading to permanent exclusions, and ideally into a pupil referral unit so they might as support, the staffing ratio is better, and working into the mainstream. they need to be new to the school, don't they, so you have to have a pru close to the school so they can be put back into the mainstream? you would hope so, because a child moved by taxi miles
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away is not ideal for the child. the conclusions, when you look at the statistics, people might think behaviour is getting worse — the picture you are painting is much more nuanced, staffing levels are a huge part of what might in previous times have been something you could cope with? i see some types of assault which have increased and worsened over the years. i don't say that children are more badly behaved. you say assaults? on staff. in primary school? yes in primary school. throwing furniture deliberately towards a member of staff, and that is sold. interesting to talk to you this morning. thank you —— that is assault. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. four tower blocks in peckham are due to be evacuated today after structural problems were found during a survey ordered in the wake
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of the fire at grenfell tower. more people are due to leave after a survey was carried out in the way of the tower fire. southwark council says the building could collapse. the gas and water will be switched off. i'm going to have to move. yeah. i found out two hours ago. after how many years? ah, 16 years. were you safe? apparently not. assistance for disabled passengers at london's busiest airport is among the worst in the country, according to a new report. the civil aviation authority rated the service at heathrow as poor or very poor by more than 60% of disabled passengers. heathrow says it's extremely disappointed" with the findings and says it will address them. film footage of the so—called battle of lewisham that was lost for decades has been rediscovered.
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it shows the national front march that took place in south london 40 years ago this weekend. up to 5,000 local people and activists stopped the march through the town centre. the footage features in an exhibition at goldsmith's university to commemorate the event. travel now. all lines are running normally on the tube, i'm pleased to say, no reported problems at the moment. southern trains between milton keynes central and east croydon and between london bridge and beckenham junction are disrupted because of staff shortages. southern thameslink and the gatwick express have 15 minute delays. and it's slow on the a406 north circular, westbound into the a1 at henlys corner. those delays there are back to the east end road in east finchley. let's have a check on the weather now, here's lucy martin. hello, good morning. lots of dry and bright weather in the forecast. it will stay largely dry through much of the day
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but the cloud will increase later thanks to our next weather front. with the detail onto the map, perhaps a touch more cloud. a little bit of cloud bubbling up into the afternoon. you can just see our next weather front pushing up. a little bit of cloud. that cloud, some outbreaks of rain, pushes in from the north—west. the cloud around, temperatures not falling too far. overnight not falling too far. lows of around 16 degrees. we start the day tomorrow with some cloud first thing. that will thin and break to allow some good spells of sunshine, just the odd isolated shower, particularly in the morning. highs of 21 degrees. as move into sunday, sunday looks like a largely dry day. there will be plenty of brightness around. temperatures reaching a maximum of 19. fairly settled through monday. not long before things turn a little
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wet and windy as we move into tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. let's bring you up to date. in the past half hour we've heard that an emergency meeting is being called of ministers from the key european countries affected by the egg contamination scandal. here the food standards agency has revealed that 700,000 contaminated eggs have been imported from dutch farms, but it insists it is "highly unlikely" they pose any risk to human health. sandwiches and salads are among the foods that have now been removed from uk supermarket shelves. the us defence secretary james mattis says america is still trying to use diplomacy to resolve the growing tension with north korea — and that war would be catastrophic. he said diplomatic efforts were yielding results, though military options were ready if needed. he made his remarks shortly after president trump had stepped up his rhetoric — saying his threat to unleash ‘fire and fury '
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on north korea might not have been tough enough. donations made to the victims of the grenfell tower fire are not reaching survivors quickly enough, according to campaigners in west london. figures from the charity commission show that less than 15% of the £189 million raised has been given to people affected almost two months after the tragedy, but it says that early difficulties in identifying and contacting those who need help are being overcome. passengers flying from gatwick during the last two summers experienced the longest average delays, according to flight data analysed by the bbc. among the ten biggest airlines, easyjet travellers suffered the worst hold—ups with an average delay of 24 minutes. both the airport and the airline say many of the problems were beyond their control. canada's foreign ministry is investigating why at least one of its diplomats stationed in cuba has needed treatment for hearing loss and headaches.
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yesterday it emerged american diplomats in havana have experienced symptoms associated with deafness. media reports suggest cuban agents may have used a sonic device that causes hearing loss. havana denies the allegation, but the us has removed two cuban diplomats from washington dc in retaliation. coming upa coming up a little bit later on, sarah will have the weather and some beautiful images from a balloon festival in bristol. blue skies and balloons. very colourful ones, too. let's go tojessica, who is at the london stadium covering the world athletics championship. it looks like a grey day from that camera angle, not at least we will not see the rain that we have had in the last couple of days? —— but at least. yes, good morning. it is drier today. the sun is coming out. it isa drier today. the sun is coming out. it is a very busy here with staff setting up events, but today we are
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looking forward to dina asher—smith. she was actually in the stadium for the olympics in 2012, but she was not competing. she was a kit carrier, and she was so inspired by the events that she took athletics more seriously, and five years later here she is racing against some of the rest in the world. —— best. it's been a difficult season for dina asher smith. in february she broke herfoot. but she was in impressive form in the 200 metres heats and then last night she dazzled us all again. she finished second in her semi final going through to tonight's final as an automatic qualifier. she's the only british woman in the showpiece. i completely broke my leg. i had to spend six weeks not doing anything. putting weight on it. and then gradually putting weight on it for the next six weeks. i was out of walking. then i learned how to walk. and then i am here.
