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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 13, 2017 7:00am-8:01am BST

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and maybe one day discover new life. i hope you enjoy watching them as much as we enjoyed making them. do not forget we are on twitter and on facebook. thank you for watching, and we'll see you soon. hello, this is breakfast, withjohn maguire and sian lloyd. a woman has killed and more than 30 people are injured in violence at a white nationalist rally in the united states. a car is driven into a crowd of anti—fascist protestors, following a day of clashes in charlottesville, virginia. go home. you are not wanted in this great commonwealth. shame on you. good morning, it is
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sunday 13 august. also ahead: ecstasy and agony at the world athletics championships. great britain's men claim the axioom relay gold, but usain bolt pulls up in his last race on the world stage. it didn't go to plan for sir mo farah, either, here at the london stadium. in his last major race on the track, he is beaten into second place in the final of the 5,000m. we will be speaking to him later. learner drivers will be allowed to have lessons on motorways from next year. and it has been clear enough for many to be able to see the perseid meteor shower lighting up the sky overnight. philip can tell us if it is going to stay clear on sunday. hello, very good morning to you.
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it is quite a cool start to the day, but i think it is going to be a very pleasant day across many parts of the british isles. one or two showers in the mix. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: white supremacists have been told to go home by the governor of virginia, after one person was killed during violent protests, when a car was driven into a group of people. overnight a 20—year—old man from ohio was arrested on suspicion of murder. more than 30 people have been injured at the protest. laura westbrook‘s report contains some disturbing images. this is what you represent! hate on the streets of this southern american city. chaos and violence erupted after a planned protest by white nationalists. the day started in a tense stand—off, as the group was surrounded by anti—racism activists. it then erupted into taunting,
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shoving, and outright brawling. this event has been declared an unlawful assembly... the rally was cancelled before it even began. the police took back streets. the crowd dispersed, then this. a car ploughs through protesters. one person was killed. a state of emergency has been declared in cha rlottesville, and a curfew is in place. later, a police helicopter crashed near a golf course, leaving two officers dead. it appeared to have been monitoring the protests. the us president said the violence is notjust one—sided. we condemn, in the strongest possible terms, this egregious display of hatred, bigotry, and violence, on many sides. on many sides. but many, even within his own party, feel those words were not enough.
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senator cory gardner directly addressed donald trump. the governor of virginia had this to say to those who came to the city. and i have a message to all the white supremacists and the nazis who came into charlottesville today. our message is plain and simple. go home. the day of violence ended with a vigil for the victims, as many reflect on a city and nation divided. two ministers who previously expressed opposing views on brexit have written a joint newspaper article clarifying the government's position. writing in the sunday telegraph, philip hammond and liam fox confirm there will be a transition period to help businesses adjust. our political reporter jonathan blake is in our london newsroom for us.
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good morning to you. it seems as if peace has broken out in the cabinet. toa peace has broken out in the cabinet. to a point, at least. you have two big beasts representing different views on different sides of the argument about brexit, burying the hatchet, putting their differences aside and saying they are united, to appoint at least. philip hammond, the chancellor, who campaigned to stay in the eu, and liam fox, the trade secretary, one of the most enthusiastic brexiteers, have put a couple of issues to bed, at least. on britain leaving the eu they are clear we will leave the customs union and the single market, so no more free movement of goods and services once we leave the eu. and they will be a transition period after march 2019 so we don't all wa ke after march 2019 so we don't all wake up on 31 march 2019 not knowing
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how to trade with other countries, not knowing what the travel arrangements, with no new system in place. the so—called cliff edge that many businesses have been worried about. but crucially, they are also saying that the transition will be time limited, so this is not away for the uk to stay in the eu the back door. lots of details to be worked out, so how long the unity last, we can't be sure. —— lasts. a danish inventor who built the world's largest privately made submarine has appeared in court in copenhagen, charged with killing a swedish journalist. peter madsen, who is a6, has denied the manslaughter of the woman, who disappeared on thursday after a trip in the vessel. cctv footage has emerged of the moment a house was destroyed by a gas explosion. a woman was inside the semi—detached house in sunderland when the blast took place on friday morning, but survived with minor injuries. it is understood that she was protected from the blast by a fridge which fell on top of her. learner drivers are to be allowed
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on to motorways in england, scotland and wales for the first time from next year. the department for transport said lessons must be in a dual—control car with an approved driving instructor. more details now from our correspondent tom burridge. learning to drive — something many of us remember doing, mainly in quiet, suburban areas. but, from next year, learners will be allowed onto our motorways. the government says it will make us safer, because when people pass their test, they will already have experience of our biggest and fastest roads. it's a good idea, because normally, as they're getting towards the end of their lessons, towards their driving test, i think it is a good idea.
