Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 12, 2017 8:00am-9:01am BST

8:00 am
and this, you will cook, now? excellent. so my trek across india from border to border is almost over, and it's been a realjourney of discovery for me off the beaten track. this isn't india "on tap", instant gratification, which some people are accustomed to, but the rewards, if you make the effort, are immense. hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. president trump issues a fresh warning to north korea. he calls for tougher sanctions and says there will be consequences if us bases in guam are targeted. and, if anything happens to guam, there's going to be big, big trouble in north korea. good morning it's
8:01 am
saturday, 12th august. also ahead: the finishing line beckons for two legends of the track — usain bolt and mo farah. yes farah‘s opening night gold remains britain's only medal here at the london stadium. but though she missed out on the podium what a performance from dina asher—smith in the women's 200 metres. she ran an impressive race and finished fourth. laser danger: new restrictions could be on the way to stop pens being shone at planes and helicopters. and tonight could be the best night for years to watch a meteor shower. and philip has the weather. hello, a very good morning to you. decent weekend of weather across the
8:02 am
british hours, one or two showers in the mix, all the details in a few minutes. good morning. first, our main story. president trump has issued a fresh warning to north korea, saying it will "regret it fast" if it continues to make threats against america and its allies. the president also called for tougher sanctions against pyongyang but he said he would love a peaceful resolution. the chinese leader xijinping has phoned mr trump and urged him to avoid "words and deeds" that could "exacerbate" the already—tense situation on the korean peninsula. our washington correspondent, laura bicker reports. president trump is leaving the north korean leader in no doubt. if he poses a threat to the us, there will be consequences. if anything happens to guam, there's going to be big, big trouble in north korea. but then came this note of reassurance. you know what i can say — hopefully it'll all work out, 0k? nobody loves a peaceful solution better than president trump, that i can tell you. these us b—1 bombers are stationed in guam. their motto is "fight tonight."
8:03 am
mr trump is keen to ensure north korea is aware of their presence. pyongyang has threatened to fire missiles at the pacific island, and although holidaymakers appear unfazed, the local government has issued leaflets urging them not to look at fireballs. but donald trump's ramped—up rhetoric is being backed by diplomatic measures. he has placed a call to president xi in beijing. mr trump wined and dined the chinese leader injanuary, in the hope that he would do more to rein in his trading partner. the threat us involvement on the korean peninsula mightjust force them to act. and it has emerged the trump administration has been in secret talks with north korea, discussions about americans imprisoned there, and deteriorating relations. donald trump is not stepping back from his war of words with north korea. some feared his statements were off—the—cuff, on impulse. but it appears, for now,
8:04 am
to be his strategy, to plant the idea in his enemies‘ mind that he is unpredictable, and not to be tested. our correspondent robin brant joins us now from the south korean capital, seoul. bring us up—to—date with the diplomatic stories emerging slightly behind the scenes, what's been going on? yes we are getting some detail of the phone call between president trump and president xi, chinese state tv reporting both men agreed in the call that north korea should stop what it is describing as provocative actions. president xi told his american counterpart that all parties which clearly includes the united states, should restrain themselves when it comes to words and actions which might exacerbate the situation. that is in line with
8:05 am
the situation. that is in line with the chinese position but all releva nt the chinese position but all relevant parties, it's notjust a description of what pyongyang is doing. on the american side, the white house saying the relationship between these two is extremely close and china is very important in trying to bring about a successful de—escalation. people here in south korea, we are close to the border with north korea, 35 miles from where i am sitting, they have long been used to the potential of conflict but some signs things might be changing, reading reports this morning that sales of gold increasing significantly, ready to eat meals as well and there will be a civil defence drill next week here in the capital involving people going to bomb shelters, getting people off the streets. it happens every year, people off the streets. it happens every yea r, last people off the streets. it happens every year, last year on their handful of the city districts were involved but this year it is reported that all district will be.
8:06 am
slight increase in preparation it seems. two legends of athletics will run their last major competitive track races at the world championships in london tonight. mo farah will be hoping to win his second gold of the games when he runs in the 5,000—metres. usain bolt will retire after taking part in the relay with the jamaican team. natalie pirks reports. goodbyes are always hard, but you don't normally get two in one day. sir mo farah‘s 5,000m final tonight is a big one. not only is it his last track race at a major championship, but he is also going for his fifth—straight distance double, an unprecedented accomplishment for a distance runner. he's been tripped before, he survived that one. now, it's up to him. when he surged ahead of the pack in last weekend's 10,000m, he cemented his place as a british sporting legend. it's gold for farah! it remains the nation's solitary gold and solitary medal. jamaica are also experiencing an unexpected lack of success. bolt gets a pretty good start...