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it was not that bad. i am joking, i would not recommend it. it was not that fun. also in action in the 200 metres last night was isaac makwala. but there was no fairytale ending to an incredible few days for him, as he finished 6th. you'll remember makwala was forced to miss the final of the 400 metres due to illness and had to run a time trialjust to get through in the 200. having made the final he was in contention around the bend but couldn't hang on. turkey's ramil gulyev won gold, ahead of wayde van niekerk. great britain's nathaneel mitchel blake finished fourth. makwala blamed his performance on having to run two races the day before. and disappointment for a—league oil in the 200 metre hurdles. she came last in the finals, which was won by the american corey carter. there will be three british women in the semifinals of the women's 800 metres later this evening.
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lynsey sharp, adelle tracy and shelayna oskan clarke all through. and there will be two british men into tonight's 1500 metres semi final. meanwhile, an exhausted laura muir qualified for the final of the 5,000 metres. she was one of the fastest losers in her semi final, with the exertions of finishing fourth in the 1500 metres earlier this week looking like they've taken their toll on her. eilish mccolgan looked impressive as she also made it through, running a personal best time. katarina johnson—thompson has gone some way to making up for her disappointing performance in the heptathlon, she made the final of the individual high jump. where she will be joined by morgan lake who also cleared the qualifying height. ahead of the men's triple jump final there had been talk that the american christian taylor could break jonathan edwards's 22—year—old world record. he didn't — but still won gold with a jump of 17.68 metres. one other story for you away from
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the athletics. the premier league returns tonight with arsenal playing host to leicester city. arsenal haven't won their opening game since 2014 and manager arsene wenger knows they need to change that. the squad looks good. we need to transform the quality of the preparation in the points. that is a pragmatic view, of course. what matters is the next game and winning it and starting in a strong way which we did not do last year. that is what we want to achieve this year. that final with dina asher—smith in the 200 metres is tonight at about 950 pm. . also going for gold will be lorraine ugen in the women's long jump. and there is a morning session here today. coverage begins on bbc two at 930 a.m.. it's august, and for lots of us it means holiday time at the beach. cue lots of selfies of people strutting about in their swimwear
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having fun. earlier this week, former vogue editor alexandra shulman posted one selfie that sparked lots of debate as to whether we should edit our pics, or leave them natural. do you often take selfies?” do you often take selfies? i very rarely ta ke do you often take selfies? i very rarely take selfies. i don't think that i would. at some people do. the point being with her that she was wearing very little, and if she hadn't been the editor of vogue, which is famous for taking pictures ofa which is famous for taking pictures of a certain style. now, the all party parliamentary group on body image, has told bbc breakfast it is particularly concerned about "body image anxiety" amongst young people at this time of year. we spoke to some to find out. just do a filter, clear your skin.” do filters on instagram. would any
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of you put up a picture which was not filtered at all? yeah. if i take a picture, as long as i am good with it, i don't care what anyone else thinks. do you think there is pressure on you to always be edited, looking your best? i think sometimes it makes you look nicer, and i am not really self—conscious about not using a filter. it makes you look better, knowing that you can have a picture that everybody else will, not appreciate, but everybody else will like it like you do. what about celebrities? when you see their pictures to you presume they are filtered? you often hope they are, because they look that good, and you don't look like that. so it gives you a bit of relief to know that thatis you a bit of relief to know that that is not real. i like it when celebrities do natural photos. then again, you know they have make—up. it is not a surprise. i am going to make your tussle is longer, your waste skinnier. i can put some make—up on you. wow! i would just
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say, i think that hayley looked great before all the adjustments in that selfie. but some people do make adjustments. joining us now is natasha devon, a former model and writer and kady mcdermott, a reality tv star who has almost one million instagram followers. good morning. kady, we saw our reporter than having all her images twea ked reporter than having all her images tweaked with filters. i think she looks lovely, that she wouldn't need to change it. why do people feel the need to tweak how they look? so that it is not a true image of themselves? social media is massive nowadays. girls feel very pressured, naturally, when they see all these perfect people. maybe they are edited, so people do feel under pressure, but it is a very difficult subject. some people do it and some people don't. do you? i don't edit
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my photos but i do use filters, if only to brighten the image. i make sure my quality is good. i take them ona sure my quality is good. i take them on a camera, so i tweak the contrast. but i do not edit or change the features on my body in any way. you are a stunning looking woman, but this, the first picture there, does not look like how you look here? really? you don't think so? i think you look at in real life, personally. really! thank you. the point i am making is that people look at these images and see highly glamorised, perfect images, and they think they need to be like that. do you know what, i get lots of people messaging me and saying, they want to look like me, and it does upset me. i try to respond to people and say they are beautiful the way they are. but on my instagram i upload photos, i do snapchat sioux without a scrap one as well. i have got
