Skip to main content

tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  August 14, 2017 11:00am-1:00pm BST

11:00 am
this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11. pakistan celebrates the 70th anniversary of its creation, and the partition from india at the end of british colonial rule. an official ceremony has taken placed in islamabad as the partition sparked the largest mass migration in history and a huge amount of bloodshed on both sides. vice president pence condemns far right groups, after a woman was killed in charlottesville protesting against a white supremacist rally. we have no tolerance for hate and violence, for white supremacists, neo—nazis or the kkk. these dangerous fringe groups have no place in american public life and in the american debate and we condemn them in the strongest possible terms. arrests of passengers suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by 50%
11:01 am
in the past year. a charity says around 140,000 vulnerable children didn't receive help last year because their situation was not judged to be serious enough. also, the sound of the underground. 50 years ago today, britain's pirate radio stations were outlawed. it led to the closure of stations which had gathered listeners by playing p°p which had gathered listeners by playing pop music, rarely heard on the bbc at the time. good morning.
11:02 am
it's monday 14th august. i'm rachel schofield. welcome to bbc newsroom live. 70 years ago tonight, 200 years of british colonial rule in india came to an end and the country was partitioned into two independent nation states — hindu—majority india and muslim—majority pakistan. the result was the one of the largest mass migrations ever recorded. pakistan celebrates its independence day today, with india marking the occasion tomorrow. in 1947, after months of political deadlock, britain agreed to divide the country in two. a separate and mainly muslim nation, pakistan, was created to meet concerns that the large muslim minority would be at a disadvantage in hindu—majority india. partition triggered one of the great calamities of the modern era, perhaps the biggest movement of people, outside war and famine,
11:03 am
that the world has ever seen. no one knows the precise numbers, but an estimated 12 million people found themselves on the wrong side of the border: hindus and sikhs moved to india and muslims travelled in the opposite direction to pakistan. sectarian violence erupted and hundreds of thousands of people on all sides were killed. reeta chakrabarti is in the pakistani city of karachi for the celebrations and sent this report. it's pakistans birthday and at every street corner, there are flags and celebrations. but it's 70 years have been very mixed. it was founded as a democracy, but has had military rule. people argue whether it's founder, muhammad jinnah, wanted a secular state or an islamic one. i went to one of karachi's universities to ask students what they think of muhammad jinnah and pakistan today. muhammadjinnah, it's the biggest name for pakistan. and every nation of the world. he is like a father. the father of the nation and he created pakistan. do you think muhammad
11:04 am
jinnah would be happy with pakistan as it is today? he would be happy. he would be really happy. pakistan is progressing every day, every second. on this 70th anniversary of independence, the country has grown very well and it is flourishing day by day and i hope it will prosper day by day. do you think that's muhammad jinnah would be happy with pakistan as it is today? not that much. basically he would see the basic needs of the people are not fulfilling right now. much of the problem now is in the religion because people nowadays, they are not tolerant and they are too much emotional. crowds come to muhammad jinnah mausoleum to pay their respects. the countries he founded was rocked again last month when the prime minister was forced to resign over corruption charges. finding political stability remains one of pakistan's many challenges. 0ur correspondent secunder
11:05 am
is in islamabad for us. how are things being marked their today? across the world, many people will consider this the 70th anniversary of partition and the awful events that happened there. here in pakistan, it is being celebrated. it is seen as the 70th anniversary of the country's independence and something that should be celebrated and people are proud of the achievements that have been made over the past 70 years and in recent years, where the number of deaths by terrorists have fallen for example. the ceremonies and celebrations started last night when the chief of the pakistani army helped hoist what is said to be the largest flag, the highest flag in all of asia at the border with india. today, there has been another
11:06 am
flag raising ceremony in islamabad. the president addressed the nation. 0ne the president addressed the nation. one of the chief guests was actually a chinese politician. there has been an airshow put on by the pakistani air force. an airshow put on by the pakistani airforce. their an airshow put on by the pakistani air force. their planes and jets have been buzzing over our heads over the past couple of hours. this independence day is regularly very enthusiastically celebrated by ordinary pakistanis every year. later on, large numbers of people will be out in their streets and cars, waving flags and showing their support. alongside the sense of celebration, is there any sense of celebration, is there any sense of celebration on what the future holds for ba rca stun? celebration on what the future holds for barca stun? —— for pakistan. celebration on what the future holds for barca stun? -- for pakistan. the celebrations come at a time of real political upheaval for pakistan. the
11:07 am
prime minister was ousted following corruption allegations, although he has denied any wrongdoing. he has given a series of speeches in the past few days in which he has repeatedly mentioned the fact that throughout pakistan's 70 year history, no prime minister has ever completed a full term in office. 0ften completed a full term in office. often because of interference by the military and it seems that the former prime minister is trying to suggest that the military were behind his removal. although the military have denied that. alongside the sense of celebration, there is a certain sense of introspection about pakistan's political history and what might be in store for the next yea rs. what might be in store for the next years. thank you very much indeed. as we've been hearing, india celebrate the partition tomorrow. 0ur correspondent sanjoy majumder is in delhi for us. how is the mood there? a great sense
11:08 am
of anticipation here as we gear up to india's independence day. in a few hours from now the building behind me will be illuminated, that it india's parliament were 50 years ago at midnight, the country celebrated its freedom from colonial room. its first minister brought in independence with a memorable speech in which he said as the world sleeps, india will awake to life and freedom. as you look where india was as 70 years ago, there is not to be proud of. many predicted it would break up because it is such a diverse country, but it has endured asa diverse country, but it has endured as a functional company. that is not the same as pakistan, they have seen many governments take office in a very peaceful transition of power. 0ne very peaceful transition of power. one of the largest economies in the world. as people reflect over the past 70 years, there is a sense of concern that some of the ideals that brought in india's freedom and its
11:09 am
freedom leader mahatma gandhi, some of those might be shifting away from it. the thought that this is a secular country, looking at a lot of the conflicts that were around at the conflicts that were around at the time of independence still possessed. the conflict with pakistan over kashmir, for instance. the religious issues with minority muslims and majority hindus, for example. they have achieved a lot over this period of time, but there isa over this period of time, but there is a long way away to the ideals that mahatma gandhi stood for. yes, what about the relationship with pakistan? what is the feeling about what needs to be done? kashmir is a key topic. the astonishing thing is that these are two countries which are so close, notjust geographically, but also culturally.
11:10 am
there are so much in common, yet there is not a daily flight between islamabad and delhi, it is just so difficult to get from one country to another. 70 years after they both celebrated their freedom from britain, relations continue to be not just britain, relations continue to be notjust in addition —— indifferent, but hostile. it is interesting to see that the indian primers to have —— they are both nuclear powers now, they have large armies, they have lots of problems which are similar in terms of their economies, living standards of many of its people, people on both sides who believe that the leader of the two countries really do need to do much more to push aside these differences and reach out to each other. thanks very much indeed. joining me now is dr yasmin khan,
11:11 am
lecturer in british history at oxford university and author of the great partition: the making of india and pakistan. thanks for coming in. this book as well as an academic exercise was also a look at real people's lives, not least a sense of your own family and their story. it is to be that the history of the partition was about muhammadjinnah and the history of the partition was about muhammad jinnah and mahatma gandhl about muhammad jinnah and mahatma gandhi, the characters at the forefront of the decision, but in recent yea rs, forefront of the decision, but in recent years, people have become much more interested in what happened to ordinary people, the displacement that happened at that time and a real lives that were destroyed. that is how i became interested in the history like many second generation children of refugees and i became interested to see what happened to the ordinary people trained to rebuild their lives. as a prize where you about what you found ? lives. as a prize where you about what you found? this gale of what happened in 1947 is astonishing. we
11:12 am
see the foundations of the conflicts between india and pakistan still in those origins in 1947, the decision that was made. some are expected things happen, nobody that agree to that plan would have seen that a mass migration would have happened 01’ mass migration would have happened or the conflict that happened afterwards. how strong an identity do you think there still is in terms of the very separate nests of those countries? it is hard for them to meet. to go across and get visas. there are peace organisations, we have to remember that indians and pakistanis are divided among ideas about nationalism, what kind of state india should be, what kind of state india should be, what kind of state pakistan should be. it is not a two—way division in any way. it gets harder and harder for a two—way division in any way. it gets harder and harderfor people to share a common history and talk about this route and foundations and
11:13 am
to see what happened in 1947 in the same way. you spoke about your interest as a second—generation and young person with no direct experience, how much difference to think there is between the attitudes who people —— with people who remember their childhood? a bit of a difference. people say that the elderly generation speak very fondly about neighbours, friends. leaving keys with the neighbours, people who helped them escape. mixed feelings, complex. later generations, it has become stripped down and simplified and harder to get back to that texture a nd and harder to get back to that texture and nuance. given that, the entrenched centre division, how hopeful idea looking to the future? i try to stay optimistic. both countries would benefit enormously from better trade relations and from closer relationships. we hope for the best and this is a moment after
11:14 am
70 years to try and reflect on that shared history and to try and remember how stereotyping and divisions could come about and actually think about how we see the other in south asia. thank you. the us vice president, mike pence, has specifically condemned far—right groups following violence over the weekend in virginia. president trump has been criticised for not identifying any specific group when he condemned the trouble. a woman was killed and 19 people were injured when a car was driven into a crowd protesting against a far—right rally in cha rlottesville. we have no tolerance for hate and violence from white supremacists, neo—nazis or the kkk. these dangerous fringe groups have no place in american public life and the american debate and we condemn
11:15 am
them in the strongest possible terms. 0ur correspondence with in america ata 0ur correspondence with in america at a vigilfor one 0ur correspondence with in america at a vigil for one of the deceased. the candles and songs are for heather heyer, who died standing up for what she believed in. after a weekend of deadly violence and anger on these streets, there's now a longing to come together in quiet grief. heather was one of the demonstrators trying to stop white supremacists marching through charlottesville on saturday. she was killed when this car plowed through a group of protesters. her close friend now appeals for unity. i want everybody to get together and unite and spread love, and spread peace, and spread happiness, and don't let hate live. don't just let somebody walk around freely and spread their hate. tell them that that's not ok. that it's not ok.
