Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 14, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

6:00 am
hello. good morning. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a big rise in the number of people arrested for being drunk and disorderly on planes. a bbc investigation finds a 50% increase in passengers being held for incidents involving alcohol on flights and at airports. good morning. it's monday the 14th of august. also this morning: a vigil is held to remember the woman killed during protests against a far right rally in the us. don't let hate live. don'tjust let someone don't let hate live. don'tjust let someone walk around freely and spread their hate. tell them that is not ok. that is not ok. in sport, great britain hit their medal target.
6:01 am
a silver from the women and a bronze from men in the 400 metre relays bring the tally to six in the final moments of the world athletics championship. good morning. we are talking about family run businesses this week. they are on the increase. there are nearly five million family—run businesses in the uk contributing nearly half a trillion pounds to the british economy. and 50 years after pirate radio ships were outlawed, we look back at how they changed the sound of music radio. and carol has the weather. good morning. for many central and eastern areas today, dry and bright with sunshine. rain in the west that is slowly going east and north through today. i will have more details in 15 minutes. thank you. see you then. good morning. first, our main story. arrests of passengers suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by 50% in the past year, according to an investigation
6:02 am
carried out by bbc panorama. critics of the airline industry say a voluntary code on alcohol sales isn't working, and want the government to amend licensing laws. tina daheley reports. where in the uk can you buy alcohol at 4am seven days a week? the answer is at an international airport. and it seems that it's leaving passengers and crew with a hangover. an investigation by bbc panorama has revealed that arrests of those suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by 50% in the past year. half of the 4,000 cabin crew who took part in a survey carried out by panorama and unite, the union, said they had either experienced verbal, physical, or sexual abuse by drunk passengers onboard a uk flight. people just see us as bar maids in the sky. they would touch your breasts, or they'd touch your bum
6:03 am
oryour legs, i mean, i've had hands going up my skirt before. phil ward, the managing director of low—cost airline, jet2, has already banned alcohol on flights before 8am, and wants the industry to take tougher measures. do you think airports are doing enough? i think they could do more. umm, i think the retailers could do more as well. two litre steins of beer in bars, mixers and miniatures in duty—free shops, which can only be there for one reason. but the airport 0perators association insists that their code of practice does works. i don't accept that the airports don't sell alcohol responsibly. the sale of alcohol per se is not a problem. it's the misuse of it and drinking to excess and then behaving badly. earlier this year, a house of lords committee called for airport licensing to be brought into line with pubs and bars. a government decision on whether to call time
6:04 am
on early—morning drinking at airports is now expected in the autumn. tina daheley, bbc news. and we will have more on that throughout the programme for you. the us vice president, mike pence, has specifically condemned far—right groups when asked to respond to the violence over the weekend in virginia. president trump has been criticised for not identifying any specific group. a woman was killed and 19 people were injured when a car was driven into a crowd protesting a far right rally in charlottesville. we have no allowance for these dangerous fringe groups like the kkk. they have no place in the american public life and debate and we condemned them in the strongest of full—term. —— possible terms.
6:05 am
0ur washington correspondent, laura bicker, was at a vigil last night to remember heather heyer, who was killed during the protests. the candles and songs are for heather heyer, who died standing up for what she believed in. after a weekend of deadly violence and anger on these streets, there's now a longing to come together in quiet grief. heather was one of the demonstrators trying to stop white supremacists marching through cha rlottesville on saturday. she was killed when this car plowed through a group of protesters. her close friend now appeals for unity. i want everybody to get together and unite, and spread love, and spread peace, and spread happiness. and don't let hate live. don't — don't just let somebody walk around freely and spread their hate. tell them that that's not ok. that it's not ok.
6:06 am
one of the organisers of the unite the right rally tried to hold a press conference. he was shouted down. shame, shame, shame! and as he left, he was forced to flee. armed police had to escort him from the city. he's condemned the violence, but says he has a right to be heard. i'm willing to die for my rights, basically. i feel like my first amendment rights, and the rights of the people at my rally were violated. but there is no sympathy here for those who brought hate to the city. laura bicker, bbc news, charlottesville. security forces in burkina faso have killed three suspected jihadist gunmen after a terrorist attack in the capital. the country's communications minister says a number of hostages remain trapped inside a restaurant after gunmen opened fire on sunday evening. at least 17 people are believed to have been killed in the attack and another eight were wounded.
6:07 am
the army and police have sealed off part of the city centre. a man has been charged with the murder of a grandfather who was attacked as he walked his dogs in norfolk. the body of 83—year—old, peter wrighton, was found in woodland near the village of east harling last saturday. police say he had been repeatedly stabbed. a 23—year—old man will appear in court later today. up to 140,000 vulnerable children did not receive the help they needed last year because their situation was notjudged to be serious enough, according to action for children. the charity has found thousands of young people referred to social services did not end up getting any support before their case was closed. the government says its reforms will improve the situation. marc ashdown reports. debby has been working in children's services for 16 years, and helps families with anything from behavioural problems to domestic and substance abuse. i've got, across the sites i run,
6:08 am
i've just under 2,500 under fives, and three members of staff. so, as much as we do, there's a lot that we can't possibly do, ‘cause we can't be everywhere at once. the amount we've already taken, we're aware we're not picking up in the same way, and it will only get worse from that. a freedom of information request to local authorities found that last year 184,500 children's needs assessments were closed because they fell short of the criteria for support. the charity, action for children, says only around one in four families received early help services such as children's centres or domestic violence programmes. we know from too many cases that if we're not able to help children early, that there are strong likelihoods that things will get worse for them. for example, in serious case reviews, 70% of the time, we know that there have been early
6:09 am
warning signs of the outcomes. but we also know that if we give children and families the tools to help themselves much earlier, then they're much less likely to need help later on in any case. the local goverment association blames government cuts for squeezing services. but the department for education says is taking action to support vulnerable children by reforming social care services and better protecting victims of domestic violence and abuse. it says councils spent almost £8 billion last year on children's social care, but it wants to help them do more. marc ashdown, bbc news. armed officers in the uk's biggest police force are to be issued with head—mounted cameras. they will be attached to the caps and protective helmets of members of the metropolitan police's firearms units. scotland yard has yet to decide on how to use body—worn cameras in undercover armed operations. the american space agency's cassini probe has begun the final phase of its mission to saturn. the satellite has begun a series of "ultra—close" passes through the planet's
6:10 am
upper atmosphere. scientists are hoping it will reveal more about the chemical make—up and internal structure of the planet. the world athletics championships ended on a high in london last night, with two more medals for great britain and northern ireland. the success of the relay teams meant british athletics hit its medal target, but onlyjust, as our sports correspondent, natalie pirks, reports. going into saturday, britain had just one medal. 24 hours later, they had six. the medal target hit at the last possible minute. it was the relay that gave the drama. britain took 0lympic runs in the women's four x 400 metres. whenjamaica's injury curse struck yet again... hamstring! just look what it meant
6:11 am
to them. silver for great britain in northern ireland. the men's four x 400 relay. the final event of the championships. rooney! martyn rooney brought home the rally in bronze, the sixth medal for britain. brought home the rally in bronze, the sixth medalfor britain. the relay teams making sure saturday and sunday were equally super. and as usain bolt took to the track to say goodbye one last time, it was a chance to reflect on a memorable ten days. it has been spectacular. i honestly can't remember in the years i have been watching championship athletics that i have seen such competitive races in so many compelling stories. and actually, as we are ushering the superstar off the scene, the compelling stories have been the emergence of
6:12 am
extraordinary young talent around the globe. but the biggest winner was athletics itself. london consistently delivered the crowd that the sport is desperately needed. and as for britain, well, they left it late, but they have shown the future is bright. natalie pirks, bbc news, at the london stadium. it was an exciting. there is nothing like athletics to get you off the couch! away from that, the premier league season is back! we have missed it. it was a great competitive debut for romelu lukaku, scoring two goals. they looked good. yes. £35 million. that is what he is there to do. away from the athletics, romelu lukaku made a dream home debut for manchester united. the belgian striker had an instant impact at old trafford,
6:13 am
scoring twice as united beat west ham 4—0 to go top of the premier league. jonjo shelvey was sent off for this, whatever you want to call it. a red card. paving the way for spurs to beat newcastle. that clearly cost his side. the american, justin thomas, won golf‘s final major of the year, the uspga at quail hollow. look at that. one of the shots of the round. thomas produced a final round 68 to claim his first major title, winning by two shots on a thrilling final day that saw five players level for the lead at one stage and england's women have continued the defence of their rugby world cup title with a thumping 56—13 win over italy, scoring ten tries in all. hosts, ireland, also won, they beat japan, but wales can no longer qualify for the semi—finals after they lost to canada. it is good to see england are going
6:14 am
well at the moment in defence of their title. that is nice to see. thank you. justin thomas, 220 on a 7—iron. for anyone who plays golf, thatis 7—iron. for anyone who plays golf, that is ridiculous. i don't suppose you don't do that. well, long levers help, but not that far. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: a bbc investigation has revealed there has been a 50% rise in the number of arrests for drunken misbehaviour on flights and in airports in the past year. demonstrations and vigils have been held across the united states following deadly violence that erupted during a far—right rally in virginia on saturday. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. lovely to see you. good morning. good morning all. we have mixed fortu nes good morning all. we have mixed fortunes in the weather this
6:15 am
morning. an east—west split. we have rain in the west and drier in the east and that will hold true through much of the day. yesterday in kent we hit 24 celsius. it was a beautiful day. in order to have the warmest day this august so far we had to reach 24.5. we could do that today, we are expecting 25 today and tomorrow for some parts of the south—east, 26. so it will get that bit warmer but we have a couple of fronts bringing rain across the west, pushing north eastwards across scotla nd west, pushing north eastwards across scotland through the course of the day, but equally a lot of dry weather to start with, and a lot of bright weather. if you are waking up from yorkshire, lincolnshire, east anglia, parts of the midlands and the south—east, you have sunshine but out towards the west we have rain. some of that rain will be heavy and it will be for a while yet across scotland. this is pushing north eastwards. northern ireland will see the back edge of the rain, now starting to clear. it pushes across the isle of man in through north—west england and north—east
6:16 am
england getting off to a bright start. that rain affecting parts of wales in south—west england, and the cloud building just ahead of it through the west midlands, for example, through the pennines, peak district. as we push towards the south—east, cambridgeshire, east anglia, essex and kent, we are back into the sunshine. through the course of the day the rain will continue to move east, and also north eastwards. it will tend to foment a bit as it does so. won't be as heavy through the course of the afternoon, so we will see right spells on the murray firth. brighter spells on the murray firth. brighter spells with sunshine in northern ireland. it could be heavy and thundery, and more rain coming across the channel islands, through southern counties in the wards for example the midlands and heading towards the wash. it is the south—east that will hang on to the brightest and the warmest conditions. temperatures possibly a little bit higher than you can see on the charts. through the evening and overnight another band of rain sweeps in from the south—west. it will be moving in the direction of
6:17 am
the east, and tomorrow eventually that clears away and what we're looking for tomorrow is a day of sunshine and showers. tomorrow some of the showers again could be heavy, also thundery. but you know the drill with showers. many will mist out altogether and hang on with decent spells of sunshine until friday. temperatures in the south—east up to about 26. that is not bad. thank you very much, see you in half an hour. let's take a look at this morning's papers. john is here, steph is out and about so only three of us on the sofa. you mentioned that this press conference, don't call me mo. we have been talking about usain bolt, and despite mo bowing out, he gave a strong press and despite mo bowing out, he gave a strong press conference and despite mo bowing out, he gave a strong press conference saying the british love to build people up and
6:18 am
tear them down. they are still questioning his links to salazar. while he has never been accused of any wrongdoing, he feels the questions keep plaguing him. he says i think it is unfair, i am ending my career on a high, and you are trying to drag me down. there are some questions. there are questions that, but it is tainting the end of his career, he feels. on the daily telegraph they are talking about stamp duty must be cut as a matter of urgency as part of a return to conservative values, that is according to rees—mogg. and jamie 0liver according to rees—mogg. and jamie oliver and his wife are hoping for a sixth child, a half—dozen. may facing backlash of a rushed brexit plans and drunken airline passengers up plans and drunken airline passengers up by plans and drunken airline passengers up by 50%. give us your views on that by the usual means and as we we re that by the usual means and as we
6:19 am
were saying, quite a lot of pictures of what has been happening in america overnight after the death of heather heyer in charlottesville over the weekend. i cringe when i see friends post the holiday paint picture on social media at four a.m.. “— picture on social media at four a.m.. —— pint picture. and lots of discussion about ant, many saying how brave he is to be talking about it. picking up on mo farah, saying he isa it. picking up on mo farah, saying he is a clean runner and has defended himself. as he ends his career on the track, these questions are still facing him, links to his coach, salazar, and the methods he has used. he is saying the british press love to build people up and knock them down. i know that you can never really say what you feel, you
6:20 am
have to hold back to a certain extent, john shearer called it pathetic. i don't know how strong thatis, pathetic. i don't know how strong that is, sporting sense. he might wa nt to that is, sporting sense. he might want to say a lot more than that. he isa want to say a lot more than that. he is a newcastle man as well. it is a little pathetic, isn't it? can i mention a couple of stories? this is rather lovely. sir mo farah doing his mo—bot on the top of the london eye. that is an extraordinary thing to do. you know capsize in roads, they will have to be renamed because tourists have been upset, concerned about animal cruelty —— cat's eyes. a p pa re ntly about animal cruelty —— cat's eyes. apparently they will have to become road studs to spare feelings. because visitors to the united kingdom... they are concerned. it never says on the road cat's eyes. they call them bot dots in america.
