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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 13, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at five. president trump is accused of being too soft on the far—right, after violence at at a rally in virginia left one person dead and many more injured. the white house hits back, saying the president's statement condemning the violence in charlottesville included all extremist groups, including the kkk and neo—nazis. the chancellor and the international trade secretary, say the government will seek a transition period to help businesses adjust after brexit. learner drivers will be allowed to have lessons on motorways for the first time from next year. sir mo farah reaches another level despite a disappointing end to his track career at the world athletics championships. in sport we will have few details of the final day of the london games as robbie grabarz prepares for the men's high jump final. and a treat for stargazers — as the persied meteor shower lights up the night sky with hundreds of shooting stars.
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good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. a man has been charged with murder after a car was driven into a crowd in the american city of charlottesville killing one woman and injuring nineteen people. the attack followed a day of violence in the city involving white nationalist protesters and anti—racist demonstrators. president trump has been criticised for failing to explicitly condemn far—right groups — but a white house spokesman denied this , saying the president had "called out" anyone fomenting racism and violence. a warning that you might find some of the images in caroline hawley‘s report distressing. late last night a vigil for the victims of what politicians are calling an act of domestic terror. there's been cross—party condemnation, notjust of the attack but of the president's
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response to it. we condemn in the strongest possible terms, this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides. on many sides. a day of disturbances in charlottesville was barred by one of the biggest public gallery —— gatherings of the far right in decades. brawls broke out with counterdemonstrators and then this. a car turned into a deadly weapon. it came after a day of disturbances sparked by one of the biggest far right rallies in the united states in recent years. they fought with counterdemonstrators and then this... a car turned into a deadly weapon. this was the moment the vehicle ploughed into antiracism protesters. one woman was killed, 19 others injured. the attack has shocked not just charlottesville, but the entire country. the car hit some people and then it backed up so that it could gain momentum so it could go faster and itjust smashed into dozens of people.
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there is at least a dozen people that were directly hit by the car. a 22—year—old man has been arrested and charged with murder. and many republicans and democrats are now calling on mr trump to speak out explicitly against white supremacism, in their words, to call evil by its name. there is growing alarm now over the right of the far right. i have a message to all the white supremacist and nazis who came into charlottesville today. our message is plain and simple. go home. you're not wanted, in this great commonwealth. shame on you. many in the state are concerned that the far right has been emboldened by the trump presidency. the rally was attended by neo—nazi sympathisers yesterday as well as members of the ku klux klan, including its former leader, who was not listening to the message of the governor. we will all be back.
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what happened in charlottesville has been a major domestic test for the president. he is now under pressure over the violence here and what the house democratic leader has called, the shameful reality of white supremacism in america today. caroline hawley, bbc news. in the last hour the governor of virginia terry mcauliffe— who you saw in caroline‘s report there— addressed a church in charlottesville, and condemned the white supremacists involved in yesterday's violence. the neo—nazis who came to our beautiful state yesterday. there is no place for you here in cha rlottesville. there is no place foryou in virginia. and there is no place for you in the united states of america. we deplore your hatred, your bigotry and shame on you. you pretend you are patriots. you're not patriots. you are dividers. you want to talk about a patriot?
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i'll talk about barbara johns who at the age of 16 years old, imprints that county virginia, let 400 students, in the 50s, and said we are not going to tolerate separate education facilities where it rains on us every day and we have no heating. and she walked those students out and said we are not coming back until we have equal facilities as white students and she was successful. so to you white supremacist and neo—nazis were here yesterday, barbara johns is a patriot, you are not. the national security advisor general h.r. mcmaster spoke to george stephanopoulous on abc's this week programme — and defended the president's statement.