11:16 am
one of the organisers of the unite the right rally tried to hold a press conference. he was shouted down. crowds: shame, shame, shame! and as he left, he was forced to flee. armed police had to escort him from the city. he's condemned the violence, but says he has a right to be heard. i'm willing to die for my rights, basically. i feel like my first amendment rights and the rights of the people at my rally were violated. but there is no sympathy here for those who brought hate to the city. laura bicker, bbc news, charlottesville. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: pakistan celebrates 70 years
11:17 am
anniversary and the end of colonial room. arrests of passengers suspected of being drunk on u:k.'s flight suspected of being drunk on u:k.'s flight have risen by 50% in the past year. in sport, for out of four in the relays, that included a silver for the women's race, and also the immense. cristiano scores and then is sent off and could face up to a 12 game ban after shoving the referee in the super cup win against barcelona. the eighth time in nine major but there is a first time winner. he won by 68 claiming it by two shots. arrests of passengers suspected
11:18 am
of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by 50% in the past year, according to an investigation carried out by bbc panorama. critics of the airline industry say a voluntary code on alcohol sales isn't working, and want the government to amend licensing laws. tina daheley reports. where in the uk can you buy alcohol at 4am seven days a week? the answer is at an international airport. and it seems that it's leaving passengers and crew with a hangover. an investigation by bbc panorama has revealed that arrests of those suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by 50% in the past year. half of the 4,000 cabin crew who took part in a survey carried out by panorama and unite, the union, said they had either
11:19 am
experienced or witnessed verbal, physical, or sexual abuse by drunk passengers onboard a uk flight. people just see us as bar maids in the sky. they would touch your breasts, or they'd touch your bum or your legs. i mean, i've had hands going up my skirt before. phil ward, the managing director of low—cost airline, jet2, has already banned alcohol sales on flights before 8am, and wants the industry to take tougher measures. do you think airports are doing enough? i think they could do more. i think the retailers could do more as well. two litres of beer in bars, mixers and miniatures in duty—free shops, which can only be there for one reason. but the airport 0perators association insists that their code of practice does works. i don't accept that the airports don't sell alcohol responsibly. the sale of alcohol per se is not a problem. it's the misuse of it and drinking
11:20 am
to excess and then behaving badly. earlier this year, a house of lords committee called for airport licensing to be brought into line with pubs and bars. a government decision on whether to call time on early—morning drinking at airports is now expected in the autumn. tina daheley, bbc news. armed officers in the uk's biggest police force are to be issued with head—mounted cameras. they will be attached to the caps and protective helmets of members of the metropolitan police's firearms units. scotland yard has yet to decide on how to use body—worn cameras in undercover armed operations. up to 140,000 vulnerable children did not receive the help they needed last year because their situation was not judged to be serious enough, according to action for children. the charity has found thousands of young people referred to social services did not end up getting any support before their case was closed.
11:21 am
the government says its reforms will improve the situation. marc ashdown reports. debby has been working in children's services for 16 years, and helps families with anything from behavioural problems to domestic and substance abuse. but she says it's become harder to provide the support they need. i've got, across the sites i run, i've just under 2,500 under fives, and three members of staff. so, as much as we do, there's a lot that we can't possibly do, cos we can't be everywhere at once. the amount we've already taken, we're aware we're not picking up in the same way, and it will only get worse from that. a freedom of information request to local authorities found that last year 184,500 children's needs assessments were closed because they fell short of the criteria for support. the charity, action for children, says only around one in four families received early help services such as children's centres
11:22 am
or domestic violence programmes. we know from too many cases that if we're not able to help children early, that there are strong likelihoods that things will get worse for them. for example, in serious case reviews, 70% of the time, we know that there have been early warning signs of the outcomes. but we also know that if we give children and families the tools to help themselves much earlier, then they're much less likely to need help later on in any case. the local government association blames government cuts for squeezing services. but the department for education says is taking action to support vulnerable children by reforming social care services and better protecting victims of domestic violence and abuse. it says councils spent almost £8 billion last year on children's social care, but it wants to help them do more. marc ashdown, bbc news. police in norfolk have charged a 23 year—old man with the murder of peter wrighton — who was attacked as he walked
11:23 am
his dogs nine days ago. we can go live now to kim riley. talk through the proceedings, kim. 23—year—old appeared by video link. it was his first court appearance after being charged of the murder of peter writing, on saturday the 5th of august. he was a retired bt engineer from of august. he was a retired bt engineerfrom the of august. he was a retired bt engineer from the village of bannon and his body was found in heathland, very close to a path. a brief hearing, it lasted no more than two minutes, alexander palmer was wearing a blue sweatshirt and trousers, had stubble, he spoke quite clearly to confirm his name, his age and his address and he gave
11:24 am
his age and his address and he gave his address to be in the village of crinkle food which is near norwich. there was no application for bail or enter a peer. he must be in norwich crown court tomorrow morning. today's hearing followed quite a lot of police activity over the weekend. 0n of police activity over the weekend. on saturday, we come from the body being discovered, more than 700 people were questioned by police. they had set up roadblocks close to the scene. we talked to about 700 people. they have had 170 calls and from the public unease at all this helped them find possibly key witnesses to what could have happened on saturday. alexander palmer as i say is expected to appear next in the crown courtjust appear next in the crown courtjust a few yards away from here. henke very much for that. a 16—year—old boy is due in court later accused of carrying out a series of moped acid
11:25 am
attacks in london. the teenager allegedly targeted six victims in less than 90 minutes onjuly 13th, spraying them in the face with a noxious liquid. the victims were all men on bikes. the defendant will appear before wood green crown court. a 27—year—old man is due in court accused of murdering his mother and sister in north—west london. the women — aged 66 and 33 — were found stabbed to death in golders green on friday. joshua cohen was charged last night. plans to build a garden bridge in london have been wound up. they said they had no hope of building the bridge. first proposed in 2012 back by then their borisjohnson, it had beenin by then their borisjohnson, it had been in doubt since sadiq khan
11:26 am
polled support for it back in april. a national breast cancer charity has been given an official warning for the way it's been running its finances. the charity commission found that the national hereditary breast cancer helpline was spending as little as 3% of its funds on charity work. it's also emerged that founder and trustee wendy watson, was paid more than £30,000. lawyers for mrs watson and the charity described the payments as "an error". a rise in crime committed in the countryside has been described as ‘deeply worrying' by a rural insurer. latest figures from nfu mutual show claims have risen by more than a fifth in the first half of the year. the insurer says farmers are continually increasing security as thieves become more sophisticated. for a full summary of the news you can go to our website where you'll be able to get more details on all of our top stories. the great bell, commonly known as big ben, will sound
11:27 am
out its world—famous bongs next monday for the last time until 2021. officials at westminster have confirmed that from noon on the 21st of august, the bell will fall silent while major repair work takes place to safeguard big ben and the elizabeth tower forfuture generations. we can speak now to our political correspondent leila nathoo who's in westminster. top of the tower. in guessing it has been allowed. —— loud. top of the tower. in guessing it has been allowed. -- loud. yes. we have protective if phones to put on. we are right at the top of the elizabeth tower, here it is, big ben. 13.7 tonnes of it. here are the bells that chime on the cause of the hour. all of these bills will be falling silent for the next four yea rs falling silent for the next four years to allow renovations to take place. it is not the actual bell that needs repairing, it is the
11:28 am
mechanism that makes the clock tick and the hammers hit the bells that needs to be repaired. there is a wider programme of renovations going on in the tower itself, things like damp, condensation. there will be a lifting, which i can tell you having trudged up all these stairs is much needed. workers will be carrying out all those pieces of work. in the coming weeks and months, there will be scaffolding covering the entire tower, they are hoping that at least one clock face will be visible at all times and to keep that clock face running with a motor, but it will be very strange indeed for all those coming to westminster not to hear these familiar sounds. this is not the first time that the bells have fallen silent, is that right? yes. there was a period in the 1980s for a couple of years when renovations were being carried out, but this will be the longest period of time that big ben will no longer
11:29 am
chime. there are plans for the bells to ring on particular days like new year and remembrance sunday, but there is a little gathering planned for next monday lunchtime at noon when the final bells. and, people will be able to hear the bells. stay with us. i will let you get your ear protectors on, the bell will chime at half past. can you feel the vibrations when it does it? yes. it is completely deafening and if we didn't have these protective earphones on, it would be extremely loud. even with the headphones on, i think i'm just going to get one now. residents will be great. the tovey cameraman richard can get his headphones on to. bells ring.