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if they're well supervised, obviously. we're looking for people who already know how to drive. mainly new drivers, they still cause problems. but when we talk about people, about learners, that would be chaos. it would be chaotic, and i don't think it is the right idea. learners will only be allowed onto a motorway with an approved driving instructor, and only in a car where the front passenger has pedals as well. road safety groups and the agency that represents driving instructors have all welcomed the move. driving on a motorway will not initially become part of the practical driving test. learners will be there just during training. one aim is to reduce the disproportionate number of young people killed and seriously injured on our roads. shooting stars littered the sky last night, as the perseid meteor shower was at its peak over the uk. 100 meteors were expected every hour. the perseid meteor shower happens everyjuly and august, as the earth passes debris from the swift—tuttle comet. and, if you caught any of the shooting stars on camera,
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please do send them in. you can e—mail us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk, or share them on facebook page. looking forward to seeing some of those. and if you were unsuccessful last night we will talk to an astra photographer later in the programme who can give you some tips for next summer. who can give you some tips for next summer. “— who can give you some tips for next summer. —— astrophotographer. let's discuss a night of surprises and drama at the world athletics championships, in london. britain's men took gold in the ax100m relay. but it didn't go according to plan for sir mo farah or usain bolt, as they brought their careers on the track to an end. our sports news correspondent andy swiss was watching. rarely has a single race encapsulated so many emotions. as the british relay team celebrated a dazzling win, usain bolt‘s career ended in calamity. it's britain out in front.
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he is going to be chased by the great man. bolt‘s jamaica were the defending champions, but it was britain who led the way. and, as they sprinted to glory, bolt‘s chase was cut agonisingly short. as britain's stunning gold sunk in, bolt was on his back — hardly the fairytale finish his career deserved. eventually he was able to hobble away, but it was the saddest end to his swansong. for the british team, though, a picture of perfection. one of the fastest times ever, on one of the biggest stages. we're world champions, it's crazy to think. especially — i feel so grateful to be in this team, and especially to run it with danny. we have some not—so—nice memories from 2012, in terms of the relay. and to run it how we ran today, we couldn't have done it without the support of the team.
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the crowd here has been fantastic. we just wanted to say thank you so much to everyone watching, and yeah, we did it. and they're in a position to challenge for the medal. quite a run forjamaica so far! and the women's team took silver, on a night when the relay team give them plenty to cheer. but the champion in the 100 comes away. usa, great britain and northern ireland and jamaica. silver medal for great britain, gold for the united states. he's going to take the gold medal. it's going to be ethiopia at last. mo farah, thanks for the silver. there was also disappointment — no golden goodbye for sir mo farah, having to settle for silver in his final race at a world championships. it's been incredible, and it doesn't hit until you actually compete here, and finally, after crossing the line and having a couple of minutes to myself, realise this is it. so a case of agony for some, but ecstasy for others. a night as unpredictable as it was unforgettable.
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one man who knows how it feels to win relay medals for his country, albeit in the a00m version, is iwan thomas. he was watching the action at the london stadium last night, and he is back there for us this morning. good morning to you. let's kick off on those relay team results. because they were unexpected. how important we re they were unexpected. how important were they for the team's medal tally? so important, for the morale, for the people of london as well. the atmosphere has been great, but it went up to another level last night. i think the girls were really confident after the heats. i thought, if i am honest, perhaps a bronze but to get the silver, and then when the guys came out you could see they meant business. it is a great example of it is not about four individuals who can run fast times, but getting that baton out
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safely. and the first leg was so quick. i thought at that point we are going to win this. and the delight on their faces, it has been a tough road to get here so to be crowned world champions really did lift the spirits of the whole team, and the nation, i hope. absolutely, really exciting results there. in terms of usain bolt, it wasn't quite the ending we had been expecting for him, though. no, quite sad, actually. individually, for him personally, i felt really sad. actually. individually, for him personally, ifelt really sad. i think if you could have looked in a magic crystal ball you would have said leave after rio, leave at the top. but for an athlete at the highest level it is very hard to determine when is the right time to bow out. and after seeing his documentary, he does get injuries, and this year is a year too far. and to go out with an injury is devastating. i don't think it will undermine his career whatsoever. he isa undermine his career whatsoever. he is a pure superstar, and usain bolt,