6:21 am
is that what we will end up with here? thank you very much, so you a little later on. —— see you a little later on. today and tomorrow, pakistan and india will mark 70 years of independence from britain, a moment of freedom amongst one of the largest mass migrations the world has ever seen. after 200 years of british rule, the 1947 partition split india to create east and west pakistan. hindus and sikhs fled to india, and muslims went to pakistan. around 12 million people became refugees, and a million people are thought to have died in the partition. in a moment we will speak to sanjoy majumder, who joins us in new delhi, where india will be celebrating their freedom tomorrow. but first let's go to secunder kermani, who is in islamabad, where pakistan are marking their 70 years of independence today. good morning to you. how will they be marking this? well, as you say,
6:22 am
in the west and in much of the world todayit in the west and in much of the world today it will be seen as a day which commemorates partition. but here in pakistan it is really the day of independence that is being celebrated here. the chief of the pakistani army at midnight last night cloistered what is said to be the largest flag in the continent of asia on a flagpole at the border with india. there has been official celebrations in islamabad, where i am now, where the president has been speaking to the nation. there will be an airdisplay, speaking to the nation. there will be an air display, by the pakistan air force, later today as well. and there has been a changing of the guard at the mausoleum of the country's founder. and this all comes amidst a period of political upheaval in pakistan. just a few weeks ago the former prime minister, nawaz sharif, was ousted over
6:23 am
corruption allegations, which he denies, and he has been talking about the fact that in the 70 year history of pakistan no prime minister has been able to complete a term in office. that is some end that has given people some food for thought on today, which is otherwise a day of celebrations. and of course, 12 million people took part in this mass migration. we know that 1 million people died. what are the ramifications for pakistan? well, i have spent much of the past few weeks speaking to people who lived through the partition of india and pakistan. it is 70 years ago, so there are lots of people in their 80s and 90s who lived through the trauma, people who lost their entire families, people who witnessed horrific violence. and a lot of them actually say that they feel slightly
6:24 am
forgotten, that people don't have that much interest in talking to them about those experiences. they have been recent attempts in pakistan to try and capture the oral testimony of these people. but otherwise, when it comes to independence day celebrations, it is always... pakistan is talked about asa always... pakistan is talked about as a country moving forward rather than a country looking to the past. it has had a lasting impact, though, on the relationship between india and pakistan, which still have a very tense relationship, particularly over the disputed kashmir region, and that conflict dates back to partition. we saw references to that conflict both by the head of the pakistani army and either prime minister today. and we will be live in new delhi later in the programme. steph is looking at the impact the five million family—run businesses in the uk have on the british economy. she is taking a look atjust one of them this morning,
6:25 am
and it is a cider maker. good morning. good morning to you, good morning everybody. i am stood ona good morning everybody. i am stood on a huge vat of cider, would you believe? so underneath my feet is probably around 500,000 pints of cider. this of course is western cider. this of course is western cider mill. a fantastic operation, andi cider mill. a fantastic operation, and i want to show you, these are the oldest of the three vats, they we re the oldest of the three vats, they were bought in 1880, so this is a family business that has been going for a long time. very successful one which exports to more than 40 countries and employs 220 people in herefordshire. certainly a successful business, and we are talking about family businesses all this week. as you point out, there are nearly 5 million of them across the uk, and they are employing something like 12.2 million people.
6:26 am
so that is about half of the people employed in the private sector. so they are certainly an important part of our economy. if you look at how much money they contribute, as well, to the uk, it is something like £500 billion. a lot of money. and there are billion. a lot of money. and there a re lots of billion. a lot of money. and there are lots of businesses out there, you might not realise a family businesses. they are some of the smaller names, you might not know whether they are family businesses or not. you have plumbers and lots of different small businesses, and you have big names as well. the likes of warburton is, clarks, and we will look at the pros and cons of being part of a family business. first, the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. the metropolitan police is to introduce head—mounted cameras to firearms officers. body—worn cameras, which are mounted
6:27 am
just below the shoulder, have already been rolled out to around 17,500 met officers. the new, head—mounted version can be worn on officers' baseball caps or ballistic helmets. detectives investigating the murder of a schoolboy in south london are trying to discover if there is a link between that and an earlier incident involving a group of armed teenagers. 15—year—old jermaine goupall was stabbed to death in thornton heath on tuesday night. two people have been charged with his murder. police say a group of teenagers wearing balaclavas and armed with sticks had been at the same spot just hours earlier. there are plans to cover the protective screen due to be erected around grenfell tower in children's drawings. scaffolding will be erected around the burnt—out tower, and then encased by netting, during an operation expected to last until the end of the year. let's have a look at the travel situation now.
6:28 am
there is a good service on the tubes this morning. 0n the roads, whitehall is closed southbound from horse guards avenue to parliament square until 27 august for roadworks. expect delays around parliament square. in central london, park lane has two lanes closed northbound at hyde park corner, following a diesel spillage. in romford, ardleigh green, slewins lane is closed because of a burst watermain near to cavenham gardens. in the city, the a1 is closed southbound at the barbican for gas works. let's have a check on the weather now, with lucy martin. hello, good morning. aftera hello, good morning. after a settled and somewhat summary we can, it has turned something a little bit more changeable as we move through this week. today, though, does start of quite bright. we will see some hazy
6:29 am
sunshine posting of the cloud will tend to increase as we go through the day. so putting the detail onto the day. so putting the detail onto the map, then, a dry and bright start with some hazy sunshine through the morning but cloud tending to ease from the west as we move into the afternoon. 0ne tending to ease from the west as we move into the afternoon. one or two outbreaks of rain, temperatures reaching a maximum of 24 celsius, it may be a touch higher than the map showing in central london. as we go through this evening, then, a few showery outbreaks of rain pushing across from the west. a dry interlude before we see now that band of rain work its way eastwards during the overnight hours. 0vernight lows between 15 and 17 celsius. so a fairly soggy start to further ease tomorrow, and then we will see some brightness developing. some good spells of sunshine, just the risk of one or two showers as we move into the afternoon, and there could be quite heavy. temperatures are little warmer than they are showing, a maximum of around 25 celsius tomorrow. now, we leave you with the outlook. wednesday looks a little bit cloudier. it does look largely dry but some rain will take us largely dry but some rain will take us overnight into thursday, but thursday a return to sunny spells
6:30 am
and showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello. good morning. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a big rise in the number of people after the horrific news from charlottesville, after the horrific news from cha rlottesville, we after the horrific news from charlottesville, we will take a closer look at what is fuelling the rise of the far right in america. also this morning, we'll bejoined by the british women's and men's relay team, fresh from their silver and bronze medal performances. #i can't believe it#! after battling illness and becoming a mum, martine mccutcheon's back with her first album in 17 years. she will be here with us a little
6:31 am
bit later. all that still to come. but now, a summary of this morning's main news. arrests of passengers suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by 50% in the past year, according to an investigation carried out by panorama. critics of the airline industry say a voluntary code on alcohol sales isn't working, and want the government to amend licensing laws. a spokesman for the home office said they will respond in due course. the us vice president, mike pence, has specifically condemned far—right groups when asked to respond to the violence over the weekend in virginia. a woman was killed and 19 people were injured when a car was driven into a crowd protesting against a far—right rally in charlottesville. president trump has been criticised for not identifying any specific group when he condemned the trouble. security forces in burkina faso have killed three suspected jihadist gunmen after a terrorist attack in the capital. the country's communications minister says a number of hostages remain trapped inside a restaurant after gunmen opened fire on sunday evening.
6:32 am
at least 17 people are believed to have been killed in the attack and another eight were wounded. the army and police have sealed off part of the city centre. a man has been charged with the murder of a grandfather who was attacked as he walked his dogs in norfolk. the body of 83—year—old, peter wrighton, was found in woodland near the village of east harling last saturday. police say he had been repeatedly stabbed. a 23—year—old man will appear in court later today. thousands of vulnerable children are reportedly not getting the help they need from social services. according to the charity action for children, up to 140,000 young people referred to social services last year did not end up receiving any help because their situation was not judged to be serious enough. the government says its reforms will improve social care. a national breast cancer charity is being investigated after its founder paid herself
6:33 am
£31,000 in breach of charity law. wendy watson, who launched national hereditary breast cancer helpline in 1996, has resigned as a trustee. financial irregularities were uncovered by the charity commission. lawyers for mrs watson and the charity described the payments as "an error." i think that we need some moose news. i thought you might say that. a rare white moose has been captured on film in sweden. the moose was spotted eating at a ditch in the small town of eda by local council chairman, hans nilsson. look at that. hans then brought a camera to the same spot the next day in the hope of seeing the moose again, he was lucky enough to film it for around 20 minutes and managed to catch it taking a dip. the animal has been well—known in the local area since it was born and is one of only 100 white moose in the country. you won't be surprised to hear some
6:34 am
moose facts. i will be giving saddam throughout the programme. —— some throughout. why do we have to wait? i can't give all of them to you right now. they eat 30 kg a day. i can't give all of them to you right now. they eat 30 kg a daylj did not know that. good morning. good morning. a busy weekend. it has been. the athletics to begin with, the curtain being brought down. we only got one medal going into the final weekend. incredible performances in the relay is. we saw the 100 metre relay on saturday. we will be speaking to both 4x4 teams later. they got a silver last night and a bronze. six medals in the end.
6:35 am
gb finish sixth in the medals table, rounding off the championship in style. the usa dominated the women's race, winning the gold medal easily. but a fine run from britain's emily diamond held off the polish challenge to take the silver, congratulated by team—mates zoey clark, laviai nielsen, and eilidh doyle. less was expected from the men's team, matthew hudson—smith, dwayne cowan, rabah yousif, and martyn rooney only reached the final as fastest losers. but rooney anchored the team to third place as trinidad & tobago took the gold. south africa's caster semenya set a new national record to win the women's 800—metre gold medal comfortably. great britain's lynsey sharp finished at the back of the field. laura muir managed an impressive sixth—place finish in the women's 5,000—metre final. the gold medal went to kenya's hellen 0biri. eilish mccolgan was 10th. iam i am really happy. it was a tough field out there. to come sixth, my
6:36 am
first world championships in this event, well, my first overall! yeah, iam event, well, my first overall! yeah, i am really happy. scoring goals is "oxygen, happiness and confidence" for new strikers. so sastoe mourinho, after club record signing romelu lukaku scored twice for manchester united in a 4—0 thumping of west ham united. the £75 million signing, making his competitive debut, was on target in both halves to set his side on their way. paul pogba rounded off a convincing victory in the last minute asjose mourinho's side look to justify many pundits' predictions that they'll be champions next spring. it was a good performance, with very high competence levels. we came into the second half winning 1—0 and playing to score more goals and playing to score more goals and playing to score more goals and playing to win in a more comfortable way. i think it was a very positive
6:37 am
performance and a reflection of the good levels of play we have. newcastle united's return to the premier league ended in disappointment against spurs. captain, jonjo shelvey, was given a straight red card four minutes into the second half for standing on delli ali's ankle. the match was goalless then, and the dismissal proved costly as ali then went on to score the opening goal in a 2—0 win for tottenham. and over in france, the world's most expensive player, neymar, made his debut for paris st germain. the £200 million player scored as well as they beat guingamp 3—0. so that makes him worth about £200 million per goal at the moment! value for money. american golfer, justin thomas, won his first major title at the pga championship at quail hollow. and when you're producing shots like this, i guess you probably know it's going to be your day. have a look at that. what an effort that was. this was him sinking a 40—foot cheap shot, this at the 13th gave him a two—shot lead which he held on to win. at one stage on the final day five players had a share of the lead. well done to him.