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folder was from the age of 11 following me so it is really important to me that i do not edit my photos. —— i have got followers on the age of 11. i would never edit a photo so that people think it does not look like me because that's is showing in 11—year—olds that they should edit their photos. they should edit their photos. they should be confident in themselves. there is evidence in the arena. for those prolific social media users, pa rt of those prolific social media users, part of the brain in the frontal lobe responsible for understanding how you fit in the social hierarchy, which can become enlarged in adolescents who spend a lot of time online. that means they are obsessively concerned with how they compare with other people. that has an effect with everything. so the girl guide attitude survey found 52% of12— girl guide attitude survey found 52% of 12— 14—year—old girls avoid everyday school activities because
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they don't like the way that they look. you have to respect information like that. maybe taking the focus away from individual social media users. that kind of blame is not useful. looking at social media as an incredible tool to share information and ask ourselves if we are using it in the best way that we can. help with that one — best way that we can. help with that one—iam best way that we can. help with that one — i am not quite clear what you are saying. should we be more relaxed about the altering of images on social media — is that what you are saying? what alexander has done is positive, someone who has... i work in the fashion industry 20 years ago. even then she was a name, she is a alpha female. for her to say, i didn't put my life on hold, i have achieved these things and i look normal underneath my clothes. the difference with alexandra and katie is age and who is more able to
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be related with an young people are likely to want to look like katie's image and brand than alexandra, even though she is successful and smart, she is from a different generation and she is not someone they can relate to. perhaps not relate to, though she is aspirational in that she has achieved a lot. we do young people a disservice if we assume they are narcissistic or want to look at certain way. there are a lot of ambitious young women who need role models. what do you think when there is a parliamentary body that says it is the time of year to be much more concerned about how young people feel, and young people assessing their looks — who takes responsibility, as someone with influence over the generation, in influencing them? my following is 90% women. i have girls messaging me
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all the time and ladies up to 50— 60, they say that i give them motivation. i am a size six and very little, though i still have stretch marks, and! little, though i still have stretch marks, and i have uploaded straight from the beach, some might look more perfect, there are some on holiday with my boyfriend and people like that i could have easily downloaded an app, smoothed it over and said i don't have stretch marks. i am happy with myself. people have messaged me to say that i have helped them to give them confidence as well. people say that people look perfect on the outside, though you're not, always, eve ryo ne outside, though you're not, always, everyone has flaws, and it is about embracing that. thank you so much of this morning. tell us what you think. stay in touch. whether or not you filter your selfies or not. i will tell you who needs no filter, sarah. sarah's bringing us the weather from the bristol international balloon festival this morning. the pictures are stunning. the balloons are impressive. i am loving
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your coat this morning. it is a gorgeous morning here. we have sunshine to start the day. we have had the mass ascent this morning, 104 balloons taken to the skies. you can see some small model hot air balloons. these are scale models of the bigger balloons as well. it is a sareen morning. we have blue the bigger balloons as well. it is a sareen morning. we have blue skies. quite tranquil. there is some sunshine and light winds. —— serene. elsewhere across the country, a front moving in. there will be outbreaks of rain at times. across much of england it is a gorgeous morning with lots of sunshine, try it with light winds, a little cloud in parts of the south and west and south east of england. a little bit of mist and murk. quite fresh feeling around 14— 15. heading
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north across the country, blue skies and sunshine. across northern england, there will be cloud and rain at 9am across northumberland and cumbria, and rain in scotland. sunshine for eastern scotland around aberdeenshire. for western scotland we have cloud and outbreaks of rain. continuing into northern ireland. it will be windy with the rain around as well. the rain moves in across the rest of wales. central and east wales is fine and dry. much of south—west england begins on a fine note, with a little rain in western cornwall and the isles of scilly. the rain in the north and west, along with the strong wind, will shift south eastwards. much of south—east england and south and east anglia should be fine. 22 degrees. elsewhere, typically 17— 19. it will feel quite breezy. through the evening the band of rain crosses through the south—east of
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england and east anglia, followed by clear spells and showers across all of the country overnight. the showers will ease away and the wind will fall lighter, so temperatures fall overnight around 13— 15 degrees in towns and cities, and cold in the countryside. what about the weekend? high pressure is moving in. it is an improving picture. plenty of sunshine on saturday. showers around parts of scotland, northern england. many avoiding those showers. and by the afternoon in the sunny spells we will see top temperatures between 16- 22, will see top temperatures between 16— 22, so not bad, some showers and breezy. i pressure stays in charge as we look at the second half of the weekend. another largely dry day on sunday with the odd rogue shower around, though many of we the showers with temperatures between 16- 21 showers with temperatures between 16— 21 degrees or so. so, rain at times, but we will see a mainly fine weekend.