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we salute you, because everything you have done for the sport has been tremendous. every time you see him that he is on the back of your next pick up. he is something special indeed. and another superstar, sir mo farah. i think i caught you having a chat with him having so many pictures with different people in the audience and talking to his family. it really says it all when we are talking about disappointment, when he had silver. yes, but for me it has been an honour to know mo. i gave him a medal in 2013, and said he had some talent and to see him come through the ranks as a junior for britain, and what he achieved on the track, a bit like usain bolt, i don't think we will remember the silver. he has literally been unbeatable and the only way he was beaten last night was for his opponents to run against him as a team. and that is what they did, they ran out of him. and it was
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disappointing for him because i could see on his face how much he wa nted could see on his face how much he wanted to get double gold. when he has time to reflect the will look back and realise what he did for this nation and for track and field. mo is amazing and i wish him all the best in the future, on the road, and no doubt he will be just as good on there. and it was fantastic to see how much time he spent with fans, having selfies, writing autographs and making the moment for them. you mentioned the next chapter on the road. how do you see that doing for him? he is bound to throw everything at it, because that is what he is like. hopefully he will have a bit of time off, because we know how ha rd of time off, because we know how hard he works. you set a date, mo leaves nothing behind. he is a perfectionist, and i don't think he would be turning to the road unless he knew he could become the best in that as well. i have no doubt we have not seen the last of mo farah, and you said he spent so much time
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with friends last night. he knows what the sport needs to others, and he knows what he has done for the sport. he always takes time out for his fans and i think it would be very deadly on the road. i think you will be tough to beat. i wouldn't wa nt to will be tough to beat. i wouldn't want to run against him. and how do you reflect back now and the competition is? i think it has been great. a lot of people have said they thought we would get more medals, but don't forget we have quite a few coming today. tom was worth in the walking, lindsay sharp in the final. and you never know, we could get a couple more medals. i think it has been brilliant and i thank the people of britain and london who have turned out in their thousands. we have had nearly 700,000 spectators in the last ten days. that is pretty amazing. thank you very much. with so much athletics this morning we are using athletics puns to get us we are using athletics puns to get us into the weather. ready, set, go, philip avery. looks like you're on your own there,
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only the love and support of your collea g u es only the love and support of your colleagues that gets you through the morning! here's a weather watcher getting down and dirty with this glorious shot from earlier this morning and those shots widely available, skies clear overnight, reflected in the templates but equating to a lovely start in most parts of the british isles —— tempts. looks fantastic out there, i'm envious you are there and i'm in here but someone has got to do it! looks like there will be a few showers in northern and western parts of scotland but many central, southern and eastern parts could get away with a dry day. the odd passing shower and that's the extent of it for northern ireland and then in the greater part of england and wales, a lovely day. the chance of a a few showers in the high ground of wales and mr west of england but in the east, the sunshine keeps on pouring on through —— south—west of england.
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good day for the world championships. conditions set fair, we could see some impressive performances. not such an impressive performances. not such an impressive performance from the weather. on monday, this area of cloud and rain all tied in with new weather fronts coming in from the atlantic, they should push through northern ireland quite quickly, leaving behind the prospect of heavy showers and may be a rumble of thunder. notice the rain doesn't get to the eastern side of england until really like on in the day on monday and before that front arrives, some could see 23, 2a, 25, feeling very summery. push those weather fronts through during tuesday, so the persistent rain giving way to the odd hefty shower and then those tending to die away as we go through to the evening and on through the night and into the first part of wednesday, that ridge of high pressure suppressing those showers. what it won't do, though, i'm afraid, is hold at bay that area
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of low pressure. notice the number of low pressure. notice the number of isobars, later in the day the western side of the british isles again looking wet and windy and that sets us up for a windy spell from wednesday into thursday, so make the most of the day, it's looking super. thanks, philip, see you later! you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. astrophysicist carol mundell is here to tell us what's caught her eye. we'll speak to carol in a minute, but first let's take a look at some of the front pages. brexit dominates the papers this morning. a picture of mo farah on the sunday telegraph immediately after the race, his head in his hands, but the lead story, britain will not stay in the eu by the backdoor the cabinet. they will leave the union and the