11:30 am
brilliant stuff. i hope richard is not vibrating. he has got a very still camera there. impressive stuff to be up close and personal. wonderful to be up here. amazing, as you can imagine. two cv bell that so much talked about, amazing. it has a little crack in it. great to be up close and personal. thank you very much indeed. let's see what the weather is. we have a lot of cloud and outbreaks of rain across western powers of the
11:31 am
uk. this is a scene in perth and can last a few minutes ago. we have got some sunshine. we have sunshine across east anglia and the south—east of england. we will keep that sunshine into the afternoon temperatures will get you 2324 perhaps 25 degrees. elsewhere you can see lots of cloud around and rain quite patchy and places. some dry interludes. temp just getting to 17 or 18 or 19 celsius. this evening in the west will pep up a bit. heavy bursts travelling eastward overnight. it may be with you first thing in the morning across the south—east of england and the north—east of scotland and north east england. that'll clear for most of us. choose the largely dry with one or two scattered showers. temperatures of around 70 degrees or 24 degrees. —— 17 degrees. this is bbc newsroom live.
11:32 am
the headlines at 11.32. 70 years on from its creation — pakistan celebrates its independence and the partition from india at the end of british colonial rule. vigils have been held in cities across the united states and the vice president mike pence has condemned far right groups, after a woman was killed in charlottesville protesting against a white supremacist rally. arrests of passengers suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by more than 50% in the past year. those working in the industry are calling on the government to do more. the family of the murdered teacher — ann maguire — britain won five medals in just over 24 hours to meet their medal target at the world athletics championships... ending with six overall... thanks mainly to four out of four in the relays. the women's 4 by 400 meters won a silver medal on the final night
11:33 am
at the london stadium... the seventh medal in seven championships in this event... with the men's quartet adding a bronze a few minutes later. prior to the weekend the team had only picked up one medal... we've come back often 0lympic we've come back often olympic games and it is hard to follow that. i think the team did so well. you're looking at the top eight finishes. so many people finishing in fourth. and we hit the medal target last night. there's plenty positive to ta ke night. there's plenty positive to take the steam and a lot of people here you will see feature on that podium in tokyo in 2020. this is my seventh with champs and my first was in helsinki. —— second world championships. this is a completely different era. we're moving on and people like myself and greg are probably at the end of our careers.
11:34 am
there are a lot of talented people. there are a lot of talented people. there are a lot of fourth places and nobody wants to finish fourth but it is promising because you look at the ages of those guys and they are only going to develop and become better and stronger athletes. so it is exciting. manchester united's new striker got their new premier league season off to an impressive start. romelu lukaku scored twice on his home debut to give his team a 4—0 win over west ham at old trafford. he scored one in each half paul pogba then rounded off the victory to put united top after the first round of fixtures. it was a good performance with dean coming into the second half to score more goals and when a more co mforta ble more goals and when a more comfortable way. i think it was a very positive performance with a good reflection of the confidence levels. good reflection of the confidence levels. tottenham's two nil win over newcastle, marked byjonjo shelvey‘s decision to stand on the ankle of dele alli.
11:35 am
that's aw him sent off four minutes into the second half. the match was goalless then, and the dismissal proved costly as ali then went on to score the opening goal in a 2—0 win for tottenham. meanwhile the world's most expensive player also made an immediate impact. neymar cost paris saint germain £200 million and scored in their 3—nil league win over guingamp. he also set up one of the other goals... cristiano ronaldo helped real madrid to beat barcelona in the first leg of the spanish super cup. but that wasn't the half of it at camp nou. good goal... understated celebration... it cost him a yellow card for removing his shirt. then later... he was booked again for diving... and so sent off. and it might not be the end of the trouble either as ronaldo pushed the referee in the back before leaving the pitch. that could land him a 12 game ban
11:36 am
and we should find out more from the authorities in spain on wednesday. justin thomas has become the eighth first time winner in the last nine golf majors after his victory at the us pga championship at quail hollow. at one point in the final round five players had a share of the lead but thomas sunk this one from 40 feet to establish a two shot lead that he never relinquished. the american hit six birdies in his 68 on sunday... and he'll move up to sixth in the world rankings. that's all sport for now. for me the pga had a special place in my heart. and maybe a special drive. i want to win every tournament play and try to win every major. at the end of the day this was really cool. for this to be my first one and have my daddy and my grandmother was watching at home. i was able to talk to them and that was able to talk to them and that was pretty cool. more sport and the next hour. pakistan has been celebrating the seventieth anniversary
11:37 am
of its independence. the country came into existence after a campaign by indian muslims towards the end of british colonial rule for a separate homeland on the sub—continent — though its birth was marred by communal violence as india was divided in two. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james robbins reports. 70 years ago britain pulled out of india. seen as the jewel in its imperial crown. british rule, the british raj, had been unravelling the 1940s amid increasing sectarian clashes. lord louis mountbatten, the last viceroy of india, what's to transport their power as quickly as possible. the british brought forward the deadline for withdrawal by almost a year. in the event was home to 400 million people with muslims are making up the quarter of
11:38 am
the population with him be the majority. there can be no question of coalescing any committee where one committee has a majority with another with another majority has admitted. the only way for coercion is partition. i urge particularly muslim india to maintain peace and order. it is with no joy in my heart that i commend these proposals to you. though i have no doubt in my mind that this is the right course. so, independents also meant partition, creating not that one but two self creating countries. —— self—governing countries. 0n the 14th of august 1947 british india was heading to attend. 0ver 14th of august 1947 british india was heading to attend. over the course of two days partition was
11:39 am
also launched. the new largely moves and state of pakistan was also born while the new india were celebrating its independence. millions of people, muslims and hindus and sikhs, find themselves in what they regarded as a lot wrong sides of the new borders. 12 million or more refugees fled from one newly created country to another. fleeing from the bloodstained towns comes a new exodus, 1 million displaced persons. rejoicing turned quickly to horror and the morning. the new governments we re and the morning. the new governments were ill—equipped to deal with such a panicked mass migration. 0ne were ill—equipped to deal with such a panicked mass migration. one of the largest in history. there was a wave of massacres, each one sparking a revenge attack. whole villages divided and sectarian lines and ten —— tens of thousands of women abducted and many were raped. the bbc correspondent winford von thomas expedients of this. we saw tones are
11:40 am
soaked with the stench of death. we came to row of 1—storey houses and i had to shut my eyes. 0n the pathway and over the furniture and in the rooms there were the dead, cutup and sprawling. after the optimism of independence the people and violence that followed cast a long shadow over the next 70 years. borders drawn on his per the british government have repeatedly been a source of tension between neighbours. relations between india and pakistan have never recovered from the trauma of partition 70 yea rs from the trauma of partition 70 years ago. the chairman of the parole board, nick hardwick, says ministers ”must act now” to address the backlog of prisoners serving an indeterminate jail term. the sentence — known as imprisonment for public protection — was abolished in 2012 but more than 3,000 people in england and wales are still being held with no release date.
11:41 am
zoe conway has this report bill and christine ward are preparing themselves to visit their son in prison. he has been locked up for the last 11 years. he has been self harming. they don't know what to expect when they see him. it's been hellish. it really has. i think this is the worst year i have ever done with james, whenjames was 17, he went to prison for year for assault. near the end of his sentence, he set fire to the mattress in his cell. for doing this, a judge gave him an ipp, or imprisonment for public protection, and said he should serve a minimum of ten months. 11 years later, he is still inside. he has no release date. it never goes away. i can't remember when i proper laughed, the last time i laughed. the last time you laughed?
11:42 am
yeah. i can't remember. i don't know what it is like to have a good time any more. james wanted to write to us that he is not allowed pens because he stabs himself with them. so a nurse wrote his words down. i was rushed to hospital last week as i cut up and lost a lot of blood. i am still on constant watch. i feel ill treated and i'm still not getting anywhere after all these months. i have spoken to my sister recently and she was in tears because of my self harming. i owe my life to her. even if not to myself. i am trying so hard to stay as strong as possible but i couldn't promise her that i wouldn't do something stupid. he shoved a pen in his arm so he went to hospital for that, just for the blood poisoning. basicallyjames is saying that when he is crying out for help, he is not getting any and that is why we are so dedicated, you know, to getting him home because we have got 100% dedication.