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thanks very much. it really does look marvellous. we will speak to you later. so, ben is talking to us this morning about women in business. yes, fascinating stories. we often talk to people who are doing some quite cool things. we are going to talk about that this morning. yes — this is the latest in our inspirational businesswoman series. today's guest founded a tech company that works with big brands to make sure their adverts get seen and shared online. they use all sorts of data to work out how and why something would go viral. sarah's been involved in famous adverts like the evian rollerskating babies ad and the dove body sketches ad. let's take a look. # hip, hot. # the rhythm of the
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boogie. today i am gonna ask you some questions about a person you met earlier, and i am gonna ask you some general questions about her face. she was thin, so you could see her cheekbones. and her chin was no sense in. she had nice eyes. -- her chin was nice and thin. she had nice blue eyes. sarah wood, welcome to breakfast. hi, ben. you don't make the ads. crucially, you make viral. we make them famous, we are a technology platform, and the date we have been collecting over the last decade is what we use to connect 90% of the biggest brands with 1.4 billion
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consumers. you biggest brands with 1.4 billion consumers. you make biggest brands with 1.4 billion consumers. you make it sound very easy — how do you do that? consumers. you make it sound very easy - how do you do that? a lot goes into it, though essentially we collect data on why people connect with videos, what gets them sharing content and what gets them reacting to the content. we found a motion is key. creating a stronger emotional impact is what makes all of the difference —— emotion. when we think about bringing emotional intelligence to digital advertising. we have a lot of connection with ads, thinking specifically about supermarkets at christmas, thejohn lewis ad, the sainsbury is that, those are the ones we like and share and wait for. —— sainsbury is ad. that has changed. we actively search out advertising in a way that we thought, you know, iwant out advertising in a way that we thought, you know, i want to avoid it. the best ads become content. you see this at moments such as the super bowl in the us and christmas here. the feelings of anticipation and excitement gets people enjoying
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the content, remembering the ad and wanting to purchase from the brand. it has not always been about tech for you, has it? it has not always been about tech foryou, has it? let's it has not always been about tech for you, has it? let's go back a couple of years. you left a job as a history lecturer to start this firm. why? | history lecturer to start this firm. why? i was lecturing american studies at sussex university, i was an academic, in a job i loved with collea g u es an academic, in a job i loved with colleagues are loved, and i was teaching the american revolution, and what i realised was there was a revolution going on outside the door, the internet revolution and the social web is becoming huge. and i wanted to be part of that. then there were personal reasons as well —iwasa there were personal reasons as well — i was a mother of two of doing the long commute from london into sussex, and every week i left my son at the nursery and it broke my heart. it was difficult to change this. what is it that triggers this moment of change? it was 7/7. i was on the system when the bomb exploded. luckily, was caught up. i was evacuated from the station. i
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went home feeling lucky and i thought, if it was my last day, am i making it count? that is when i made the change of. people for that you we re the change of. people for that you were mad to make the change, leaving a good job, you had a mortgage, you had kids, and you said, we're gonna start a business — how did you make the decision to take the gamble on it? starting a business is like having kids — there is never the right time, there is always a reason not to do it. what i learned as an academic is it is great to be curious and those who succeed keep learning and exploring ideas and those who are prepared to take risks. so it felt like a good time because we could see this big opportunity in social media, nvidia advertising. we take it for granted, although you were starting this business, there was no twitter or facebook —— video advertising. you spotted the trend. it was an
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incredibly disruptive business model. web advertising was just becoming a thing. there was no advertising on youtube. we took a risk on that. we could see huge interest. we do that by iteating. we had a comedy website first. what we saw was lots of people loved video —— iterating. saw was lots of people loved video -- iterating. so successful, rupert murdoch's approached you, news corp now owns you. “— murdoch's approached you, news corp now owns you. —— newscorp. is there a worry that you are selling at? we are autonomous. and newscorp have purchased us because of our entrepreneurial culture. they have started up a lab that is about bringing on board six companies to incubate ideas to create the future of storytelling and journalism. i think newscorp, like lots of others, understand the importance of innovative thinking. so much more i wa nt to innovative thinking. so much more i want to talk to you about, sarah, and you are not going anywhere — we
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will continue this conversation on facebook live on the bbc breakfast page at 8:15am, so send in your questions and i will put them to her, she is going to stick around. thank you very much. i won't have you answer it now but i want to know your favourite advert of all—time. put it on facebook. thank you. it is on. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. southwark council have tried to reassure residents who have been evacuated from tower blocks after structural problems were found. more people are due to leave after a survey was carried out in the wake of the tower fire. southwark council says the building could collapse. the gas and water will be switched off. i'm going to have to move.
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i totally understand residents are worried, and i understand why they are worried. what i would like to reassure residents is as soon as we knew about the issue we can't offer gas supply to make residents as safe as possible. there will be inconvenience, unfortunately, as a consequence, but we are working around the clock to fix this as well. a woman has been dragged to the ground after she was targeted by a gangin ground after she was targeted by a gang in lewisham boost turner does. —— in lewisham, who snatched her necklace. assistance for disabled passengers at london's busiest airport is among the worst in the country, according to a new report. the civil aviation authority rated the service at heathrow as poor or very poor by more than 60% of disabled passengers. heathrow says it's extremely disappointed" with the findings and says it will address them. let's have a check on the travel now.