8:07 am
usain bolt‘s final individual race last weekend ended in a bronze. tonight represents a chance to go out with the bang he so desires and deserves. it's gatlin, right at the death! for british athletes, yesterday was another day of close calls. dina asher—smith broke herfoot in february, and only started running again injune. it was britain's fifth fourth—place finish at the championships, but this was quite some achievement. and dina asher—smith fourth. to see that i missed out on a bronze by 0.07, which, ok, in sprinting is a lot. but i am quite frustrated. but at the same time, on reflection, i'm really happy to have done a 22.2, so yeah. that's surely another foul, is it? it is.
8:08 am
elsewhere, lorraine ugen could only manage fifth in the long jump, and nick miller came sixth in the hammer final. there could be british medals in the women's high jump and the relays, but today will no doubt be remembered for the end of the mo—bot, and the end of the bolt. have the tissues at the ready. and we'll be speaking to british 400—metre record holder iwan thomas an anti—islam candidate is being allowed to stand in ukip‘s leadership election, despite previous attempts by party members to block her. anne marie waters campaigns against sharia law in the uk and some party members have said they may resign if she wins. our political correspondent leila nathoo joins us from our london newsroom. this is controversial even for a
8:09 am
ukip isn't it, if some of its members are saying they will not support it. absolutely, ukip has been trying to shake off these associations with islamophobia and racism and now we have a candidate who has called islam evil, called islam a killing machine, putting herself forward for leader of the party. as you say there have been attem pts party. as you say there have been atte m pts to party. as you say there have been attempts to try to block her, she was blocked for standing as a candidate in the general election and there is deep and ease among a lot of ukip members about what her candidacy will present and signify to the public about what ukip stands for. there are those in the party who think this is not the direction ukip should be taking. paul nuttall you will remember the previous leader who stood down tried to go into the last election on a platform also singling out the muslim
8:10 am
community, he talked about banning the burqa and defended his controversial views but they did not go down well with voters, the ukip vote collapsed at the last election so deep unease in ukip circles that they could go further in this direction. although anne marie waters does insist this is something no other party, no other person is prepared to talk about and she does think that sort of platform will be popular with her party members and voters. as we go towards the leadership contest, lot is being examined about ukip and how well are not it has emerged after relative success during the brexit referendum. i think ukip has been struggling to find its identity after the brexit referendum, its whole reason for being was to leave the eu, it was a success in its terms and since then with the departure of nigel farage, the ii
8:11 am
candidates putting themselves forward for leadership, hardly any of them are household names and then it is struggling to find a new direction, and new reason for being, a new way to broaden its appeal. i think this whole contest will be a period of soul—searching for the party. good to talk to you, thank you. a 19—year old british man has died while snorkelling in greece. harry byatt, who was a watersports instructor, was found unconscious on the sea—bed off the island of zakynthos. an investigation has been launched by the greek authorities. new measures to tackle the dangerous use of laser pens will be considered by the government, amid concerns about their threat to air safety. the lasers, which can temporarily blind people, have been used to target aircraft and pilots. proposals include licensing retailers and restricting advertising. currently, shining lasers at a plane can incur a fine of up to £2,500. the american singer, taylor swift, has won a key victory in a two—part
8:12 am
court battle with former radio dj. a judge in the us state of colorado has dismissed david mueller‘s claim that she got him fired. however, the court is still considering ms swift's counter—claim that he reached under her skirt and groped her during a pre—concert reception in 2013. mr mueller has denied the accusation, though admits he may have inadvertently touched her skirt. stargazers will be hoping to get a great view of the perseid meteor shower tonight. astronomers say hundreds of meteors will streak across the sky in a display that may be visible around the world. the display should peak at around ”pm this evening. clear skies permitting, it will be seen in most parts of the uk. police in texas have released dramatic footage of a most unlikely car crash. the accident happened when the car drove through a set
8:13 am
of safety barriers. the driver was treated at hospital but is expected to be ok. a p pa re ntly apparently the car fell six floors. but everyone was ok, including the person in the car which came down, the rok just minor person in the car which came down, the rokjust minor injuries. amazing. world leaders have called for calm after a week of fierce exchanges between the united states and north korea. last night, president trump warned pyongyang the us military was "locked and loaded" should missiles be fired toward its territory in the pacific. north korea said america was driving the situation to nuclear war. so, is diplomacy still an option or is military action inevitable? joining us now from southampton is rear admiral chris parry — a former nato commander. thank you for your time this