6:38 am
hosts, ireland, came back from 14—0 down to beat japan 24—14 at the women's rugby world cup. there was also an emphatic win for defending champions england, who ran in ten tries for the second successive game as they beat italy. wales, though, can no longer qualify for the semi—finals after they lost to canada. i suppose he is the man we have been talking about for the last week, usain bolt. and he was given an emotional farewell on the final night of these championships. he was presented with a section of the track from london 2012, a games at which he declared himself a "living legend" by defending his 100 and 200—metre 0lympic titles for a second time, before he completed a lap of honour for the last time. i think we all agree he was a living legend. and after cramping up the other night in the relay, good to see him back on his feet. it did look painful at the time,
6:39 am
didn't it? he looked slightly bemused with the presentation of the slice of track. everything has to be given. you have to be creative. what ami given. you have to be creative. what am i going to get? running spikes? thank you. charlottesville, a small city in the us state of virginia, has become the latest battleground in america's racial divide. it started over the weekend when white supremacists held a torch lit rally to protest against a decision to remove the statue of the confederate civil war general, robert e lee. some gave nazi salutes. one woman, heather heyer, was killed when a car rammed into a crowd of people trying to stop the white nationalist rally. joining us now is professor remy cross, who specialises in protest movements at webster university in st louis. to be clear, the protest that happened in seattle on sunday afternoon was scheduled well in advance of the incident that occurred in virginia on saturday. however, it is very likely that the attendance and attention was
6:40 am
heightened here as a result of that tragic incident. the protest went on for several hours. there was no physical violence for the most part. a little bit of pushing and shoving. but because of mental borders around the whole plus protecting the groups from each other, most of it was verbal, but obviously a lot of animosity between those two groups. and, at one point, there was quite a bit of yelling, and you could not hear what people on the stage were saying. some of the counter protesters were invited to speak their mind. we see these rallies in seattle, especially during this political climate, we see them all across the united states. this is not the end. people are upset and passionate on both sides of the aisle. what they both breach is safety a nd aisle. what they both breach is safety and keeping things non—violent. and for the most part, thatis non—violent. and for the most part, that is what happened on sunday. reporting from seattle. joining us now is professor remy cross, who specialises in protest movements
6:41 am
at webster university in st louis. good morning to you. thank you very much forjoining us. i know you have talked about, looked out, these kinds of movements for some time. what do you make of what happened in cha rlottesville ? what do you make of what happened in charlottesville? i think it is a tragedy what happened. but at the same time, it fits the wider pattern of how these sorts of groups, and the counter protesters, often, the conflict in these sorts of demonstrations. ok, what do you think is going on right now? is it reaching a peak that you have not seen reaching a peak that you have not seen before? umm, well, you know, there is a theory that says these things come in waves. we certainly saw in the early to mid—1990s, a rise of this sort of right—wing violence with the us militia groups that rallied around events like ruby ridge and culminated in the oklahoma city bombing. we have seen a rise in
6:42 am
these groups in the past two years. 0bviously, one of the contributing factors was the campaign and the language that was used, oftentimes, in the campaign of donald trump. by prior to that, the ability of a lot of these groups to organise and find each other on the internet has made it easy for people that believe in these kinds of ideologies to find fellow travellers. what is it the white supremacists want? fellow travellers. what is it the white supremacists wa nt?|j fellow travellers. what is it the white supremacists want? i think for them, what they often, when you sit down and talk with them, what they often will tell you if they feel their way of life, writes for other people does not mean a lowering of their own right. —— rights. they think any rights extended to other groups, whether they are racial ethnic minorities, sexual minorities, women, what have you, necessarily result in a reduction of rights for primarily white man, although there are white women
6:43 am
involved in these groups as well and other sorts of hangers—on. they see rights for others as a zero—sum game where they lose on their own rights. and they are pushing back. where they lose on their own rights. and they are pushing backm where they lose on their own rights. and they are pushing back. it is a difficult question to answer, but what can be done to bring down this high level of animosity?” what can be done to bring down this high level of animosity? i think in the short—term, one of the things that happened in charlottesville was not adequate response on the part of certainly national leaders in condemning this, but also local leaders being prepared for the sorts of skirmishes that might break out. you were talking a few moments ago about seattle where the police seemed more capable of keeping them separate. in the long—term, it is dialogue are reaching out to people at risk ofjoining these movements you feel alien aged and feel like they have a raw deal in showing them this is not the way to make up for
6:44 am
perceived lacks. —— alienating. a very mixed week of weather last week. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. thank you, good morning. good morning to you as well. this week is also going to be rather mixed in terms of weather. what we have today is an east—west split. we have rain in the west, it is also in the north, and it will be drier in the east, as it currently is. we have a couple of weather fronts coming our way. this one is pushing eastwards, this one is pushing northwards, and both are bringing rain with them as they do so. they are weakening as they do so. they are weakening as they go through the day. however, we have seen some heavy rain in northern ireland, more heavy rain to come across scotland and you can see the weather front of rain extending
6:45 am
all the way down towards the english channel. so this morning, still some rain to come across scotland. some of that heavy. dry in the north, the rain continuing to ease out of northern ireland through the morning but it will be across the isle of man, in through cumbria and lancashire. however, if you are through northumberland, yorkshire, lincolnshire, you are off to a dry start. then we pick up the rain across wales. it has moved through west wales but it continues through the bristol channel and in parts of devon, cornwall and somerset. just ahead of that the cloud is building saw a bright start across the midlands by the sunny start for east anglia and ethics in kent. through the course of the day this whole system starts to fragment. the rain will break up and we will start to see some will break up and we will start to see some brighter breaks around the murray firth, parts of wales, south—west england, but at the same time we will see some showers develop and some sunshine across
6:46 am
northern ireland. some of the showers will be heavy and thundery, and then we have another line of rain sweeping up from the english channel, through the channel islands, in across central and southern parts of england in the direction of the wash. if you are in the far south—east he will hang the to the sunshine the longest, and somewhere in the kent —— in kent or east anglia could see the sunshine the longest. rain pushing eastwards through the course of the night. i did quitea through the course of the night. i did quite a bit cloud left and some drizzly conditions. it might be a little bit lower than you can see integrated in the charts. a murky start to the day across the south—east. could hear the odd rumble of thunder first thing. the rain includes eastern counties generally through the course of the morning and tomorrow will be a day of sunshine and showers. some of the showers could be heavy and thundery. many of us will mist them and have a fine, dry and sunny day. temperatures could hit 26 summer in the south—eastern corner through the course of tomorrow but generally we are looking at the range 14 to about 22. so mixed weather, and more mixed weather to come as we head through
6:47 am
the rest of the week. it looks divided up, doesn't it? thank you very much. pockets of loo all over the place. thank you very much. -- pockets of blue. this week, steph is taking a look at a handful of the five million family—run businesses in the uk, and the impact they have on the british economy. she is at one of them this morning, and it is a cider maker. good morning to you. there is a lot of side are being shipped out of here this morning. this is a pretty big operation. exports to more than 40 countries, and you can see all the cakes behind me. they employ about 220 people as well. and we are here because we are talking about family businesses, and how much they contribute to the uk economy. it is about £1 trillion every year they contribute as a whole. it is about 5 million of them in the uk, and this is one of them. it is westons cider mill, and we have a mother and son.
6:48 am
helen and gary, good morning to you both. helen, you are fourth—generation in this business, so fourth—generation in this business, so give us the history of it. well, my great—grandfather came here in 1878 and started making cider in 1880. he had nine children and my grandfather had five. so i am norman's eldest daughter, and i have two and two sisters, and i have had two and two sisters, and i have had two sons, and guy is our cider maker. when you were growing up, and this was in your family, did maker. when you were growing up, and this was in yourfamily, did you feel the pressure to be part of it? no, we always had work to do. we we re no, we always had work to do. we were always put to good use, picking up were always put to good use, picking up cider apples in the autumn, helping the production lines. so we grew up learning about work and cider making, and it was always in our burns, in our blood. and is there something you always wanted to
6:49 am
do, to be part of the business? —— in our bones. my grandfather showed me the way, and made me believe that westo ns me the way, and made me believe that westons cider mill is the best cider in the world. and you have to think that, being part of the family, but there must be pressures at times working for your mother. not all the time, but that is family for you! it is no different to working for anybody else. we all work together, and we all love what we do. and thank you for letting us in. i know you will be speaking to us again throughout the morning, and showing us throughout the morning, and showing us around. there are a couple of other people we need to chat to. elizabeth is from the institute for family business. they contribute an awful lot, but they, too the economy? they certainly do, absolutely. and in terms of the pressures of family businesses, are they different to any other businesses? they have challenges, like all other businesses, but there are some unique sets of features that apply to family businesses. we
6:50 am
see that apply to family businesses. we see them as opportunities, as well as the challenges. one of the interesting thing is, having spoken toa interesting thing is, having spoken to a lot of family businesses, if they say that they think differently in terms of the longevity of the business. do you think that is the case, and can you explain a little bit more about that? we look at that and we say that family businesses tend to think in generations rather than quarters. so there is this long—term approach to wanting to stay in business. and i think that affect how you think about how you do things, how you treat people, how you operate. i think that is a real benefit. and before we go, ijust wa nt to benefit. and before we go, ijust want to show you in here, because it is so interesting to see how they make cider. in here we have all of the vats, it is all oak aged cider. each of those has something like 500,000 pints of cider in it. certainly they are kept very busy here. as you can see, this is an incredibly big operation, employing 220 people. iwill
6:51 am
incredibly big operation, employing 220 people. i will be here throughout the morning talking about the importance of family business. the size of it is so impressive. and we are at a family business each day for the next few days, looking at why they are important and why they work. in the 1960s, pirate radio changed the face of broadcasting. it was revolutionary for playing continuous music, and launched the careers of tony blackburn, john peel and kenny everett. but 50 years ago today, pirate radio stations became illegal, and they were forced to close down. breakfast‘s tim muffettjoins us now from a mock pirate ship in essex. good morning. yes, good morning to you from a former blood vessel mooring on the waters in harwich. if you saw the film the boat that rocked, all about pirate radio, it might look familiar. it was used in that film and 50 years ago today a law came into force which sought to
6:52 am
you legalise pirate radio. these ships which went out to sea in the 60s and broadcast pop music to try and circumvent the laws which prevented that music from being broadcast. they had a huge impact. i remember going out from harwich and seeing this little boat floating around, and! and seeing this little boat floating around, and i thought this is going to alter everything that comes through. tony blackburn's prediction was right. in the early 1960s, the bbc played hardly any pop. commercial radio was banned. by broadcasting from international waters, pirate stations like caroline, radio london, and swinging radio england, exploited a loophole. we were 400 miles off the coast. we flew under the panamanian flag. now, if anyone went on to that boat from this country, it was like declaring war on this country, it was like declaring waron panama. this country, it was like declaring war on panama. this was radio
6:53 am
caroline's london hq, where tony blackburn had his first audition. did you have any sense of what a big deal this was going to be for you and for pop culture? yes, i did. yes. i really thought that this was going to be the start of something very big. good morning, everyone. tony blackburn with you. feeling a bit under the weather. we have about an eight for scale out there. broadcasting pop music from ships like this, out at sea, pirate stations were very popular. but on land, they won't just winning stations were very popular. but on land, they won'tjust winning over millions of fans. they also faced a powerful enemy. the government. the pirates are a menace, and i don't believe at all but the public wouldn't support action to enforce the law. at midnight on 14 august 1967, a marine offences act became law. it was now illegal for british citizens to work on the chips, or to supply them. johnnie walker had
6:54 am
recently joined supply them. johnnie walker had recentlyjoined caroline. look at that, you look so young!|j recentlyjoined caroline. look at that, you look so young! i haven't changed, have i? they were fun times. and i'm sure there were those ofa times. and i'm sure there were those of a government that really liked the fact that there were pirates on the fact that there were pirates on the airand the fact that there were pirates on the air and certainly the young people and their families all loved it. it bridged all generations and all social classes. many pirate stations packed up, but caroline continued to casting from the sea until 1990. it anchored further into international waters to avoid uk regulations. this chip, the ross revenge, was a chip in the 1980s. it recently returned to the water. what we wa nted recently returned to the water. what we wanted to do is return the ship toa we wanted to do is return the ship to a useful broadcasting purpose. while we dine out on our nostalgia, which is a selling point, we also wa nt to which is a selling point, we also want to now look to the future. this is radio caroline, the sound of the who. having been streamed online
6:55 am
since the late 1990s, the station has just been granted a new am broadcast license, 50 years after the lawther tried to ban them, britain's pop pirates are back on the water. that ship is moored about 40 miles south from here. this ship, the lv18, has been commandeered a bbc radio essex. you were on—board radio caroline when that law came into force. you are going to be broadcasting today. what was it like being a pirate at sea? good morning, and thank you forjoining us. it was sad and it was happy, because we didn't know what the government was going to do. most of the stations we re going to do. most of the stations were shutting down, but us naughty boys were carrying on, risking fines and ajail boys were carrying on, risking fines and a jail sentence for playing pop music on the radio. it seems unbelievable now, but we were excited because we knew the public we re
6:56 am
excited because we knew the public were with us. i have it on good authority that the government at the time used to get more complaints about banning us than it did about the vietnam war, the economy, or anything else as well, and they still banned us. now that music is so still banned us. now that music is so easy to still banned us. now that music is so easy to access, still banned us. now that music is so easy to access, have we lost the magic of broadcasting from the ship, which seems odd in itself?m magic of broadcasting from the ship, which seems odd in itself? it has lost a lot of its magic, because it is homogenised. they have taken a a lot of the fun out of it. thanks to the people that set it up, we were told just to get out and entertain. it was a bit like manchester united, they used to sayjust go out and entertain the fans, and we had the same period. i know you have some prep to do for your show. there is going to be a historic tie—up between bbc radio essex and radio caroline, a coming together of the bbc, official broadcasting, and pirate radio as well. they are all friends now, putting all that behind them. it is a historic day in the world of broadcasting but from
6:57 am
beautiful harwich on board the lv18, i will leave you. and johnnie walker meets the pirates is on bbc radio two tonight at 10:00pm o'clock. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. the metropolitan police is to introduce head—mounted cameras to firearms officers. body—worn cameras, which are mounted just below the shoulder, have already been rolled out to around 17,500 met officers. the new, head—mounted version can be worn on officers' baseball caps or ballistic helmets. the idea was first suggested three years ago following the death of 29—year—old mark duggan. detectives investigating the murder of a schoolboy in south london are trying to discover if there is a link between that and an earlier incident involving a group of armed teenagers. 15—year—old jermaine goupall was stabbed to death in thornton heath on tuesday night.