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all lines are running normally on the tube, no reported problems at the moment. southern trains between milton keynes central and east croydon and between london bridge and beckenham junction are disrupted because of staff shortages. southern thameslink and the gatwick express have 15 minute delays. and roadworks are slowing things down on the seven sisters road— southbound towards finsbury park station let's have a check on the weather now, here's lucy martin. hello, good morning. lots of dry and bright weather in the forecast. particularly weather in the forecast. this morning, starting off particularly this morning, starting off with some sunshine. it will stay largely dry through much of the day but the cloud will increase later thanks to our next weather front. with the detail onto the map, perhaps a touch more cloud. a little bit of cloud bubbling up into the afternoon. you can just see our next weather front pushing up. a little bit of cloud. through this evening and a navy
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outbreaks of rain pushes in from the north—west. with the cloud around, temperatures not falling too far. overnight lows of around 16 degrees. we start the day tomorrow with some cloud first thing. that will thin and break to allow some good spells of sunshine, just the odd isolated shower, particularly in the morning. highs of 21 degrees. as move into sunday, sunday looks like a largely dry day. there will be plenty of brightness around. temperatures reaching a maximum of 19. fairly settled through monday. not long before things turn a little wet and windy as we move into tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. an emergency meeting to discuss the europe—wide egg contamination scandal is called by the eu. at least 700,000 eggs have been sent to the uk from european farms caught up in the scare. some processed foods have been pulled from supermarket shelves,
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but officials insist it's unlikely the public is at risk. good morning it's friday 11th august. also this morning: the us defence secretary says war with north korea would be catastrophic. james mattis insists diplomacy is delivering results. a friendship forged through football. one month on from the death of bradley lowery, jermain defoe speaks for the first time about his best friend. he loved his football, he loved me, i loved him, for me every time i saw him it was a special feeling. and i'm live here at the london stadium. it's day 8 of the world athletics championships and here on bbc
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breakfast we're getting a little bit excited about one british athlete in particular. six months ago she broke herfoot — but her beaming smile now says it all. dina asher smith is back and she will line up against the world's best in tonight's 200 metres final. congestion, air traffic control strikes and bad weather cause flight delays but which airports & airlines are the worst offenders? i'll have the details. after being hit by the manchester bomb, robbie potter was left with a bolt lodged in his heart. just days after leaving hospital he'll be here to tell us how doctors helped him to cheat death by a hair's breadth. and sarah has the weather. good morning, the weather this morning coming from the bristol balloon fiesta, we have watched 140 king off this morning, quite a spectacle, i will bring you a full
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forecast in about 15 minutes. an emergency meeting is being called by the eu to discuss the europe—wide 999 by the eu to discuss the europe—wide egg contamination scandal. 700,000 contaminated eggs have been imported from dutch farms and in the past hour has told us that number could rise. the agency insists it is "highly unlikely" the eggs pose any risk to human health. sandwiches and salads are among the foods that have now been removed from uk supermarket shelves, as natasha emerson reports. millions of eggs destroyed, supermarkets scrambling to clear their shelves. and now, police raids and arrests. two men have been held by dutch police over batches of poisonous eggs sold across europe. fipronil, a pesticide commonly used to kill lice and fleas on pets, has made its way into the food chain. earlier this week, the food standards agency said 21,000 contaminated eggs had been imported to the uk. now, it thinks it could be as many as 700,000. but that's still only a fraction
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of the 34 million we eat each day. and the agency said you would have to eat 10,000 contaminated eggs to see any effect. the reason we have asked to withdraw the product from the shelf is an issue of trust in food, these eggs have something in them which should not be there and that is why we are asking for the eggs to be withdrawn, not because of the public health risk. so far, some salads and sandwiches sold by these four supermarkets have been withdrawn from sale, but whole eggs are safe. despite those reassurances, the scandal continues to spread through europe, with 11 countries now thought to be affected. millions of eggs will be destroyed, as will hundreds of thousands of hens. four years ago, horsemeat was found in burgers and ready—meals. once again, questions are being raised about what goes into our processed foods and where it comes from. officials hope the contaminated eggs will be out of the food chain soon, but the investigation into europe's latest food scandal is likely to go on for some time.
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natasha emerson, bbc news. hundreds of people are going to be moved out of their high rise flats — after an investigation has revealed they are not safe there. 242 flats in south east london are affected. the issue with the gas supply was discovered during an investigation into fire safety prompted by the grenfell tower tragedy. dan johnson is there with the latest. explain the nature of the problem? residents in these blocks are waking up residents in these blocks are waking up to letters from the council which say the gas has been cut off with immediate effect and they are going to have to move out in the longer term so work can take place to make the tower blocks safe. this all started in the wake of the grenfell tower when extra examinations were carried out but this is not about the cladding, or primarily about fire safety, this is about whether
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the concrete structure could withstand a gas explosion and that all goes back to an explosion had another tower block in the late 60s here in london which led to a colla pse here in london which led to a collapse and four debts. work was supposed to have been carried out on blocks of a similar design to make sure they could withstand that sort of explosion so the council thought these were safe but during this latest inspection it has been revealed but the work probably wasn't actually carried out so an incident almost 50 years ago still having implications, another fine for people to worry about and something which might affect more buildings thanjust something which might affect more buildings than just the four here. it looks like there are 242 flights a year that will be affected, people have been given temporary heaters because they have no gas but it's going to need major structural work to make these tower blocks safe. donations made to the victims of the grenfell tower fire are not reaching survivors quickly enough, according to campaigners in west london.
