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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 12, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. president trump issues a fresh warning to north korea. he calls for tougher sanctions, and says there will be consequences if us bases in guam are targeted. and, if anything happens to guam, there's going to be big, big trouble in north korea. good morning, it is saturday 12 august. also ahead: the finishing line beckons for two legends of the track, usain bolt and mo farah. yes, farah‘s opening—night gold remains britain's only medal here at the london stadium. and there was disappointment again last night, as dina asher—smith finished fourth in the women's 200m final. laser danger.
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new restrictions could be on the way to stop pens being shone at planes and helicopters. and tonight could be the best night for years to watch a meteor shower. and philip has the weather. very good morning to you. not too much to gripe about this particular weekend. a lot of dry weather around, one or two showers in the mix to keep it interesting. more details injust a mix to keep it interesting. more details in just a few minutes. good morning. first, our main story: president trump has issued a fresh warning to north korea, saying it will regret it fast if it continues to make threats against america and its allies. the president also called for tougher sanctions against pyongyang, but he said he would love a peaceful resolution. our washington correspondent laura bicker reports. president trump is leaving the north korean leader in no doubt. if he poses a threat to the us, there will be consequences. if anything happens to guam, there's going to be big, big trouble in north korea.
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but then came this note of reassurance. hopefully it will all work out. nobody loves a peaceful solution better than president trump, that i can tell you. these us b—i bombers are stationed in guam. their motto is "fight tonight." mr trump is keen to ensure north korea is aware of their presence. pyongyang has threatened to fire missiles at the pacific island, and although holidaymakers appear unfazed, the local government has issued leaflets urging them not to look at firebombs. but donald trump's ramped up rhetoric is being backed with diplomatic measures. he placed a call to president xi in beijing. he spoke to the leader injanuary in the hope that he would do more to rein in his trading partner.
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the threat us involvement on the korean peninsula mightjust force them to act. and it has emerged the trump administration has been in secret talks with north korea, discussions about americans imprisoned there, and deteriorating relations. donald trump is not stepping back from his war of words with north korea. some feared his statements were off the cuff, on impulse. but it appears, for now, to be his strategy, to plant the idea in his enemy's mind that he is unpredictable, and not to be tested. our correspondent robin brant joins us now from the south korean capital, seoul. so bring us up—to—date on the latest in movements and diplomacy. just some news from south korea, and first let's do the stuff from the states. laura mentioned the call between donald trump and his chinese counterpart, xijinping. between donald trump and his chinese
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counterpart, xi jinping. we between donald trump and his chinese counterpart, xijinping. we are between donald trump and his chinese counterpart, xi jinping. we are told by the chinese media that president xi urged restraint on all relevant parties, so everyone involved, that includes donald trump, and urged them to show restraint in words and actions that may exasperate tension here on the korean peninsula. so some detail on that call. from north korea, reports overnight that a p pa re ntly korea, reports overnight that apparently 3.5 million young people and former soldiers have volunteered to reinvest or invest again in the military that. and also, here in south korea, i have spoken in the last few days about people being used to facing the prospect of conflict with their neighbours from the north and often many people here just ignore the language coming from the north, and even from washington, dc. but there are some reports today that things may be slowly changing. reports from reuters news agency more people are buying ready meals, more people are buying ready meals, more people are buying ready meals, more people are buying gold, and there is a civil defence plan for an exercise next week in the city of seoul. this happens every year but
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this year every district of the city is taking part, we are told. that didn't happen last year. so some signs that things may slightly be changing here. two legends of athletics will run their last major competitive track races at the world championships in london tonight. mo farah will be hoping to win his second gold of the games when he runs in the 5,000m. usain bolt will retire after taking part in the relay with the jamaican team. natalie pirks reports. goodbyes are always hard, but you don't normally get two in one day. sirmo don't normally get two in one day. sir mo farah‘s 5000 metre final tonight is a big one. not only is it his last track race at a major championship, but he is also going for his fifth straight distance double, an unprecedented accomplishment for a distance runner. he has been tripped before, he has survived that one... when he surged ahead of the pack in last weekend's 10,000 metres he cemented
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weekend's10,000 metres he cemented his place in british sporting legend. it is gold for mo farah! it remains the nation's solitary gold and solitary medal. jamaica are also experiencing an unexpected lack of success. experiencing an unexpected lack of success. bolt gets a pretty good start... usain bolt's final individual race last weekend in endedin individual race last weekend in ended in a bronze. tonight represents a chance to go out with the bang he so desires and so deserves. it is justin gatlin, right at the death! for british athletes yesterday was another day of close calls. asher—smith broke herfoot in feathery and only started running again injune. it was britain's fifth fourth placed finish at the championships, but this was quite finished. and dina asher-smith fourth. iici missed out on a bronze by seven one hundredths, it feels a lot. i am quite frustrated, but at
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the same time on reflection i am really ha p py the same time on reflection i am really happy to have done a 22.2, so yes —— to see i. really happy to have done a 22.2, so yes -- to see i. elsewhere, lorraine could only manage fifth in the long jump, and nick miller came sixth in the hammer final. there jump, and nick miller came sixth in the hammerfinal. there could be british medals in the women's high jump british medals in the women's high jump in the relays, but today will no doubt be remembered for the end of the mo—bot, and the end of the bolt. have the tissues ready. and jessica will have more on the athletics at 6:30am, and we will be speaking to british a00m record holder iwan thomas and former 0lympic heptathlete kelly sotherton later in the programme. an anti—islam candidate is being allowed to stand in ukip's leadership election, despite previous attempts by party members to block her. anne marie waters campaigns against sharia law in the uk, and some party members have said they may resign if she wins. the contest is likely to decide the future direction of the party,