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customs union in 2019 and not stay in the eu by the backdoor. that was an articlejointly in the eu by the backdoor. that was an article jointly written by philip hammond and liam fox. the same subject, different spin in the observer front subject, different spin in the observerfront page subject, different spin in the observer front page this morning, david miliband, ed's brother, it says he makes a dramatic entry into the debate about britain's exit from the debate about britain's exit from the eu, calling for a second vote on the eu, calling for a second vote on the detail of the brexit deal. lots to talk about there i'm sure. the mail on sunday is leading on theresa may, saying she's going to head off a threat to sack her as prime minister by making a public plea to tory supporters to give her another chance, she will make a grovelling apology, they say, the conservative party conference will show her apologising for the loss at the general election. she will be apologising. a frantic week of ripping open
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envelopes and going into schools and colleges and checking online with exa m colleges and checking online with exam results coming up. the sunday times goes with the story schools fear chaos over tough a—levels. it's the first time the new exam system has been put to the test. the sunday times is saying that the marks required to secure top grades in the first new tough new exams have been lowered to avoid a dramatic fall in standards. a nerve wracking time of year. astrophysicist carol mundell joins us now. you've been going through the papers and a story you've chosen in the telegraph, which is about nasa to probe pluto. what's happening there? this is nasa's new horizons programme and it's been travelling through the solar system for the last 13 years. it reached pluto earlier this year and sent back spectacular photos of the planet and scientists put it into hibernation for the last five months to save energy and it's carried on travelling through the solar system,
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to the most distant reaches humans have ever reached directly with a probe and what they will do on september the 11th is wake up the probe and then it will have a five—month journey to a mysterious region of the solar system called the khyber belt and the idea is to study a new object we found with space satellite telescopes around the world. we think it is to rocks ora the world. we think it is to rocks or a double rock stuck together, 12 kilometres across, 4 billion miles from earth. that will be the first time we've ever studied the building blocks of the solar system with a probe. -- probe. how fundamental? very. it's about studying the origins of the solar system, how are formed and how we got here today. origins of the solar system, how are formed and how we got here todaym could answer the questions? new horizons literally. your eye is a lwa ys horizons literally. your eye is always going to be drawn to science stories and maybe even science fiction stories. this is a piece in the daily star this morning. this is
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jeremy kyle, tv presenter, he's coming toa jeremy kyle, tv presenter, he's coming to a show that uses artificial intelligence to resolve real—life dilemmas. artificial intelligence to resolve real-life dilemmas. it sounds like science fiction but it is becoming science fiction but it is becoming science fact, many people already in counter artificial intelligence, sat navs, mobile phones with apps, the idea of this show is to see whether artificial intelligence can provide the human interface. scientists have been doing work on this, but the technology and the ethics behind it are quite controversial and some studies show for example children suffering from autism can benefit from this technology but of course there are other ethical issues in terms of replacing people's jobs so it's an active area of research for scientists working in al, it will be a trusting to see how well it will do compared to human dilemmas. absolutely. the observer saying harry potter and friends, bad news for owls. there's a downside to
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everything that's wonderful! i'm sure many of your viewers are fans of harry potter, i am and so are my children, but unfortunately it's fuelling a global illegal trade in birds like hedwig the owl so poachers are selling them to those who want to live the harry potter fa ntasy. who want to live the harry potter fantasy. don't buy these birds and certainly don't buy from unregistered sites. thanks very much, you will be back in an hourwith thanks very much, you will be back in an hour with more bits and bobs from the sunday papers. also talking about meteors. we will look forward to getting your thoughts on that. we're here on the bbc news channel until nine this morning, and coming up in the next hour: britain's sir mo farah willjoin us from the london stadium in underan hour. we'll also be joined by the gold winning men's relay team. and if that's not enough, we'll also have the british women's relay team too. bye for now. how many people does it take
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to change the 225,000 lightbulbs on blackpool tower during the illuminations? wes barry has the job of checking every single one of them before the big switch—on, which is just two weeks away. katie walderman has been to meet him. it is approaching that time of year again, when all eyes are on blackpool for the big switch on. and here is the man making sure the main attraction doesn't disappoint. wes barry is in charge of checking every single led on the blackpool tower. and that is 225,000, to be precise.