6:58 am
two people have been charged with his murder. police say a group of teenagers wearing balaclavas and armed with sticks had been at the same spot just hours earlier. there are plans to cover the protective screen due to be erected around grenfell tower in children's drawings. scaffolding will be erected around the burnt—out tower, and then encased by netting, during an operation expected to last until the end of the year. the idea is to project the drawings by local schoolchildren onto the screen. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. 0n the roads, whitehall is closed southbound from horse guards avenue to parliament square until 27 august, for roadworks. expect delays around parliament square. in central london, park lane has two lanes closed northbound at hyde park corner, following a diesel spillage. in romford, ardleigh green, slewins lane is closed because of a burst watermain near to cavenham gardens.
6:59 am
in the city, the a1 is closed southbound at the barbican for gas works. let's have a check on the weather now, with lucy martin. hello, good morning. after a settled and somewhat summery weekend, it has turned something a little bit more changeable as we move through this week. today, though, does start off quite bright. we will see some hazy sunshine first thing, although cloud will tend to increase as we go through the day. so putting the detail onto the map, then, a dry and bright start, with some hazy sunshine through the morning, but cloud tending to increase from the west as we move into the afternoon. one or two outbreaks of rain, temperatures reaching a maximum of 24 celsius. i think they will be a touch higher than the map is showing in central london.
7:00 am
as we go through this evening, then, a few showery outbreaks of rain pushing across from the west. a dry interlude, before we see another band of rain work its way eastwards during the overnight hours. 0vernight lows of between 15 and 17 celsius. so a fairly soggy start the further east you are tomorrow, and then we will see some brightness developing. some good spells of sunshine, just the risk of one or two showers as we move into the afternoon, and they could be quite heavy. temperatures a little warmer than they're showing. again, ithink, a maximum ofaround 25 celsius tomorrow. now, we leave you with the outlook. wednesday looks a little bit cloudier. it does look largely dry, but some rain will take us overnight into thursday, but thursday a return to sunny spells and showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello. good morning. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a big rise in the number of people arrested for being drunk and disorderly on planes. a bbc investigation finds a 50% increase in passengers being held for incidents involving alcohol on flights and at airports. good morning. thanks for watching.
7:01 am
it's monday the 14th of august. also this morning: a vigil is held to remember the woman killed during protests against a far right rally in the us. don't let hate live. don't just let someone walk around freely and spread their hate. tell them that is not ok. that is not ok. in sport, great britain hit their medal target. a silver from the women and a bronze from men in the 400 metre relays bring the tally to six in the final moments of the world athletics championship. good morning. it is a business, a
7:02 am
family one, going since 1880. i will talk about how family businesses are on the rise and are contributing to our economy. 50 years after pirate radio ships were outlawed, we're live on the modern, legal, version to find out how they changed the sound of music radio. that looks lovely. what about the rest of us? good morning. an east—west split. it will stay dry for central and eastern parts of england and the opposite in the west. i will have more details in 15 minutes. good morning. arrests of passengers suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by 50% in the past year, according to an investigation carried out by bbc panorama. critics of the airline industry say a voluntary code on alcohol sales isn't working, and want the government to amend licensing laws.
7:03 am
tina daheley reports. where in the uk can you buy alcohol at 4am seven days a week? the answer is at an international airport. and it seems that it's leaving passengers and crew with a hangover. an investigation by bbc panorama has revealed that arrests of those suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by 50% in the past year. half of the 4,000 cabin crew who took part in a survey carried out by panorama and unite, the union, said they had either experienced verbal, physical, or sexual abuse by drunk passengers onboard a uk flight. people just see us as bar maids in the sky. they would touch your breasts, or they'd touch your bum or your legs. i mean, i've had hands going up my skirt before. phil ward, the managing director of low—cost airline, jet2, has already banned alcohol on flights before 8am, and wants the industry to take tougher measures.
7:04 am
do you think airports are doing enough? i think they could do more. umm, i think the retailers could do more as well. two litre steins of beer in bars, mixers and miniatures in duty—free shops, which can only be there for one reason. but the airport 0perators association insists that their code of practice does works. i don't accept that the airports don't sell alcohol responsibly. the sale of alcohol per se is not a problem. it's the misuse of it and drinking to excess and then behaving badly. earlier this year, a house of lords committee called for airport licensing to be brought into line with pubs and bars. a government decision on whether to call time on early—morning drinking at airports is now expected in the autumn. i don't accept that the airports don't sell alcohol responsibly. we have had many comments about this
7:05 am
this morning. 0ne we have had many comments about this this morning. one of them saying the most obnoxious man was on our flights to london from los angeles yesterday. he caused issues before they got on the plane, but no issues when he was on it. another saying that the sad actions of an irresponsible few are ruining it for eve ryo ne irresponsible few are ruining it for everyone else. i see no other option than outright bans on consumable alcohol at all airports. send us your thoughts. we are on in some airports. if you are watching at an airport, good morning to you. the us vice president, mike pence, has specifically condemned far—right groups when asked to respond to the violence over the weekend in virginia. president trump has been criticised for not identifying any specific group. more than 30 people have been
7:06 am
injured, and one woman, heather heyer, was killed when a car drove into a crowd trying to stop the rally. we have no tolerance for hate and violence from white supremacists and the kkk. these dangerous fringe groups have no place in the american public life and the american public debate and we condemn them in the strongest possible terms. demonstrations and vigils have taken place across america in response to the violent protests in virginia. more than 30 people have been injured, and one woman, heather heyer, was killed when a car drove into a crowd trying to stop the rally. speaking to the bbc, her friend called for unity. heather was always — she always spoke with conviction — she liked to make you laugh. she didn't care what she said. shejust make you laugh. she didn't care what she said. she just wanted the best for everyone.
7:07 am
today and tomorrow, pakistan and india will mark 70 years of independence from britain, a moment of freedom amongst one of the largest mass migrations the world has ever seen. after 200 years of british rule, the 1947 partition split india to create east and west pakistan, a separate country. hindus and sikhs fled to india and muslims went to pakistan. around 12 million people became refugees and a million people are thought to have died in the partition. in a moment, we'll speak to sanjoy majumder who joins us in new delhi, where india will be celebrating their freedom tomorrow. but first, let's go to secunder kermani who is in islamabad where pakistan are marking their 70 years of independence today. what exactly will we see there? well, at midnight last night, the chief of the pakistan armed forces helped raise what is said to be the largest flag in asia, the highest
7:08 am
flag in asia, at the border with india today. today there has been an address from the president to the nation at another flag raising ceremonies. there is due to be in a show by the pakistani air force and a changing of the guard at the mausoleum of the founding father of the country. —— airshow. the pakistani is celebrate independence, with people coming out in cars and motorcycles with flags. today is about independence, but for many people, it is also about partition and the awful violence that took place and the legacy that still leaves on, both in the personal lives of those who lived through it, and with the tense relationship they continues between pakistan and india. now let's go to our india correspondent, sanjoy majumder who joins us from new delhi. good morning to you. i know that
7:09 am
they have their commemorations tomorrow. what will they be doing? well, very similar to back a sign. —— pakistan. every year the president raises the flag and gives a speech to the nation. behind me you can see a speech to the nation. behind me you can see the parliament building in india were at midnight 70 years ago india celebrated its freedom with its first prime minister, marking the moment with a celebrated speech in which he echoed the lines, while the world sleeps, india wakes to life and freedom. there has been a subdued celebration in the lead—up to the date. it is the 70 it yet but there have been no special celebrations. it is just in as another holiday. they have come a
7:10 am
long way since 1947. it is now a $7.5 trillion economy. it is doing well. but there is a lot of reflection on whether it has moved away from the ideals that marked its freedom. thank you, both of you. thank you. the world athletics championships ended on a high in london last night, with two more medals for great britain and northern ireland. the success of the relay teams meant british athletics hit its medal target, but onlyjust, as our sports correspondent, natalie pirks, reports. going into saturday, britain had just one medal. 24 hours later, they had six. the medal target hit at the last possible minute. it was the relay that gave the drama. britain took 0lympic runs in the women's four x 400 metres last year. the usa, though, would take some beating.
7:11 am
but when jamaica's injury curse struck yet again... just look what it meant for them. silver for great britain in northern ireland. so, to the men's 4x400 relay. the final event of the championships. "rooney" goes up the cry from the crowd. martyn rooney brought home the rally in bronze, the sixth medal for britain. the relay teams making sure saturday and sunday were equally super. and as usain bolt took to the track to say goodbye one last time, it was a final chance to reflect on a memorable ten days. it has been spectacular. i can't honestly remember in the years i have been watching championship athletics that i have seen such competitive races and so many compelling stories. and, actually, as we're ushering the superstar off the scene, the compelling stories have been
7:12 am
the emergence of extraordinary young talent around the globe. but the biggest winner was athletics itself. london consistently delivered the crowd that the sport is desperately needed. and as for britain, well, they left it late, but they have shown the future is bright. natalie pirks, bbc news, at the london stadium. and we will continue to talk about that. we have both the men's and women's 4x400 relay teams after eight. the men are first. thousands of children affected by issues including drugs, alcoholism, and neglect are reportedly not getting the help they need, despite being referred to social services. according to the charity action for children, many young people are missing out on support because their situation is notjudged to be serious enough. joanna nicolas trains children's social workers and joins us now. good morning to you. thank you for
7:13 am
coming in to talk to us about this. starting with the numbers, are they surprising? concerning? not a surprise, certainly concerning. there are many families out there who need support and they are not getting the support they should be getting. one of the things that has come out in the report is they have issues but are not considered to be bad enough. what impact is that having? what we should have his much better early support so when a family better early support so when a fa m ily starts better early support so when a family starts to struggle there is somewhere you family starts to struggle there is somewhere you can go. family starts to struggle there is somewhere you can go. what is happening, because of the economic situation, is the early help is just going. there is not somewhere to go for those families. more families are reaching crisis point. then they get into the social care system, which is not nearly as constructive for those families as just having someone for those families as just having someone less frightening than social ca re someone less frightening than social care where they can go and say i
7:14 am
need a bit of help. social care was a big issue in the general election. the government say they are supporting recruitment and training. is that being felt and seen on the ground? umm, i think it is important not to knock everything. the focus is on adult social care, not social ca re is on adult social care, not social care for children. we talk about budgets, it is not all about money. but if you decimate services, you are going to struggle. and, because of that, combined with the economic situation, making life much, much harderforfamilies, it situation, making life much, much harder for families, it is situation, making life much, much harderforfamilies, it is a melting pot of a really, really worrying situation. you mentioned earlier about early intervention. what kind of help... what sort of help can you see of help... what sort of help can you see making a difference?” of help... what sort of help can you see making a difference? i know you have done a lot of reporting on children's centres being closed. they are fantastic places. they are a nonthreatening places that families can go for help and
7:15 am
support. we are seeing them disappearing to a large degree. it is places like that for families which arejust not is places like that for families which are just not there any more. and that is the worrying thing, that we are not picking these families up and not helping them early enough. how much of an issue is regional variation? are their big differences depending on where you live? there are big differences, and it depends on what is going on in that particular area. this week we have had a lot about child sexual exploitation. there is a lot of focus on that. understandably there is the increase in online abuse, we are seeing itjust absolutely exploding, and what we are seeing is that the families, the everyday normalfamily ‘s that the families, the everyday normal family ‘s outback, who are struggling, we are not catching those families early enough —— families out there. what kind of impact is it having on workers? is changing the way they have to work?