8:14 am
morning, for the benefit of a lot of people who are having thoughts about what if, given what we have heard, could you tell us what your knowledge and expertise what if north korea does fire and the soul now? —— fire a missile now? north korea does fire and the soul now? -- fire a missile now? there are now? -- fire a missile now? there a re lots of now? -- fire a missile now? there are lots of options on the table for america if that happens. the americans have a considerable antiballistic missile capability they will deploy, i also think north korea should consider america having a considerable consensual capability to hit north korea should they even try to target missiles at any part of american territory. we have two remember americans are uniquely sensitive to being hit with the first blow, remember pearl harbor
8:15 am
911? north korea are underestimating the resolve of the americans to deal with this issue if they prove to be aggressive. there is a divergences of opinions as to donald trump's technique here, the message is he is sending out, what is your take on how he has approached what he has said? i think we have to recall america is notjust donald trump, he has a whole administration working with him and i think our experience with him and i think our experience with the president is that while you are looking at his right hand his left hand is doing something else. i think the left hand here is putting considerable military pressure on north korea that it is also sending a message to china and iran, saying if you reach a certain threshold where america feels threatened certainly with weapons of mass destruction we will react. you may not have had that confidence under my predecessors but under me we will react to serious threats to this
8:16 am
country. we have seen the president trump knows the value of having the three elements of strategy in place, in the past we have seen the diplomatic and economic instruments largely ignored by the north korean regime, this time the third part of thatis regime, this time the third part of that is being backed up with military threat and action as well. it's something which was missing when the russians invaded crimea and ukraine. we had us and uk politicians are saying work it will be diplomatic and economic pressure and president putin just walked straight through it. there was no military pressure or threat to deal with what was an overt act of aggression by russia. we are seeing america seeing work you have reached the end of the road, we have had agreements in the past, we are not getting the can down the road, you now have military pressure applied to what is quite overtly unordered ethernet which may in future include
8:17 am
weapons of mass destruction. you mentioned uk and worldwide politicians, people might have anxiety about whether we would be somehow involved if this became some kind of military intervention, with your knowledge and expertise how does that set, are we obliged to provide back—up? does that set, are we obliged to provide back-up? i don't think we are obliged by treaty to help. i think morally and because america is oui’ think morally and because america is our closest ally if we were asked for help i think it would be carefully considered by the government certainly in terms of surveillance and combat support. there is no moral equivalence between north korea and any other country in the world, this is a rogue nation that is headed by essentially a gangster dictator and even china sitting on the sidelines is pretty politically immoral. everyone should be coming together
8:18 am
to put pressure on this north korean regime to get back in its box before america very seriously puts it back in its box. thank you very much for your time this morning. here's philip with a look at this morning's weather. sunshine on the way from the looks of it. shaking up to be a decent weekend, i am not seeing the covers would come into play but let's go further south from the north—east, one of the other weather watchers caught the fa ct other weather watchers caught the fact there is a weak weather front on the channel coastal areas providing missed and mark and that will be extending its influence towards kent and sussex. this feature that is already providing rain across the corner of scotland drift down. it's not a bad weekend
8:19 am
despite that, not a bad saturday, quite a bit of cloud around, might produce one or two showers away from the band of cloud and rain i have spoken about in the north—east of england but many areas will enjoy a decent sort of day, if you have a plan for the outdoors i don't think for many of you the weather will get in the way, showers across the north—east part of scotland and a bit breezy. if you are heading towards the world athletics championships it will be a decent evening for proceedings. quite this way down through the diagonal north—west to south—east should see pretty clear skies but you will need a few layers because underneath the clearing skies you will feel it very
8:20 am
chilly the longer you stay up. but i least think we are all in with a pretty decent chance of seeing it tonight. perhaps better than sunday for this south—western quarter, againa for this south—western quarter, again a decent day on sunday, still showers for parts of scotland but the cloud filling in ahead of a weather front which make its presence felt across many parts as we get into monday, a lot of you on holiday but it's going to be the south—eastern quarter which avoids worst of the rain, could be quite wet at times per many areas during the day. this is where we check... of course it does! looking nice. as forecast! going to be a wonderful setting.