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i have got to admit it is the one time of year when my heart will start fluttering, is our switch on that. it really does, because that is... all eyes, if something doesn't work... is... all eyes, if something doesn't work. . . and is... all eyes, if something doesn't work... and people love to point out the ones he has missed. there are lots of people saying there are lights out. i say, yes, thanks. thanks for telling me. but being the sole person responsible for the p, sole person responsible for the ' t sole person responsible for the upkeep, just how long does it take to change almost 250,000 lights? hopefully in the next few weeks we will have everything done. and just like your christmas lights, when one goes, it takes a whole lot with it. except wes has to dangle over the landmark in order to fix them. there are some advantages, though. landmark in order to fix them. there are some advantages, thoughm landmark in order to fix them. there are some advantages, though. it is thrilling every day you come out here. it is a fantastic location. a lot of guys work in places thatjust don't have the view you have got here. great in the sunshine, less so in the wind and rain. you have to be
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a will to stand the cold up here. it becomes my second hobby, is watching all the weather people. you really do get a battering from the ceo, obviously, in blackpool. you go overboard on waterproofing, just to try and make them last even longer than they are expected to. so that is the first one replaced. just 219,999 to go. you'd better get a wriggle on, wes katie walderman reporting there. time is flying by, already it is time is flying by, already it is time for the blackpool illuminations. we will be back with a summary of the news at 7:30am. hello, this is breakfast, withjohn maguire and sian lloyd. coming up before 8:00am,
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philip will have the weather. but first, at 7:30am, a summary of this morning's main news: one person has died and more than 30 others have been injured after a day of violence between far—right protesters and anti—fascists in the us city of charlottesville. a 20—year—old man from ohio has been arrested, after a car was driven into a group of people trying to prevent a white nationalist rally from taking place. president donald trump condemned the violence. in this great commonwealth, shame on you. you pretend that you are patriots, but you are anything but a patriot. you came here today to hurt people. and you did hurt people. but my message is clear. we are stronger than you. you have made our
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commonwealth stronger. you will not succeed. the governor of virginia there, talking about the shocking scenes we have seen over the last 2a hours or so scenes we have seen over the last 2a hours orso in scenes we have seen over the last 2a hours or so in charlottesville. two ministers who previously expressed opposing views on brexit have written a joint newspaper article clarifying the government's position. writing in the sunday telegraph, philip hammond and liam fox confirm there will be a transition period to help businesses adjust, but it will only last for a limited period of time, their comments are being seen as an attempt to show unity between rival sides in theresa may's cabinet. a danish inventor who built the world's largest privately made submarine has appeared in court in copenhagen charged with killing a swedish journalist. peter madsen, who is a6, has denied the manslaughter of the woman, who disappeared on thursday after a trip in the vessel. cctv footage has emerged of the moment a house was destroyed by a gas explosion. a woman was inside the semi—detached
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house in sunderland when the blast took place on friday morning, but survived with minor injuries. it is understood that she was protected from the blast by a fridge which fell on top of her. extraordinary. learner drivers are to be allowed on to motorways in england, scotland and wales for the first time from next year. the department for transport said lessons must be in a dual—control car with an approved driving instructor. road safety groups, as well as the agency that represents driving instructors, have welcomed the move. shooting stars littered the sky last night as the perseid meteor shower was at its peak over the uk. 100 meteors were expected every hour. the perseid meteor shower happens everyjuly and august, as the earth passes debris from the swift—tuttle comet. and we both mr. hopefully we will
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see some photos of it later. and if you have any, do send them in. let's get some sports, and let's go over tojessica, who get some sports, and let's go over to jessica, who can get some sports, and let's go over tojessica, who can give us the latest from the london stadium. we we re latest from the london stadium. we were reflecting on last night and also looking ahead. definitely. what also looking ahead. definitely. what a night of drama it was. this time yesterday we were hyping up the fact that mo farah and usain bolt would be competing on this track, their last major track championships, of course. but actually, that didn't quite go to plan, did it? it was the performances of four young british men who really stole the show in the final of the four x 100 metre relay. they won gold, so it will be on this very podium, on the top step, but that british team will receive their gold medals before the start of the
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evening's session. the british team of cj ujah, adam gemili and danny talbot had put nethaneel mitchell—bla ke in a fantastic position for the final leg. bolt, who was running the anchor leg forjamaica, pulled up injured, while mitchell—blake held off america's christian coleman to win team gb‘s second gold of the championships. the crowd erupted to celebrate a truly fantastic performance. we're world champions, it's crazy to think. especially — i feel so grateful to be in this team, and especially to run it with danny. we have some not—so—nice memories from 2012, in terms of the relay. and to come here and actually run it how we ran today, we couldn't have done it without the support of the team. the crowd he has been fantastic. we just wanted to say thank you so much to everyone watching, and yeah, we did it. joy for the british team, but it wasn't the end to usain bolt‘s track career that he wanted. his final—ever race ended with him crumpled in pain on the track. his career ended with eight olympic golds, 11 world championship golds and three world records. we may never see his like again, but it wasn't the way bolt would have wanted to end his glittering career.