7:16 am
i think it makes it harder and harderfor i think it makes it harder and harder for all the i think it makes it harder and harderfor all the professionals, who are working with families. it is we never have enough time to do the work that we want to do. most people go into social work to help families and we are not seeing enough of that work being done because they are doing much more of the firefighting. thank you for coming on and discussing those issues. a department of education spokesperson told us it was taking action to improve social care and to provide extra funding for councils. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: a bbc investigation has revealed there has been a 50% rise in the number of arrests for drunken misbehaviour on flights and in airports in the past year. demonstrations and vigils have been held across the united states following deadly violence that erupted during a far—right rally in virginia on saturday. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather.
7:17 am
many people going on holiday at this time of year. what is happening in the uk with the weather? well, it is a right old mixture. good morning, everyone. this morning some of us will be seeing sites like this and some of us will be seeing some rain. we have a bit of an east—west split going on with the weather. rain in the west and drier and brighter in the west and drier and brighter in the east. parts of east anglia and kent could hit 25 celsius. if that happens it will be the warmest day this august so far. you can see an array of weather fronts across us producing some rain as we go through the course of the night. heavy rain across northern ireland and western scotland, but this line of rain through wales, north—west england and south—west england. move away from that and we're into brighter skies. so still some heavy rain to come across parts of scotland. not yet into the north. the rain moving out of northern ireland slowly through the morning and moving across the isle of man in through cumbria, lancashire, wales, and
7:18 am
heading down towards south—west england. could see some heavy bursts mixed in here as well. ahead of it you will notice the cloud, so a bright start across the midlands, for example, through parts of yorkshire. then we run into the sunshine as you push further east, through the east midlands, east anglia, essex and kent. through the course of the day, as all this rain moves eastwards and north eastwards, you will find it will start to turn that bit lighter. it will fragment and breakup. immediately behind it there will be some low cloud and drizzle on the coast and hills. it will brighten up around the murray firth. northern ireland seeing some sunshine with some heavy, thundery showers as well but the driest conditions will be further east. at the same time as all of that happening we have some rain coming up happening we have some rain coming up from the channel islands, through hampshire, the midlands and eventually the direction of the wash. so right old mixture of weather. more rain pouring in through the evening and overnight eastwards. you might hear the odd rumble of thunder in that. some of
7:19 am
it could be happy as well. it will not be a cold night, are staying in double figures although whether cloud breaks in some sheltered glens it could be quite a cool night. tomorrow we start off with this line of rain in the south—east. it could be thundery first thing but the whole lot pushes off into the north sea and tomorrow is a mixture of sunny spells and some showers. some of the showers could be heavy and thundery once again, but i know means we'll be all see them. and if we don't, temperatures could rise quite nicely. in parts of the south—east, again, east anglia and the south—east favoured for this, we could hit 26 celsius. as we move from tuesday into wednesday and thursday, we have a little bridge of high pressure which settle things down for a time. you can already see what is coming our way as we move through wednesday. this next area of low pressure is going to bring some rain with it, and also strengthening winds. so even as we head towards the end of the week that forecast is still quite topsy—turvy. the end of the week that forecast is still quite topsy-turvy. it certainly looks it, thank you very much. steph is looking at the impact the five million family—run businesses in the uk have
7:20 am
on the british economy. she is taking a look atjust one of them this morning, and it is a cider maker. good morning. morning, everybody. the smell in here is amazing. this huge that behind me, called squeaky, you might have seen me stood on top of it, has something like 500,000 pints of cider in there. —— vat. they use this as a base to make lots of their ciders but it is a family business which has been going on for an awfully long time. have a look at these vats. they are the oldest ones, from 1880, bought second—hand in 1880 by henry weston, who started the business. they are very old vats indeed. this is one of around 5
7:21 am
million family businesses in the uk. between them, family businesses employ more than 12 million people. that is nearly half of all private—sector employment they all contributed nearly £500 billion to the uk economy in 2015. it all goes to show there are more of them than we all think, from your local plumber or butcher to the big companies like the bread maker warburtons, the construction equipment manufacturerjcb and clarks shoes, all family firms. i will be here throughout the morning, talking to the family about the pros and cons of running a business like this. but fascinating as well to see at all. the thing that has caught my eye this morning, look at the size of that spanner. we'll need to find some big nuts for that. we will see you a little bit
7:22 am
later. a bbc investigation has revealed 2,000 flight attendants have experienced or witnessed verbal, physical or sexual abuse by drunk passengers on uk flights in the last year alone. panorama spoke to cabin crew, who said that the worst routes are to alicante, ibiza and palma. joining us now is ally murphy, a former cabin crew manager. good morning to you. i mean, you, of all people, i suppose i not surprised by these figures. just give us a little bit of an idea about the impact of drunk passengers on cabin crew. it can go from as big as you see on cabin crew. it can go from as big as you see in the news, where planes get diverted or people are handcuffed, arrested, caused safety issues, or the stuff that you deal with everyday as cabin crew, just people swearing at you, maybe touching you inappropriately, things that you would never have to put up an everydayjob that you would never have to put up an everyday job but for some that you would never have to put up an everydayjob but for some reason when you are in the erat becomes the norm. so let's say someone is on the
7:23 am
flight norm. so let's say someone is on the flight and they have all this we had quite a bit to drink beforehand. what processes do you go through? can you refuse them drinks, can you... it is illegal to be can you refuse them drinks, can you... it is illegalto be drunk on board an aircraft so if we spotted someone board an aircraft so if we spotted someone coming board an aircraft so if we spotted someone coming on board an aircraft so if we spotted someone coming on board already drunk they would be sent straight home. if it happened in the flight, you would stop the supply alcohol, we would take it further if there was anything that you could arrest them for, physical abuse or danger to the aircraft at all. that is what i wanted to ask you. because you are ina i wanted to ask you. because you are in a confined space, what about the impact on safety? does it have an impact on safety? does it have an impact on safety? does it have an impact on safety, do you think? absolutely. even if it is just the direct result of... i had a passenger who had ta ken direct result of... i had a passenger who had taken sleeping ta blets passenger who had taken sleeping tablets and alcohol and tried to open the door. he wouldn't have succeeded, but it causes so much fear. there are safety issues in that sense. but also, if i am
7:24 am
dealing with somebody who is inebriated, then i am not perhaps aware of medical situations going on, other safety or security situation is going on. there is less and less cabin crew on flights these days and if one or two of them is dealing with an unruly passenger because of alcohol, it can away from safety. panorama say there has been a 50% increase in the last 12 months. have you noticed that yourself? i actually quit in 0ctober. yourself? i actually quit in october. because of this reason? among many reasons. everyday i was thinking what will i have to put up with today? i was avoiding certain routes because i didn't want to even put myself in that situation, and i just thought it wasn't away for me to live. what are the roots? montego bay, i would to live. what are the roots? montego bay, iwould never go to live. what are the roots? montego bay, i would never go to montego bay, i would never go to montego bay, because it was well known for a abusive, drunken passengers. and las vegas, because there was a lot of people out there for a good time. and you are presumably trained in how to deal with s. but it is still
7:25 am
a scary situation to be put in —— deal with this. there were times i was surrounded by four guys over 6—foot tall, being quite aggressive because i would stop their alcohol. and i had nowhere to get help, i didn't know what would happen. but it was constantly being in that situation. so when you landed and things have been going on, would you report them? was that easy do?m there was anything you could say to there was anything you could say to the police, i want this person arrested because they caused safety issue, but because things happen all the time a lot of things just went over their heads. you didn't want to deal with the paperwork. what is the a nswer to deal with the paperwork. what is the answer to it? it is airport is not selling alcohol so readily. duty free, passengers having a realisation what the limits are, and it comes from the airlines themselves giving staff support so they can deal with these situations.
7:26 am
lots of people getting in contact. joanna says alcoholic beverages help you sleep better on a plane. just saying, it isn't all bad, just don't overdo it. we read that the spanish are sick to death of drunken british tourists causing trouble on their way on holiday and most of us are sick of them being drunk at airports and being loud and abusive on flights. and pam says alcohol and travel just do not flights. and pam says alcohol and traveljust do not mix. 0ne flights. and pam says alcohol and traveljust do not mix. one thing, you need your wits about you for security flight announcements, and the fact that alcohol dehydrates you even more so on a plane. the fact that alcohol dehydrates you even more so on a plane. and this episode of panorama is on bbc tonight. let us know what you think on that, we will read more of your comments a little later on. e—mail us comments a little later on. e—mail us and you can find us on social media. and our facebook page always has a big topic of discussion each morning. he and if you are watching
7:27 am
us morning. he and if you are watching us atan morning. he and if you are watching us at an airport and you have problems going on, or having a quiet flight, problems going on, or having a quiet flight, or a cup of tea, or a coffee, get in touch. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. the metropolitan police is to introduce head—mounted cameras to firearms officers. body—worn cameras, which are mounted just below the shoulder, have already been rolled out to around 17,500 met officers. the new, head—mounted version can be worn on officers' baseball caps or ballistic helmets. the idea was first suggested three years ago following the death of 29—year—old mark duggan. detectives investigating the murder of a schoolboy in south london are trying to discover if there is a link between that and an earlier incident involving a group of armed teenagers. 15—year—old jermaine goupall was stabbed to death in thornton heath on tuesday night. two people have been charged with his murder. police say a group of teenagers wearing balaclavas and armed with sticks had been at the same spot just hours earlier.
7:28 am
there are plans to cover the protective screen due to be erected around grenfell tower in children's drawings. scaffolding will be erected around the burnt—out tower, and then encased by netting, during an operation expected to last until the end of the year. the idea is to project the drawings by local schoolchildren onto the screen. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. 0n the roads, whitehall is closed southbound from horse guards avenue to parliament square until 27 august, for roadworks. expect delays around parliament square. in central london, park lane has two lanes closed northbound at hyde park corner, following a diesel spillage. in romford, ardleigh green, slewins lane is closed because of a burst watermain, near to cavenham gardens. in the city, the a1 is closed southbound at the barbican for gas works. let's have a check on the weather
7:29 am
now, with lucy martin. hello, good morning. after a settled and somewhat summery weekend, it has turned something a little bit more changeable as we move through this week. today, though, does start off quite bright. we will see some hazy sunshine first thing, although cloud will tend to increase as we go through the day. so putting the detail onto the map, then, a dry and bright start, with some hazy sunshine through the morning, but cloud tending to increase from the west as we move into the afternoon. one or two outbreaks of rain, temperatures reaching a maximum of around 24 degrees celsius. i think they will be a touch higher than the map is showing in central london. as we go through this evening, then, a few showery outbreaks of rain pushing across from the west. a dry interlude, before we see another band of rain work its way eastwards into the early hours. 0vernight lows of between 15 and 17 celsius. so a fairly soggy start the further
7:30 am
east you are tomorrow, and then we will see some brightness developing. some good spells of sunshine, just the risk of one or two showers as we move into the afternoon, and they could be quite heavy. temperatures a little warmer than they're showing. again, ithink, a maximum ofaround 25 celsius tomorrow. now, we leave you with the outlook. wednesday looks a little bit cloudier. it does look largely dry, but some rain will take us overnight into thursday, but thursday a return to sunny spells and showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. the main stories. arrests of passengers suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by 50% in the past year, according to an investigation carried out by panorama. critics of the airline industry say a voluntary code on alcohol sales isn't working, and want the government to amend licensing laws.