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which has 20 members of the european parliament and nearly 350 local councillors, but no mps. a 19—year—old british man has died while snorkelling in greece. harry byatt, who was a water sports instructor, was found unconscious on the seabed off the island of za kynthos. an investigation has been launched by the greek authorities. new measures to tackle the dangerous use of laser pens will be considered by the government, amid concerns about their threat to air safety. the pens, which can temporarily blind people, have been used to target aircraft and pilots, as our business correspondent jonty bloom reports. laser pens, or pointers, are designed to be used to highlight something of interest, but they can be dangerous, and dazzle or blind people have shone directly at people's eyes. last alone there were 1258 laser attacks on aircraft, even
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though it is already an offence with a maximum fine of £2500. helicopters, which fly lower than many aircraft and typically have only one pilot, are thought to be especially vulnerable to laser pens. the government is now going to consult on new measures to restrict the dangerous use of laser pens and boost safety, such as introducing a licensing scheme for retailers, limits on the advertising of laser pens, and potential restrictions on their ownership, as well as a possible awareness raising campaign to educate people about the dangers of laser pens. interested parties, including businesses, retailers and consumers, now have eight weeks to submit their evident and proposals. —— evidence and proposals. the american singer taylor swift has won a key victory in a two—part court battle with ex—radio—dj david mueller. a judge in the us state of colorado has dismissed mr mueller‘s claim that she got him fired. however, the court is still considering her counter—claim that david mueller reached under her skirt and groped her during a pre—concert
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reception in 2013. he has denied the accusation, though admits he may have inadvertently touched her skirt. stargazers will be hoping to get a great view of the perseid meteor shower tonight. astronomers say hundreds of meteors will streak across the sky, in a display that may be visible around the world. the display should peak at around 11:00pm this evening. clear skies permitting, it will be seen in most parts of the uk. we will find out what the weather is looking like for that little later this morning. police in texas have released dramatic footage of a most unlikely car crash. a vehicle fell seven storeys from a car park, hitting a vehicle in the alley below. the accident happened when the car drove through a set of safety barriers. the driver of the falling vehicle was treated at hospital, but is expected to be ok. the other motorist was unhurt. extraordinary, isn't it? goodness.
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very lucky to be alive. extraordinary. let's take a look at this morning's papers. the front page of the guardian this morning, this is a story we are going to take a look at a little later on on breakfast. forced labour, for 26 years, the reality of modern slavery in the uk. 11 members ofa modern slavery in the uk. 11 members of a lincolnshire family have been conflict that of a series of modern slavery offences. we are going to be talking about this a little later on. picture on the front, just a with lots of bubbles on his beard. he isa with lots of bubbles on his beard. he is a leicester city supporter and that was before the match against arsenal, the opening game of the premier league season. his team lost 4-3. and premier league season. his team lost 4—3. and mo farah in thoughtful
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mood, training yesterday for his 5000 metre final. it is his last major track event, and they will be many questions, given that he is the only team gb medal winner at this stage. the main story is about midwives, women no longer being told they should have babies without medical intervention. the front page of the daily telegraph, the latest person to be announced as a contender on strictly come dancing is an 80s popstar turned church of england vicar —— strictly come dancing. he said god does not always in dallas with gifts equally as he was talking about his dancing skills. and universities being accused of allowing admissions to descend into every parole, students increasingly being offered places regardless of their exam results. the front page of the daily mail, their story about home and car insurance. people who pay for
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insurance. people who pay for insurance monthly are being charged hundreds of pounds a year extra, according to the daily mail. a couple of stories to bring you, the sun has done a survey showing that most people want prince william on the throne. and the daily mirror is saying that the owner of the car in which princess diana died has sparked fury, by declaring he wants the wreckage to go to a museum in the wreckage to go to a museum in the united states. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: president trump warns north korea's leader, kim jong—un, he will regret it fastif he continues to threaten america or its allies. and it's goodbye to two world champions, mo farah and usain bolt as they prepare for their final major athletic events. also coming up in the programme, there's an unexpected item in the bagging area on click today as the team marks the 25th anniversary of the supermarket self—check—out and finds out what the future holds
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for our weekly. here's philip with a look at this morning's weather. we were talking about the meteor shower, the perseid meatier shower. the 11 o'clock tonight, if we are still awake. we will need clear skies. we get them? no pressure, then! we are not the only early rises. 0ur weather watchers are already up and about, a glorious scene at the murray serve. it has been one of those weeks where you think we would have little shower of seeing —— little chance of seeing the meteor shower tonight. just hang on. these fronts are coming down across the british isles. that more northerly feature has enough about it to be producing bits and pieces of rain. that gradually worked down the eastern
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side of the pennines through the afternoon. the more southerly feature is producing drizzle in the southern counties. having said all of that, it is not a bad weekend. quite a bit of dry without there. if you have a plan i do not think the weather will get in the way today. while two showers further west, the bulk of those showers coming down with the odd weather front, but for northern ireland and a good part of scotland, it will be a decent day. there are more showers are further north you go in scotland. as we get on towards the latter part of the day, we have already heard about a number of athletes retiring on the track, it will be dry a ua heading off towards east london. the fringe continues apace. i do not think the weather will get in the way of events there either. through the evening and coming up towards 11 o'clock i think south—west scotland and northern ireland, anywhere down across this spine of the country, coming down towards the south—east, could well be really quite clear. i think that will work quite nicely.