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the president has been clear. we cannot tolerate this kind of bigotry and hatred. what he did was he called on all americans to take a firm stand against it. this is a great opportunity for us to ask ourselves what are we teaching our children? tolerance has to overcome this kind of hatred, this hatred that is grounded in ignorance, ignorance of our values and what makes us unique as americans. our commitment to each other, our commitment to freedom, liberty, tolerance and rights for all of us. well said, but he did not call out the white supremacists responsible for the violence. when it comes to radical islamic terrorists and the president said you cannot solve the problem if you do not problem if you do not say the name, does that not apply to domestic terrorism? he called out anyone, anyone who is responsible for four amending this kind of bigotry, hatred, racism and
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violence. the president was very clear on that. i am sorry. that seemed to be suggesting moral equivalence. maybe to you, george, but not to me, i think the president was very clear. i'm going to speak to a professor —— from a local university in charlottesville. he witnessed the protest. i saw all of them because they paraded by my home. they were a motley crew. basically goons and thugs, but they are all white supremacists and they made that clear by chanting over and over, you will not replace us and jews will
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not replace us and they went a few paces from my home and beat up on counterdemonstrators and that was my introduction to them. i was shocked by how many there were, hundreds and hundreds. we have tended to think, certainly in this country that it is a bit ofa certainly in this country that it is a bit of a fringe movement, the ku klux klan and some of the white supremacist groups, was itjust that this rally had received such prominence, such publicity in advance that it attracted people from well outside of virginia? that is certainly part of it, but i think you also have to remember that they have been energised and empowered by donald trump. he clearly cultivated them during the campaign, he pretended not to know the name of the kkk former grand wizard david duke who unfortunately was right here yesterday trying to orchestrate this disaster that unfolded. trump understands that they are part of his days and that is precisely why he did not denounce them in his very
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disappointing statement. you say orchestrate the disaster that unfolded, this was a terrible incident in which one person died, we have someone charged with murder, that was not an orchestrated attack, it was violence between two groups that clearly are energised both sides and feel angry against the other and it got of hand. do not do any false equivalency, this was a rally organised by right supremacists, white supremacist, . .. we got through this in the 1960s and the 1970s but they are back and they are back for lots of different reasons but they cannot be tolerated, nor should you make that false equivalency between a rally organised by these far right wing extremists and some of the people who came out to oppose them. your country is built on belief in the freedom of expression, freedom of
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speech is protected by the constitution, you may not like the views that are being expressed and i am sure you did not like having them shouted outside the window of your sitting—room on friday night but those are views expressed by people who are citizens of the united states, isn't the way to defeat that by argument and debate, not necessarily by what we saw yesterday? i am at the university founded by thomas jefferson and yesterday? i am at the university founded by thomasjefferson and of course i believe in the first amendment and they have been accorded plenty of opportunities for that including over the past weekend. we did not interfere with their marching on the lawn at the rotunda even though we detest them, we let them do it, we were willing to listen to their argument. they came spoiling for a fight, they were interested in fighting, not talking, and attracting media attention like yours. in terms of the bigger debate, this is the catalyst for this, plans to move their statue of robert e lee, from the prominent
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place it has had over many decades in the city. why are those issues, you talked aboutjefferson, one of the founding fathers of the united states, why are those wounds still a p pa re ntly states, why are those wounds still apparently not healed? but racism i’u ns apparently not healed? but racism runs deep and i thinkjust about every society, it still does in this one but we have made enormous progress since the 1960s, but it is still there and of course, this statue of robert e lee, like statues similarly placed all around the south and a few in the north, represent slavery to a large portion of our population, african americans, are 12 and a half percent of the population, many hispanics are offended and many whites like me are offended and many whites like me are deeply offended. it is basically are deeply offended. it is basically a statue to a man but it is also a statue to a cause. fortunately, a lost cause, but unfortunately a
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cause that will not be forgotten by segment, mainly of young white males. is this because they feel left behind? they may left behind, they may in some cases not have jobs, but they don't have jobs because they do not have the proper education and training. those things are available in most places to them, but they choose to blame minorities for their lack of position in society and they are also told by their parents and grandparents how it was for earlier generations and they wonder why they are not on top as were those earlier generations. well, we have changed and we now valued contribution everyone. that is my guest speaking earlierfrom everyone. that is my guest speaking earlier from the university of virginia which is in charlottesville. the uk will need a transition period to help businesses adjust after brexit according to both the chancellor and the international trade secretary. in a joint article for the sunday telegraph, philip hammond and liam fox stressed any deal would not be indefinite or a "back door" to staying in the eu.
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the two men have previously put forward opposing views on brexit. jonathan blake reports. two senior government ministers with two very different approaches to leaving the european union. liam fox and philip hammond, the voice of caution in cabinet. now in an apparent show of unity, reiterating that brexit will mean leaving the single market that allows free trade and movement of people and leaving the customs union which sets eu wide import tariffs, writing a joint piece the sunday telegraph the ministers said the economy needs to stay strong through brexit. and that means business needs to have confidence, they say, there will not be a cliff edge when we leave the eu in just over 20 months‘ time. this is why the ministers continue, they believe a time—limited interim period will be important to further our national interest and give business greater certainty. it cannot be, they say, indefinite, it cannot be a back door to staying in the eu. it sounds worryingly to me
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as if the price that philip hammond has had to pay for a transitional arrangement has been to sign up to us leaving the single market and the customs union. i think that's a dreadful mistake the future of the economy, jobs and prosperity in britain. with this article liam fox and philip hammond are hoping to reassure those concerned that the government is dragging its feet on brexit and those worried about the potential impact a sudden impact from the eu could have and a united front is important and the government is to get what it wants from negotiations with eu officials in brussels. and this week we hear in more detail what brexit might look like. the government will publish a paper setting out its plans for firstly, the border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland. and how to ensure goods will be continue to be sent between the uk and eu countries. negotiations begin again in brussels at the end of the month, the brexit secretary david davis says himself, time is of the essence. jonathan blake, bbc news.