11:43 am
in order to be released, ipp prisoners must prove to a parole board that they are no longer a risk to society. that might sound straightforward but many have struggled to access the programmes designed to reduce that risk. the system has struggled to cope. some people watching this will say, he must have done things in prison to deserve him being kept there this long, that this 11 years has to be for reason, it has to be his fault. i can't stress enough how untrue that is. he has never been violent in the 11 years in prison. the officers said that they never feel unsafe around james. james' parole hearings have been delayed repeatedly because the prison service has failed to carry out vital mental health assessments. his upcoming hearing in september is more than a year behind schedule. i dread getting up in the morning because i don't know what is going to be coming that they, what is going to happen. is there going to be
11:44 am
a knock on the door, is there going to be a phone call or whatever? a phone call to say what? took his own life and that is what i believe he will do. if we can't get him out, i think that's what it's going to be. that he will take his own life? yes. eventually. he will do, eventually. he will do. because he don't see any way out. i can't. james' family may have got used to hearing about his self harming, but they are unprepared forjust how ill he looked on the visit. we've got in there, james looked absolutely terrible. his skin's yellow, he has lost so much weight. his self harm is unbelievable. and they are just leaving him there to rot. he is on constant
11:45 am
watch because of the self harm, he's literally sat behind a cage like an animal where they walk past and point and laugh at him. how is that humane? how is that human rights? the south korean president, moon jae—in, has urged the united states and north korea to end their current stand off peacefully. addressing his senior advisors at a weekly meeting, mr moon called on north korea to halt all threatening actions meanwhile the head of the us military is in south korea for talks about the crisis. generaljoseph dunford is meeting president moonjae—in and the country's defence minister. afterwards he'll go on to china and japan. live to seoul and our correspondent there yogita limaye. how much is expected of this meeting? we have just had a word about what was discussed and for
11:46 am
what we know general dunford has told the south korean president the us will only use military action against north korea if economic and military routes fail to succeed. i'm told that the president did use the word piece several times, emphasising the statement he made earlier today that he doesn't want war to break out in the korean peninsula and wants a peaceful resolution to this crisis. this is a scheduled visit by general dunford but the timing is no critical, given it comes against the backdrop of heightened tensions between the united states and north korea. we know the joys of the dunford is due to go on to china and japan. he will no doubt take a regional view of this? while the united states and japan have conducted drills as well. last week of the threat north korea made it said it will attack the waters around the us south pacific
11:47 am
territory guam of, we know that around japan they had moved missiles into sectors and were drills conducted in the united states today. here in south korea at the annualjoint military exercises conducted by united states and south korean conducted by united states and south korea n forces conducted by united states and south korean forces will next week. we will remember that threat that north korea made of mid august to present this attack to attack guam to their president. it does not look like despite all those efforts tensions will abate soon. in a moment the business news. pakistan celebrates the seventieth anniversary of its creation, and the partition from india at the end of british colonial rule. the us vice president mike pence condemns far right groups,
11:48 am
after a woman was killed in charlottesville protesting against a white supremacist rally. and arrests of passengers suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by more than 50% in the past year. despite falling unemployment, pressure on incomes looks set to continue, with pay rises forecast at 0ne percent over the next year. according to the chartered institute of personnel and development, wage growth has weakened as the supply of labour has also gone up. this also means more applicants for new vacancies — particularly for low to medium skilled jobs. the cost of rural crime in the uk has hit £39 million — according to the latest figures from nfu mutual. it says some farmers are "turning their backs on farming altogether" due to crime. more on that in a moment. japan reports its longest run of economic growth in a decade —
11:49 am
its sixth straight quarter of economic growth. but there are concerns that soaring debt and stubborn deflation could derail the recovery in the world's third largest economy. rural crime costs the uk economy £39m a year — with many farmers now feeling "under siege" from thieves. that's according to a study by the national farmers union — that says the worst hit county is lincolnshire, where the cost of rural crime has now hit £2.5m. regionally, north east england and the midlands were the worst—affected — costing around £7 million. let's speak to tim price who is a rural affairs specialist at the national farmers union. it is interesting when you look at those figures because in some respect you might think it is a bit of a hidden crime, when we don't really much about. you can just crime, when we don't really much about. you canjust go back to
11:50 am
crime, when we don't really much about. you can just go back to the beginning, what is being stolen? just about everything that can be moved from farms, from - were just about everything that can be mc toi from farms, from - were tifv’ and %%5 tifv’ to 1d about to publish - report were about to publish the report with senior ’ f ” were about to publish the report with seniot figures for the first with senior figures for the first . e. with senior figures for the first . s. of 2017 which indicate a 20% part of 2017 which indicate a 20% rise so we have quickly change their headings on a report to warn farmers there appears to be a new wave of very determined and brazen thieves operating the countryside. where does the stuff end up? i imagine some of it has limits of resale value and are not many people who might be able to use a tractor. tractors are an international gold mine. the last five the big murky in
11:51 am
stolen tractors has been up through eastern europe and then exported right across the globe. these are machines that are worth 60 to £100,000 and are in huge demand right across the developed world and like a right across the developed world and likea car right across the developed world and like a car use it in the middle so it can be used anywhere in the world. what is implication for us? we touched on many foreigners coming back on farming altogether. i assume it also means prices go up everyone else for us as consumers. it also means prices go up everyone else for us as consumerslj it also means prices go up everyone else for us as consumers. i do not know there will be a direct impact on prices by farmers themselves and people the countryside, we find every time we meet them rural crime is top of what is because either they have been the victim or a neighbour has been the victim or they have seen somebody suspicious a p pa re ntly they have seen somebody suspicious apparently sticking out their property. that leaves two great stress and they're having to spend a small and security there purposes.
11:52 am
it cost something like £25,000 to put in reasonable securityjust for an average sized farm. thank you very much. in other business news... exports of scottish salmon have hit a record value of £346 million in the first half of the year — that's up 70% on the same time last year. the united states remains the largest market, while china is the most significant asian buyer. the chief executive of australia's largest bank is to retire following a money laundering scandal. ian narev has been head of commonwealth bank since 2011 but civil charges accuse the lender of breaching financing rules. those claims have wiped billions of dollars off the bank's market value. bitcoin is hovering above the $4,000 mark after surging past the milestone at the weekend. bloomberg reports it has soared on growing optimism faster transaction times will hasten the spread of the cryptocurrency.
11:53 am
i could explain it but it is probably really complicated. a quick look at the numbers for you. we should say that it's a little trade. a lot of traders are on holiday and nobody is really willing to call the top of the market because you've seen all those recognises at the stock markets around the world. some suggest no could be right for a correction but a lot of people away on holiday so it may not happen yet. japan's growth is picking up again and seeing its best session and about a decade but all those worries over north korea and the united states are weighing on their minds. you and me will chat about crypto conciliator. in the 1960s pirate radio changed the face of broadcasting and was revolutionary for telling continues musical monster careers of tony blackburn and john peel and kenny everett. but 50 years ago by radio
11:54 am
stations became illegal and were forced to close down. stations became illegal and were forced to close downlj stations became illegal and were forced to close down. i member going out from harwich and seeing this little boat floating around and thinking this could change all broadcasting this country. tony blackburn ‘s production was right. in the early 1960s the bbc played hardly any pop. commercial radio was banned. i broadcasting from international waters pirate stations like caroline and greater london and swinging radio england exploited a loophole. we were three and half thousand three and a half miles of the coast of france and we've flew under the panamanian flag. if anyone went on this board from this country it was like declaring war and panama. this was the london hq for radio caroline were tony blackburn had his first edition. the job any sense of what this would be for you and the pop culture?|j sense of what this would be for you and the pop culture? i really thought this is good for the start of something very big.
11:55 am
broadcasting pop music from ships like this out at sea, the pirate stations were very popular but on land they weren't just winning over millions of fans, they also faced a powerful enemy, the government. the pirates are a menace and i don't believe the toll that the public won't support action to enforce the law. at midnight on the 4th of august 1967 the marine offences act became law. it was now illegal for british citizens to work on the ships or supply them. johnnie walker had ships or supply them. johnnie walker ha d rece ntly ships or supply them. johnnie walker had recently joined ships or supply them. johnnie walker had recentlyjoined caroline. haven't changed, have i? they were fun times. i'm sure there were those the government to really like the five the pirates were mere and seven
11:56 am
of the young people and their families all loved it. it bridged all generations and all social classes. many pirate stations packed up classes. many pirate stations packed up the radio caroline continued broadcasting from the scene until 1990. it added further into international waters to avoid uk regulations. this ship was a studio throughout the 1980s. it has recently returned to the water. we wa nted recently returned to the water. we wanted to return the ship to a useful broadcasting purpose. the study as a selling point but we also wa nt to study as a selling point but we also want to know look to the future. this is radio caroline and the sound of the who. having been streamed online since the late 1990s the station has just been granted a new am broadcast license. 50 years after the law that try to ban them, britain's pop pirates are back on the water. the
11:57 am
headlines coming up but first let's get a look at the weather. we have a rather grim day across western and northern parts of the uk without bricks have been quite heavy at times across scotland. this is a recent weather watcher for toll from perth and kinross. you can see the extent of that cloud which looks more like autumn in august for not many of us. —— for many of us. that brea ks many of us. —— for many of us. that breaks towards east anglia and the south—east of england where we have the best of the sunshine. with those sunny skies not feeling too bad i suspect suffolk with those blue skies. we keep that sunshine across east anglia and the south—east of england but elsewhere quite a bit of quotas as we satellite picture and is bricks of rain. that room becomes a bit more patch into the afternoon. still some heavy bursts into the afternoon, particularly in central and south western parts of scotland.