8:21 am
going to be a wonderful setting. going to be amazing this season, mo farah, usain bolt running in their last major competitive track races. let's talk now to former commonwealth and european champion iwan thomas, who's at the london stadium this morning. good morning, how are you?” good morning, how are you? i am good thank you. it has been brilliant, the whole chat thin chips, the atmosphere, i am the whole chat thin chips, the atmosphere, iam privileged the whole chat thin chips, the atmosphere, i am privileged to be track—side every night. atmosphere, i am privileged to be track-side every night. sun is shining, let's start with mo farah, running the 5000 metres, prediction is, the hope is he will get gold, help the uk team's medal tally but it's what he has meant the world of athletics as a character, someone who works so hard. yeah, he has been absolutely brilliant. i was
8:22 am
privileged to meet him when he was 13, i presented him with a medal and told him he had talent and to keep going. you can see him on the track, the reaction he brings and what he's done for the sport is superb, i think tonight will be the hardest because of lot of athletes will be coming in fresher, they will have not doubled up. but i would never bet against him because the reception when he runs around the track lifts him. in the kinky he was waving to the crowds to get the atmosphere going and it's been a privilege to watch him. i think he will do it tonight. he said he found the 10,000, one of his hardest races. yeah, it is hard. every time tried to beat people, they will gang up tried to beat people, they will gang up on him, run tactics to disrupt, not just to try to win the up on him, run tactics to disrupt,
8:23 am
notjust to try to win the race but to throw him off. everyone is against him because they know he's so good. he has such speed over the last 400 metres, if they are not making him tired by the time the bell goes it is hard to beat him so i think he will try to do that tonight, take it out a lot earlier and make him have to work harder than he would want. but would never say never with him winning another gold medal because he's so talented and works so hard and as you know we need another medal. let's talk about that then, two schools of thought, one is saying we have done well, only just one is saying we have done well, onlyjust missing out, quite a few fourth places. but another seeing what is happening with our system of coaching, we are seeing training abroad, not getting what they need from here, what are your thoughts?” ama from here, what are your thoughts?” am a glass half—full guy. five quarters places, while langford 800
8:24 am
metres, a lot of people had never heard of him, he made the final and came fourth, just missing out. dina asher—smith who had a broken foot earlier this year had a horrendous build—up to the championships but just missed out again. if the championships were a month away are another year, those fourth positions could have been bronze medals and we would be standing here with one gold medal and five bronzes which is a great championship. and it's not all over, robbie grabaz on the high jump, the relays, if we can pick up a few more medals i think it will be a few more medals i think it will be a good championships. i think it has been anyway but it's just u nfortu nate been anyway but it's just unfortunate that those who don't know the sport inside out will say it's been a failure because we don't have many medals. talking of disappointment, usain bolt, we saw him with a bronze medal, today in the four by 100 m relay what are the chances the jamaican team and usain
8:25 am
bolt, his last appearance on the team, going out with the gold? bolt, his last appearance on the team, going out with the gold7m has to happen, i want britain to get gold, that would be fantastic, but cannot see usain bolt not leaving this track without a gold medal around his neck. the team are so strong, if they get the batting around, its not about individuals, it's getting the one piece of metal around safely, you need four strong athletes in sync with each other. if the jamaicans get it right and they will want revenge on the americans. ido will want revenge on the americans. i do you sum up what usain bolt has meant to athletics? the saviour of my sport. he came around when it was ina bad my sport. he came around when it was in a bad place, he does notjust perform when it matters, he is a champion of the track. every night i am at the stadium and the home straight is full of a massive pack of jamaicans who come straight is full of a massive pack ofjamaicans who come every night
8:26 am
and make the most noise they are so proud. he's notjust the jamaica on the map he's put athletics back on the map he's put athletics back on the world map. he is a superstar, once ina the world map. he is a superstar, once in a generation you get somebody like him and it's been a privilege to watch him.” somebody like him and it's been a privilege to watch him. i cannot disagree with any of that, always lovely to talk to you, enjoy today, we are veryjealous, take care. time now for a look at the newspapers. anand menon is here to tell us what's caught their eye. the first story from the times? absolutely, the british government releasing a load of documents next week which is interesting because previously they have said we don't need to do that, one of them according to this story is about the irish border and the fact the government now says there will be a customs border between the north and south which will irritate the irish government a lot. it's one of the
8:27 am
great sticking points, or the arguments about brexit, it is the one place where there is a land border. absolutely and when theresa may made the lancaster house speech injanuary may made the lancaster house speech in january there was a may made the lancaster house speech injanuary there was a clear tension between talking about leaving the customs union and on the other hand saying we do not want border between the north and south of ireland. earlier this week we were talking about, we were on the isle of skye and one of our correspondence was talking about how it is suffering from being too beautiful with the number of tourists, they were looking at them ways to limit out and it's also happening in europe as well, almost some hostility to some tourists in parts of spain? yeah and it is interesting how it is spreading, acts of facility against tourists in barcelona, problems in venice for a while with new laws about picnicking in public, the
8:28 am
locals getting fed up with the number of tourists. they will introduce new rules to limit the number of tourists which might put prices up will stop across spain has been this backlash. a call to limit the numbers. there is the aspect of air bnb. get when you look at the economics, 16% is the contribution made to the gdp of spain by the tourism industry so losing something like that would be significant. they must be very annoyed if they are willing to lose that income. absolutely and i think a lot of the rhetoric is there are things more important than money and maintaining our city for ourselves is one of them. but they have to do strike a balance, they do not want to close the tourist trade because that would
8:29 am
be fatal for the economy. there is a sense that people are profoundly tired of voting but this story is about who might ever win another general election. this is an interesting story and i cannot figure out if it is a silly season story or has legs. this guy used to be an adviser to george osborne and david davis which is interesting of itself because they are on different sides of the brexit debate and he has suddenly emerged as a twitter superstar, attacking brexit, attacking his former colleagues in the front bench of the conservative party and saying we need a third party because the tories and labour are not up to scratch, we need a new centrist party and it should be called the democrats. that's causing a star, what it comes to we will find out. you are big on football so this story you have picked out.” thought it was a lovely headline,
8:30 am
manchester city spending more on their defence and bosnia spend on its defence policy which i think throws the transferor window into sharp relief. and with all the hype, the premier league is back and it's been very successful commercially. the first game last night. lyon arsenal against leicester. 4—3. as a football fan do you feel partly responsible for the money madness because you are watching it, what do you do to try to cap the madness? joe i have an opt out but i am a fan ofa joe i have an opt out but i am a fan of a club not in the premier league soiam of a club not in the premier league so i amjust of a club not in the premier league so i am just jealous of a club not in the premier league so i am justjealous and bitter. it will not change will it? as long as there is an audience the money will roll in. headlines coming up, see you soon. hello. this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up before nine: philip will have the weather.