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figures from the charity commission show that less than 15% of the £189 million raised has been given to people affected almost two months after the tragedy — but it says that early difficulties in identifying and contacting those who need help are being overcome. there's been a sharp fall in the value of shares in the social media company that owns snapchat. they fell by nearly 17%, after the owners of the photo messaging app reported more than £300 million in quarterly losses. the number of users was lower than expected and market analysts say the company has been struggling with fierce competition from rivals such as facebook‘s instagram. the airports and airlines with the worst summer flight delays have been revealed. ben is here with the details. iam i am sorry, i am always the bearer of bad news, we have been looking at data for airports and airlines over the last couple of summers, it's not good news. one in five flights to
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and from the uk now has the average delay of 30 minutes and that has been a real concern. 30 minutes in itself is nothing to worry about but it's becoming common. easyjet is the worst, average delays of 24 minutes. gatwick is the worst airport for delays, on average 27 minutes. the two things we should say, easyjet say we carry 78 million passengers a year so say we carry 78 million passengers a year so we are say we carry 78 million passengers a year so we are the biggest airlines so we year so we are the biggest airlines so we will have more delays, gatwick says we have one runway and face a lot of congestion when we fly predominantly to europe and that is where police come into place. some good news? yes, if you are travelling from a regional airport chances are be west delayed, belfast and leeds bradford had the least delays. so you might wonder why we
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still have so many delays well it's the usual combination of air traffic control strikes in france, spain, italy and greece, lots of bad weather which can disrupt things and congestion in the air, we know there is debate about the extra runway at heathrow and gatwick just is debate about the extra runway at heathrow and gatwickjust has one runway, so heathrow and gatwickjust has one runway, so contending with all that airlines are inevitable but the airlines are inevitable but the airlines are inevitable but the airlines are trying to cut it down. there is also a claim for more compensation, that we should not have to ask for it when there are delays, that it should come automatically. i am sure many would agree. the us defence secretary james mattis says america is still trying to use diplomacy to resolve the growing tension with north korea — and that war would be catastrophic. he said diplomatic efforts were yielding results, though military options were ready if needed. he made his remarks shortly after president trump had stepped up his rhetoric — saying his threat to unleash ‘fire and fury‘ on north korea might not have been tough enough. the american effort has
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diplomatically lead, it has diplomatically lead, it has diplomatic structure and, it is gaining diplomatic results and i wa nt to gaining diplomatic results and i want to stay right there, right now. the tragedy of war is well enough known, it does not need another characterisation beyond the fact it would be catastrophic. lets see what he does with guam. he does something in guam it will be an event the likes of which nobody seen before, what will happen in north korea. robin brant is in seoul for us this morning — people are wondering, how are people they are reacting to this rise in quite aggressive rhetoric? what a contrast in tone, we have said it before and it will not surprise you but life goes on here. there is the potential of conflict with the neighbours to the north for decades
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and yes the rhetoric has got worse and yes the rhetoric has got worse and the president and the white house who speaks like previous presidents have never spoken and a belligerent is coming from pyongyang as well but nonetheless they face the prospect of a conventional conflict just 35 miles the prospect of a conventional conflictjust 35 miles up the road. i think there will be those in south korea who take some assurances from other words from donald trump overnight, he said he did not think north korea could go around threatening north america but its allies south korea and japan which reminds people of the strong military alliance which is important to defend and protect. but this is a country which recently elected a president who is more consolatory in tone and he envisages hopefully bringing the north back to the negotiating table and trying to negotiate a lasting peace and perhaps that is more along the lines of what james matthews is talking about in terms of their speeding up
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automatic effort. banks were keeping. more than two months after the manchester bombing, which left 22 people dead and more than 100 injured, nine people are still being treated in hospital. robby potter and his partner leonora ogerio were waiting to collect their daughters from the ariana grande concert. they were standing right next to the suicide bomber when he detonated the device. robby has just been discharged from hospital, and we'll be speaking to him in a moment. first here's our correspondent judith moritz with his story. from a concert to a coma. this was robby potter with his girlfriend leonora after the manchester arena explosion. they stood next to the attacker and lived to tell the tale. i actually looked at the...
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the idiot, the bomber. he was only ten metres away from me. i can remember his face to this day. i've never asked his name, i'll never ask his name. i don't want to know his name. because you can't... no point hating a man that's already dead. but you know it was him? yeah, i know it was him, yeah. they'd gone to collect their kids from the concert. the children were safe inside, but their parents were in the lobby when the bomb went off. the brightest flash i've ever seen in my life. it was like a cloud of mercury exploding, you just seen bits of silver flying everywhere, which was obviously the bolts and nuts he'd packed into his bag and his body. eventually just dived, just collapsed and fell on the floor but i found out i'd obviously punctured my lung and had a couple of bolts stuck through my heart. this bolt, fired from the bomb straight into robbie's heart. he cheated death by a hair's breadth. you can see the two ribs here, that's the back of the ribs. the bolt was removed with incredible precision by this surgeon at wythenshawe hospital.