11:58 am
for much of northern england will be some drier interludes and maybe even some drier interludes and maybe even some riders coming through from time to time. heavy showers in northern ireland and we could see some more persistent rain coming back into south—west england to wales and patchy rain towards the midlands in central and southern england but will be the south—east that receives in the sunshine temperatures reaching 24 and maybe even 25 degrees. heavy rain coming back into the east was all that cloud and rain, temperatures not falling too far, 15 or 16 celsius and is clear skies in the north west. temperatures there from 11 to 13. wayne for south east and north—east england and eastern scotland will gradually clear and for most of us and dues did not a bad day. some sunny spells and 12 scattered showers arrived throughout the day. temperatures about 17 or 19 degrees but in the south—east corner again
11:59 am
temperatures up into the 20s, 22 or 24 degrees. the ridge of high pressure takes us into wednesday. two things mostly settled this area of low pressure is going to get them backin of low pressure is going to get them back in and we will see things deteriorate somewhat across northern ireland and western fringes of england and wales during wednesday. you can see 60 degrees in belfast but elsewhere it should be dry on wednesday and thursday will have a mixture of sunny spells and showers. to summarise for this week, it stays quite unsettled with sunny spells, heavy showers around and it will turn cooler later in the week. more details on the website that is it from me. bye. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11. -- 12.
12:00 pm
the end of british colonial rule in india and the start of partition — it's 70 years since the formation of an independent india and pakistan. celebrations have taken place in pakistan with fireworks to celebrate independence day. vice president pence condemns far right groups, after a woman was killed in charlottesville protesting against a white supremacist rally. we have no tolerance for hate and violence, for white supremacists, neo—nazis or the kkk. these dangerous fringe groups have no place in american public life and in the american debate debate and we condemn them in the strongest possible terms. arrests of passengers suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by 50% in the past year.
12:01 pm
the family of murdered teacher ann maguire have lost their legal challenge to call pupils in contact with her schoolboy killer before her murder to give evidence. a charity says around 140,000 vulnerable children didn't receive help last year because their situation was not judged to be serious enough. also, the sound of the underground. 50 years ago today, britain's pirate radio stations were outlawed. it led to the closure of stations which had gathered listeners by playing pop music, rarely heard on the bbc at the time. good afternoon.
12:02 pm
it's monday 14th august. i'm rachel schofield. welcome to bbc newsroom live. 70 years ago tonight, 200 years of british colonial rule in india came to an end and the country was partitioned into two independent nation states — hindu—majority india and muslim—majority pakistan. the result was the one of the largest mass migrations ever recorded. pakistan celebrates its independence day today, with india marking the occasion tomorrow. in 1947, after months of political deadlock, britain agreed to divide the country in two. a separate and mainly muslim nation, pakistan, was created to meet concerns that the large muslim minority would be at a disadvantage in hindu—majority india. partition triggered one of the great calamities of the modern era, perhaps the biggest movement of people, outside war and famine, that the world has ever seen.
12:03 pm
no one knows the precise numbers, but an estimated 12 million people found themselves on the wrong side of the border: hindus and sikhs moved to india and muslims travelled in the opposite direction to pakistan. sectarian violence erupted and hundreds of thousands of people on all sides were killed. reeta chakrabarti is in the pakistani city of karachi for the celebrations and sent this report. it's pakistan's birthday and at every street corner, there are flags and celebrations. but it's 70 years have been very mixed. it was founded as a democracy, but has had military rule. people argue whether it's founder, muhammad jinnah, wanted a secular state or an islamic one. i went to one of karachi's universities to ask students what they think of muhammad jinnah and pakistan today. you muhammadjinnah, it's the biggest name for pakistan. he is like a father. the father of the nation and he created pakistan. do you think muhammad jinnah would be happy with pakistan as it is today? he would be happy.
12:04 pm
he would be really happy. pakistan is progressing every day, every second. on this 70th anniversary of independence, the country has grown very well and it is flourishing day by day and i hope it will prosper day by day. do you think that's muhammad jinnah would be happy with pakistan as it is today? not that much. basically he would see the basic needs of the people are not fulfilling right now. much of the problem now is in the religion because people nowadays, they are not tolerant and they are too much emotional. crowds come to muhammad jinnah mausoleum to pay their respects. the countries he founded was rocked again last month when the prime minister was forced to resign over corruption charges. finding political stability remains one of pakistan's many challenges. earlier i spoke to dr yasmin khan,
12:05 pm
lecturer in british history at oxford university and author of the great partition: the making of india and pakistan. i asked her how strong the identities of the two countries has now become since partition. it is hard for them to meet. to go across and get visas. there are peace organisations, we have to remember that indians and pakistanis are divided among ideas about nationalism, what kind of state india should be, what kind of state pakistan should be. it is not a two—way division in any way. it gets harder and harderfor people to share a common history and talk about this root and foundations and to see what happened in 1947 in the same way. you spoke about your interest as a second—generation and young person with no direct experience, difference do you think there is between the attitudes of people who
12:06 pm
remember their childhood? a bit of a difference. people say that the elderly generation speak very fondly about neighbours, friends. leaving keys with the neighbours, people who helped them escape. mixed feelings, complex. later generations, it has become stripped down and simplified and harder to get back to that texture and nuance. with me now is the journalist mihir bose, the author midnight to glorious morning, which explores how india has been transformed over the past 70 years. do all 1947. i hesitate to suggest that you will have clear memories of the immediate moment, but what do you take from that childhood of change? it has been enormous change. when i was growing up, the fear was that india wouldn't survive because it has been partitioned. many
12:07 pm
religions, races, languages. many dialects. the moment the prime minister died, the country would split up, that is what people said. it was a time of shortages. you couldn't invite more than 50 people toa wedding. couldn't invite more than 50 people to a wedding. food came from america. you had a £2 restriction if you went abroad. i came here to study from loughborough university because it wasn't one of the 0xbridge university, people were snobbish. i had to pay for the first year. it was that kind of country, it didn't look like it would manage change. it has. literacy was 12%, now it is 74. in that sense, india -- it now it is 74. in that sense, india —— it has survived. pakistan was
12:08 pm
considered the strong state, stopping communism. it is completely changed. come along way and defied expectation. yes. that makes me optimistic, but what worries me is that young indians i don't think look at where they have come from. they are in danger of making some of the mistakes that led to partition. there is a bit of intolerance in the air. mum by, now for instance, it is unbelievable. muslims sikhs live side—by—side. now there is a form of religious apartheid. houses are only sold in certain areas about what area you are in. my mother was a devout hindu, next to it was a muslim saint who we bow down to in the evenings. we got sweets from the
12:09 pm
goddess in the morning and water in the evening. each way you win. given that the partition has caused entrenched views, how can that be and picked? there is a growing middle class, even middle—class with a lot of problems, there needs to be a lot of problems, there needs to be a realisation of cultural unity. despite all the differences. and that religion doesn't hold together. looking at pakistan's story, the creation of bangladesh shows there isa creation of bangladesh shows there is a bengal culture. my folks come from bingo. in my book, i talk about going back to bangladesh. the bengalis food is better in bangladesh than it is in bengal. there was a lot of unity there. but ona there was a lot of unity there. but on a lot of weight. concentrate on
12:10 pm
the culture, forget the religion. you could really have good coexistence. it will be interesting to see. some challenges there. great to see. some challenges there. great to have your thoughts there. the us vice president, mike pence, has specifically condemned far—right groups following violence over the weekend in virginia. president trump has been criticised for not identifying any specific group when he condemned the trouble. a woman was killed and 19 people were injured when a car was driven into a crowd protesting against a far—right rally in cha rlottesville. we have no tolerance for hate and violence from white supremacists, neo—nazis or the kkk. these dangerous fringe groups have no place in american public life and the american debate and we condemn them in the strongest possible terms. 0ur washington correspondent laura bicker was at a vigil in charlottesville last night
12:11 pm
to remember heather heyer, who was killed during the protests. 0ur washington correspondent laura bicker was at a vigil the candles and songs are for heather heyer, who died standing up for what she believed in. after a weekend of deadly violence and anger on these streets, there's now a longing to come together in quiet grief. heather was one of the demonstrators trying to stop white supremacists marching through charlottesville on saturday. she was killed when this car plowed through a group of protesters. her close friend now appeals for unity. i want everybody to get together and unite and spread love, and spread peace, and spread happiness, and don't let hate live. don't just let somebody walk around freely and spread their hate. tell them that that's not ok. that it's not ok. one of the organisers of the unite the right rally tried to hold a press conference.