8:31 am
but first, a summary of this morning's main news. president trump has issued a fresh warning to north korea, saying it will "regret it fast" if it continues to make threats against america and its allies. the chinese leader xijinping has phoned mr trump and urged him to avoid "words and deeds" that could "exacerbate" the already—tense situation on the korean peninsula. the president called for tougher sanctions against pyongyang but he said he would love a peaceful resolution. if anything happens to guam, there will be big, big trouble in north korea. hopefully, it will work out. nobody loves a peaceful solution better than president trump — that, ican better than president trump — that, i can tell you. an anti—islam candidate is being allowed to stand in ukip‘s leadership election, despite previous attempts by party members to block her. anne marie waters campaigns against sharia law in the uk and some party members have said
8:32 am
they may resign if she wins. the contest is likely to decide the future direction of the party, which has 20 members of the european parliament but and nearly 350 local councillors, but no mps. a 19—year—old british man has died while snorkelling in greece. harry byatt, who was a watersports instructor, was found unconscious on the sea—bed off the island of zakynthos. an investigation has been launched by the greek authorities. new measures to tackle the dangerous use of laser pens will be considered by the government, amid concerns about their threat to air safety. the lasers, which can temporarily blind people, have been used to target aircraft and pilots. proposals include licensing retailers and restricting advertising. currently, shining lasers at a plane can incur a fine of up to £2500. the american singer taylor swift has won a key victory in a two—part court battle with former radio dj. a judge in the us state of colorado has dismissed david mueller‘s claim that she got him fired. however, the court is still considering ms swift's counter—claim that he reached under her skirt and groped her during
8:33 am
a pre—concert reception in 2013. mr mueller has denied the accusation, though admits he may have inadvertently touched her skirt. stargazers will be hoping to get a great view of the perseid meteor shower tonight. astronomers say hundreds of meteors will streak across the sky in a display that may be visible around the world. the display should peak at around 11 o'clock this evening. clear skies permitting, it will be seen in most parts of the uk. those are the main stories this morning. this will be the setting for some
8:34 am
real drama tonight, and some emotional goodbyes.” real drama tonight, and some emotional goodbyes. i think people watching will feel emotional. for usain bolt, it's his last track event. and mo farrah is running in the 5000 metre race, his last major championships tonight. i think people will be feeling emotional, and that briton... it will be some moment, won't it? we were talking to you when thomas about usain bolt, and he called him the saviour of athletics. it's a really big night tonight, isn't it? yes, these two are legends of the sport. they will bea are legends of the sport. they will be a lost notjust athletics but to sport in general. there are some preparations going on, so hopefully you can still hear me. they are testing the pa system. usain bolt, we have seen him line—up at the start of that 100 metres, 200 metres
8:35 am
—a start of that 100 metres, 200 metres — a massive personality and an individual character, and he has backedit individual character, and he has backed it up with consistent performances, time and again. he has won pretty much everything there is to win, and it will be a bitter— sweet moment tonight. i want to bring you up—to—date on what happened last night, because it has been a difficult year for dina asher—smith. six months ago, she broke her foot and asher—smith. six months ago, she broke herfoot and couldn't asher—smith. six months ago, she broke her foot and couldn't walk, and yet last night, she was in the final of the women's 200 metres, just six months later, but she couldn't quite make it onto the podium, despite a very impressive race. she became the latest briton to have to settle for fourth place. she was seven 100ths away from a personal best. britain's medal tally stays at just one,
8:36 am
personal best. britain's medal tally stays atjust one, but dina asher—smith says the team is positive. we have had a lot of fourth places, and at the same time, lots of those have been from people who are so young, they probably have another decade in them. they will be ones to watch in championships to come. britain's lorraine ugen also missed out on a medal in the long jump final. she finished fifth with a jump of 6 metres 72. gold went to the american brittney reese, who won her fourth world title. we seem to be all doing well. we're focusing on just trying to see what we can do. a lot of our team are still quite young, so it is kind of a changeover from the older guys retiring, and stuff like that. so it's guys like us getting more experience, and getting used to being closer to the medals. in the hammer final, the british record holder, nick miller, was in the silver medal position at one stage. but he couldn't better his throw in the early rounds of 77 metres 31 and he finished sixth. there was drama in the women's 800 metre semi—finals. britain's lynsey sharp finished
8:37 am
fourth in her race but was then disqualified as she was believed to have impeded another athlete close to the finish line. british athletics appealed the decision and she was later reinstated. she will be the only briton in sunday's race after adelle tracey and shelayna oskan—clarke failed to make it through. it was more straightforward for britain's chris o'hare in the semi finals of the men's 1500 metres. he comfortably qualified for sunday's final, he finished fourth. jake wightman missed out. one other moment to mention from last night's action: spare a thought for beatrice chepkoech. have a look at this — the kenyan was the pre—race favourite but amazingly managed to go the wrong way and miss the waterjump. she saw all her competitors go the right way so had to go back and do it again, but moments later she was in trouble again, getting in the way of several athletes,