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it was wedged between the back wall and the front wall of the two blood vessels, so a millimetre either way at any velocity and... thankfully it didn't, but we wouldn't be having this conversation in this setting. one millimetre difference? literally. one, two, three, four, i declare a thumb war. robbie's daughter teagan was separated from her dad when the blast happened. next time she saw him, he was in a coma. she called him names to try and wake him up. it'sjust hard to see it, with him just lying there, not talking, having machines allover him. you spoke to him? yes. teagan said "come on, fathead, it's peahead." that's our names we call each other. as soon as that happened, the eyes just lifted, and from that day, i've fought everyday. robby‘s girlfriend leonora was also badly hurt and sedated in hospital. she and robby each face many
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months of rehabilitation. morning, ladies! before the blast, robby played rugby. now every step is an effort. but he says he's determined that one day he'll play again. judith moritz, bbc news, wirral. robbyjoins us now. good morning. good morning. quite tough watching that back? big memories. you tough watching that back? big memories. you were tough watching that back? big memories. you were discharged from hospital on tuesday? you have been back home? how is it? to be honest, very strange. i have been used in hospitalfor very strange. i have been used in hospital for almost three months, very strange. i have been used in hospitalfor almost three months, a shock but i am still getting around. my shock but i am still getting around. my daughter and dad have been brilliant, the supporters of the by brilliant, the supporters of the rugby club, the whole rugby community. we will talk more about teagan ina community. we will talk more about teagan in a moment. we saw your
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surgeon, you said an amazing man. torque is through the business of whether shrapnel was and how close you were to things being so much worse? he explained to me the main one went through my heart. 20 millimetres from an artery, but the other bolt, the doctor told me a millimetre either side, as his words were, i would millimetre either side, as his words were, iwould not millimetre either side, as his words were, i would not be here. you said a moment or go that is the difference between new breeding in or breathing out. whatever i was doing that night, breathing in or breathing out, i would have died, obviously. how is your heart? i went last wednesday, he is fully impressed with my recovery, i have got my fitness back. i have never smoked, that has helped. the base and you played rugby. you talk about yourfamily and your rugby and you played rugby. you talk about your family and your rugby friends. the rugby club have been brilliant, they have given me my extra strength. the team that i play for
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have a charity day for me. they have given me strength. so many people have wished me well. when i feel down i think i have to do it for them, they want to be back. down i think i have to do it for them, they want to be backm down i think i have to do it for them, they want to be back. it is amazing what family can do. my dad has been amazing, he is 75 and has become like a 25—year—old. he sorted out my bills, we had hassle from the paper press, he dealt with that. antiguan. teagan the tiger. she has been so mature, she had to walk through at the end, walking past her dad lying on the floor dead, she has walked through a battlefield. we heard reference to the time when you we re heard reference to the time when you were in hospital and she was trying to help bring you around, talking to you. presumably you remember nothing? for three weeks lots of people came and talked over me, i was completely out of it, i did not breathe when i was off the machines,
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i relied on the machines. when i was semi coming round my father tried talking to me, i did not respond, teagan came in, she called me fathead and said it was peahead. did it have an impact? it opened my eyes. in the first time for over three weeks i saw clear. and she was there? the little tiger was there and asked me for a sum wrestle straightaway. it is £1 a go! we can have a game but i will take your money. we saw a picture of your partner leonora in hospital with you. what happened? you and leonora we re you. what happened? you and leonora were in the lobby? in the foyer area. both your little girls were in the concert? thankfully away from that part? she finished late, that probably saved hundreds of kids. how is teagan and leonora? she has been
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brilliant, never missed a day of school, she came to see me all the time, she helps me get around, she even pushed me in a wheelchair. she has good arms on her! she has been a star. everybody listening to your story, i am getting a sense of your personality already. you are one of those people, you joke about things... you've got to a life, haven't you? how are you, i suppose there's what i am asking. people who have been through such a terrible event, yourfamily have been through such a terrible event, your family as well, what has been the impact? i still think about all the time, sometimes i feel a bit guilty because my girlfriend is still in hospital, what i put teagan through, having to walk through a minefield, it is something she a lwa ys minefield, it is something she always wanted to see, that concert. ican always wanted to see, that concert. i can still see the blast in my head. i have had counselling, which is coming on pretty good. i still have lots of rehab to do with my
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nerves in my leg, the good thing is my heart is ok. the nhs have been brilliant, from the doctors to the cleaners, they would bring me a cup of tea every morning. the porter used to sneak a few bets on because i could not get sky bet on, i should not mention not, sorry! they gave me strength. it is like the river, it is not the power of the river that brea ks is not the power of the river that breaks the rock down, it is the persistence of the river. my friends and family have give me that persistence. i've got to get back to work, i've got to play rugby again. they have taken nothing from me. the biggest thing is i have to get my confidence up to go to a concert again. it has been amazing talking to you this morning. thank you so much. we met teagan earlier and she looks like she is in great form and a great support, as is all your family, and we wish you all the best
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with your recovery. i am sure you will get to that concert.” with your recovery. i am sure you will get to that concert. i hope so. thank you very much. sarah's bringing us the weather from the bristol international balloon festival this morning. this is the 39th international balloon festival in bristol, the largest annual gathering of hot air balloons in europe. we have already seen balloons in europe. we have already seen 104 balloons taking off in the morning mass ascent. bullying is still behind me, tethered at the moment, we have some miniature model balloons. this event runs over four days, it is free to attend and we expect to see about half a million people visiting. it isa people visiting. it is a tranquil start to the day with sunshine and light winds. elsewhere across the country we expect a bit of rain. there is a weather front moving from west to east. this morning's weather looks fine and dry across bristol and much of southern and central england,
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with sunshine and light winds. a bit cloud, particularly across the south—east of england, temperatures warming into the mid teens. northwards across the country, sunshine across much of the midlands and into northern england, but some rainfor and into northern england, but some rain for parts of cumbria and northumberland through the morning. that continues into southern scotland. eastern scotland should see brightness, heavy rain for the west of scotland. quite windy as well. for northern ireland, looking pretty cloudy with outbreaks of rain. some of that will push into west and wales, central and east wales are fine and dry with sunshine across much of the west country. we will see rain pushing and across parts of corbel through the morning. this band of rain across the north and the west of the country edges slowly south eastwards through the course of the day. for the south—east of england and east anglia you should avoid the wet weather through much of the day, staying dry with temperatures up to around 22 degrees in the south—east.