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it will mean that it will be a chilly start to sunday. that will be across a good part of the british isles, but here again, sunday looks like a very decent day. you can see the blue speckles for yourself. that is where the bulk of the showers are across the northern part of scotland. the cloud fills in towards the south—west. again, having said all of the above, that looks as though it is going to be a really decent sort of day. however, as we come towards monday, the clouds are filling in for a reason. an active weather from spilling lots of rain across the greater part of the british isles. if you are in east anglia and the south—east for the bulk of the day i think you will get away with a half decent day and probably a dry one. so for the most pa rt probably a dry one. so for the most part the weekend is mostly dry, with some sunny part the weekend is mostly dry, with some sunny spells. considering what many of us have gone through this week this is not such a bad forecast. not too bad at all, and don't you like it when the weather fits in with the perseid meteor shower?” will not be up myself, but good luck
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to all of those. if you are staying up to all of those. if you are staying up to watch, as i said, it will be quite chilly. quite a few layers, as well as your binoculars. good advice. we'll be back with a summary of the news at 6:30. now it's time for the film review with jane hill and james king. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's interesting cinema releases is james king. welcome. what have you been watching? i've been watching charlize theron in a spy thriller that's 007 meets basic instinct. the name's blonde, atomic blonde. from the academy awards to the afterlife, oscar winner casey affleck returns under a sheet in a ghost story. and get ready to tap, clap and stomp your way through an uplifting
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new dance documentary, step. quite an eclectic mix this week, james. let's start with the big blockbuster. it looks like one. yes, atomic blonde, so charlize theron stars in this. it's a spy thriller directed by a guy called david leitch. previously he's worked on a movie called john wick with keanu reeves, that was a big hit a couple of years back. there are similarities, they are both very stylish. style over content, really. very violent, very polished, very cartoonish. but atomic blonde has some basis in real events because it is set in 1989 after the fall of the berlin wall. charlize theron is a spy sent there by the british government to track down a list of missing agents. let's have a look. so, is this your first time in berlin? yes.
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well, it is a remarkable time to be here. wonderful music. superb nightlife, marvellous restaurants. you must try the central cafe for a drink. you'll need it later. you remembeer abramowitz, don't you? of course you do. yeah. we can kind of guess what happens after that. it has been hard to find clips of any duration which are not violent. she's quite adept with her stilettos, is charlize. it is ridiculous. however, i think there is some fun to be had with its ridiculousness. firstly, charlize theron is great and there is a pairing that she has with james mcavoy, we didn't see it in that clip, but he's a fellow british agent in berlin and he's crazy and over the top and she is ice cool and very measured so they have this great chalk and cheese partnership.
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that really works. she's such a watchable actress, isn't she? very watchable actress. looks great in this, of course is an oscar winner, she can actually act. i wouldn't say she particularly has to act that much in this, but we know she can. and the style is great, this industrial punk aesthetic to it, this pumping 19805 electro soundtrack. we can see a bit of action, the car chases and the fights are stunning and relentless. it almost beats you into submission. with it being visually striking should it remind us of pulp fiction, is that what he's after, the slick look with the violence that goes with it? what it does not have that pulp fiction had is the witty, clever script. it is easy to be snobbish and say the plot is flimsy and stretched. it means you can get away with quite a lot. i think it relishes its own silliness and pulpy quality. it acknowledges that and when a film is shameless about it it can get away with much more.