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the conservative mp and former brexit minister david jones welcomed the announcement. i certainly think that phillip hammond has wrote back from his previous position. i think there is no doubt about that. i think that everyone was very concerned about three orfour weeks ago that he was suggesting that this transitional period should last a long time. now it is clear it is going to be a relatively short period and of course, at the end of that period, we will have completely left the european union. we will no longer be subject to the supremacy of the european court ofjustice, and we the single market and we will be leaving the customs union as well. in the next hour, the final session of the world athletics championships will get underway in london. we have four medals. great britain are currently 6th in the medals table — with several more up for grabs tonight.
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olly foster is at the london stadium for us — what are our prospects tonight? well, we did not think they were that good last night outside of mo farah but we jumped from one that good last night outside of mo farah but wejumped from one medal to four and we are keeping everything crossed that out of the seven finals tonight with some british interest, we can get another couple of medals. the best chance will be in the relays. the final events of the championships. we have had four gold medals decided this morning. a route around buckingham palace, tom bosworth, and man behind the resurgence of race walking in this country, he was disqualified for running. the portuguese competitor, a world record, the first of these championships, that came in the 50 kilometres race walk.
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she broke her own world record. for getting the gold medal as well, over £120,000, she has taken the biggest prize money so far after ten days of competition. a lot of ice will be on the 800 metres women's final, caster semenya should wind her third world title, she is a double olympic champion, but with caster semenya goes a lot of debate, the code is the iaaf want caster semenya to take effectively hormonal reducing drugs, because she has advanced levels of testosterone. she has a condition and lynsey sharp who is also going to be going in that final, she was castigated so to speak last year at the olympics, when she said in that final, in which she finished outside the medals, she said it was simply not fair that they are having to race against women with these advanced levels of naturally produce testosterone levels. all sorts of
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ethical debates, very delicate issue, many people have said that caster semenya has been treated incredibly unfairly down the years. the iaaf want to bring in this rule but the court of arbitration for sport said that you cannot. the iaaf are going back next month to say we have got some proof that increased testosterone levels mean that they do have three times more likely chance of performing better than other women. we have got laura muir going in the 5000 metres, it was caster semenya who just pipped terror to a bronze medal in the 1500 metres. the daughter of liz mccolgan is also going on that final, but thatis is also going on that final, but that is going to be so tough, you cannot look beyond the ethiopians and kenyans to hoover up all the medals there. there is an outside chance in the first event in the field, that is robbie grabarz, in the high jump. he field, that is robbie grabarz, in the highjump. he hasjust turned 30 and says he is too old to carry on after london, but of course so many
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amazing memories of london because thatis amazing memories of london because that is where he got a bronze medal in the olympics five years ago. he gave us in the olympics five years ago. he gave us a scare in in the olympics five years ago. he gave us a scare in qualification, just clearing the height he needed to get into that final at his third attempt. there will be a lot of british support for him as well. plenty to look forward to, but i think it is the relays towards the end of the day when we look for british success the four by 400. too old at 30, that is a rather sobering comment! let's go back to mo farah, who was celebrating today by being on top of the london eye, but he had a less enjoyable experience, which was facing the media, which has become much more difficult for him than in the past, can you explain a bit of the background to that? yes. that is why he has kept it to a minimum. wanted to focus on doing the 10000 and 5000 double. he got
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the 10000 and 5000 double. he got the 10,000 in the bag on the opening evening, a wonderful race in which she was back to his best and he said it was brutal, the toughest race of his life and last night, we saw him just pipped to another double, taking silver, but take the pain away from all the gold medals, ten in all that he has delivered in a great britain vest. world championships, it was his first defeat since the 2011 world championships, can you believe it? you need to rewind to an interview he gave to bbc sport where he hinted about the sacrifices he has made, going to the other side of the world and that is when he linked up the world and that is when he linked up with his coach alberto salazar in oregon in the united states and basically changed his whole approach and said he has never worked so hard and said he has never worked so hard and then the rewards began to come. alberto salazar, a lot of controversy surrounding him because he is under investigation by the us anti—doping agency for his medical practices with other athletes. he