12:12 pm
he was shouted down. crowds: shame, shame, shame! and as he left, he was forced to flee. armed police had to escort him from the city. he's condemned the violence, but says he has a right to be heard. i'm willing to die for my rights, basically. i feel like my first amendment rights and the rights of the people at my rally were violated. but there is no sympathy here for those who brought hate to the city. laura bicker, bbc news, charlottesville. washington correspondence joins us now. you have seen mike pence, out and takea now. you have seen mike pence, out and take a different approach to the president. yes. using the word,
12:13 pm
naming itfor president. yes. using the word, naming it for what people think it is. an attack by neo—nazis, white supremacists, whatever you want to call the groups was that these putting a name to it. the irony of the city were asian and something the city were asian and something the president is coming in for —— the president is coming in for —— the irony of the situation. the irony of barack 0bama coming in for criticism about not saying islamic with terrorism, but now trump is doing the same. it makes it more difficult for people to heal, come together. if you have a political row going on alongside it, which is what we have. talking of people coming together, we had seen vigils across the united states. had you reflect on the mood now and the
12:14 pm
sense of how big an issue all of this is for america? this rumbles through american society as a bit of a drumbeat. it didn't start with donald trump, it was around before that. you will remember those killings in south carolina couple of yea rs killings in south carolina couple of years ago when a white supremacist shot a bunch, years ago when a white supremacist shota bunch, nine years ago when a white supremacist shot a bunch, nine i think it was, ina shot a bunch, nine i think it was, in a church. you do get these killings and it is a hangover from some of the loyalties that went back from the civil war from the south. it is not a new thing. the difficulty is that it what has kept them in check is the effective use of law and order and strong message from central government, white house. that is what people are frightened about here. there is not a strong message from the white house, that these groups will become
12:15 pm
emboldened, organise more, feel able to be out in the open even more and do more damage than they already have done. thank you very much indeed. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: pakistan celebrates the 70th anniversary of its creation and the partition from india at the end of british colonial rule. mike pence condemns far right groups after a woman was killed in charlottesville protesting against a white supremacist rally. arrests of passengers suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by more than 50% in the past year. let's get across the sports news. good afternoon. britain won five
12:16 pm
medals and just after 24 hours. to be there medal target. britain won five medals in just over 24 hours to meet their medal target at the world athletics championships... ending with six overall... thanks mainly to four out of four in the relays. the women's 4 by 400 meters won a silver medal on the final night at the london stadium. the seventh medal in seven championships in this event, with the men's quartet adding a bronze a few minutes later. prior to the weekend the team had only picked up one medal. this is my seventh world championships which was pretty dire. —— the one in helsinki before was dire. we are now moving on from some oh and jess and people like myself and greg are probably on the way to the end of our careers, but there are many people coming through. we had a lot of fourth places, nobody wa nts to had a lot of fourth places, nobody wants to come forth, but if you look at the ages, they will develop and
12:17 pm
get better as athletes. cristiano ronaldo helped real madrid to beat barcelona in the first leg of the spanish super cup. his celebration prompted a yellow card. a second and therefore a red following just two minutes later. another attempting to get through on goal. down he goes. he was booked for diving, it is reynaldo's reaction which could cost him and maximum 12 match game. find out more about that on wednesday. rail went on to win the game 3—1. justin thomas went on to win the masters. five players had a share in the lead at some point. he sunk this one from 40 feet to establish a two shot lead that he went on to never relinquish.
12:18 pm
he hit six birdies and will move on to sixth in the world rankings. for me, the pga definitely had a special place in my heart and maybe a special drive. like i say, i want to win every tournament i play, every major. at the end of the day, this was really cool. this is my first one, with my dad here, my grandpa was watching at home. i was able to talk to him, that was pretty cool. that is all this port for now. thank —— the sport. ajudge has ruled that pupils who witnessed the murder
12:19 pm
of the leeds teacher ann maguire should not give evidence at her inquest. her husband is challenged a decision not to call students who witnessed the attack to court. ann maguire was stabbed to death in her classroom at corpus christi catholic college in leeds 2014. reminders about this awful event. yes. she was stabbed as she was teaching back in 2014. her killer was 15—year—old will mccormack, sentenced to life in prison. convicted of murder, suspected to serve around 20 years in jail. convicted of murder, suspected to serve around 20 years injail. no inquest into her death has taken place yet. that should happen later this year, but earlier this year, the assistant coroner of west yorkshire ruled that former pupils who knew will comics. don mcguire had
12:20 pm
wa nted knew will comics. don mcguire had wanted them because the student had told others that he was carrying a knife and also there were threats that he would carry out the killing. lord justice at the high court today handed down his judgment lord justice at the high court today handed down hisjudgment said that the inquest should go ahead later this year and dismissed that claim for those former pupils to be called as witnesses. what reaction has there been from the family? no doubt very disappointing news for them. the family have said through their solicitors that they are disappointed. they say that they will now take stock, discuss their options with the legal team, remained committed to finding out the truth of exactly what would happen back in april 20 14. they say they want to see an open, fair process. that is the only way they
12:21 pm
believe that lessons will be learned from the process. arrests of passengers suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by 50% in the past year, according to an investigation carried out by bbc panorama. critics of the airline industry say a voluntary code on alcohol sales isn't working, and want the government to amend licensing laws. tina daheley reports. it's available 24—hour at a day in every airport across the uk. and it seems that it's leaving passengers and crew with a hangover. an investigation by bbc panorama has revealed that arrests of those suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by 50% in the past year. half of the 4,000 cabin crew who took part in a survey carried out by panorama and unite,
12:22 pm
the union, said they had either experienced or witnessed verbal, physical, or sexual abuse by drunk passengers onboard a uk flight. people just see us as bar maids in the sky. they would touch your breasts, or they'd touch your bum or your legs. i mean, i've had hands going up my skirt before. phil ward, the managing director of low—cost airline, jet2, has already banned alcohol sales on flights before 8am, and wants the industry to take tougher measures. do you think airports are doing enough? i think they could do more. i think the retailers could do more as well. two litres of beer in bars, mixers and miniatures in duty—free shops, which can only be there for one reason. but the airport 0perators association insists that their code of practice does work. i don't accept that the airports don't sell alcohol responsibly. the sale of alcohol
12:23 pm
per se is not a problem. it's the misuse of it and drinking to excess and then behaving badly. earlier this year, a house of lords committee called for airport licensing to be brought into line with pubs and bars. a government decision on whether to call time on early—morning drinking at airports is now expected in the autumn. tina daheley, bbc news. armed officers in the uk's biggest police force are to be issued with head—mounted cameras. they will be attached to the caps and protective helmets of members of the metropolitan police's firearms units. scotland yard has yet to decide on how to use body—worn cameras in undercover armed operations. a man has been remanded in custody — charged with the murder of a grandfather — who was attacked as he walked his dogs in norfolk. 0ur correspondent, kim riley, was outside norwich magistrates' court with this update. 23—year—old alexander palmer appeared actually via video link from a police custody suite,
12:24 pm
some miles from here. it was his first appearance since being charged in the early hours of this morning with the murder of peter wrighton, and 83—year—old he'd been out walking his dogs on saturday of august when he was attacked. he was a retired bt engineer from the village of bannon and his body was found in heath land very close to a path. in a very brief hearing, probably lasted no more than two minutes this morning, alexander palmer, he was wearing what appeared to be a blue sweatshirt and grey trousers committee seem to have some stubble, unshaven, he spoke quite clearly to confirm his name, his age and his address and he gave his address as being in the village of cringleford, which is near norwich. there was no application for bail,
12:25 pm
he didn't enter a plea and district judge nick watson remanded him in custody before he appears tomorrow at norwich crown court which is actuallyjust a few yards away from the magistrates' court, but there will be a hearing them. today's hearing followed quite a lot of police activity over the weekend. on saturday, a week on from the body being discovered, more than 700 people were questioned by police. they have set up roadblocks close to the scene. they have also had 170 calls in from the public and they said all this help them find possibly key witnesses to what might have happened on that saturday. alexander palmer, as i say, due to appear next in the crown court just a few yards away from here. more than 3000 people in england and wales are being held.
12:26 pm
is then hellish. it really has. this the worst year. wenzhou to 17, he went to prison for a year for assault. during the end of the sentence, he set fire to the mattress in itself. in doing this, thejudge gave him an ipp, and imprisonment for public protection, and said he should serve a minimum of ten months. 11 years later, he is still inside. he has no release date. james wanted to write to us, but he is not allowed pence because he stabs himself with them, so a nurse wrote his words down. he stabs himself with them, so a nurse wrote his words downlj he stabs himself with them, so a nurse wrote his words down. i was rushed to hospital last week as i
12:27 pm
cut up and lost a lot of blood. is both to my sister recently and she was in tears because of my self harming. iowe was in tears because of my self harming. i owe my life to her, even if not to myself. i am trying so ha rd if not to myself. i am trying so hard to stay as strong as possible, but i couldn't, so that i wouldn't do something stupid. some people watching this will save he must have done things in prison to deserve to be kept there this long, this 11 yea rs be kept there this long, this 11 years must be for a reason. it has to be his fault. he is not dangerous. he has not been violent for the 11 years in prison. the office rs for the 11 years in prison. the officers say they never feel unsafe around james. in order to be released ipp prisoners must prove to the parole board that they are no longer able risk to society. that might sound straightforward, but many have struggled to access the programme designed to assess the risk. there will be a knock on the
12:28 pm
door or a phone call to tell us. to say what? to say he has taken his own life. i think that is what he will do if we can't get her out. eventually, he will do. he doesn't see any way out. i can't. james' pa role see any way out. i can't. james' parole hearings have been delayed many times because it has failed —— they have failed to carry out assessments needed. they are shocked about how ill he looks after visiting him. he has lost so much weight. his self harm is unbelievable. they are just leaving him there to rot. he is on constant watch because of the self harm. he is sat behind a cage like an animal.