7:31 am
a spokesman for the home office said they will respond in due course. keep your comments coming in on that as well. the us vice president, mike pence, has specifically condemned far—right groups when asked to respond to the violence over the weekend in virginia. a woman was killed and 19 people were injured when a car was driven into a crowd protesting against a far—right rally in charlottesville. president trump has been criticised for not identifying any specific group when he condemned the trouble. security forces in burkina faso have killed three suspected jihadist gunmen after a terrorist attack in the capital. the country's communications minister says a number of hostages remain trapped inside a restaurant after gunmen opened fire on sunday evening. at least 17 people are believed to have been killed in the attack and another eight were wounded. the army and police have sealed off part of the city centre. a man has been charged with the murder of a grandfather who was attacked as he walked his dogs in norfolk. the body of 83—year—old,
7:32 am
peter wrighton, was found in woodland near the village of east harling last saturday. police say he had been repeatedly stabbed. a 23—year—old man will appear in court later today. thousands of vulnerable children are reportedly not getting the help they need from social services. according to the charity action for children, up to 140,000 young people referred to social services last year did not end up receiving any help because their situation was not judged to be serious enough. the government says its reforms will improve social care. a national breast cancer charity is being investigated after its founder paid herself £31,000 in breach of charity law. wendy watson, who launched national hereditary breast cancer helpline in 1996, has resigned as a trustee. financial irregularities were uncovered by the charity commission. lawyers for mrs watson and the charity described the payments as "an error." officials in nepal are struggling to repair the nation's key highways
7:33 am
after four days of flooding and landslides. the disaster has damaged several bridges and roads. the distribution of relief material has been delayed because of the continued rainfall. nearly 70 people are thought to have died with several people still missing. it is time for another slice of moose news on moose monday. a rare white moose has been captured on film in sweden. the moose was spotted eating at a ditch in the small town of eda by local council chairman, hans nilsson. hans then brought a camera to the same spot the next day in the hope of seeing the moose again, he was lucky enough to film it for around 20 minutes and managed to catch it taking a dip. the animal has been well—known in the local area since it was born and is one of only 100 white
7:34 am
moose in the country. just kidding, it is not moose monday. i've got two little moose fa cts . monday. i've got two little moose facts. white moose are not technically albino, they get white fur due to technically albino, they get white furdue toa technically albino, they get white fur due to a recessive gene. they don't have the pink eyes. see that under the neck of the moose? it's called the bell, part of the mating ritual. they are judged called the bell, part of the mating ritual. they arejudged on called the bell, part of the mating ritual. they are judged on the size of it and it gives off an attractive scent. thank god we only have sound and vision. coming up on the programme, carol will have the weather. we will be speaking to both of the 4x400 relay teams. the premier league is back. lots of new
7:35 am
signings. as you can imagine, jose mourinho has been ringing the praises of his new striker. it could lead them to the title of this season, could it not? scoring goals is "oxygen, happiness and confidence" for new strikers. so sastoe mourinho, after club record signing romelu lukaku scored twice for manchester united in a 4—0 thumping of west ham united. the £75 million signing, making his competitive debut, was on target in both halves to set his side on their way. paul pogba rounded off a convincing victory in the last minute asjose mourinho's side look to justify many pundits' predictions that they'll be champions next spring. it was a good performance, with very high competence levels. we came into the second half winning 1—0 and playing to score more goals and playing to win in a more comfortable way. i think it was a very positive performance and a reflection of the good levels of play we have.
7:36 am
newcastle united's return to the premier league ended in disappointment against spurs. captain, jonjo shelvey, was given a straight red card four minutes into the second half for standing on delli ali's ankle. the match was goalless then, and the dismissal proved costly as ali then went on to score the opening goal in a 2—0 win for tottenham. and over in france, the world's most expensive player, neymar, made his debut for paris st germain. the £200 million player scored as well as they beat guingamp 3—0. so that makes him worth about £200 million per goal at the moment! iam not i am not sure if that shows value for moneyjust i am not sure if that shows value for money just yet. cristiano ronaldo used to be the world's most expensive player. the 80 million real madrid paid for him seems paltry compared to the neymar fee. but again, he proved his worth, scoring a goal in his side's win over barcelona in the spanish super cup. that pose cost him though as he was booked for removing his shirt. and a second yellow card later for diving saw him sent off. that might not be the end of the trouble though as he pushed
7:37 am
the referee in the back before leaving the pitch. so, further trouble could be coming his way. american golfer, justin thomas, won his first major title at the pga championship at quail hollow. and when you're producing shots like this, i guess you probably know it's going to be your day. this was him sinking a 40—foot cheap shot, this at the 13th gave him a two—shot lead which he held on to win. at one stage on the final day five players had a share of the lead. for me, the pga will always have a special place in my heart, and gave mea special place in my heart, and gave me a special drive. like i said, i wa nt to me a special drive. like i said, i want to win everything i do. the other day, this was really cool, for this to be my first, and for my dad to be here and my grandpa to be at home. i was able to talk to him. it was really cool. that trophy dwarfs
7:38 am
him! hosts, ireland, came back from 14—0 down to beat japan 24—14 at the women's rugby world cup. there was also an emphatic win for defending champions england, who ran in ten tries for the second successive game as they beat italy. wales, though, can no longer qualify for the semi—finals after they lost to canada. england face the united states on thursday, a straight shootout between the two. thank you very much. i was thinking about the fantastic night of athletics last night. great britain's 4x400—metre relay teams made sure the world championships finished on a high last night. thankfully. it was a fitting end to a tournament which waved goodbye to some major talent but also gave fans a glimpse of a new generation of track and field stars. we will remind ourselves of some of the highlights. here we go, then. london's calling. britain's watching. this is phenomenal. he is a world
7:39 am
superpower! he is a world superpower! #pump it up#! wins it! oh, look at that! laura muir was so close! #pump it up#! who is going to get it? cunningham! well, it was really an exciting
7:40 am
night. former british athlete, iwan thomas, knows all about winning 400—metre relays. he's outside the london stadium. good morning to you. we will talk about last night. what was your highlights? about last night, everything was fantastic. behold championships. there was a worry about the medal count is not being that great, but the 4x4 was great, but my highlight had to be the men's 4x1. a great example that you don't need the best in the world if they can come together as a squad and get the baton around safely and you can get on top of the world. i am proud to be british. i think we put on such a great championship. to think it was a world record attendance,
7:41 am
hundreds of thousands of people visiting london. it was a greatjob. the 4x1 was amazing. in terms of the men's 4x4, what was going on with the heat? they changed the lineups. were the issues in the buildup? is that normal? issues aren't normal, but normally you want the strongest athletes to be confident of qualifying, saving their legs and bringing them in for the final. i am not sure what happened behind the scenes, i am not sure what happened behind the scenes, iam not not sure what happened behind the scenes, i am not close to the team. but i am glad they brought him in. he is so talented. it is quite difficult. the stagger is different than the normal races. it is difficult tojudge. he than the normal races. it is difficult to judge. he set them off toa difficult to judge. he set them off to a fantastic start. when martyn had the last leg, i knew he could get it to the end. it was brilliant.
7:42 am
whenever i speak to them, they are saying thank you to the crowds. it was crucial that we had such great home support. i don't know about the politics, but it is all forgotten because we have the medal. we will ask about that later. talk us through the women's 4x400, which was also fantastic. brilliant, silver medal. you come to a major championships and everything has to be perfect on the day. for some athletes, the individual event may not have gone well, but this is a chance to finish on a high. i was proud of the girls coming together. a young team. with such a large crowd, it can raise your spirits, or you can crumble under pressure. the girls did not do that. to get a silver medal, it was not expected. i thought a bronze would be great to finish a championship for them. but
7:43 am
another medal. you are with them when they finished on the track. you have spent a lot of time with someone we can show you. another stand—out star of the tournament was the official mascot, "hero the hedgehog." tell ellie how great it has been to work alongside her invention. delight and a nuisance to be thank you, designing someone truly remarkable. hero the hedgehog changed the game. he roughed me up a couple of times, though. every night he comes out and i never know what he comes out and i never know what he is going to do. they never rehearsed it. he jumped he is going to do. they never rehearsed it. hejumped on me and tried to throw me in the war to the other night. but thank you, hero the
7:44 am
hedgehog has been incredible. thank you very much indeed. before we talk to you, we will have a look at hero the hedgehog in action. in a minute we can see that. he has been very, very busy. talk to us he has been very, very busy. talk to us about that design. this is hero the hedgehog. tell us. this is from the hedgehog. tell us. this is from the paralympics. so you designed both. we will show them soon. did you want him to be a fun character getting involved in running down the steps and talking to the athletes and having fun as well? yeah. when you have seen it for yourself, how have you reacted to seeing these things the mascots have got up to? it has been great to see them come to light. why did you come up with
7:45 am
hero the hedgehog? they are an endangered species. did you imagine your hedgehog might be so naughty? no. let's see the best bits of hero the hedgehog. he was very special, what in the? and as well as seeing hero, what else did you get to see and what else did you get to see and what else did you enjoy? well, i got to see else did you enjoy? well, i got to see usain bolt and mo farah run. and you were there at the start of this creation, presumably? yes, we have the phone calls saying she won the competition. so the how exciting. and then the trip up to be live on blue peter in april.