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it wasn't quite the farewell to a major track championships either that great britain's sir mo farah would have hoped for. the four—time olympic champion will compete in a couple more track races, before switching to running marathons. but this was his last chance to win another gold medal, and he gave it everything in the 5,000m. but ethiopia's muktar edris did what farah usually does to the opposition. the briton just didn't have enough left in his legs after defending his 10,000m title. he signed off with a silver medal, and happy to share the moment with his family. it is very special. at the time, they were in mummy‘s tummy, and at the same time, rhianna has grown up. it doesn't hit until you compete here, and finally, after crossing the line and having a couple of minutes to myself, realise this is it. the better man won on the day, but i gave it all. i didn't have a single bit left at the end. there was another silver medal
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for team gb in the women's ax100m relay, a thrilling run by the british quartet of asha philip, desiree henry, dina asher—smith and daryll neita. the 100m world champion, tori bowie, anchored the usa to a gold medal. jamaica were third, their only sprint medal of the championships. no such medal success for britain in the highjump, though. both katarina johnson—thompson and morgan lake cleared 1.95m, but it was only good enough for them to finish in fifth and sixth place, respectively. australia won their first medal of the championships, in the women's100m hurdles — sally pearson, returning to london, where she won gold in the 2012 olympics, becoming a world champion for the second time. so much drama here at the athletics, but plenty going on in
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the premier league, as well. on the first weekend of the new season, defending champions chelsea were beaten by burnley, while newly promoted huddersfield town sit at the top of the table. ben croucher has the best of the action. so, how many of you expected to be waking up with huddersfield leading the premier league this morning? well, that is what you have got. no fluke, either. a diamond display at crystal palace, in their first top—flight game since 1972. three for huddersfield, and a dream start to their premier league chapter. for burnley, there was delight, there was disbelief, and a deserved three points as well, stunning the champions in their own backyard. three first—half goals condemned nine—man chelsea to a brutal defeat. on the south coast, the seagulls had soared into the premier league, but brighton's home game capsized. sergio aguero on target, in a 2—0 win.
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liverpool fans will have to keep their heads up. they were heading for victory, but miguel britos's injury—time equaliser salvaged a 3—3 draw. and, at goodison park, there was only one name on everyone's lips. it's rooney! nearly 13.5 years since his last competitive goal for everton, wayne rooney scored the winner against stoke. we know the name. wayne rooney! so here is a full list of yesterday's results. everton winning1—0, thanks to that wayne rooney goal, while west brom beat bournemouth by the same score. southampton were held to a goalless draw by swansea city. the big result in the scottish premiership was stjohnstone beating motherwell 4—1. that result put them top
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of the table on goals scored, just ahead of champions celtic. elsewhere, there were wins for hamilton, hearts, hibs and aberdeen. and kevin kisner is leading the us pga championship going into today's final round. the american is looking to win his first major title, and has a one—shot lead after three rounds at quail hollow. england's paul casey had a poor end to his day, dropping back to level—par, but remains the highest—placed british player, seven shots off the lead. idid say i did say that we would be speaking to all of the medallist this morning. it wasn't long ago they we re morning. it wasn't long ago they were on the track competing behind me. i don't think they will have had much sleep this morning. and what a great place you are at the moment, in the top spot, on that podium. we will be back with you later.
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it is the final day of the world athletics championships in london, so here is sian, with a quick rundown of the must—see tom bosworth takes on the men's 22 on the race walk in the afternoon session. he holds the british record in the event after coming a surprise sixth in rio. robbie grabarz will hope to replicate his success at london 2012, taking bronze in the men's high jump. the london 2012, taking bronze in the men's highjump. the only major medal missing from his collection is for the outdoor championship. laura muirwas in the for the outdoor championship. laura muir was in the women's 5000 metre race, having reached the final as the fastest qualifier. she narrowly missed out on a medal in the 1,500m earlier in the competition. it has been a dramatic road to the women's 800m finalfor been a dramatic road to the women's 800m final for lynsey sharp, after initially being disqualified for locking arms with the us contender.