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is it a missed opportunity because the time period in which it is set, berlin, such a great city, it could be the most fantastic story. are they not bothered about that. a slightly missed opportunity but still worth seeing, a male fantasy of a female spy, i don't think many spies are six foot tall former models wandering around in stockings and suspenders. but there is just enough awareness for it to get away with it and i would happily watch another, that movie hasn't done really well but if there is a sequel i wouldn't complain. 0k. we move to something that could not be more different. i am intrigued that this was shot in secret, is it apocryphal that the director was so concerned
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about how it might end up that he thought, i just won't tell people i am making it. it is very low budget. this is david lowery, last year he moved into the mainstream because he made a film with disney called pete's dragon, so a remake of the old disney story. but that was out of characterfor him. he's much more of an independent, low budget film maker, this is a return to that. this is a ghost story as the title suggests. not a horrorfilm, a drama. casey affleck plays a recently deceased man who returns in spirit to his home to watch over his grieving partner, rooney mara. he is still wearing the sheet that he had placed over him in the morgue. talking about difficult clips to find, it is hard to show you any clips out of context because pacing and the rhythm of the film is so key. it is a very slow film. there are many takes were seemingly not much happens, the camera is very static and quiet.
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there's probably more music than dialogue in it. it's even shot in the old 4x3 ratio, the square tv ratio to make it feel claustrophobic. so it's pretty bold and risk taking. i can understand why david lowery might want to keep it secret in case it did not work. i think it does work. you have to take a bit of a leap of faith to get into its rhythm and slowness but when you do it is rewarding and a film about memory and legacy and slowl change. ok, i am a bit worried the trailer might put people off, it's quite bizarre! it isn't that kind of movie. what is your third choice? a documentary, called step. people use the word ‘feelgood' too much, to the point of redundancy but this is genuinely a feel good movie. a documentary about a girl's dance troupe, called the lethal ladies working out of a high school in inner—city baltimore. the film focuses on three of the girl dancers in particular, about their hopes and aspirations.
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trying to break the cycle of poverty they come from and get out of baltimore and into college. very charismatic leads, the people in the film are very charismatic. as we will see in this clip. this is the girls in training. you will watch me step. actually, i'm going to make you watch me step. i'm going to get my step, it's going to get up in your grill. i'm going to take you by your neck and you're gonna watch me do what i do. that's what you're supposed to project, every time you get in front of somebody. that's what you step on. if you're not stepping on it, sit down, go home, good night. stand to attention and give me that face. nothing to stop! i like that teacher, i am not missing with her.
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she's brilliant, everyone is brilliant. it's a really uplifting story. it's uplifting because it does not scrimp on the hardships. these people that we focus on have had tough lives. there is a lot of anger and it's set among the backdrop of the black lives matter movement and the female empowerment movement. so there tough issues going on. that makes it all the more feel—good when the highs come along and when it gets more optimistic. it's not really a film about stepping as a dance. if you don't know much about stepping, very popular in american colleges, but it's not about the technique and history of stepping. really it's a film about what dance means to people when they don't have much else. i'm really looking forward to that one. and for best 0ut this week you have delighted me because it is a reissue and what a pleasure it was to watch this film so many years later. this is prick up your ears. re—released, a movie
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about playwright joe 0rton, rereleased for the 50th anniversary of his death, the film actually came out in 1987, so the film itself is 30 years old. stephen frears is the director, alan bennett is the writer, based on the diaries ofjoe 0rton, which we see in the movie. we seejohn lahr who was the editor, played by wallace shawn in the movie. and then it flashes back to the life ofjoe 0rton. gary 0ldman is amazing as 0rton. i am always reminded of a couple of things, first that time in the 80s when gary 0ldman and contemporaries like daniel day lewis and tim roth were the angry young men of british cinema and the future of british cinema. weren't they? now daniel day lewis has announced his retirement! and gary 0ldman will be
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playing winston churchill! so you feel very old watching this! secondly, more importantly, what alan bennett did with this script is capture the whit and boisterousness that made joe 0rton such a great playwright in the 1960s. gary 0ldman great, vanessa redgrave, for me, it is alfred molina's movie. he plays kenneth halliwell, 0rton's lover. they had an ultimately tragic and shocking relationship. he steals the show. but what is so striking, as you say, the film is 30 years old and it is a litany of wonderful actors because the mother of 0rton is played byjulie walters and his sister is played by frances barber, these people are part of britain's acting firmament. alan bennett has become even more part of the furniture. what he does brilliantly is give us movies that feel traditional but they are pretty out there when you look at what is going on. now quick thought about the dvd. raw, belgian/french horror movie about a student who goes to vetinary college and discovers a cannibalistic tendencies. beautifully unsettling.