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denies those allegations that he has done anything wrong, as does mo farah. remember those russian hackers, they leaked some reports which seem to suggest that there we re which seem to suggest that there were some question marks over some doping results from mo farah since he has been with his coach. he has never failed a he has been with his coach. he has neverfailed a drugs he has been with his coach. he has never failed a drugs test and has denied all the allegations of wrongdoing, which is why he has kept himself away from the media in this his final global track meeting. ahead of the news conference this morning, and the questions came yet again, questioning his association with alberto salazar. what i have achieved is through hard work and sometimes, you guys get to be certain times, because you never write the fact, the fact is over the years, i have achieved through my ha rd years, i have achieved through my hard work, through hard work and pain. he just
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hard work, through hard work and pain. hejust finds it hard work, through hard work and pain. he just finds it so frustrating that the questions keep coming, but as long as this investigation into his coach, alberto salazar, who will still be associated with both far as he gets into marathon running, those questions will keep coming and he will keep denying all those allegations strongly. we're not going to see the last of him on the track, he will race in birmingham over 3000 metres and a couple of weeks and then over 5000 metres in zurich in the diamond league, but then we can see exactly what sir mo farah can achieve on the road. arlene foster there at the london stadium with a good bit of advice and predictors for the evening ahead. thank you very much, enjoy it. let me bring you some breaking news which we are getting out of cha rlottesville news which we are getting out of charlottesville this afternoon. this is about the death of the woman, she
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was aged 32, she was the woman who was aged 32, she was the woman who was killed by that speeding car. a man has been charged with murder, the car was apparently driven into a crowd of counterdemonstrators who we re crowd of counterdemonstrators who were opposing the white supremacist gathering, to take back our country, as the campaigners, the white supremacist put it. the woman was 32, she died in that and the other deaths were those of a 48—year—old man and at trooper from quentin virginia and they were officers who died when their helicopter crash. the helicopter had been used during the course of watching the protest. it was a helicopter that was used to support the governor from time to time and he paid personal tribute. in this statement, which is coming out from our colleagues in washington, the city of
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cha rlottesville washington, the city of charlottesville says that the woman was struck down by a vehicle while exercising a peaceful right to free speech. the senseless act of violence rips hole in our collective hearts. it will never make up for the loss, we will pursue charges against the driver who caused her death and we are confident that justice will prevail. he has been charged with murder. let us cross to the ball with a number of people killed in floods and landslides caused by torrential rain has now reach 49. elephants and rats have been sent to rescue tourist trapped in lodges near the national park. let us speak now to our correspondent in kathmandu. he is an environment correspondent. thank you for talking to us. serious weather of this kind is not unusual in nepal, but how bad have these floods being? this time, it has been really
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bad. it is water everywhere. several rivers have broken their embankments, bridged their embankments, bridged their embankments and several of them have joined together. as a result, several settlements, villages, farmland, they are submerged, highways cut off, bridges washed away. it is a grim situation. there is still rain going on although there are predictions that it will ease now. this is a very imaginative solution to the problem of getting to those survivors of the floods and getting to those who need help, using the elephants and floating devices, nepal is a relatively poor country, how well—prepa red devices, nepal is a relatively poor country, how well—prepared is it for dealing with natural disasters of this kind. when it comes to predictions now, projections are much better than they were even three orfour much better than they were even three or four years much better than they were even three orfour years ago. much better than they were even three or four years ago. having said
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that, the home minister was on the record saying just now that there are not even adequate boats to rescue people. basic things are missing. the government has admitted that they are overwhelmed, their lack of resources, it is a huge issue and also not forget that there are many many remote areas where there have been no proper roads, it is very difficult to find out where these people actually are. because of the severe weather, there are no telephones, electricity is gone, therefore it is a massive challenge now. what do you think the prospects are now for the coming days and weeks, what sort of help is going to be needed. that is another thing, the bbc service has interviewed several survivors, people are affected and there is a general complaint that belief is just not there. they are talking about
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rescue, even with that it is not having the government admits that. relief as far away, but that is a huge issue. this question of preparedness, this has been on the agenda for years, but when things let this happen, when incidents happen, it does not seem to be there still. i guess the question that will be posed again once the clean—up operation is over, although for now people have different priorities. our environment correspondent, thank you for that update. the kenyan opposition leader raila odinga has given a defiant response to international calls for him to respect the results of last week's disputed presidential election. at a rally in the informal settlement of kibera in the capital nairobi, he urged his supporters to boycott work tomorrow. the kenyan opposition leader raila odinga has given a defiant he said he would announce his full course of action on tuesday. earlier i spoke to our correspondent in nairobi, anne soy, and i asked her whether mr odinga really believed he could overturn the election result.
