Skip to main content

tv   Newsday  BBC News  August 15, 2017 12:00am-12:31am BST

12:00 am
i'm rico hizon in singapore. the headlines: china halts key imports from north korea as un sanctions kick in over pyongyang's nuclear weapons programme. devastation in sierra leone. at least 300 people are feared dead after flooding and a massive mudslide. i'm babita sharma in london. also in the programme: oh my god! people are badly hurt. two days after the racist violence in virginia, president trump finally condemns far—right extremists. racism is evil and those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the kkk, neo—nazis, white supremacists. india marks seven decades of independence from britain. but is the country what its founding fathers had hoped for? sometimes you feel that things
12:01 am
are not the way nehru wanted or gandhi wanted. live from our studios in singapore and london. this is bbc world news. it's newsday. it's 7am in singapore, midnight in london and 7:30am in pyongyang, where state media is reporting that kim jong—un has discussed with senior officers a plan to fire missiles at an area near the us pacific territory of guam. north korea's kcna news agency warned the us to stop what it called arrogant provocations. mr kim is also reported to be watching what america is doing and hasn't made any decisions yet. with me is huangjiangyu from national university
12:02 am
of singapore's faculty of law, who specialises in chinese and international law. he joins us live in the studio. professor, glad you could join us for this unfolding development taking place right now. more rhetoric from kim jong—un, what kind of message is he now trying to send to trump and the us?” of message is he now trying to send to trump and the us? i think the message from korea serves two purposes. number one it is face saving, it shows north korea wouldn't give in to any pressure, especially because the neighbouring countries like china and russia seem more sincere than before in implementing un sanctions. number two, they are words of deterrence. kim jong—un said he would be watching what the us does and he would be serious about it, if you do
12:03 am
any action to harm me, harm my interests, then i will take action. and kim jong—un is interests, then i will take action. and kimjong—un is not scared of anyone, despite the un and china sanctions and all this strong rhetoric from president trump?” think in the past few years kim jong—un has established a track record to ensure he wouldn't give into any pressure. this is just another example. now that we have this latest statement from kim jong—un, how do you think donald trump will respond? jong—un, how do you think donald trump will respond ?|j jong—un, how do you think donald trump will respond? i think donald trump will respond? i think donald trump will respond with even stronger rhetoric. that's just his personal stamp. we will continue to see the exchanging of words. but north korea, if they launch something near guam, it depends, it depends on how far the missile will drop in the water of guam. if they
12:04 am
drop in the water of guam. if they drop it in the high seas then there is no excuse for the us to go to war. are we likely to see a strike from north korea? it could happen, it could happen. but launch career could launch the missiles in the waters near guam but probably not very close. what would be the repercussions, particularly from china? they are a key ally of kim jong—un, what will beijing likely do? china's official position is not clear but what we understand from the media reports and from the analysis within china, if north korea launched the first attack and china will stay neutral, china wouldn't help north korea. if the us launches the first attack them china might be forced to help north korea. we are watching these developments very closely. thank you so much for your insights, huang jiangyu,
12:05 am
very closely. thank you so much for your insights, huangjiangyu, a professor at the national university singapore faculty of law. let's take a look at some of the day's other news. more than 300 people are feared dead and others remain trapped after a huge mudslide in the west african state of sierra leone. here's umaru fofana in freetown. digging for corpses. hundreds are believed to be lying beneath this rubble after sugarloaf mountain caved in. the voracity and speed of the mudslide completely submerged dozens the mudslide completely submerged d oze ns of the mudslide completely submerged dozens of houses that have been constructed here, many illegally. they ranged from tin shacks to concrete story buildings. some structures can't be seen, they are buried. earlier in the day eight torrent of mud and water carrying away everything in its path in many parts of freetown. this driver risked his life on a bridge that was all but overwhelmed by water during the flash floods. witnesses described how roads turned into churning rivers of mud. freetown is
12:06 am
a city with few defences against heavy rains. they come every year but normally not with such ferocity. hundreds of bodies have been taken in with the morgue struggling. soldiers are warning people to evacuate the neighbourhood. the victims in serially own are among the world's poorest people with the un saying around 60% are living below the national poverty line. some survivors have risked everything to try to salvage the few possessions they can despite the rising waters. , bbc news, freetown. juror is in denver said that david villa wrote taylor swift at a 2015 event. —— david villa. the british man who was credited
12:07 am
with stopping the spread of the wannacry computer virus has appeared in court in america, on unrelated hacking charges. marcus hutchins denied writing and distributing code which could help steal banking details. he was released on bail, and will be allowed to continue his cyber—security work while living in los angeles. mike pence has defended donald trump's comments that military options could be used in venezuela. he said the us would not stand by while venezuela collapsed to dictatorship. president maduro has called on his supporters to attend an anti—imperialist march to protest against america. and more than 10,000 people have come together in indonesia's north—west province of aceh to perform a traditional saman dance in the name of unity. the record—breaking performance was held to promote harmony, ahead of the country's independence day on august 17. after two days of equivocation,
12:08 am
today president trump condemned by name the white supremacists and neo—nazis who marched in charlottesville, virginia. the demonstrations there at the weekend turned violent, and one woman was killed when a car plowed into a crowd of counter—protestors. today, the man behind the wheel was denied bail. the bbc‘s north america editor jon sopel starts our coverage. vacation suspended, the president returned to washington this morning from his holiday to meet the director of the fbi and the attorney general following the weekend violence in charlottesville. meanwhile in the university of virginia town, there were scuffles outside the court where james alex fields appeared this morning on murder charges after a car ploughed into antiracism protesters. oh, my god, people are badly hurt. oh, my god, badly hurt.