7:46 am
and what is it like seeing this drawing which happened at home created as part of life? it hasjust an amazing experience, the whole thing. and being there at the stadium on saturday... all your schoolfriends must think you are so cool schoolfriends must think you are so cool. has it gone down well at school? yes. thank you very much indeed, and good luck with your next creation. will you stay being an artist? will you keep drawing? yes. and congratulations on creating something that has brought so much jov- something that has brought so much joy. and i want to say thank you to hero as well. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. it is not too shabby a job. good
7:47 am
morning to you. we had mixed fortu nes morning to you. we had mixed fortunes with the weather today, because in the west we do have some rain, but it is dry in the east and for some eastern parts it is also going to be pretty sunny as we go through the day. the reason it is wet is because we do have these weather fronts moving east and wet is because we do have these weatherfronts moving east and north eastwards, taking the rain with them as they do so, but they will tend to wea ken as they do so, but they will tend to weaken as we head to the course of the afternoon. we have seen some heavy rain from them this morning across northern ireland and western scotland. you can see the big weather front extending all the way down across western parts of england and wales. through the morning that will continue to drift eastwards. the cloud will build ahead of it at where we have sunshine from yorkshire down towards hampshire and the isle of wight we will see the cloud built. a further east you travel, it won't, and it will be quite sunny through the day. later more rain is going to come in across central and southern parts of england. into the afternoon, some rain across scotland. not as heavy or as much as this morning. it will
7:48 am
brighten up around the murray firth. here, we could see temperatures get up here, we could see temperatures get up around 20 celsius. the rain breaking across north—east england. afair bit breaking across north—east england. a fair bit of cloud, the rain moving out of northern ireland only to be replaced by sunshine and showers, some of those will be heavy and thundery. the remnants of the rain across wales in south—west england. some brightness and this new band coming up some brightness and this new band coming up across some brightness and this new band coming up across the midlands and heading in the direction of the wash. and here it is as we go through the evening. then the next ban comes in, moving from the west towards the east. some of that will be heavy and possibly thundery as we head through the overnight period. leaving behind a quite a lot of low cloud, some drizzle and also some showers. it is not going to be a cold night. in towns and cities, temperatures easily staying in double figures. we start with this rain in the south—east in the morning. that could be thundery. we will also have across the north—east but the whole lot pushing off into
7:49 am
the north sea, leaving behind a mixture of sunshine and showers. and there will be more sunshine around tomorrow, but some of the showers will be heavy and possibly thundery. i know means we'll be all see them. temperatures roughly around 19 to 21. somewhere in east anglia or kent could hit 26 tomorrow, which is a pretty good temperature for the stage in august. as we head from tuesday into wednesday, a little ridge of high pressure things down. 0ne ridge of high pressure things down. one or two showers during tuesday but on wednesday we have got this area of low pressure with its fronts coming our way. tightly packed isobars mean it will be wet and windy. for wednesday, a lot of dry weather, variable amounts of cloud, sunshine, a few showers and then as we head into thursday, once again things settle down a touch, with more in the way of sunshine. so the weather really is topsy—turvy as we go through this new working week. thank you very much, i think. watch out if it gets topsy—turvy. this week, steph is taking a look at a handful of the five million family—run businesses in the uk, and the impact they have on the british economy. she is at one of them this morning, and it is a cider maker. good morning to you, morning
7:50 am
everybody. i am at westons cider mill, and these cider apples are not very nice to eat, i am told, but through the whole process they will turn into cider, and as you said, this is a family business which has been going since 1880. they are on the fifth generation, and you can come and meet them inside. we have mark and giles, holding things back for us. come inside and have a look at this process. we have helen and guy, mother and son, who run this whole business. tel is a bit about the business history. it has been going since 1880. that's right, my great—grandfather came here in 1878 and started making cider in 1880. he had nine children and three of his sonsjoined him in the business. the
7:51 am
girls helped as well, but they married and went away and we have continued ourselves here. i am the great and my son guy is my son, of course. as the boss of the business, was it a natural thing for you to come and be part of it, and to end up come and be part of it, and to end up running at? it is interesting, i can remember sitting on someone's lap and sticking stamps on things as a child. and i loved working here. and guy, for you, as the son of helen, was it inevitable you would join? to be fair, i was an artist at school, i did a foundation in art andi school, i did a foundation in art and i came here looking for work just as temporarily, and mum offered mea just as temporarily, and mum offered me a job just as temporarily, and mum offered meajob in just as temporarily, and mum offered me a job in the lab and i did that for seven years, a quality assurance job, and! for seven years, a quality assurance job, and i never left. i learnt the trade, alert the chemistry side of making, and overa trade, alert the chemistry side of making, and over a period of 15 yea rs i making, and over a period of 15 years i became a cider maker. do you think there is a different way of
7:52 am
running a business when it is family—oriented? running a business when it is family-oriented? i think it is more personal, because it is part of you. you live it and breathe it. because of that it is more important than you actually can't get away from it. you wake up in the morning and going to bed thinking of it. do you ever have any time when you are not talking about work as mac you two must be a nightmare! you do go home and forget about it, but you are still thinking about it really. what about succession planning? in any other business you would advertise for a new chief exec but i guess you quys for a new chief exec but i guess you guys are for a new chief exec but i guess you guys are looking at your relatives thinking who might be next?” guys are looking at your relatives thinking who might be next? i am looking forward to my children taking over, or at least having a go at it. it is important to the family. we all try and work together, and we bring the youth through. and if they don't want to work for you? well, it is up to them. i hope they will do. very often they are shareholders anyway,
7:53 am
so often they are shareholders anyway, so if they are not working in the business they have business at heart. we have meetings to discuss the business and they are kept on board with what is happening in the business. thank you very much for letting us in. it is an incredible process seeing the apples put into the vats, and the cider being made and bottled and sent out. and the vats have something like 500,000 pints of cider in each of the vats. so far! pints of cider in each of the vats. so far i have seen about 30 vats. more from me later on. does it smell scrumptious? it smells lovely, actually. it is a bit vinegary, the smell, in terms of the cider being made, but it does smell nice. it smells like a good night out, actually. thank you very much. it probably smells a bit weird at 7:55 a.m.. in the 1960s, pirate radio changed the face of broadcasting. it was revolutionary for playing continuous music, and launched the careers of tony blackburn, john peel
7:54 am
and kenny everett. but 50 years ago today, pirate radio stations became illegal, and they were forced to close down. breakfast‘s tim muffettjoins us now from a mock pirate ship in essex. good morning to you. if you have ever seen good morning to you. if you have ever seen the 2009 film the boat that rocked, this might look familiar. this was used in that film. it is all about pirate radio, those broadcasters going out to sea, and broadcasting to the land. today it has been commandeered by bbc essex who will be broadcasting alongside radio caroline, which still exists, in a bid of broadcasting history. as we look around this ship we will have a chat toa man around this ship we will have a chat to a man who knows what it was like
7:55 am
to a man who knows what it was like to be at sea in those days. alan turner, broadcaster. what was it like being at sea with radio caroline? fantastic. fora 24—year—old to be in a ship on the north sea playing records all day long, fantastic. how important is it that this law was made, because it sought to outlaw pirates. it was an illegal, but the british government didn't like the fact that they were not in control, so the marine offences bill came into force 50 yea rs offences bill came into force 50 years ago, and that is what we are marking today. and you are going to be broadcasting with radio caroline, a bit of history. yes, radio caroline, which is anchored just across from us, and the bbc are going to broadcast radio caroline's programmes. we will let you carry on with your preparation. we will be talking later tojohnnie walker, the famous dj and now on radio two. they
7:56 am
tried to outlaw it, radio caroline continued until 1990. more details about that a little later this morning. and johnnie walker meets the pirates is on bbc radio two tonight at 10:00pm. have a look at theirs. we will hand off to our newsrooms across the uk with a shot from the estuary. a beautiful shot this morning and we will see with the national headlines inafew will see with the national headlines in a few minutes' time. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. the metropolitan police is to introduce head—mounted cameras to firearms officers. body—worn cameras, which are mounted just below the shoulder, have already been rolled out to around 17,500 met officers. the new, head—mounted version can be worn on officers' baseball caps or ballistic helmets. the idea was first suggested three years ago following the death of 29—year—old mark duggan.
7:57 am
detectives investigating the murder of a schoolboy in south london are trying to discover if there is a link between that and an earlier incident involving a group of armed teenagers. 15—year—old jermaine goupall was stabbed to death in thornton heath on tuesday night. two people have been charged with his murder. police say a group of teenagers wearing balaclavas and armed with sticks had been at the same spot just hours earlier. there are plans to cover the protective screen due to be erected around grenfell tower in children's drawings. scaffolding will be erected around the burnt—out tower, and then encased by netting, during an operation expected to last until the end of the year. the idea is to project the drawings by local schoolchildren onto the screen. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. 0n the roads: in central london, park lane has two lanes closed northbound at hyde park corner, following a diesel spillage.
7:58 am
busy around hyde park corner. whitehall is closed southbound from horse guards avenue to parliament square until 27 august, for roadworks. expect delays around parliament square. in romford, ardleigh green, slewins lane is closed because of a burst watermain near to cavenham gardens. in the city, the a1 is closed southbound at the barbican for gas works. let's have a check on the weather now, with lucy martin. hello, good morning. after a settled and somewhat summery weekend, it has turned something a little bit more changeable as we move through this week. today, though, does start off quite bright. we will see some hazy sunshine first thing, although cloud will tend to increase as we move through the day. so putting the detail onto the map, then, a dry and bright start, with some hazy sunshine through this morning, but cloud tending to increase from the west as we move into the afternoon. one or two outbreaks of rain, temperatures reaching a maximum of around 24 degrees celsius. i think they will be a touch higher than the map is showing in central
7:59 am
london. as we go through this evening, then, a few showery outbreaks of rain pushing across from the west. a dry interlude, before we see another band of rain work its way eastwards into the early hours. 0vernight lows of between 15 and 17 celsius. so a fairly soggy start the further east you are tomorrow, and then we will see some brightness developing. some good spells of sunshine, just the risk of one or two showers as we move into the afternoon, and they could be quite heavy. temperatures a little bit warmer than they're showing. again, ithink, a maximum ofaround 25 degrees celsius tomorrow. now, i'll leave you with the outlook. wednesday looks a little bit cloudier. it does look largely dry, but some rain will take us overnight into thursday, but thursday a return to sunny spells and showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello this is breakfast,
8:00 am
with dan walker and louise minchin. a big rise in the number of people arrested for being drunk and disorderly on planes. drunken singing a bbc investigation finds a 50 % increase in passengers being held for incidents involving alcohol on flights and at airports. good morning, it's monday 14th august. a vigil is held to remember the woman killed during protests against a far right rally in the us. don't let hate live.
8:01 am
don't just let someone walk around freely and spread their hate. tell them that's not ok. that is not ok. in sport, great britain hit their medal target. a silver from the women and a bronze from men in the 400 metre relays brings the tally to six in the final moments of the world athletics championship. good morning from herefordshire, this is a family business that has been going since 1880 and there are 5 million family businesses across the uk and i will be looking at how they contribute to our economy. 50 years after pirate radio ships were outlawed — we look back at how they changed the sound of music radio. and 20 years ago martine mccutcheon was a household name — illness and family took her out of the limelight. now she's back and will be here to tell us all about it.
8:02 am
and carol has the weather. it isa it is a wet start across scotland and northern ireland and parts of northern england, wales and south west england, the rain will move east and gradually weakened through the course of the day, but brighter skies in the south east and eastern parts of the country. good morning. first, our main story. arrests of passengers suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by 50% in the past year, according to an investigation carried out by bbc panorama. critics of the airline industry say a voluntary code on alcohol sales isn't working, and want the government to amend licensing laws. tina daheley reports. where in the uk can you buy alcohol at 4am seven days a week? the answer is at an international airport. and it seems that it's leaving passengers and crew with a hangover.
8:03 am
an investigation by bbc panorama has revealed that arrests of those suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by 50% in the past year. half of the 4,000 cabin crew who took part in a survey carried out by panorama and unite, the union, said they had either experienced or witnessed verbal, physical, or sexual abuse by drunk passengers onboard a uk flight. people just see us as bar maids in the sky. they would touch your breasts, or they'd touch your bum or your legs. i mean, i've had hands going up my skirt before. phil ward, the managing director of low—cost airline, jet2, has already banned alcohol sales on flights before 8am, and wants the industry to take tougher measures. do you think airports are doing enough? i think they could do more. i think the retailers could do more as well. two litres of beer in bars,
8:04 am
mixers and miniatures in duty—free shops, which can only be there for one reason. but the airport 0perators association insists that their code of practice does works. i don't accept that the airports don't sell alcohol responsibly. the sale of alcohol per se is not a problem. it's the misuse of it and drinking to excess and then behaving badly. earlier this year, a house of lords committee called for airport licensing to be brought into line with pubs and bars. a government decision on whether to call time on early—morning drinking at airports is now expected in the autumn. tina daheley, bbc news. this y condemned far-right the us vice president, mike pence, has specificallly condemned far—right groups following violence over the weekend in virginia. president trump has been criticised for not identifying any specific
8:05 am
group when he condemned the trouble. a woman was killed and 19 people were injured when a car was driven into a crowd protesting against a far—right rally in cha rlottesville. we have no tolerance for hate and violence from white supremacists, neo—nazis and the kkk. these dangerous fringe groups have no place in american public life and the american public debate and we condemn them in the strongest possible terms. 0ur washington correspondent laura bicker was at a vigil in charlottesville last night to remember heather heyer, who was killed during the protests. the candles and songs are for heather heyer, who died standing up for what she believed in. after a weekend of deadly violence and anger on these streets, there's now a longing to come together in quiet grief. heather was one of the demonstrators
8:06 am
trying to stop white supremacists marching through charlottesville on saturday. she was killed when this car plowed through a group of protesters. her close friend now appeals for unity. i want everybody to get together and unite and spread love, and spread peace, and spread happiness, and don't let hate live. don't just let somebody walk around freely and spread their hate. tell them that that's not ok. that it's not ok. one of the organisers of the unite the right rally tried to hold a press conference. he was shouted down. crowds: shame, shame, shame! and as he left, he was forced to flee. armed police had to escort him from the city. he's condemned the violence, but says he has a right to be heard. i'm willing to die for my rights, basically. i feel like my first amendment
8:07 am
rights and the rights of the people at my rally were violated. but there is no sympathy here for those who brought hate to the city. laura bicker, bbc news, charlottesville. security forces in burkina faso have killed two suspected jihadist gunmen after a terrorist attack in the capital. the country's communications minister says a number of hostages remain trapped inside a restaurant after gunmen opened fire on sunday evening. at least 18 people are believed to have been killed in the attack and another 8 were wounded. the army and police have sealed off part of the city centre. a man has been charged with the murder of a grandfather who was attacked as he walked his dogs in norfolk. the body of 83—year—old peter wrighton was found in woodland near the village of east harling last saturday. police say he had been repeatedly stabbed. a 23—year—old man will appear in court later today. a rise in crime committed in the countryside has been described as ‘deeply worrying'
8:08 am
by a rural insurer. latest figures from nfu mutual show claims have risen by more than a fifth in the first half of the year. the insurer says farmers are continually increasing security as thieves become more sophisticated. we really are seeing an increase in brazen and unconcerned thieves who will go to a farm in broad daylight evenif will go to a farm in broad daylight even if there are people around and walk into sheds and take things and drive off with them. it is a very worrying time for farmers and there isa worrying time for farmers and there is a lot of anxiety because farmers know they are a distance from police and they can't put everything on the farm together in one place and lock it up like you can with an urban business. up to 140,000 vulnerable children did not receive the help they needed last year because their situation was not
8:09 am
judged to be serious enough, according to action for children. the charity has found thousands of young people referred to social services did not end up getting any support before their case was closed. the government says its reforms will improve the situation. armed officers in the uk's biggest police force are to be issued with head—mounted cameras. they will be attached to the caps and protective helmets of members of the metropolitan police's firearms units. it is arguably one of the most distinctive sounds in the world. big ben chimes however, next monday at midday big ben will chime for the final time for four years to allow repair work to take place on the clock in elizabeth tower. the bells will still ring out on remembrance sunday and at new year — but will otherwise fall silent for only the third time in 150 years. i'm rather sad about that. i know it has to happen. it is a very
8:10 am
distinctive nice. experts have suggested the sound of the bongs could change because soot has to be removed while the bell's being repaired and this could change the sound frequency. infour in four years' time we will do a pre—soot bong and one after the claim. —— claim. the world athletics championships ended on a high in london last night, with two more medals for great britain and northern ireland. the success of the relay teams meant british athletics hit its medal target — but onlyjust, as our sports correspondent natalie pirks reports. ina in a moment we will speak to the bronze medallists from the women's relay. commentator: those who are here will never forget it. going into saturday, britain had just one medal. 24 hours later, they had six.