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they believe he would have gone to court. the fact that he has had his agents at polling centres and also at the electoral commission headquarters, checking the results, three days before the announcement was made and the fact that nothing came out of that, then possibly they did not find serious discrepancies that would have been enough to go to court with. with regard to supporters and how many will heed his call, already we have seen some voices of dissent within his party. governors, in the western region, his stronghold are really appealing to business leaders, business owners to business leaders, business owners to reopen their shops, so that non—alike can continue. a group has claimed responsible body
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foran a group has claimed responsible body for an attack on us forces in iraq in which to service people died. the violence occurred west of mosul, a town still under the control of ias. the us military says five other people were injured in the fighting. now to illuminations of a different kind, and shooting stars littered the sky last night as the purr—see—ud meteor shower was at its peak over the uk. you've been sending in your pictures from around the country. up to 100 shooting stars an hour were visible, there's another opportunity to see the display tonight. it's an annual event as the earth passes debris from the swift—tuttle comet. here's monica grady, professor of planetary and space sciences at the open university. the swift—tuttle comet comes around the sun every 133 years and as it comes around the sun, it sheds dust and gradually all that dust builds up so it spreads all around the orbit. the earth, as it passes around the sun, it goes through that cloud of dust, every year, around this time of year and so we see, all these shooting stars
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which are tiny bits of dust from the tail of the comet burning up in our atmosphere. the perseid is visible through all ofjuly and august. but because the tail is quite broad, if you like, it is this weekend that is the maximum. friday to sunday nights. you can see meteors, shooting stars, every night of the year. sporadic ones which are random bits of dust. each one about the size of a grain of sand. and these you can see if you are somewhere dark and you let your eyes get used to the dark. you canjust lie in your back and watch the sky. even though the moon was out, it is waning, so tonight it will be a bit smaller, if you get in the shadow of the moon, behind a wall or something like that, so that you can block out the moon from your picture, then you should be able to see the meteors really well. there you go. try it tonight. a
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quick schedule change. the film programme was supposed to be on at quarter to six. it is actually quarter to six. it is actually quarter to six. it is actually quarter to seven. before that we will bejoining the quarter to seven. before that we will be joining the viewers on bbc one from the main news. before that, the weather. rain in the outlook. but a lovely weekend for most of us. we have seen cloud increasing. fairweather cloud in wales and the south—west of england. showers across scotland. a lot of the cloud elsewhere will fade away. high cloud coming away
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overnight. thickening across the west. rain by midnight to northern ireland. by the end of the night in south—west england, south wales and the west of england. the chances of seeing the meteors shower not as good as they were last night. this was sent in by one of weather watchers. clearer skies overnight, particularly towards the east. not clear skies by the morning across scotla nd clear skies by the morning across scotland and northern ireland. the wettest weather pushing further into scotland. some outbreaks of heavy rain over the irish sea into the north—west of england. showery rain across wales and the south—west of england. through the midlands, much of eastern england, dry to start the day. hazy sunshine. it could stay dry all day because the rain is not moving east yet. showery rain across northern ireland, western england and wales, heavy rain in northern
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ireland, signs of rain in the south—west later. temperatures about 17 to 18 degrees. sunshine further east. quite warm in the south—east. we will see the rain turning heavier during the evening and overnight, spilling northwards and eastwards across spilling northwards and eastwards a cross m ost spilling northwards and eastwards across most of the country. the south east perhaps missing most of it. the heavy rain should have pushed away by tuesday morning. that will leave us with some sunshine and some showers. some heavier ones. a better day in the south—west. those showers will decay during the evening as this brief bump of high pressure comes in. it gets squeezed out by low—pressure from the atlantic. pretty unsettled week ahead. some sunshine from time to time. we can expect some heavier showers, maybe longer spells of rain, turning cooler. a man is charged with murder after a
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car is driven into antiracism protestors in the united states. new footage emerges of the attack. the death of a woman in charlottesville, virginia came after a gathering of white nationalist groups. the governor of the state says they are not welcome. there is no place for you in the united states of america. we deplore your hatred, your bigotry and shame on you. the white house defence president tom's response, saying his condemnation of violence on many sides included the far right. also this evening, a joint pledge from the trade secretary and the chancellor. a brexit transition period will not be a back door to staying in the eu. plans to allow a learner drivers onto motorways to better prepare themselves for a real—life conditions after passing the test. and a sir mo farah takes to new heights to mark the end of his career on the athletics track.