12:09 am
the president's "everyone's to blame response" and silence until now lit a firestorm of criticism. so why has donald trump been so unusually tongue tied over this? well, the number of fully paid—up white supremacists may be small. the number who have sympathies is probably far larger, and they were among the most vociferous supporters of him last november. certainly, his surrogates have condemned the far right, but donald trump reluctantly so. today, 48 hours on, a dramatic shift in language from the embattled president. he sounded tense. there was no freewheeling as he gripped the lectern and gripped every word on the autocue, his eyes barely moving. racism is evil, and those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the kkk, neo—nazis, white supremacists and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as americans. we are a nation founded
12:10 am
on the truth, that all of us are created equal. we are equal in the eyes of our creator. we are equal under the law, and we are equal under our constitution. but this was too little, too late for ken frazier. the boss of one of america's biggest pharmaceutical companies, and he has resigned from the president's industry forum, saying: within minutes, donald trump fired back, saying on twitter: mr president, can you explain why you did not condemn those hate groups?
12:11 am
they have been condemned, they have been condemned. donald trump has bent to criticism, something that has not happened often, but why it has taken two days to name these groups, well, that question still hangs. jon sopel, bbc news, washington. let's bring you more on our breaking news this hour with reports we're getting from north korea that kim jong—un has been briefed on a plan to fire missiles towards the us pacific territory of guam. the territory a tiny island home two us airmen and naval bases. —— to usairand —— to usair and naval bases. the bbc‘s yogita limaye joins me from seoul. what's the reaction? we expect the president to speak in a couple of hours, its liberation day in south korea, will be celebrated by north korea, will be celebrated by north korea as well. the details of that
12:12 am
statement, published in the north korean official news agency today, basically says kim jong—un carefully examined this plan and discussed it for a long time with his generals. but it also says he is going to watch for a little more time what they describe as the foolish and stupid behaviour of the us before they decide to make that strike. if south korea was expecting the rhetoric to calm down a bit, that doesn't seem to be happening, even though yesterday the south korean president came out and sent out an emphatic message saying he doesn't wa nt emphatic message saying he doesn't want waron emphatic message saying he doesn't want war on the korean peninsula and they need to be a peaceful resolution and that's what he emphasised to america's top ranking general, generaljoseph dunford, who was visiting south korea yesterday. the us top military chief has gone to china and japan now, how much of
12:13 am
a diplomatic process will they continue with this war of words as the backdrop of the conversation? especially in china, he said that he yesterday, general dunford, the message they are taking to china is none of these apple diplomatic or economic measures will work unless china implements the economic sanctions passed this month. what he has also said is when he goes there he will try to speak to china about that. china yesterday said from today they will impose a ban on imports of coal, iron and seafood from pyongyang and if actually implemented, that could economically impact the country but so far there's been defiance from the career and many analysts i speak to have said sanctions haven't worked in the past with the country. we will see how that plays out. yogi till i, live in seoul. —— yogita
12:14 am
limaye. you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme: the verdict in the court case between an american dj and the us singer taylor swift. we'll cross live to our correspondent in los angeles. idi amin, uganda's brutalformer dictator, has died at the age of 80. he's been buried in saudi arabia, where he lived in exile since being overthrown in 1979. two billion people around the world have seen the last total eclipse of the sun to take place in this millenium. it began itsjourney off the coast of canada,
12:15 am
ending three hours later when the sun set over the bay of bengal. this is newsday on the bbc. i'm rico hizon in singapore. i'm babita sharma in london. our top stories. north korea's state news agency says the country's leader kim jong—un has discussed a potential strike against guam in the pacific with his military and stands ready to strike at all times. he is said to be watching the action before taking a decision. at least 300 people are feared dead in sierra leona after an entire hillside collapsed in heavy rains. here in britain, the bongs of london's big ben will fall silent
12:16 am
next week for four years so that major conservation work can be carried out on its tower. the chimes will still be used, however, for important national events such as new year's eve and remembrance sunday. the silence is designed to protect the workers who'll be repairing the building around the famous bell. that story is popular on bbc.com. let's take a look at what some of the newspapers around the world are covering. we'll start with the front page of the financial times, it says some of china's biggest companies are facing greater state control as the communist party rights itself into the memorandums of association of more than 30 firms. the china daily reports on a boom in botox — small cosmetic surgeries like fillers have doubled in china in the last five years, according to its front page. it says ten million doses of the two most popular treatments will be used this year. and in the uk, the guardian reports