8:11 am
the medal target hit at the last possible minute. it was the relay again that provided the drama. britain took 0lympic runs in the women's four x 400 metres last year. the usa, though, would take some beating. but when jamaica's injury curse struck yet again... the women claimed silver. just look what it meant for them. silverfor great britain in northern ireland. so, to the men's 4x400 relay. the final event of the championships. commentator: "rooney" goes up the cry from the crowd. martyn rooney brought home the rally in bronze, the sixth medal for britain. the relay teams making sure saturday and sunday were equally super. and as usain bolt took to the track to say goodbye for one last time, it was a final chance to reflect on a memorable ten days. it has been spectacular. i can't honestly remember in the years i have been watching championship athletics that i have
8:12 am
seen such competitive races and so many compelling stories. and, actually, as we're ushering the superstar off the scene, the compelling stories have been the emergence of extraordinary young talent around the globe. but the biggest winner was athletics itself. london consistently delivered the crowds that the sport desperately needed. and as for britain, well, they left it late, but they have shown the future is bright. natalie pirks, bbc news, at the london stadium. in 25 minutes time we will speak to the man who won the bronze. —— men. let's speak to that silver—winning women's relay team. zoey clark, laviai nielsen, eilidh doyle and emily diamond. you have cancelled a flight to take pa rt you have cancelled a flight to take part in the interviews? yes, i meant to be at the airport, but i'm still
8:13 am
here, speaking to you. thank you for doing that. what an occasion, 100% record in all the relays for medals for great britain, a great way to finish the world championships.” could not quite hear that. that is the london traffic. i said it must have been a great way to cap off the world championships with a medal in every single relay. amazing. we saw the four by 100 metre guys the day before and that was an inspiration, this was an amazing way to end the championships and it is very great that everyone could perform when it counted. you have the final leg home, were you concerned at any point? you had the polish athlete breathing down your neck. you must have been concerned because you were in the silver medal position and you
8:14 am
have got to hold onto it. when you get the baton, and the crowd jeering, you don't know what is happening behind you, you have got to run your leg as fast as you can —— cheering. that is what i did, and i tried to not worry about it too much and hope i could hold her wrath which i was able to. —— her off. during the race we saw the jamaican tea m during the race we saw the jamaican team struggle. were you aware of that and did it change your perspective on the race? going into it they had been one of the favourites for the silver.” it they had been one of the favourites for the silver. i did see it happen just before favourites for the silver. i did see it happenjust before we were favourites for the silver. i did see it happen just before we were about to break. we all knew there was a medal chance for us yesterday sol we nt medal chance for us yesterday sol went and grabbed the button and thought, i need to get us into position to get a medal. i didn't think too much of it. when i saw her
8:15 am
pull up think too much of it. when i saw her pullupl think too much of it. when i saw her pull up i was like, yes! laughter i appreciate your honesty! as team captain for great britain, there has a lwa ys captain for great britain, there has always been talk about this medal total. going into the weekend it was only one medal and that was mo farah's goals only one medal and that was mo fa rah's goals early only one medal and that was mo farah's goals early on in the championships. did the team feel pressure to perform and win the additional medals? we always want to win medals. that's why we come here. i think for us personally we forget about the medal target, wejust i think for us personally we forget about the medal target, we just want to do our best. i think watching the quys to do our best. i think watching the guys and the girls team and mo on the saturday night gave us a big boost and made us want to be part of it and boost and made us want to be part of itand win boost and made us want to be part of it and win our own medal too.” boost and made us want to be part of it and win our own medal too. i love the fact you're inspiring the next generation of athletes to go out and do what you've done, in 2012 you
8:16 am
we re do what you've done, in 2012 you were holding the kit forjessica ennis—hill of what was that moment like and what was it like to be back in the stadium winning your own medal? back in 2012! was such a huge fan of the sport. i always wanted to be up there. last night to walk and need the stadium and the same paths as when! need the stadium and the same paths as when i was 16 drawback so many memories. to walk back in as a medallist was surreal. we should come to you as team captain, eilidh. what are you able to tell us about celebrations last night? laughter we all got back really late. i ended up enjoying room service in my dream! i'm sure that some others celebrated a bit harder than i did! congratulations on the silver medal,
8:17 am
it's been brilliant to watch some british success at the world championships. don't miss your flight! laughter will be talking to the men's four by 400 m relay in half an hour. they took bronze. the gold for the men's team was stunning. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. a bbc investigation has revealed there's been a 50% rise in the number of arrests for drunken misbehaviour on flights and in airports in the past year. demonstrations and vigils have been held across the united states following deadly violence that erupted during a far right rally in virginia on saturday. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. we've got a bit of
8:18 am
sunshine and we've also got some rain in the forecast. if you're in some eastern parts of england, there's a good chance he will stay dry. not every part of eastern england but in the west it's a wet start. it's courtesy of this array of weather fronts. they've been producing some heavy rain during the overnight period across northern ireland and scotland. this line is moving out of wales and cornwall. the whole lot pushing eastwards. through the day it will fragment and break—up. ahead of it a lot of dry weather with some rain already across parts of northern england, thenit across parts of northern england, then it starts to break up. behind it are lots of low cloud, drizzle. eventually we'll see some brightness develop. for some of some sunshine coming out. especially across northern ireland where we've got a mixture of sunshine and bright and showers through the afternoon. grain is continuing to move across scotland, breaking up. —— rain is
8:19 am
continuing to move. parts of north—east england may miss the rain but the cloud will build. for wales and south—west england, our riverfront drifting eastwards. some brightness as opposed to some sunshine coming through. really in the far south—east it's likely to hang onto the sunshine. we could have high is up to 25. some rain moving towards the wash in the latter parts of the afternoon and then more rain spreading towards the east as we head overnight. some of that will be thundery. most places staying in double figures. these temperatures indicating what you can expect. for the north—east similar story with the rain, the whole lot pushing off into the north sea and then a day of sunshine and showers. if you catch a shower it could be heavy and thundery but many of us
8:20 am
will miss them. it will feel pleasa nt will miss them. it will feel pleasant enough for the time of year with 20 being baha'i. except for east anglia, essex and kent. it is possible we could hit 26. the ridge of high pressure that is upon us is eventually usurped by this area of low pressure coming in. also telling you it's going to be rather windy on wednesday. rain advancing eastwards. as it clears on thursday sunshine and showers again. thank you! an insight into the magic of breakfast, louise hunt standing up of breakfast, louise hunt standing up during your weather report! laughter i sat down with a surprised look on my face but now everybody knows what i was doing! laughter you
8:21 am
can't sit down for three and a quarter hours. i can't sit down for 15 minutes let alone three hours!l bbc investigation has revealed that two thirds of flight attendants have witnessed drunken behaviour on flights in the last year alone. panorama says the worst rates are to, ibiza. there were times when i was surrounded by four guys all over 6—foot tall being quite aggressive because i had stopped their alcohol. i have no way of getting help. luckily nothing happened but it was a co nsta nt luckily nothing happened but it was a constant being in that situation. joining us from our london newsroom is karen dee, the chief executive of the airport 0perators' association. are you surprised by these figures?
8:22 am
we identified that that is a problem. one of the things i would say is that these are very small in number. it's still a tiny proportion we had, not tick—macro more than 268 passengers going through our airports in the uk last year. the 400 arrests is a tiny proportion. but of course when these incidents happen as your previous speaker mentioned, they have a big impact and is totally unacceptable. what's interesting about the panorama investigation and our guest here is that it's not necessarily that there are arrests, but that safety for example was being affected by what's going on on board flights. when cabin crew are disrupted the safety of other passengers are put in danger. that's absolutely correct. the crew are primarily for the safety of the aircraft. what the
8:23 am
industry has been doing, the airports, the retailers, bars and restau ra nts, airports, the retailers, bars and restaurants, working with the police and the airlines, all of us collaborating to say we want passengers to have a good time but getting drunk and getting on an aircraft and behaving badly is unacceptable. it's not fair on the crew, the airport staff but also on the other passengers. we are working really closely together in collaboration across the industry to make sure that we minimise the number of these incidents that happen and target particular groups where necessary, but also to make sure that when they happen proper enforcement takes place so that passengers realise they won't be able to get away with this. you have able to get away with this. you have a voluntary code, isn't it evidence it's not working? the voluntary code is really good at bringing all of those parties together. airports are quite complex and there are
8:24 am
different at points. 0ne quite complex and there are different at points. one of the great things is that the sharing of information and making sure the teens in individual airports are working together so that we can see where they're rather large groups of people considered high risk that we can pay a closer eye on what's going on, and actually talk to them early and make sure they understand that if they drink too much they won't get on their flight. we will try and stop them so their holiday is at risk. it is an offence to get on board a plane drunk or to be drunk ona board a plane drunk or to be drunk on a plane. the industry is working together to make sure where that happens we are going to make sure the punishment is sitting. the airports are making money on the alcohol being sold. what would your reaction be to having, for example, the hours they can be sold restricted? at the moment, the
8:25 am
licensing act, because airports are a controlled environment, the government doesn't apply the licensing act. it's wrong to assume that means there are no rules. loss of the offences apply in the same way that they do on the high street. a lot of the retailers in the airports and bars and restaurants are already trained to the same requirements so we are applying the same kind of rules that apply on the high street. i think i would take us back to making sure that 268 million passengers to travel through and enjoy the bars and restaurants in a sensible way. we've got to make sure it's the people that are breaking the rules and behaving badly, those other people that need to be penalised, not the other passengers who are just there and behave perfectly well. thank you for your time. and panorama is on tonight on bbc one at 8:30pm. thank you for getting in touch about
8:26 am
that this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we had a fairly decent weekend, with temperatures into the 20s, and today it will stay dry but it will be quite wet in the west. already this morning, where in scotland and northern ireland and north west england and the wales and the south—west and the rain will continue for most of the day. there is cloud spreading east, but for east anglia and the south—east it is likely to stay dry and sunny in the afternoon but showers for most of scotla nd afternoon but showers for most of scotland in the afternoon and a maximum temperature of 18, with more rain to come across the north will stop and a few spots of rain coming towards lincolnshire down to yorkshire and into the midlands and
8:27 am
central southern england. patchy rain continuing in wales and the south west but for kent and east sussex, the home counties, norfolk, it was a largely sunny and that is where temperatures will be the highest. through the evening, this area of rain will move east and eventually across the far south—east of england there will be rain overnight. temperature no lower than 14-16 overnight. temperature no lower than 14—16 although it could turn cold in northern ireland and the far west of ireland. the rain will clear away on tuesday gradually. for many of us on tuesday, a good day, some scattered showers across the east, but temperatures, 17, 19, 25 in the south east and feeling pleasant in the sunshine. we will have a mixture of sunny spells and scattered showers this week and it will feel cooler later in the week as well.
8:28 am
this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and ben bland. abenomics is working! japan reports its longest run of economic growth in a decade. live from london, that's our top story on monday the 14th of august. japan records its sixth straight quarter of economic growth, fuelled by a rise in consumer spending.
8:29 am
8:30 am

71 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on