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good afternoon. the white house has defended president tom's reaction to an attack on antiracism protestors in the state of virginia, saying his condemnation had included white nationalist groups, even though he did not specifically mention them. a 20—year—old man has been charged with murder after a car was driven into a woman who was part of a demonstration against a rally of far right groups in charlottesville. 19 other people were injured. laura bicker sent this report from charlottesville. after a violent day of division, cha rlottesville has after a violent day of division, charlottesville has come together to pray, to show this city condemns the
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heat brought here by neo—nazis is and white supremacists. the virginia governor went from rota road, holding worshippers in this baptist church. he promised to keep politics out of the pulpit but there was a message he felt he had to give. out of the pulpit but there was a message he felt he had to givem is about politics in that the political rhetoric in this country todayis political rhetoric in this country today is breeding bigotry. the streets here simmered with tension yesterday before finally erupting into violence as white supremacists is gathered for a rally. the group, which included members of the ku klux klan, said it wa nted members of the ku klux klan, said it wanted to take america back. antiracism activists challenged them. police tried to disperse the crowd but this day was not to end peacefully. a car, at speed, ramdin to protestors. shocked witnesses
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ca ptu red to protestors. shocked witnesses captured the aftermath. the crash killed heather heyer, who had fought races all her adult life. many others are still being treated in hospital. those who captured the scene and camera say they were not shockedit scene and camera say they were not shocked it ended in tragedy. the police have charged 20—year—old james fields junior with second—degree murder. james fields junior with second-degree murder. the nazis came to town yesterday clearly had the intent of causing violence. you don't come to town with shields and helmets and weapons and have a militia with semiautomatic weapons around their shoulders, if you are here to peacefully express an opinion. others say the scenes do not represent cha rlottesville opinion. others say the scenes do not represent charlottesville and they want politicians to challenge those responsible. it is important to call these people what they are, white supremacists, and i don't understand why it is so difficult. they are not hiding this behind a
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statue. they didn't, go here because ofa statue. they didn't, go here because of a statue. they came here to fulfil the promise of president trump and take their country back. this city did not want bigotry on its streets. it's people know what to remember those who died trying to challenge it and to keep the peace. we can talk to laura bicker live now. how would you some up the political reaction to the attack? there has been considerable focus on what president trump did and didn't say. amidst the condolences and floral tributes being brought here, there is anger, as you havejust heard. many feel that mr tom's condemnation of the violence did not go far enough. he did not explicitly named the alt—right groups. the criticism has even come from within his own party. one republican senator said the president must call evil by its name. this was the work, he said of white supremacists and
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this was domestic terrorism. the white house has come back with a statement. they said of course the president wanted to condemn all groups, including the kkk, neo—nazis and white supremacists. and general mcmaster has described this as terrorism. but when it comes to how this city recovers, many people told me this is supposed to be one of the picturesque in the south, and now this street will never be the same. laura bicker, thank you. after weeks of public divisions between members of public divisions between members of the cabinet over brexit, the chancellor philip hammond and the international trade secretary liam fox have made a joint pledge, saying a transition period will not be a back door to in the eu. they have previously put forward opposing views on brexit. here is ben wright. not always heading in the same direction. while the chancellor wanted britain to stay in the eu, trade secretary liam
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fox has long believed in brexit. in headlines over the summer there are disagreements over what should happen after britain leaves the eu in march 2019 happened here. today though, a united front. riding a john cleese in sunday telegraph, they say there must be a cliff edge break when britain leaves in 2019. —— must not be. they will see a time—limited transition period. but britain will leave the eu single market and the customs union. britain will leave the eu single market and the customs unionlj think it is actually very encouraging because over the last few weeks we have seen conflicting signals sent out by those members of the cabinet. and now it does look as if someone has said to mr fox and mr hammond, we need to see unity. the customs union sets eu wide import tariffs. the single market allows free trade and the movement of people. ministers say the uk can leave both while still giving
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business confidence during our departure from the eu. it sounds worryingly to me as if the price philip hammond has had to pay for a transitional arrangement has been to sign up to us leaving the single market and the customs union. i think it is a dreadful mistake for the future of our economy, jobs and prosperity in britain. this will have to be hammered out in brussels. the eu insist progress has to be made in terms of sorting out the divorce before the uk's future relationship can be discussed. one issueis relationship can be discussed. one issue is the border between the republic of ireland and northern ireland. this week, the government will publish its formal position paper on the issue, expected to include plans to give irish citizens the right to move freely into the uk after brexit. ministers will also said they thinking on how a new customs arrangement with the eu may work after brexit. and more position papers will follow through the summer ina papers will follow through the summer in a clear effort scots criticism that ministers don't have