12:17 am
on some big changes for uber there. customers can now leave tips for drivers and will soon be charged for keeping the cars waiting — it's apparently an attempt to ease tensions with drivers over their labour rights. more now on another breaking story this hour — a verdict in the court case between an american dj and the us singer taylor swift. jurors in federal court in denver agreed that david mueller had groped her at a 2013 event. his claim for damages, on the grounds that his reputation had been destroyed by false allegations was thrown out. i can speak to the bbc‘s peter bowes in los angeles for more on this. bring us up to date with what we know so far? it is all over now, the jury know so far? it is all over now, the jury have come down on taylor swift's side. they have ruled that she was groped by the dj and have
12:18 am
ordered him to pay $1 in damages, a symbolic amount because that is what she had asked for. she went to court over this because she said she wa nted over this because she said she wanted to stand up for her rights. it was not about the money. it all started when he sued her, this goes back to 2013 when it is said to have happened, he sued her a couple of yea rs later happened, he sued her a couple of years later because he lost his job. he said she was to blame for having lost hisjob. that he said she was to blame for having lost his job. that part of the case was thrown out of the court last week by thejudge, was thrown out of the court last week by the judge, she said that no connection could be made that taylor swift caused him to lose his job. and we have heard from the jury that they have sided with taylor swift in terms of the grouping. that he did it. and have we heard anything from the dj? not since the verdict. we heard a lot from taylor swift when she gave evidence last week, quite detailed evidence on the witness
12:19 am
stand. she said she was violated in a way that had never happened to her before. she explained her case quite calmly and in a lot of detail. no doubt we will hear in the coming hours some reaction from her. another aspect to this case was where the dj had made accusations against taylor swift's mother and managerfor bowing against taylor swift's mother and manager for bowing to the radio station with the story of what had happened. thejury station with the story of what had happened. the jury ruled that they we re happened. the jury ruled that they were right to do that. with that verdict being passed down, do we know what kind of punishment or sentenced this radio dj is going to face? -- sentence. it seemsjust the symbolic $1. taylor swift did not go to court first, the dj went to court first. his side of the case was thrown out. she countersued, not for the big money he had been asking for, but for $1, a matter of
12:20 am
principle. she wanted to stand up for women everywhere. thank you very much for that. india is today marking its 70th anniversary of independence from britain. it comes a day after pakistan held its celebrations for independence, which included a spectacular display of fireworks. with the end of colonial rule in 1947, india was split in to two countries to create a homeland for muslims in pakistan. but partition, as it was called, was marred by bloodshed: hundreds of thousands of people died, and millions were displaced. reeta chakrabarti has been speaking to one family in the indian city of amritsar about how partition affected them, and what they feel about india today. remembering happy times, but this family lived through trauma. this man and his wife fled with their
12:21 am
children, but the events have gone largely undiscussed. unfortunately my generation has not brought much to the younger generation, my children and grandchildren, about the partition. it is high time that this came out. we made the mistake, but history should not. he feels it may not be what the country's founding fathers had hoped for. may not be what the country's founding fathers had hoped fonm is not what should be. sometimes you feel that things are not what you wanted, what they wanted. for their grandson, india has an exciting future. in the coming decade, india is going to become the place to be with so much technology coming up. but at the same time, culturally, there is a bit of a decline, largely due to censorship. pakistani tv
12:22 am
programmes are now barred. his cousin wants to know more about partition to understand why the countries remain such suspicious neighbours. i have never felt the tension between india and pakistan. i have travelled in the us and london and got along perfectly well with pakistanis. but those meetings happen abroad, and he has never been to pakistan. the effects of petition are still felt strongly today, even for young people, for whom it is just history. and we'll have a special series of features on the partition of old india all this week on bbc world news. you can also visit our website for more information. you'll find personal stories from people who went through partition at the time, and an interactive timeline explaining why it happened. a cloud is hanging over the future
12:23 am