8:38 am
bringing a couple down. to her credit, she still managed to finish fourth. now you are up—to—date with the athletics. let's catch up on some of the day's other sport, then. and just a few miles from here there were goals galore as the new premier league season announced itself in style. arsenal beat leicester 4—3 at the emirates stadium on a dramatic opening night. after going a goal down early on, leicester came back to twice take the lead, with jamie vardy scoring twice. but arsenal drew level before olivier giroud headed the winner with just five minutes left. arsene wenger‘s side started the new season having won just one of their previous five opening—day matches. i felt that they have shown fantastic spirit. never gave up, and came back and won the game. i must congratulate the players. defensively, we can do better. but overall, i believe we have produced a top—quality game. liverpool's preparations have been hit by their star player
8:39 am
philippe coutinho handing in a transfer request — after the club rejected a £90m bid from barcelona. the brazilian is injured and will miss their season—opening trip to watford — one of seven premier league fixtures today: scottish champions celtic maintained their 100% start to the season with a one—nil win over partick thistle. brendan rodgers' side have now gone 51 domestic games unbeaten. bad weather in north carolina hampered play at golf‘s final major of the year, the pga championship at quail holllow. but not before japan's hideki matsuyama shot a brilliant second round 64 to give him a share of the lead. the best placed briton is paul casey, who is five shots adrift. but storms delayed play meaning several players will have to return to finish their rounds later today. the pa system is in full flow here,
8:40 am
but later tonight, 50,000 fans will be here, eager to see one final glimpse of legends of the sport, usain bolt and mo farah, on the track. it is sure to be a bit — sweet moment, charlie. about an hour or so before they get into action there, because there is an early morning session this you. dan's here to tell us what's coming up on football focus. i have stolen your football! i wa nted i have stolen your football! i wanted to talk to you about the steeplechase. we will show it again. i feel so sorry for this woman, this athlete, who must have been so in the zone, or thinking she is going to go around the group that she just went round the wrong bit of the lane. you don't actually have to jump lane. you don't actually have to jump nose, you can get over them however you like, put your hands on them if you like. that would be the
8:41 am
only way i could do it! and she still finished fourth, which is determination, isn't it? what have you got dan? well my football has been stolen. she hurt herself by smacking it against her head. feel how light that is. i thought when you headed the ball, it is heavy, andi you headed the ball, it is heavy, and i thought it wouldn't hurt. i'm not doing it again, because that is three times! is one good thing they have put in this, the graphics flicker when the ball spins in the air, so the players can see the ball more clearly in the air. it is all about speed these days. still hurts! the football season started last week. seven goals last night. on
8:42 am
football focus, we will obviously talk about that. we will show part of our interview withjermain defoe. very moving. he has not spoken much about the death of bradley lowery, the fan that he was friends with. but we went to interview him this week, and he really opened up about the depth of friendship he had with this young lad. he walked into the dressing room one day, picked out his favourite player, and they had a strong bond and friendship, and he gets quite emotional. it is hard to watch this interview without welling up, because you see how much bradley meant to jermain defoe. up, because you see how much bradley meant tojermain defoe. you learn about the depth of friendship. we have also been talking about some of theissues have also been talking about some of the issues of the week — phillip continue back at liverpool, wayne rooney at everton. we have got alan
8:43 am
shearer speaking to rafael benitez, who has had a miserable summer, not being able to buy the players he wanted. he says that he wouldn't be anywhere else, though.” wanted. he says that he wouldn't be anywhere else, though. i was a bit disappointed at some stage of the summer, when! disappointed at some stage of the summer, when i decided that i wanted to stay and be in a top side that could compete. i will try to do my best. people asked why i am not leaving, and it is because i want to be in the premier league, to be close to my family, and to be with the team that i love. we have two chelsea defenders, we will look at brighton, huddersfield, the new boys in the premier league. and harry ned —— harry redknapp, managing in his 17th year. meantime, do not head the
8:44 am
football! i have learnt my lesson! i might have a bruise! now, philip has the weather. we were just talking about ball games, and! we were just talking about ball games, and i can't help showing you this picture, to bring back my own sporting memories. that is the ground of pontypool, as many of you will know. this brings back memories of my youth. from the isle of wight to sussex and kent, there is a weather front keeping the cloud low and thick at the moment. another one is there, just in the eastern side of scotland. it has been a dank affa i res of scotland. it has been a dank affaires first thing. —— a dank
8:45 am