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a plan and are divided. it is also intended to put pressure on brussels to crack ——. we are talking about britain's future relationship with eu sooner rather than later. the clock is ticking. the two—year window for doing the deal is already slipping by fast. 17 former army instructors will come before a court martial next month, charged with assault on recruits. the group from the army foundation couegein the group from the army foundation college in harrogate will appear at a court—martial centre. they face 40 charges, including battery and actual bodily harm. learning drivers are to be allowed onto motorways in england, scotland and wales for the first time next year, a change in the law will mean drivers can take lessons with an improved instructor and ina lessons with an improved instructor and in a dual controlled car. the department for transport believes it would be better preparation for independent driving after learners have passed their test. daniela rav reports. they can be
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daunting for young motorists. driving at speed, surrounded by bigger vehicles. from driving at speed, surrounded by biggervehicles. from next driving at speed, surrounded by bigger vehicles. from next year, learners will get motorway lessons. chantal lee passed his driving test six weeks ago. it took a further two weeks to brave a motorway on his own. you go into the slip road and you can see all the cars. you have to merge onto the right and there are ca rs to merge onto the right and there are cars going 70 mph, sometimes faster. you are a neuron. it is terrifying. the changes about making... young drivers are more likely to be killed or seriously injured. i would much rather have someone next to me on the motorway who has been taught how to drive on the motorway than somebody who has left the test centre. i think this will mean a safer environment for all motorists. there will be strict
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rules for learner drivers on motorways. they will have do have an improved driving instructor with them. they must be in a dual controlled car where the instructor can take over if necessary. some road safety groups believe the motorway lesson should be compulsory but only once you have passed your test. there is so widespread support for this change to the rules. this is about making it a controlled environment, making sure nothing can go wrong are a funny thing does go wrong there is a fully trot —— qualified professional next to them. not the type of thing i would recommend mum and dad to help out with. motorway driving will not be tested. it is additional training to make new motorists drive safely with confidence. it is the final day of the world athletics championships. with news of that and the sport, let's join natalie perks. plenty of thrills but unfortunately
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for britain no spills in the reworked —— relay last night. it was sirmo reworked —— relay last night. it was sir mo farah‘s last track race in a major championship. this morning he accused critics of trying to destroy his legacy because of questions surrounding his coach, alberto salazar. here is dan roan. british athletics has grown accustomed to victory. but after mo farah‘s opening—night gold at london 2017, they had to wait. a series of medal hopefuls fell agonisingly short. but then finally at the end of day nine, changed. two silvers and a glorious gold in the men's100 metres relay team. the newly installed head of british track and field told me today the championships had provided some late relief. the real issue is how we got the underlying talent to take us into the next age of british athletics? we absolutely have. mo
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farah has provided many enduring images and this morning was no exception. his links with coach alberto salazar, who is under investigation by us anti—doping authorities, ensures his legacy is not without controversy. today reacting angrily to media scrutiny. ifi reacting angrily to media scrutiny. if i have crossed the line and alberto has crossed the line, something will be done. i have achieved what i have achieved and now you tried to destroy it. controversy was never far away at these championships. superstar usain bolt was beaten in his farewell 100 metres by drugs cheatjustin gatlin. and outbreaks of illness added team hotel saw sprinter issac makwala wrap prevented from racing before being allowed to complete. the saddest sight was bolt in his final appearance, the relay, denied cruelly once again, this time
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through injury. i can't remember a time, and i'm sure you of all covered multiple world championships, i can't remember a time when competition has been actually so competitive and the stories around them so compelling. and i guess for me, the compelling nature of those stories has been the emergence of such extraordinary young talent. this has looked and felt like london 22. but as with the olympics here five years ago, there have been sell—out crowds, proof once again that when it comes to major sports events, british enthusiasm remains on them to. and ata time enthusiasm remains on them to. and at a time when athletics is facing a challenge to remain as relevant as it once was, that has been a huge boost. athletics needed a championships like this. it really needed london. london has, go to the rescue of the sport. the sport has got to be on its bended knees saying, thank you very much. you have done something no other city could have done. these championships
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mark the end of an era. they also prove that sport refuses to follow the script. totte n ha m the script. tottenham have made a winning start to their premier league season, beating newcastle united 2—0 at st james' park. it was a harsh reproduction to the top flight football for newcastle. joe lynskey was watching. in these football heartlands, hope comes with expectation. after a season away, newcastle street premier league progress. but in this division one wrong move can turn the tide. the man leading the note wasjonjo shelvey. a midfielder seth on the unexpected. this stamp on dele alli was in front of the referee. the home side had looked comfortable but gaps were opening. when harry kane went close, top sensed a breakthrough. dele alli was back on his feet and stamping his authority.