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determined to freak you out with the acting, performing and lighting and editing. it is like carrie directed by salvador dali! it weird, but it is wonderful. james, thanks very much. james king, thanks for being with us and that's just about it for this week. enjoy your cinema going. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. coming up before 7:00am, philip will have the weather for you. but first, at 6:30am, a summary of this morning's main news: president trump has issued a fresh warning to north korea, saying it will regret it fast if it continues to make threats against america and its allies. the president also called for tougher sanctions against pyongyang, but he said he would love a peaceful resolution. the chinese president, xijinping, has phoned mr trump and urged him to avoid words and deeds that could exacerbate the already—tense situation on the korean peninsula. if anything happens to guam, there
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is going to be big, big trouble in north korea. hopefully it'll all work out, 0k? nobody loves a peaceful solution better than president trump, that i can tell you. new measures to tackle the dangerous use of laser pens will be considered by the government, amid concerns about their threat to air safety. the lasers, which can temporarily blind people, have been used to target aircraft and pilots. proposals include licensing retailers and restricting advertising. an anti—islam candidate is being allowed to stand in ukip's leadership election, despite previous attempts by party members to block her. anne marie waters campaigns against sharia law in the uk, and some party members have said they may resign if she wins. the contest is likely to decide the future direction of the party, which has 20 members of the european parliament and nearly 350 local councillors, but no mps. a 19—year old british man has died
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while snorkelling in greece. harry byatt, who was a water sports instructor, was found unconscious on the seabed off the island of za kynthos. an investigation has been launched by the greek authorities. the american singer taylor swift has won a key victory in a two—part court battle with ex—radio—dj david mueller. a judge in the us state of colorado has dismissed mr mueller‘s claim that she got him fired. however, the court is still considering her counter—claim that david mueller reached under her skirt and groped her during a pre—concert reception in 2013. he has denied the accusation, though admits he may have inadvertently touched her skirt. stargazers will be hoping to get a great view of the perseid meteor shower tonight. astronomers say hundreds of meteors will streak across the sky, in a display that may be visible around the world. the display should peak at around 11:00pm this evening. clear skies permitting, it will be seen in most parts of the uk.
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and it will be clear as well for most of us, but cold, so phillip says. britain's medal tally still stands atjust one gold in the world athletics championships, but could mo farah make it a double today? jessica is at the stadium for us. good morning. yes, good morning. good morning. yes, good morning. good morning, everyone. as you say just one medalfor the british good morning, everyone. as you say just one medal for the british team s0 just one medal for the british team so far at the world of latics championships. lots of fourth places for the british team —— world athletics championships. when you consider the british team is young and inexperienced at major championships it bodes well for the future. it has been a difficult year for asher—smith. she broke herfoot six months ago, and couldn't even walk, let alone run. she made the 200m final, but couldn't quite make the podium, and dina asher—smith became the latest briton to have to settle
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for fourth place. she ran a season's—best time, and was just 0.07 seconds away from securing a medal. dafne schippers, from the netherlands, won gold. it means britain's medal tally still stands atjust one, but asher—smith says the team is staying positive. honestly, i am over the moon. we have had a lot of fourth places, at the same time, loads of those fourth places have been by people that were s0 young places have been by people that were so young they probably have another decade in them. so they might not have got a medal here today, but they will definitely be ones to watch in champs to come. britain's lorraine ugen also missed out on a medal, in the long jump final. she finished fifth, with a jump of 6.72m. gold went to the american brittney reese, who won her fourth world title. we seem to be all doing well. we are focusing on just trying to see what
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we can do. a lot of our team are still quite young, so it is kind of a changeover from the older guys retiring, and stuff like that. so it is guys like us getting more experience and getting used to being closer to the medals. in the hammer final, the british record holder, nick miller, was in the silver medal position at one stage. but he couldn't better his throw in the early rounds, of 77.31m, and he finished sixth.adelle tracey there was drama in the women's 800m semi—finals. britain's lynsey sharp finished fourth in her race, but was then disqualified, as she was believed to have impeded another athlete close to the finish line. british athletics appealed the decision, and she was later reinstated. she will be the only briton in sunday's race, after adelle tracey and shelayna 0skan—clarke failed to make it through. it was more straightforward for britain's chris 0'hare in the semi—finals of the men's1,500m. he comfortably qualified for sunday's final. he finished fourth. jake wightman missed out. let's catch up on some of the day's other sport then,
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and just a few miles from here, there were goals galore, as the new premier league season announced itself in style. arsenal beat leicester 11—3 at the emirates stadium, on a dramatic opening night. after going a goal down early on, leicester came back to twice take the lead, with jamie vardy scoring twice. but arsenal drew level, before 0livier giroud headed the winner with just five minutes left. arsene wenger‘s side started the new season having won just one of their previous five opening—day matches. i felt that they have shown fantastic spirit. never gave up, and came back and won the game. i must congratulate the players. defensively we can do better but overall i believe we have produced a top—quality game. liverpool's preparations have been hit by their star player, philippe coutinho, handing in a transfer request after the club rejected a £90 million bid from barcelona.