12:29 pm
they walk past and point and laugh at him. how is that humane? how is that even write? zoe conwy reporting there. first, let's cross the news room and get the weather. good afternoon. a mixed week of weather. we have got used to that. there is some sunshine in the forecast, but it is not as simple as that because while at times there will be blue skies overhead, it will generally be quite a cool week of weather and we will see some outbreaks of rain at times. various areas of wet weather out there. one drifting across scotla nd out there. one drifting across scotland at the moment. rain bridging across the south—west. heavy thundery downpours for the south west. all the while, east anglia and the south east largely dry. here, you could get up to 25 degrees. pulses of heavy and
12:30 pm
possibly thundery rain will push northwards and eastwards, thunderstorms in the far south east later on. clear spells, and mark might, cool and fresh in the northwest. tomorrow, we start off with a... spells of sunshine, a few showers, many places avoid them and spell... continue to be dry. pretty u nsettled, spell... continue to be dry. pretty unsettled, suddenly mixed through the rest of the week. must pakistan has been celebrating the 70th anniversary of its independence. vigils have been held in cities across the united states
12:31 pm
and the vice president mike pence has condemned far right groups, after a woman was killed in charlottesville protesting against a white supremacist rally. arrests of passengers suspected of being drunk at uk airports and on flights have risen by more than 50—percent in the past year. those working in the industry are calling on the government to do more. the inquest of murdered leeds schoolteacher ann maquire will not hear from students who'd been in contact with her killer, judges at the high court have ruled. several of herfamily members had wanted the coroner to hear the pupils' evidence. the great bell, commonly known
12:32 pm
as big ben, will sound out its world—famous bongs next monday for the last time forfour years. officials at westminster have confirmed that from noon on the 21st of august, the bell will fall silent while major repair work takes place to safeguard big ben and the elizabeth tower forfuture generations. i'm very glad to be able to say we can now talk to steve jaggs who is the official keeper of the great clock... . the workers are complete magician of the tower for future generations to enjoy. —— renovation. it is 160
12:33 pm
yea rs old to enjoy. —— renovation. it is 160 years old and a victorian masterpiece of architecture and engineering and we have our obligation to preserve this for future generations. in the meantime they will be people disappointed not to hear those wonderfully evocative sounds of the bells. yes, there will be people also living in london and tourists in london but let me assure you we are doing everything in our power to make sure the bell sounds very important ceremonial events such as remembrance sunday and obviously new year ‘s night. such as remembrance sunday and obviously new year 's night. that is good. some people will still get a little chance to hear them but it will be a long wait until it is finally back in action. 2021. will discern the same in all the repairs have been done? everything should be exactly the same. that is what we're planning for. there will be no change in the tone and no change in bells themselves. we are all curious back here. keeper of the great clock being your title. how does one get a
12:34 pm
job like that? basically you apply for it and i was lucky enough to be successful. is that because you're the man who is passionate about clocks or from an engineering job? the man who is passionate about clocks orfrom an engineering job? i am the reactive ceremonial manager for the palace of westminster so my day to dayjob is 42,000 calls a year and is part of that i am the ceremonial manager so i manage events like the state 0pening ceremonial manager so i manage events like the state opening of parliament and i look after big ben of elizabeth tower. thank you very much forjoining us. keeper of the great clock. pakistan has been celebrating the seventieth anniversary of its independence.
12:35 pm
the country came into existence after a campaign by indian muslims towards the end of british colonial rule for a separate homeland on the sub—continent — though its birth was marred by communal violence as india was divided in two. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james robbins reports. 70 years ago britain pulled out of india. seen as the jewel in its imperial crown. british rule, the british raj, had been unravelling the 1940s amid increasing sectarian clashes. lord louis mountbatten, the last viceroy of india, worked to transport their power as quickly as possible. the british brought forward the deadline for withdrawal by almost a year. india was home to 400 million people with hindus were the majority. muslims are making up the quarter of the population with him be the majority. there can be no question
12:36 pm
of coercing any community where one community has a majority with another with another majority has admitted. the only way for coercion is partition. i urge particularly muslim india to maintain peace and order. it is with nojoy in my heart that i commend these proposals to you. though i have no doubt in my mind that this is the right course. so, independence also meant partition, creating not that one but two self creating countries. the new borders were brought together in five weeks. 0n the 14th of august 1947 british india was heading to attend. over the course of two days partition was also launched. the new largely muslim state
12:37 pm
of pakistan was also born while the new india were celebrating its independence. millions of people, muslims and hindus and sikhs, find themselves in what they regarded as a lot wrong sides of the new borders. 12 million or more refugees fled from one newly created country to another. fleeing from the bloodstained towns comes a new exodus, 1 million displaced persons. rejoicing turned quickly to horror and mourning. the new governments were ill—equipped to deal with such a panicked mass migration. one of the largest in history. there was a wave of massacres, each one sparking a revenge attack. tens of thousands of women abducted and many were raped. the bbc correspondent winford vaughan thomas expedients of this. we saw towns soaked
12:38 pm
with the stench of death. we came to row of 1—storey houses and i had to shut my eyes. 0n the pathway and over the furniture and in the rooms there were the dead, cutup and sprawling. after the optimism of independence the people and violence that followed cast a long shadow over the next 70 years. borders drawn by the british government have repeatedly been a source of tension between neighbours. relations between india and pakistan have never recovered from the trauma of partition 70 years ago. a vigil has been held for the woman killed during violence in the town of charlottesville in virginia. heather heyer died when a car was driven into a crowd of people, protesting about a rally by white supremacists. her close friend marissa blair has been speaking to our correspondent laura bicker. heather was always... she always spoke with conviction, she liked to make you laugh. she didn't care what she said. she just wanted
12:39 pm
the best for everyone. she stood for equality. she didn't wa nt she stood for equality. she didn't want hague and wanted everyone to be equal. she understood as the white woman the privilege she might have had and she was sorry that minorities had to go through what they have to go through. when it happened heather was standing right in front of me. what did you see? we we re in front of me. what did you see? we were just marching and there was a commotion at the front of the crowd. we thought somebody got into scuffling and you look up and you see bodies flying. it is like a split—second decision and leading thinkers to move that is coming so fast and i could feel was my fiance pushing me. and then it wasjust
12:40 pm
chaos. i started looking for marcus. ifind chaos. i started looking for marcus. i find markets. then chaos. i started looking for marcus. ifind markets. then we chaos. i started looking for marcus. i find markets. then we started looking for heather. —— marcus. then we find her. what you think about the person who has done this?” think it is an act of terror and a hate crime and it should be treated as this. the group that was here stood for hate. he knew what he was doing. it was a deliberate act and he knew what he was doing. everybody is saying she was crossing the street. we were walking on the street. we were walking on the street which i'm told was closed. he barrelled down. you could hear the horsepower and the wheels. i want everybody to get together and unite and spread love and spread peace and spread happiness and don't let hate live. don't let somebody walk around freely and spread their hate. tell
12:41 pm
them that is not ok. we just need to spread them that is not ok. we just need to s p rea d love them that is not ok. we just need to spread love all day, every day and not just when something spread love all day, every day and notjust when something like this happens, when the tragedy happens. now everybody wants to get together and rally and be there and we will be there for heather but heather would want is to be there all the time and that's what we will do. up to 140,000 vulnerable children did not receive the help they needed last year because their situation was not judged to be serious enough, according to action for children. the charity has found thousands of young people referred to social services did not end up getting any support before their case was closed. the government says its reforms will improve the situation. marc ashdown reports. debbie has been working in children's services for 16 years and helps families with anything from behavioural problems to domestic and substance abuse.
12:42 pm
but she says it's become harder to provide the support they need. i've got, across the sites i run, i've gotjust under 2,500 under fives and three members of staff, so as much as we do, there's a lot that we can't possibly do because we can't be everywhere at once. the more they're taking... we're already aware of families that we're not picking up in the same way and it's only going to get worse from that. a freedom of information request to local authorities found that last year, 184,500 children's needs assessments were closed because they fell short of the criteria for support. the charity action for children says only around one in four families received early help services such as children's centres or domestic violence programmes. we know from too many cases that if we're not able to help children early, that there are strong likelihoods that things will get worse for them. for example, in serious case reviews, 70% of the time we know that there have been early warning signs of the likely outcomes. but we also know that if we give children and families the tools to help themselves much earlier, then they're much more likely not
12:43 pm
to need help later on in any case. the local government association blames government cuts for squeezing services. but the department for education says it's taking action to support vulnerable children by reforming social care services and better protecting victims of domestic violence and abuse. it says councils spent almost £8 billion last year on children's social care, but it wants to help them do more. marc ashdown, bbc news. a 16—year—old boy is due in court later accused of carrying out a series of moped acid attacks in london. the teenager allegedly targeted six victims in less than 90 minutes onjuly 13th, spraying them in the face with a noxious liquid. the victims were all men on bikes. the defendant will appear before wood green crown court. a 27—year—old man is due in court accused of murdering his mother and sister in north—west london.