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no new additions have come to spurs this summer but they can count on his quality. last season's runners—up were approaching their best. ben davies found himself in the box, 3—point field. for newcastle and shelvey, the lessons are in black and white. progress in this division never comes easy. manchester united's £75 million signing romelu lukaku scored twice on his debut for the club. they have beaten west ham at old trafford, with the full—time whistle having just gone. defending champions england have enjoyed another comprehensive victory at the women's rugby world cup. they have beaten italy 56—13 in dublin. there were ten changes from the team that beat spain on wednesday. daniel waterman was one of the changes. she scored two of the ten tries. wales and ireland
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have just started their latest games. that is all the sport for now. plenty more to come from here, including at 9:30pm, usain bolt will doa including at 9:30pm, usain bolt will do a walking lap of honour to say goodbye. there are some metal opportunities for britain. there are two medals short of their target of six. could they pull off something remarkable? find out at 6:30pm across the bbc. that is it from us for now. more news throughout the evening. we are back at ten o'clock. no time for the news where you are. hello again. you are watching bbc news. it is seven minutes to six. despite the tensions on the peninsula, some south koreans say the war of words between president donald trump and pyongyang makes them laugh. this weekend, thousands are attending the annual peace concert which takes place alongside the north korean border, the ceasefire line since the war itself
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has never been declared officially over. we have this report. k-pop music plays this is a peace concert being held in south korea barely five kilometres from the border with north korea, which is perhaps one of the most militarised borders in the world. it's been organised every year since 2011 by local authorities but, in light of recent tensions and heightened hostilities, it would seem almost absurd that a government would allow such an event to happen, and that tens of thousands of people would actually come out to attend it and bring their families and their children along. k-pop music plays but that's the thing about south korea, that's the thing about this country — the people here have gotten so used to hearing these harsh words from their northern neighbour that it's almost become a part of normal life. korean pop music has often been used as a propaganda tool by south korea,
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with speakers on the border blaring it into north korea. this country has said that it remains open to dialogue with its northern neighbour, but this music is not going to be heard there, it's unlikely to be broadcast there. and south korea's message, at the moment, seems to be falling on deaf ears. that is the peace concert in south korea. how many people does it take to change 225,000 light bulbs? know it is not the joke that is coming up, it is the blackpool power and the illuminations are not far off. wesley berry has szewczyk every one of those lights. the big switch on is just two weeks away. casey walled and has been to meet him. it's approaching that time of year again when all eyes are on blackpool for the big switch—on.
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got to get a few... here's the man making sure the main attraction doesn't disappoint. wesley berry's in charge of checking every single led here on the blackpool tower ahead of big switch—on. that's a lot to look at, 225,000 to be precise. i have to admit, it's the one time of the year my heart starts to flutter on switch—on night. all eyes, if something doesn't work, it's like, ah, ah! and people love to point out the ones he's missed. there are lots of people saying, you know there's lights out. yeah, yeah, i do. thanks, thanks for telling me! but, being the sole person responsible for their upkeep, just how long does it take to change almost a quarter of a million lights? hopefully in the next few weeks we'll have everything done. and just like your christmas lights, when one goes it takes with it a load more, except wes has to dangle 517 feet and nine inches over the resort‘s landmark in order to fix them. there are some advantages though.
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it is thrilling every day you come out. it's a fantastic location. a lot of other guys in this industry are working in places you don't have the view you have here. great in the sunshine, less so in the wind and rain. you have to be able to stand the cold up here. it becomes my second hobby, watching all the weather people. you really do get a battering from the sea air because we're so close in blackpool. we go overboard on waterproofing just to try to make them last even longer than they're expected to. so, that's the first one replaced. just 224,999 to go! and with just over three weeks to the big switch—on, you better get a wiggle on, wes. katie talking to wes barry about his
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remarkablejob. good job katie talking to wes barry about his remarkable job. good job he katie talking to wes barry about his remarkablejob. good job he has got a good head for heights. let's get the weather. here is darren betts. hello there. if you want to see the meatier shower, skies will be clearer earlier in the night. cloud will increase from the west. most of it quite high cloud. except towards northern ireland where we have thicker cloud and rain by midnight. by thicker cloud and rain by midnight. by the end of the night that will have pushed into north—west scotland, west wales and the south—west of injured. it will not be as cold as it was last night. we will have some rain around for western areas, quickly pushing further into scotland. wet for the rush hour in the south—west of scotland. showery rain coming into northern ireland. rain on and off across wales and western parts of england. further east, midlands, much of eastern england, maybe dry with hazy hunjan —— sunshine. rain overnight. the worst of it gone by
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tuesday. sunshine and showers in northern ireland, scotland, northern and eastern england. dry run brighter towards the south—west. this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at six. president trump is accused of being too soft on the far—right, after violence at at a rally in virginia left one person dead and many more injured. the white house hits back, saying the president's statement condemning the violence in charlottesville included all extremist groups, including the kkk and neo—nazis. the chancellor and the international trade secretary, say the government will seek a transition period to help businesses adjust after brexit. learner drivers will be allowed to have lessons on motorways for the first time from next year. sir mo farah reaches another level after failing to achieve a golden ending at the world athletics championships. in sportsday, we'll have full details of the final day of the london games as robbie grabarz prepares for the men's highjump final.
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