of australia's beauty minister after he became caught up in a crisis of the dual citizens in public office. they are banned under the australian constitution. barnaby joyce they are banned under the australian constitution. barnabyjoyce is also a citizen of new zealand, he said he will stay in office until the high court decides whether he has broken any rules. a professor from the university of syd ney told professor from the university of sydney told me more. section 44 of the constitution, the intention is to make sure that if you are a member of the australian parliament, your allegiance is to australia. if your allegiance is to australia. if you have dual citizenship you can become a member of parliament, but you must have gotten rid of your dual citizenship first. anyone who has citizenship from another country must renounce it and take all reasonable steps to do so, before they nominate as a member of parliament. how old is the law? it comes from our constitution when it was first enacted in 1901. you can
12:24 am
trace the relevant provisions back to reduce laws. that is from the time of active settlement. talking of the head of state, a dual citizen? that is an interesting issue. that is because the head of state seems pretty british from where we are sitting. in terms of the curiosities of life, she is above the constitution and the commonwealth. it is just for people under the commonwealth who want to be members of parliament. they can only have australian allegiance and not allegiance to the uk or any other country. this has got a lot of people talking on social media. they say the law is outdated, it is ridiculous. the high court is assessing a number of cases here. where does the legal ruling stand? is this setting a precedent?m where does the legal ruling stand? is this setting a precedent? it will be interesting to see what the high court does. hopefully they will give
12:25 am
us court does. hopefully they will give usa court does. hopefully they will give us a bit more clarity. 0ne court does. hopefully they will give us a bit more clarity. one of the issuesis us a bit more clarity. one of the issues is that barnabyjoyce has received citizenship by descent, rather than birth. most people born overseas have a clue that they might need to check their citizenship status. barnaby joyce, need to check their citizenship status. barnabyjoyce, born in australia, he really had no idea that he potentially had citizenship because one of his parents was from overseas. a lot of countries give citizenship to the children of their own citizens. it is something that all politicians need to sort out for all politicians need to sort out for a joined the australian parliament. and before we go, a lioness who was rescued from a zoo in aleppo in syria has given birth just hours after arriving at a wildlife park in jordan. dana was transported to a reserve with four other lions, two bears and two tigers on a three month trip via turkey.
12:26 am
they've named her hajar, which means flea in arabic. tuesday's looking to pretty cloudy, quite blustery at the weekend. heavy rain over some areas, and in the early hours of tuesday morning, there could be some rain in the far north feast of the country and possibly the far south—east as well, maybe even a clap of thunder. the day starting is a relatively mild one. , ——1. day starting is a relatively mild one. , "1.14, day starting is a relatively mild one. , ——1.14,16, even up to 17. right across most areas, some showers around, here and there. the
12:27 am
south—east, midlands, wales, some showers in the lake district. maybe some showers in northern ireland and western scotland, most of that rate moving to the north—east of the screen, good riddance. as far as tuesday morning, the second half of the morning in the afternoon, showers brewing inland. not a com pletely showers brewing inland. not a completely dry day. take an umbrella if you are out for any length of time. sunny spells, feeling quite warm, but showers breaking out. how are we doing compared to the rest of europe? london getting up to 2a degrees, on par with paris and similarto degrees, on par with paris and similar to moscow. in italy and rome, temperatures up to 35 degrees. at home, tuesday into wednesday, a ridge of high pressure. that usually means fine weather. for many parts of england and eastern scotland, wednesday morning and afternoon looking fine. you can't miss this.
12:28 am
this is the next low pressure weather fronts moving in this is the next low pressure weatherfronts moving in during wednesday morning and afternoon. we going downhill in belfast, glasgow, around the irish sea, liverpool and into cornwall. london looking fine. temperatures up to 23 degrees. rate moving through during the course of wednesday into thursday. a fresh day for most of us on thursday. brisk winds, some showers. temperatures getting up to around 2a degrees. by friday, quite blustery with sunshine and showers. i'm babita sharma with bbc world news. our top story: north korean leader kimjong—un has been briefed on a plan to fire missiles near guam. north korea's state agency is reporting that the leader says discussions with military are under way for a potential strike on the island which is home to us air and naval bases. hundreds of people are feared dead after a mudslide
12:29 am
near sierra leone's capital, freetown. a hillside collapsed following heavy rains, engulfing many homes. and this story is trending on bbc.com. a verdict has been reached in the court case between an american dj and the us singer taylor swift. jurors in federal court in denver agreed that david mueller had groped the singer at an event in 2013. now on bbc news, it's hardtalk and another chance to see stephen sackur‘s interview with the screenwriter dustin lance black. welcome to hardtalk, i'm stephen sackur.
12:30 am

22 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on