affair. there is a lot of cloud around at the moment, and there could be the odd showery burst of rain. even away from that weather front in the north, there will be one of two showers in the afternoon. for many, a dry, bright afternoon. temperatures respond to the sunshine -20, 21 temperatures respond to the sunshine — 20, 21 celsius in the south. northern ireland and scotland will have one or two showers but also a lot of dry weather, with sunny spells. not a cold afternoon, which will suit the athletes and spectators alike at the world championships in east london. if you are thinking about the perseid shower, we will show you the night—time temperatures. the skies we re night—time temperatures. the skies were clear and some areas, and on a
8:46 am
diagonalfrom the north were clear and some areas, and on a diagonal from the north west of the south—east, clear skies, yes, diagonal from the north west of the south—east, clearskies, yes, but you will need some layers to wear if you will need some layers to wear if you are outside. on sunday, a decent day, a scattering of showers across the north and west of scotland. the cloud comes ahead of a weather front, bringing wet weather to northern and western parts of the british isles, just on time for monday. england winning the world cup, red rum crossing the line first in a third grand national, virginia wade at wimbledon — moments of sporting history can be hard to forget. now a charity is using memories of sporting events, like these, to help people living with dementia and they've just received an archive of 90,000 photographs. the hope is that they will encourage people to socialise and make the connections between their long and short term memory.
8:47 am
breakfast‘s john maguire has been finding out more. at the time of stanley matthews, there was another english forward who was reckoned to be as good as a different player, but they were a lwa ys different player, but they were always vying for top dog. what was his name? tom finney? tom finney. you would be hard rest to beat this tea m you would be hard rest to beat this team ina you would be hard rest to beat this team in a football quiz. the depth of their knowledge is extraordinary, but the difficulty comes in bringing that knowledge to the surface, as they all have dementia. once a week, they all have dementia. once a week, the charity sporting memories runs this group in motherwell. there are others across the uk, and for many year, it is the highlight of the week. is any people watching this and they are feeling lonely, this is the place to come. this is one of the
8:48 am
sporting memory places. these are second to none. the people, the carers, and these people are first class. often, dementia patients find distant memories more vivid than recent ones. chapterjim about football in the years just fall away. the scottish cup final when the celtic centre half mcneill got a corner kick, and i was sitting at the front of the stand, and i seen mcneill moving from the halfway line and running, and he scored that day. they were playing dunfermline, and that was one of the best moments that was one of the best moments that i can remember, like, you know. jessica... did anybody see her on the telly over the weekend? the group also talks about current
8:49 am
events, such as the world athletics championships, making those connections between yesterday and today. do you remember his name? the group enjoys the chance to socialise. sport, like music, seems to help connections, start conversations, and photographs offer a powerful window to the pass. you don't know what might resonate in what might trigger a memory, and thatis what might trigger a memory, and that is what is so fascinating about what we do as well — you don't know what we do as well — you don't know what will trigger that particular memory. but then you hear a spontaneous story from somewhere, and it is fascinating, and everyone in the group enjoys that. reuters has just given sporting memories and incredible archive of 90,000 images, and now the charity is recruiting help. we want to hear from volu nteers help. we want to hear from volunteers who want to enjoy delving through these boxes of incredible images, and helping us to scan them
8:50 am
and digitise them. it is likely this huge collection would have been locked away in an archive, never to be seen again. but now, these historic images will have a new life and will help people to forge links between their own past present and future. john maguire, bbc news, motherwell. joining us now is guy mowbray, football commentator and patron of the sporting memories foundation. when you see that, you think, it makes perfect sense. you hear people saying they can remember the passage of play in an individual match, and yet other things have slipped away. it is amazing the power of photographs, still, these days. you see people liked up. someone quiet in the corner, in their own place, and suddenly, something will spark. and it is notjust the sporting conversation they will choose — everything else comes to light. you see people switching back on. what
8:51 am
is the sport that triggers the memory is the most? all kinds, depending on where in the country you are. for me, it is football and it has never been anything else. it could be a famous sporting name doing other things. there were images of pele having a shave, things like that. something that will trigger something, stimulate conversation and get the brain going. and the conversation is not necessarily about sport, because it brings a new confidence to someone. it is scary, losing your memory. this is why i got involved a few yea rs this is why i got involved a few years ago. this is a great thing that brings people together. my whole job is based that brings people together. my wholejob is based on sporting memories. if i lost my sporting memory, i would memories. if i lost my sporting memory, iwould be memories. if i lost my sporting memory, i would be no use. it is incredible how it just memory, i would be no use. it is incredible how itjust gets people out and about and talking. the cricket pitch are we so there is, was that viv richards?”