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but after a successful appeal she will be on the night's starting lineup. the final day's action sta rts lineup. the final day's action starts on bbc two between 1pm and 4:30 p.m., picking up again between 6:30pm and 8pm and you can see the closing hours of the championships from 8pm on bbc one. hogging the middle lane and tailgating — just two bad habits seen all too often on british motorways. but from next year, to stop this from happening in the future and to improve safety, learner drivers will be able to have lessons on the motorway. they will have to have an approved instructor in the car with them, and the vehicle must be dual—controlled. but is it a good idea? joining us now are blake toone, who is a driving instructor, and sean curley, who is a newly qualified driver. good morning to both of you. thank you very much for coming in. i guess this has been in the offing for a
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while. what do you think? good idea or not? i have been for it since they mentioned it. i think it is a great move by the government. they will fill the skills gap from newly qualified to those that are quite experienced on the motorways. they will still have to build—up their experience once qualified, but having that experience with a driving instructor is going to be invaluable. i think it is a good decision. it is a nerve racking thing for many newly qualified drivers, going on the motorway for the first time. it is a long time since i passed my test but i can remember when i did it for the first time. can you remember going on the motorway? how much have you done?|j have done a lot now and i actually quite enjoyed at the first time going on the motorway it was quite a terrifying experience. i think it is quite as are that you can pass your test without ever going on. so you are test without ever going on. so you a re newly test without ever going on. so you are newly qualified with no experience at travelling at that speed, no experience of what to
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expect. on the motorway, there is no going back. you see the cars going past, it is quite terrifying. you feel all right about it? yes, once you have done it a few times you realise there are less things to ta ke realise there are less things to take in, and it is quite enjoyable. but the initial time, terrifying. i would love to have had someone with me. probably held your breath for the first couple of minutes. and i guess it is not going to be the first lesson you go on the motorway. you will need a certain amount of confidence already. i would suggest... i'm not put in words in the mouth of the dvla but maybe wait until the candidate has booked a test, that could be the controversy, a driving instructor shouldn't take someone out so early that it scares them to death. someone who is quite close to test standard or at test standard i would suggest is the way to go. you would
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only take them on when you are convinced they are ready? yes, that's what the dvla are hoping. convinced they are ready? yes, that's what the dvla are hopingm would be part of the test but it's just some practice, what he thought would have been very useful in the run—up to it, going out and having the confidence of being somebody qualified but it won't actually be on the test. it can't be part of the test because there are too many driving test centres with motorways nowhere near. they might have to move towards... they might have to do more driving tests so everyone has to go on the motorway but for now that is quite a long way away. sean, how long ago did you pass was yellow six weeks ago, so not too long. my instructor did say that he would give me an extra lesson when i was afraid to go on at first. my friend said to come and visit me and i haven't seen him in ages and i thought i'd go for it to see what it is like. it was all right? it was,
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but initially it was the terror of going on first time, which is why i think it's a good move by the government to promote this. why is it important to include motorways if you can? there aren't motorways everywhere, there's only one motorway in wales, in south wales, i took my test in wrexham so it might not have been possible for me but what's the difference between motorways and jewel carriageways because learners go on jewel carriageways now quiz you? they do, there's money involved in. local carriageways have one slip rd from sa lfo rd. carriageways have one slip rd from salford. there's not that many opportunities to do slip roads on and off. then bear in mind, a busy motorway junction like and off. then bear in mind, a busy motorwayjunction like wesley action 13 across two lanes to get to the trafford centre —— words lead. then
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the other two lanes are going back to the left to get to the m62, it's a mishmash and difficult even for an experienced driver so to get that experienced driver so to get that experience a bit earlier will stand them in good stead. thank you very much indeed, very interesting subject, i think everyone at home will have an opinion. and drivers, it will be new for them to see l plates on the motorway so we will see how it develops. i don't know if you're motorway driving home but have a safe journey if you are! watch out for him if you see him heading home this morning! let's have a look at the weather and philip, we're going to fire the starting gun, off you go! how much longer to go? good starting gun, off you go! how much longerto go? good morning! gloria seems today across the country, weather watchers have been up and about very early capturing some really glorious scenes. it is going to stay that way for the greater pa rt to stay that way for the greater part of the country right from the
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word go. a chilly start, one or two temperatures in northern ireland very close to freezing and elsewhere, two, three, four but once the sun comes through it will warm up the sun comes through it will warm up very nicely indeed. one or two flies in the ointment in the shape of the showers there liberally across the northern half of scotland, further south, dumfries, galloway, ayrshire, you might not see any. similar in northern ireland, a bit cloudier here, maybe some showers and in the high ground of wales and the south—west, the odd passing shower but essentially you get the picture. very pleasant indeed. top temperature in the south—eastern quarter, 23 or 24, warm work if you're running or even attending the last day of the world championships in this london. no medals for the weather in the western side of the british isles for monday, a new set of weather fronts, our misfiring summer continues apace. heavy bursts in
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there and when the rain is through northern ireland, turning showery, some sharp with a rumble of thunder. not getting to the east for most of the day, pleasantly warm here, much like august, 23, 24 even 25. then we ta ke like august, 23, 24 even 25. then we take the weather fronts and the low pressure and swing it through overnight monday into tuesday, leaving behind tuesday as a showery to across the british isles and some of those quite sharp. —— do. the temperatures not anything to write home about, upper teens for the most part. when the showers fade as we bring in this ridge of high pressure, think about air coming down as it goes up in the heart of low pressure, things calming down for the start of wednesday but you can see what is knocking on the door, a wet and windy end to the day across western parts. again the east won't see the rain until late on thursday and it's looking rather autumnal with a spell of wet and
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windy weather for many of us. not a word we wanted to hear! thanks very much, see you later! we will be back with the headlines at 8am but now on breakfast it is time to pack our passports and check out the travel show. from india's border with china, and thejumping off point for the next adventure. i'm on the banks of the mighty river brahmaputra, and about to go to a very spiritual place, the island of majuli, one of the biggest river islands in the world. now there's 150,000 people on that island, and only six ferries a day, each one is really crammed. just looking at the list of prices for all the different categories: passengers, 15 rupees, that's ok,
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that's reasonable. then you go down, pass the vehicles, animals have today, buffalo has to pay 45. bull, cow, 30. and then the poor elephant has to fork out 907 rupees! perhaps fortunately, none of these creatures were travelling with us today. and incredibly, after a few last—minute panics, we are set to go. i climb onto the corrugated aluminium roof tojoin men who do this trip day in, day out. starting in tibet, the brahmaputra river is nearly 2000 miles long, second only to the amazon, in the volume of water that rushes through it. we arrive at majuli and it is turmoil again trying to get off the boat.