12:44 pm
the women — aged 66 and 33 — were found stabbed to death in golders green on friday. joshua cohen was charged last night. plans to build a garden bridge in central london have been wound up after backers of the project gave up their search for financial support. the garden bridge trust said they had "no choice" but to abandon hope of building the pedestrian crossing linking the south bank and temple. first proposed in 2013 and backed by then—mayor borisjohnson — the bridge's future had been in doubt ever since london mayor sadiq khan pulled the greater london authority's support for the project in april. a national breast cancer charity has been given an official warning for the way it's been running its finances. the charity commission found that the national hereditary breast cancer helpline was spending as little as three per cent of its funds on charity work. it's also emerged that founder and trustee wendy watson, was paid
12:45 pm
more than £30,000. lawyers for mrs watson and the charity described the payments as "an error". a crime in the countryside has been described as deeply disturbing by an insurer. the insurer says farmers are having to tackle rising crime as these are becoming more sophisticated. you can get details on all other top stories from our website. the south korean president, moon jae—in, has urged the united states and north korea to end their current stand off peacefully. addressing his senior advisors at a weekly meeting, mr moon called on north korea to halt all threatening actions. meanwhile the head of the us military is in south korea for talks
12:46 pm
about the crisis. generaljoseph dunford is meeting president moonjae—in and the country's defence minister. afterwards he'll go on to china and japan. we have just had a word about what was discussed in the meeting and from what we know general dunford is told at the south korean president of the united states will only use the church against north korea if economic and diplomatic routes fail to succeed. in fact what i'm told is that the president actually use the word piece several times during this conversation, emphasising the statement he made earlier today that he does not want war to break out on the korean peninsula and he wants a peaceful resolution to this crisis. this is a scheduled visit by general dunford and the timing is critical government comes against the backdrop of heightened tensions between united states and north
12:47 pm
korea. we know that joseph dunford is due to go on to china and japan and no doubt will be taking original view of this. while the united states and japan have been conducting drills as well, because last week the threat that north korea made seeing it will attack the waters around the us pacific territory of guam, we do know these rockers will fly over japan territory of guam, we do know these rockers will fly overjapan and in japan they had moved missile interce ptors. japan they had moved missile interceptors. here the annualjoint military exercises conducted by united states and south korea forces will begin next week and also lets remember that threat that north korea made, setting a deadline of mid—august to present the plan to attack guam to their leader and after that they will wait for his command. despite all those efforts
12:48 pm
it does not look like tensions will abate soon. the end of british colonial rule and the start of partition. it is 70 yea rs the start of partition. it is 70 years since formation of an independent india and pakistan. the us vice president mike pence condemns far right groups after woman was killed in charlottesville protesting against the white supremacist rally. arrest of passenger suspected of being drunk and you pay up boards and on flights have risen by over 50%. —— at united kingdom airports and on flights has risen by over 50% in the last year. security forces in burkina faso have killed two suspected jihadist gunmen after a terrorist attack which killed at least 18 people —
12:49 pm
including a french citizen — in the capital 0uagadougou. the incident took place just 200 metres from a similar attack in january last year. bill hayton reports. violence has returned to the main streets of 0uagadougou. security forces sealed off the area around the turkish restaurant and tried to treat the wounded. witnesses said three men arrived in a car and opened fire on those sitting inside. anyone who could, ran. translation: we had just finished eating and had left the restaurant. we were waiting outside for the driver to come to and pick us up and we heard the shootings. afterwards, i didn't hear anything any more. the apparent target was the 200 metres from the site of a previous attack, a year and a half ago. that was claimed by a group called the al-qaeda in the islamic maghreb. it's assumed the same group is responsible for this assault, too. translation: in the beginning, with that was robbery, but then we realised it was more than that. some were telling us we were robbed, and then thrown out. but then we saw what happened — it's worse than we thought. burkina faso has seen
12:50 pm
a string of attacks claimed byjihadist groups. a multinationalforce intended to fight back is still being formed. for the time being, ouagadougou is a city on edge. bill hayton, bbc news. bolivia's president has formally enacted a law stripping a national park of its protected status so that a new highway can be built through it. the plan had been cancelled six years ago following a march by indigenous people. however, president morales — who is also of indigenous heritage — has accused his critics of colonial attitudes. russell trott reports. celebrations from at least of bolivia ‘s indigenous peoples. this occasion has provoked political fireworks and muslim communities. at the rally in the city of trinidad, the rally in the city of trinidad, the president signed a law and tending to allow development of a
12:51 pm
national park created over 50 years ago to protect the rights of indigenous peoples. the new law has been condemned by environmental activists that the president dismissed their objections. the so—called colonial environmentalism is not interested in the indigenous movement having schools and hospitals and having electricity that we have highways. the government wants to build a highway, nearly 180 kilometres long, write to the park. this is the vast majority of indigenous people support the plan that are plenty who still it. translation: the president has enacting a law that will bury indigenous peoples. he is destroying their heritage belongs to bolivia.
12:52 pm
campaigners will take the case to the constitutional tribunal and may repeat a march in the capital that helped defeat a similar plan six yea rs helped defeat a similar plan six years ago. the battle in bolivia between environment and development is farfrom between environment and development is far from over. australia's deputy prime minister has revealed he may be a citizen of new zealand. barnabyjoyce has told the country's parliament he was "shocked" when the new zealand high commission contacted him to say he could be a citizen by descent, because the politician's father was born there. he has referred himself to the high court because holding public office as a dual citizen is not allowed in australia. in the 1960s pirate radio changed the face of broadcasting — it was revolutionary for playing continuous music — and launched the careers of tony blackburn, john peel and kenny everett. but 50 years ago today, pirate radio stations became illegal and they were forced to close down. tim muffett reports. i remember going out from harwich
12:53 pm
and seeing this little boat floating around, and i thought, this is going to alter everything that comes through. tony blackburn's prediction was right. in the early ‘60s, the bbc played hardly any pop. commercial radio was banned. by broadcasting from international waters, pirate stations like caroline, radio london, and swinging radio england exploited a loophole. we were 400 miles off the coast. - 3.5 — 3.5 miles. we flew under the panamanian flag. now, if anyone went on to that boat from this country, it was like declaring war on panama. this was radio caroline's london ho, where tony blackburn had his first audition. did you have any sense of what a big deal this was going to be for you and for pop culture?
12:54 pm
yes, i did, yes. i really thought that this was going to be the start of something very big. good morning, everyone. tony blackburn with you, feeling a bit under the weather. we have about an eight—force gale out there. broadcasting pop music from ships like this, out at sea, pirate stations were very popular. but on land, they won'tjust winning over millions of fans. they also faced a powerful enemy — the government. the pirates are a menace, and i don't believe at all that the public wouldn't support action to enforce the law. at midnight on 14 august 1967, the marine offences act became law. it was now illegal for british citizens to work on the ships, or to supply them. johnnie walker had recentlyjoined caroline. look at that, you look so young! i haven't changed, have i? they were fun times. and i'm sure there were those in the government that really liked the fact that there were pirates on the air, and certainly
12:55 pm
the young people and their families all loved it. it bridged all generations and all social classes. many pirate stations packed up, but caroline continued broadcasting from the sea until 1990. it anchored further into international waters to avoid uk regulations. this ship, the ross revenge, was a ship in the ‘80s. —— was its studio. it recently returned to the water. what we wanted to do is return the ship to a useful broadcasting purpose. while we dine out on our nostalgia, which is our selling point, we also want to now look to the future. this is radio caroline, the sound of the who. having been streamed online since the late ‘90s, the station has just been granted a new am broadcast license. 50 years after the government tried to ban them, britain's pop pirates are back on the water. in a moment the news at one
12:56 pm
with kate silverton and we'll we will be alive in lahore and delhi. first the weather. there are some fine weather and the forecast for this week, you just need to know where to look for it. london was a decent bed this morning with blue skies overhead for this weather watcher. a sunny start and weather watcher. a sunny start and we will see some spells of such as wea k we will see some spells of such as weak are generally quite could feel to the weather and some outbreaks of rain moving through at times. that was the case across northern ireland this morning with grey skies and co antrim with a bit of rain and drizzle and along long stroke of cloud we have various areas of wet
12:57 pm
weather running from south to north. one across scotland with outbreaks of rain here and also some rain for central and south western portions of england as well as wales. some further heavily thundery downpours swinging into the further south west later on. it is a snapshot of four o'clock. a lot of cloud across scotla nd o'clock. a lot of cloud across scotland with outbreaks of rain. 15 or16 scotland with outbreaks of rain. 15 or 16 degrees. an extra bright spells and thundery downpours from scotla nd spells and thundery downpours from scotland and northern ireland and the brief dry interlude from northern england. this dry weather holds on for east anglia and the south—east tempters could block to 25 degrees. further westward at 16 or 1780 degrees without bits of rain and some pulses of heavy thundery rain swinging across the south—west of england into wales has got was heaving. this wet weather will drift northwards overnight and gives pooler travelling conditions. a clutch of thunderstorms in the south—east overnight. players felt elsewhere in this fairly chilly night across the north—west. the
12:58 pm
more some wet weather that there will clearly quite quickly and it will clearly quite quickly and it will leave behind a mixture of sunshine or showers. some will be heavy and thundery in the north but most heavy and thundery in the north but m ost pla ces heavy and thundery in the north but most places will stay about drive. tem pters most places will stay about drive. tempters 17 degrees to 19 degrees for more spit up to the 20s for east anglia and the south—west. it could bea anglia and the south—west. it could be a little bit chilly to start off wednesday. period should stay dry with a spells of sunshine. —— temperatures. 17 degrees to 22 degrees in wales and the south—west. thursday another day sunny spells and heavy showers and some very wet and heavy showers and some very wet and potentially windy weather in on friday. india and pakistan mark 70 years of independence from britain — a moment of freedom that came amid one of the largest mass migrations the world has ever seen. at the stroke of midnight when the
12:59 pm
world sleeps india will awake to freedom. but the optimism quickly gave way to widespread violence which left over a million people dead. i'm right in pakistan where despite a violent birth the nation is celebrating with people filling the streets. also this lunchtime. strong condemnation of white supremacists after the violence in virginia as the us vice president gives a statement that goes much further than donald trump's.
1:00 pm
1:01 pm

33 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on