8:52 am
cricket pitch are we so there is, was that viv richards? i missed that. i'm not a huge cricket fan, but i am looking at that and thinking, who was that? it starts you thinking, doesn't it? one of the most iconic ones is 2005, with freddie flintoff and brett lee. who is that? it is a pakistan player. freddie flintoff consoling brett lee isa freddie flintoff consoling brett lee is a fantastic one. i went to see your pusher — lancashire last night, and there was a fantastic catch that future generations will talk about for a long time. the power of the photograph is incredible. what sporting memories have got from reuters is this archive, so they need volunteers to help to scan the archive. it is amazing what you can
8:53 am
get out of it yourself. and the groups are there this might all over the country. there will be a group near you. you go along, there are weekly sessions, and i went to one recently where there was a woman who had never been interested in football in her life and now plays it and watches it and loved it. do you have an image or a memory from your childhood perhaps that springs to mind? so many. mine would be the winning penalty for york city against arsenal when i was 12 years old. and you can see it? absolutely. i was there. and you know who you are with? it brings back smells and everything. it gets people who have perhaps gone into a place where they are on their own, perhaps have early—onset dementia and are struggling to deal with life in
8:54 am
general, and it brings them out again, it really does. it is an inspiring charity to be involved with. you are commentating today, so your memory will be tested! wayne rooney will be playing for everton today, 13 years after he left the club, so the new generation will get some memories. lovely to see you today. thank you. it's the world's fastest—growing way of communicating. emojis — those little pictures you can send within texts or online messages — are increasingly showing up everywhere from adverts to court cases. have you ever sent one? what do you think? i know what i think, and i asked the question.” think? i know what i think, and i asked the question. i have, and you are surprised. i think i have literally sent one, once. what was it? i can't remember, because i don't know what half of them are, which is the story. it can be a fun way to communicate, but get it wrong and you can damage your brand, insult other cultures, and in one—case,
8:55 am
a man was arrested after his message was considered threatening. we sent hayley hassell out to see if people could translate a sentence made up solely of emojis. fly to a beach, it is sunny, bikinis, burgers — a holiday? not got a clue. no idea whatsoever. if someone said that, what would you think they may? going on holiday. there you go. packing for holiday. i like it. having a good time on holiday, nice food, weather, lots of drink. i was going after the beefburger one. is it a holiday? you think food, smiley face, and holidays? it means, i am going on
8:56 am
holiday, and i will have some food and a lovely time. keith is explaining to us now. that person was excited to be going on holiday. you saw the icon of the sunshine, some nice beverages and food, get in the bikini and enjoy the beach. keith is the world's first emoji translator. is a pleasure to be here. why do we need a translator? a recent study released by facebook shows that on facebook messenger alone, each and every day, 5 billion in 0g icons are sent. if you take into account the other social media outlets —— 5 billion emoji icons are sent. there are very specific meanings in certain cultures and countries, and
8:57 am
even language— specific meanings. what other problem areas that will get you in a bit of bother? cultural variation in interpretation, but also across various devices, different renderings, so when an emoji is created, is a code is written that is supposed to be read ina written that is supposed to be read in a uniform manner, but when they are given to apple, google or microsoft, they hire designers to create their version, and in most insta nces, create their version, and in most instances, they look similar and can be interpreted similarly, but in some instances, they can vary dramatically from the intended meaning. the eye rolling icons — on samsung devices, it looks like an expectant face. so a samsung user seeing that message may think, wow, they seem infused about my message, i will keep talking to them. we will
8:58 am
doa i will keep talking to them. we will do a test, because i know that charlie loves them. the one that is brown and is a triangle, and it has a face on it, and it looks... it looks rude. is it rude? it is rude. it isa looks rude. is it rude? it is rude. it is a poop? it is not ice cream. it is a poop? it is not ice cream. it has a nice big happy face on it, so you might think, that must be a happy ice cream. it's not. it is intended to be excrement. in a short list of new emoji icons potentially being released next year, there is a variant proposed where it has a sad face. more appropriate! a quick test. charlie, what does that mean? i'm worried about the rain, so i'm covering my head. no... this person is lying down with their head in the clouds. obviously! if they had had
8:59 am
their head in the cloud, would that not have been easier? what does this say? no teeth hadn't pudding? -- hand pudding? you are not far off. that person seems to have already had some food, so they'll say no thank you. no. iwill show had some food, so they'll say no thank you. no. i will show you it again. it is no, don't bite the hand that feeds you! this is an example of how, if you put together a sentence without knowing the rules, people can misconstrue them. sentence without knowing the rules, people can misconstrue themm sentence without knowing the rules, people can misconstrue them. if we had an emoji for, it's time for the
9:00 am
headlines, it would come at right now. so thank you. we'll see you in an hour.

14 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on