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elsewhere typically 17 to 19 with cloud quite breezy with the outbreaks of rain. it will turn to showery weather from the north—west later in the day. heading into the evening, that band of rain and strong winds pushes gradually towards the south—east and clearer skies with some showers as we head to the cause tonight. most of those showers will ease away and the winds for lighter overnight, temperatures down to 13 to 15 in the towns and cities but a bit colder in the countryside. saturday morning for many gets off to a fine start with sunshine, some showers on saturday across parts of northern england, wales and scotland, many of us will avoid the showers altogether, so not avoid the showers altogether, so not a bad day. winds easing and temperatures around 16 to 22 degrees on saturday. high—pressure staying with us into the second half of the weekend. sunday should be another mostly dry day, we could catch the odd rogue shower in the east but
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many places again avoiding the showers. light winds, sunshine and temperatures around 16 to 22. the weekend looks fine and dry, but for many you will see rain and winds arriving later today. that is how it is looking, back to charlie and naga. studio: we don't mind a little bit but it would be nice if we crept back into those temperatures, is there any hint of that in the long—term forecast at all? there any hint of that in the long-term forecast at all? it is looking a bit better through next week, we have had some really u nsettled week, we have had some really unsettled conditions over the past three weeks, some optimism, particularly in the south the weather looks settled. i have been fascinated by the square hot—air balloon. how does it keep that shape? all i was thinking earlier is that regular blues that you blow up naturally, you can't buy a square one. logic tells me that all balloons should be... anyway, there will be an answer somewhere, it is
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me thinking out loud. i would think putting seems in a rubber balloon would be difficult. sarah, will you get a ride? will we get the forecast from the air?” have been up, only in a tethered balloon. about ten feet off the ground or so. i don't know if i will be lucky enough to take to the skies. we will be chatting to the festival's founder later in the morning, we will see what he says. use your charm! thank you, we will speak later. if the weather is nice and you by the seaside, may be looking for things on the beach, look at this in norfolk. the wide shot does not do it justice, as it norfolk. the wide shot does not do itjustice, as it closes in, this is a gigantic pipe that has washed up on the shore. the maritime and coastguard agency confirmed two other measuring eight feet in diameter, you can see a tiny person, get a sense of scale. this is the plugged end. they were
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being told, they untethered. they we re being told, they untethered. they were around 1500 feet long, being towed to north africa. apparently there are another ten lots of these pipe segments still at sea. they pose no danger or risk of pollution or whatever, but they are impressive. as fines on the beach go, that is quite big! and 8—foot wide diameter, 1500 feet, perfect pipes for running through. we have asked if you have had similar incidents happening to you, things you have found on the beach. let us know, send them in. i don't think anyone else will have found a pipe like that! but you get some funny things washed up on the beach. we will show your pictures a little later. time to get the news, travel and where you are. today will not be as nice as it was
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yesterday but things will improve over the weekend but for today there will be rain at times particularly in northern and western areas because an area of low pressure up to the north bringing this weather front and with it eyed breaks of rain, this morning heavy rain across parts of scotland, the rain edging its way east into northern england, wales and the south west, across the far south west likely to stay mostly dry. by this afternoon while the bulk of the heavy rain clears it will be quite drizzly, the lake
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district and peak district, quite cloudy for northern ireland during the afternoon, heavy rain for a time in central, southern england and the midlands, this is where you will get away with the largely dry day with the sunshine and temperatures 22 or 23 degrees. tonight the rain will push its way south and east, quite cloudy, staying about 13, 15 celsius, one or two spots of rain or drizzle around but as we go into the weekend, the weather systems clearing away, high building from the west, that'll settle things down from the weekend, there will be one or two showers dotted around, for many of us looking like a dry day with decent spells, temperatures about really should be for the of year, perhaps a degree are so law, should not feel too bad really get
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prolonged sunshine, by sunday again at chance of one or two showers but for most of us it's a dry day on sunday and temperatures up to about 16-20. sunday and temperatures up to about 16—20. more details on the website. this is business live from bbc news with susannah streeter and jamie robertson. snap, crackle and pop — the bubble looks to have well and truly burst for snapchat‘s parent company. shares plunge on bigger than expected loss. live from london, that's our top story on friday august 11th. snap shares plunge by close to 17% as losses mount. we'll be discussing what's gone wrong for the company that was once the toast of silicon valley. from one troubled tech firm to another — uber‘s ousted boss travis kalanick has been sued for fraud by one of the company's
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biggest investors. we will explain all.

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