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the brazilian is injured and will miss their season—opening trip to watford, one of seven premier league fixtures today. we are prepared. that is the good news. but now the biggest of course now it is a real competition again. no friendly games, no preseason games. it is all or nothing again, and really looking forward to it. scottish champions celtic maintained their 100% start to the season with a 1—0 win over partick thistle. brendan rodgers's side have now gone 51 domestic games unbeaten. bad weather in north carolina hampered play at golf‘s final major of the year, the pga championship at quail hollow, but not before japan's hideki matsuyama shot a brilliant second—round 64, to give him a share of the lead. the best—placed briton is paul casey, who is five shots adrift. but storms delayed play, meaning several players will have to return to finish their rounds later today.
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castleford have moved ten points clear at the top of super league, with five games remaining. it follows their 23—1; win over salford red devils. elsewhere last night, there were wins for wigan and hull. you are up—to—date on the sport, and iamso you are up—to—date on the sport, and i am so excited, because tonight mo farah is back on the track. so i hope you have been practising your mo—bots? something like that, isn't it? i don't think we will beat you at that one. very good, very, very good. the british athletics team are back in action on day nine of the world athletics championships. here are some of the moments you might not want to miss. there are six gold medals up for grabs today. the british women's four x 100—metre relay team hope to
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repeat their bronze medal success at last yea r‘s repeat their bronze medal success at last year's 0lympics. they will be chasing jamaica, who are looking for their third straight title. the final takes place at 9:30 p.m.. katarina johnson—thompson is up again in the women's high jump final. it is a chance for her to make amends after coming seventh in the same event in the heptathlon. it is one of the night's star events. mo farah goes for the double gold in the final major championship track act of his career. a victory here would see him leave as double world champion, after winning the 10,000 metres last weekend. and usain bolt goes for gold in his last appearance before retiring. jamaica won the last three four x 100—metre world titles. this is how you can watch today's coverage. that is a look ahead to vent a
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little later on this morning, this evening and this afternoon. world leaders have called for calm after a week of fierce exchanges between the united states and north korea. last night, president trump warned pyongyang the us military was "locked and loaded," should missiles be fired toward its territory in the pacific. north korea said america was driving the situation to nuclear war. so what is life like for those living in neighbouring south korea? peter morton is a us expat, and joins us from the capital, seoul. peter, thank you very much for your time on bbc breakfast today. you have been living in south korea for how long? about six years altogether. about six years, so you have got an insight, i suppose, into
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this often fractious relationship that the west has with north korea, but also how south koreans view this relationship, and whether or not they are under threat from north korea. how is that changing? there is certainly more tension over the last several months. the general feeling among koreans might be surprising to people outside the country. it is not really their primary concern. it is a secondary 01’ even a treasury concern for koreans living here —— tertiary. they are more concerned the daily life, things that are of concern in any country, the jobs life, things that are of concern in any country, thejobs market, housing, income inequality, things like that. things that are a little less sensational, perhaps, than the tension with north korea. has it been covered in the media? we are obviously taking an interest in this
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in the uk as we see donald trump's rhetoric ratcheted higher, and kim jong—un's words as well. how is it then reported that, in terms of an escalation of words? i think the focus is less on trump. people don't follow as closely the tweets and the rhetoric that is coming out of washington. they are more focused on the relationship between obviously north and south korea, but also china. and i know you have lived there for six years, and the last three years you have been back, i know that on two separate occasions you have lived in south korea. you have a daughter. are you concerned at all about how she is being brought up, or herfuture, as the daughter of an american? of course. of course i do have concerns. the tension with north korea is only one of them, and i have been asked if
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they intend to go home because of this issue, because of the missile tests a nd this issue, because of the missile tests and the increased tension with trump... between trump and kim jong—un. it is a concern, it is definitely a concern, but it is not the only one. there are lots of other things that i consider. so going back to the united states to live, you know, it is something i anticipate doing, but the decision wouldn't be driven just by this tension. seoul is, what, 30 miles away or tension. seoul is, what, 30 miles away 01’ s0 tension. seoul is, what, 30 miles away or so from the border with the north? i mean, you have said it is a second or third tier priority for many people. it is quite close. what do people talk about when they talk about what is going on in north korea? how differently do they see their lives? there is... there is a sort of, i guess... i guess people,
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i would say, have adapted to it. it is not a new situation. this has been going on for many, many years. ever since the armistice in 1953, it is absolutely something koreans have been living with for more than 60 yea rs been living with for more than 60 years now. so it is not something that they are actively worried about. it is there in the background, it is something... you know, it surely adds a level of stress and concern to daily life, but it is there in the background. it is not something that people are talking about everyday of the week. good to hear that you are not too worried at all. thanks very much, peter. 0ur worried at all. thanks very much, peter. our main stories this morning: we werejust peter. our main stories this morning: we were just talking about at the moment ago, president trump warns north korea's leader, kim jong—un, he will regret it fast if he continues to threaten america or its allies. we are saying goodbye to two world champions. usain bolt and
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mo farah prepare for theirfinal major athletic events. also coming up major athletic events. also coming up in the programme: tracing family roots. we find out how a village in the cotswolds got more than it again for when it took part in a landmark dna study. let's look at the weather this morning. sunrise or sunset? let's look at the weather this morning. sunrise orsunset? i let's look at the weather this morning. sunrise or sunset? i can never tell the difference. even more intriguing, this is a sunrise over north yorkshire. but i am intrigued, is stuart wright inside that looking at us watching his picture, or as stuart right next door with caravan in the? i'm not sure. if he gets in touch i will keep you up—to—date. that looks quite decent. it doesn't look so charming, because we have notjust one but two weather fronts close by to the british isles, the more southerly feature and some cloudy fa re southerly feature and some cloudy fare here. there is enough about this to create thick cloud,