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to avoid the queue, there is a sneaky way out, which involves climbing onto another boat and going down that way. you know what, i think i'm going to take that one. well, he we are, on land, doesn't look quite as spiritual as i imagined, but if you look away into the distance, it's just one big flat land of desert. let's see. the island is home to 22 monasteries, or satras, initially established in the 16th century by the assamese guru, sankardeva. boys are instructive from a very young age in the religion that he preached, vaishnavism, an offshoot of hinduism.
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the monks are celibate and according to their beliefs they worship only one god, follow a vegetarian diet, and reject the caste system. and here, the doctrine includes this special art form. this form of classical dance is now recognised by the authorities as a genre in its own right. many of these monks have performed around the world. that was amazing. thank you very much indeed.
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i know you spend a lifetime learning the skills of this, but can i have a go, can i try? arms through here...? very good. thank you so much. one, two, three, four. there are 64 positions in this classical dance and i'm having trouble with the first two. it's very difficult. one, two, three... without the grace, as well. no grace whatsoever. he makes it look so easy. and it's incredibly difficult. i'm going to leave
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it to the experts. sometimes you have to give up and let them carry on. an exquisite performance. but there's one problem, one very big problem, and that is that this island may simply not exist in just a few decades time. hard to believe at the moment but there is a genuine worry that majuli will be submerged and destroyed within 20 years. in the last 70 years it has shrunk in size by two thirds. and a majority of the original 65 monasteries have gone. every monsoon, the brahmaputra
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river swells, eroding the terrain around it. bit by bit, land is disappearing. but there is hope. for the last 36 years, he has taken on an extraordinary challenge, to save this land from vanishing. and so, his lifelong calling began. jadav is known today as the forest man of india. he began planting trees so the roots would bind the soil, soak up excess water, and prevent the land from being eroded by flooding. from a barren landscape, he has created a forest the size of new york's central park. and he feels this will be more effective in saving nearby majuli then following government
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flood prevention schemes. so we are now going to do the ritual that every guest that comes here is asked to do, which is to plant a tree. what kind of tree is this? i'm going to put this in here... it's good. he has spoken at environmental summits all around the world, and his roll call of guests is equally international. i do know that everyone who plants a tree, when it grows,
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they put a plaque down with their name on it, and i'm going to have that privilege, fantastic, thank you. and so to my final day in assam, and a different kind of ritualistic celebration of nature. if there's one repairing theme throughout my trip in the north—east, it's the sense of community, everywhere, really, and there's nothing better to illustrate that than this... a local village going down to the river, to celebrate harvest. this community was started in 1939 by a young woman
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who came from the mountains in search of food. i believe she found that this place was better for her because it is coated in water, and civilisation needs water, she brought friends and family here, followed by a brother. the entire family of her own clan... all from that one woman? really, fascinating, wow. this is a much—loved annual celebration and people of all ages gather to muck in, using fishing methods that have been passed down the generations. then you pull it towards you... pull the stick... and look! you can see this!
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it's full of fish, it full of fish. this is today's catch... wow! that is pretty good. and this, you will cook, now? excellent. so my trek across india from border to border is almost over, and it's been a realjourney of discovery for me off the beaten track. this isn't india "on tap", instant gratification, which some people are accustomed to, but the rewards, if you make the effort, are immense. hello. this is breakfast, withjohn maguire and sian lloyd. a woman's killed and more than 30 people are injured in violence at a white nationalist rally in the united states. a car is driven into a crowd
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of anti—fascist protestors, following a day of clashes in charlottesville, virginia. go home. you are not wanted in this great commonwealth. shame on you. good morning. it's sunday 13th august. also ahead: ecstasy and agony at the world athletics championships — great britain's men claim the four by 100 metres relay gold, but usain bolt pulls up in his last race on the world stage.
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