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producing showers this afternoon going down the eastern side of the pennines. having got across the borderfor pennines. having got across the border for scotland. —— from scotland. the day is not too bad. more dry weather than some of us would have experienced this week plus fast. there is aid dotting of showers here from the eastern side of the pennines this afternoon. as you can see, the vast majority of us have dry, fine, even sunny weather this afternoon. parts of scotland doing quite nicely. a scattering of showers away from the frontal system. many of you will be dry. certainly much drier at the olympic stadium later on today than was the case when my family were there watching mo farah in the semi—final on wednesday. my word, that was an absolute deluge. here are the rest of the showers drifting down the eastern side of the british isles. quite a decent evening and night coming in across south—west scotland, northern ireland, on the diagonal through the north—west of
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england and wales, to the heart of the midlands. it will turn chilly. if you are up and about to see the perseid meteor shower, most areas will be in with a decent chance tonight. certainly better than the western areas tomorrow night, because we have cloud coming in. it will take some time before it rocks up, so again, it looks like after that chilly start, sunday will be a decent day. we still have that spring clean of showers in places but the cloud is just filling in from the west across wales and the south—west later in the day. just tempering the sunshine at this stage. temperatures pushing towards 21 and 22 degrees at best. make the most of that. monday looks shocking. save for the south—eastern quarter, which was a driver a good part of the day. if you are anywhere near that frontal system and you are on holiday i think you will see counter local attractions indoors rather than out of doors. —— seek out the local attractions. i think you would be peeved if you are on holiday. peeved, a good word. we can discuss
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that during a brief interlude. the interlude being click. see you at seven o'clock. this month marks the 25th anniversary of the self checkout. the first one was installed in new york on 5 august, 1992, in price chopper. so what does its inventor, doctor howard schneider, remember of it all? i hadn't gone shopping much, so i went to the supermarket near my house with a stopwatch. and i started looking at people checking out, and my stopwatch went "click, click" — it was a mechanical one. and, you know, isaid wow, what a great environment.
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this is so messy. good luck with any machine doing it, and i said, this would be a great, great problem to solve. and then i started building a machine in my garage. i actually spent every cent i had on parts, and i got the first machines built. see, i love self—service checkouts, but then i'm a control freak. but i do believe they save you time. until they go wrong, at which point they become a right pain in the bagging area. the technology in the machines now is less than it was 25 years ago, using 286 computers, using ms—dos 3.3. i had better technology 25 years ago than what you see now, which is the reason for a lot of frustrations. please wait for assistance. please remove item before continuing. so now people are thinking outside of the shopping basket, to try and update the self checkout and reduce the delays further. in japan, reggie robo takes your basket and bags your
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shopping for you. the system, which was trialled at the beginning of the year, scans the rfid tags on all the items at the same time. since december, the amazon go shop has been undergoing testing in seattle. once it is working, shoppers should be able to pick up their items and simply walk out of the store. swedish cafe company wheelys is working on a similar idea. although this staff—less shop will even come to you. here at canary wharf, in london, something less spectacular, but which seems to me more workable and more scalable. grab and go has been invented by ba rclayca rd. the app scans bar codes as you grab items off the shelf, and then you just go. payment is taken from the card that is linked to the app, and the receipt is sent to the phone, so you don't have
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to wait in a checkout queue at all. but, with all that grabbing and going, are you thinking what i'm thinking? in the future, if you're scanning things and then just putting it in your bag, and then just walking out, and all the doors are open, i can see more people stealing more stuff. so you can basically very easily pick up some item and then can walk out, but on the way you have cctv, you have a man on the ground basically monitoring all of that. it works in exactly the same way. so it's no more secure than a self—scan checkout, but i do wonder how many people would just accidentally miss that barcode, and leave with a lot of unpaid stuff. although, even here, technology might be able to spot them. supermarket giant walmart has filed a patent to incorporate facial recognition, blood pressure and heart rate monitoring into its stores to try and understand customer frustration at checkouts. it might improve customer service, but previous trials of the tech have been used to try to spot shoplifters, raising a few security concerns along the way. in fact, just this week, the supermarket announced it is also trialling a scan—and—go solution,
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but this one relies on shop assistant approval before you can leave. in china, which is home to several unmanned stores like this one, you need your face to get in the front door in the first place. like barclaycard's grab and go, customers scan items using their phones, and they can even heat up their grub in the microwave inside. speaking of heating things up, a similar chinese idea, bingo box, ran into problems when one of its glass clad stores began to overheat. now, as it was unmanned, it wasn't until customers began to complain that the sweltering temperatures were ruining the food inside that the shop was shut down. it is now back up and running, and everything is cool. so it's not all plain sailing for these souped—up shops, and it will be a while before we buy our weekly groceries in the store without some form of human interaction or intervention. but, as our patience wears
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increasingly thin in this age of grabbing and going, it's no surprise that bingo box plans to open 5,000 more stores in the coming year. premier league football starts again this weekend, which i'm reliably informed is important to some people. seriously, though, fans will be excited to see what their clubs new signings have to offer. but how do you know if a new player is going to be right for your team? well, one company is using virtual reality to identify talent, and also help players to recoverfrom injuries. here is carol hawkins. i'm in manchester, home of great football, to check out a small start—up that isjoining up with premier league clubs for an idea that's only eight months in the making.
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ifeel like i'm doing pretty good. this vr system helps scouts recruit players by using statistics from virtual gameplay to decide whether or not the player would work fora team. but it separately is also being used to help injured players get back to full fitness, mentally and physically. you have injured players who will often spend anything from six months to ten months, years out of the game. and the scientists, the physios will work with them, but we do not know what they're going to do in a situation, what decisions they're going to make. now, they can play games, as well as having the treatment, the movement is limited, but they can feel a part of the squad. they are using an htc5 headset, with the usual hand controllers attached to shin pads. and the kit is wireless,
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crucial for football drills. as well as this version, they are also working on one for goalies, which will require an extra pair of sensors. several premier league clubs are signing up to use the vr system, because it promises to bring players back from the bench faster. and the first question they ask — does it feel like a real ball? you do feel like you're really hitting the ball, it's quite strange. i don't know if‘t is the sound, or the visuals, but it is very immersive. and i know people always use that word for vr, but it does feel as though you are hitting it. but, of course, you're not. and because you are not, it's important players don't try too hard, and injure themselves even more, especially when they've cost clubs millions of pounds.
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part of the problem is to make sure that they are not hyper—extending. we had a player last week who is not allowed to kick a physical ball. we have been working with physiotherapist and sport scientists. part of our calibration process is to make sure people do not hyper extend. we had an injured player last week who was not allowed to kick a physical ball. he was fit, he could probably run a marathon, but the injury meant he couldn't do it. it is basically a case of, ifeel like i'm kicking a ball. psychologically, it is massive. i am now in the rehab drill and there is a man to my left who is tracing a s with his foot. now, i cannot do that, because my balance on these prosthetics just is not there, sorry, physios! but i can see how that would be very useful for injured players, but not just injured players, in hospitals. players will complete a set of exercises and drills which will be scored, and their fitness can then be
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judged by coaches. elsewhere in the sport world, american football is embracing vr quickly. strivr there is a company out of stanford university, currently working with seven nfl teams to allow players to practice anytime, anywhere, without the same physical tolls. and in the netherlands, another vr company, beyond sports, has a contract with both arsenal and stoke city for match analysis and vr training. but, back in the uk, a man who won premier league titles as a player and coach with manchester united thinks the new technology could really help. i think it benefits both amateur, professional and grassroots. you can put pressure into the situation. the technology is part of sport now. football, possibly, have had a reluctance to use it, but it's moving in that direction. but the kit they are offering is not cheap, with packages starting at £5,000, and increasing to more
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than £20,000 a month. but the potential benefits of vr to the football clubs that can afford it are intriguing. coaches want to train and test footballers in the most effective way, by recreating the pressure and intensity of performing in a packed stadium. so what would the manager with the most premier league titles under his belt, sir alex ferguson, think about it? do you think fergie would have been up for it? he would have a look at it, yeah. i think he would. he was open to all that sort of stuff, as long as it made a bit of a difference. 0r sometimes it's what people like, you know, players like it. they like something new and fresh. top clubs are big businesses, and the money in football is only going to increase. and, as it does, teams will be looking for any way to improve. as you watch your team this weekend, remember that last—minute winner or fingertip save might be the result of some hard hours spent
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in a virtual world. and that's it for the short cut of click this week. the full version is waiting for you on iplayer. over the next couple of weeks, we are going to give you the chance to rewatch two of our favourite shows from the year so far — the two india specials. we'll be travelling across the country, to meet the people working hard to change lives, save lives, and maybe one day discover new life. i hope you enjoy watching them as much as we enjoyed making them. do not forget we are on twitter and on facebook. thank you for watching, and we'll see you soon. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. president trump issues a fresh warning to north korea. he calls for tougher sanctions, and says there will be consequences
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if us bases in guam are targeted. and, if anything happens to guam, there's going to be big, big trouble in north korea. good morning, it is saturday 12 august.
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