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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 15, 2017 5:45am-6:01am BST

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but it came after criticism from business leaders. the article in the ft highlights that trump waited 48 hours to denounce white supremacist groups and not before lashing out on twitter about a resignation within the president's manufacturing council. in the japan times, the country's economy grows at its fastest rate in more than two years for its second quarter. consumer spending and capital expenditure also showing their strongest growth figures in three years. will the pace continue heading into the 2020 olympics? the new york times features a story looking at london's grenfell tower tragedy. under the headline "fire reveals a double standard," the piece draws the contrast between the affluence of south kensington against those in north kensington, home to some of britain's poorest, and where now a blackened shell of public housing stands. uber attempts to extend an olive branch to its drivers by allowing them to receive tips and charge when they have to wait for customers. this article in the guardian says the move is an attempt to take the sting out of a long—running dispute with drivers over labour rights. and big ben to fall
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silent forfour years. the daily telegraph looks at the backlash. some mps have protested that the chimes will be out of action, to protect workmen renovating the icon. i tell you what, that has had a lot of backlash. nobody likes it when a and is silent, do they? —— when a ben is silent. with us is maike currie, investment director at fidelity personal investing. before we talk about big ben falling silent, let's talk about the top story, the condemnation that president trump has finally given to what happens in charlottesville. it took him 48 hours. he did it, but he still lashes out at somebody who has
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resigned, it is remarkable. still lashes out at somebody who has resigned, it is remarkablem still lashes out at somebody who has resigned, it is remarkable. it is. the question is, is it too little, too late? the question is, is it too little, too late ? this the question is, is it too little, too late? this is not a man who is known for thinking before he speaks. he governs by twitter, he lashes out oi'i he governs by twitter, he lashes out on twitter. it took him 48 hours to condemn the atrocious behaviour, racism, and i think this will come back and bite him, because the expectation from business leaders was for more. we saw kim frasier, that chief executive saying that he is resigning from the manufacturing council if trump doesn't do something about this.” council if trump doesn't do something about this. ijust council if trump doesn't do something about this. i just wonder, for these people in business, reputation is so important, and if they feel that there is any possible compromise to that, they are going to ta ke compromise to that, they are going to take a big step backwards. absolutely. we already saw that with the paris climate agreement, with leaders like elon musk of tesla distancing themselves from trump, because of the decisions he has made. i wonder, if
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because of the decisions he has made. iwonder, if they because of the decisions he has made. i wonder, if they want to have a positive influence, can they may be do more good by actually staying close to the president and fielding their thoughts? it is one of those dilemmas. it is an interesting dilemma, but it is all about round reputation and whether you want to be associated with certain behaviour. how do you stay close to such a president, who is basically speaking his mind all the time? oldman sacks, apple, all of them describing how they are not happy with the president's actions. —— goldman sachs. that is what shocks me, that he then tweeted that comment about merc, about the prices. it is very petty, from the leader of the world's leading superpower. on to the japan times. then, you are covering this? yes, finally good news from japan. annual growth rate of 4%. but they still
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have these underlying problems in the economy, the ageing population, that massive pile of debt. that is what they need to tackle long—term. it is good news for prime minister shinzo abe, because he has had four years of abenomics, that catchall phrase which encompasses the spending that was done to kickstart the japanese economy. there economy stagnated since the 19805 when there wa5 stagnated since the 19805 when there was the property and stock market doubled. the big rob is that they have an ageing population and an aversion to immigration. they need to kickstart there economy and for that, they need a younger population. but things are finally looking up for japan. population. but things are finally looking up forjapan. what is interesting is that this is a market which has been out of favour with investors, seemingly forever, but if you look at the performance of japan's benchmark index, it has outperformed the s&p 500, the us market, which is a riproaring market. it has outperformed the ftse 500 x four times as much. things are looking up. and they have the
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0lympics looking up. and they have the olympics in 2020. that costs a lot of money but also draws in a lot of money. the question is whether this can continue to the olympics. on the 14th, we might be two year anniversary of the absolute tragedy at grenfell tower. —— marked the two year anniversary. the new york times has an interesting piece about the tale of two boroughs. this is talking about south kensington and north kensington and how the concerns of the residents of south kensington, the revving of very expensive supercars, is listened to by the council, and yet the desperate concerns of the north kensington residents were simply not. it is really appalling. you hear some of these complaints that came from south kensington, like neighbours building underground cinemas and swimming pools, ferraris dragracing in the streets, compared
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to the complaints around the g re nfell tower, to the complaints around the grenfell tower, the fact that the fire extinguishers were outdated, that there was no community fire alarm, and what grenfell tower has become is a symbol of inequality, this inequality we have seen in the la st this inequality we have seen in the last few years as government spending has been cut. it is really the poor who have felt it the hardest. here it is on the front page of the new york times. the danger with these things is often that they are front and centre of the news agenda for a few days or a few weeks, then attention moves on and the agenda moves on. but the fa cts and the agenda moves on. but the facts a re and the agenda moves on. but the facts are still being discussed and it is on the front page of an international newspaper. the attention is still very much on it. let's move on to the guardian. —— the guardian. do is trying to sweeten things with its drivers. you can leave tips now. this is a practice that has been happening in the united states for some time, but i'iow the united states for some time, but now uk users can leave tips, and uber drivers now uk users can leave tips, and uberdrivers can now uk users can leave tips, and uber drivers can overcharge if they
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are left waiting for passengers. it is interesting, because we see the rise of these giddy economy companies, like uberand baru, and it is all about the flexibility, people want the flexibility that these companies offer, but there is these companies offer, but there is the danger workers can be exploited. aren't uber missing the point, because many of their workers are concerned about workers rights. talking about something like living tips, it dodges the issue that is at the centre of these concerns. that is right. some people have called this a cynical pr tricks, because the real issue is workers rights, the real issue is workers rights, the excessive long hours that do the drivers had to work, and the minimum wages they are paid. ashley excessive long hours without uber drivers have to were stopped and a warning to anybody who uses uber that the cancellation period has been shortened. it used to be up to five minutes that you could cancel if you changed your mind. that is now down to two minutes. if you cancel after now down to two minutes. if you ca ncel after two now down to two minutes. if you cancel after two minutes you pay a fee. i can see why they do that,
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because if the driver has started moving towards you and then you cancel it is not really fair. now, on to silencing bend. big ben. not ben bland. there has been a big backlash over the fact that big ben, we will not hear its chimes for four yea rs. we will not hear its chimes for four years. iam we will not hear its chimes for four years. i am quite surprised byjust how angry some people are. yes, because as this article points out, 457 -- because as this article points out, 457 —— for because as this article points out, 457 -- for 157 because as this article points out, 457 —— for 157 years, big ben has not been silenced. even in the second world war. the reason they have introduced this is for the health and safety of the workers working on this maintenance project. it has to do with their hearing. but this is the most photographed landmark in britain. every tourist to comes to london wants that mandatory selfie with big then. —— with big ben. they can still get the
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selfie, although they will be to some construction scaffolding. but they will not hear the sound, those bongs. it is not quite the same. one of the mps said it was so important for the mental well—being of the nation. that is overstretching it slightly, especially for anybody watching outside of london. they are questioning why it cannot ring from 5pm to 7pm, when the building work is finished for the day. that is a fair point. but the work must be done. a £29 million renovation project, for those of you enjoy fa cts project, for those of you enjoy facts and figures. it has been a pleasure. thank you forjoining us this morning for the papers review. time for both of us to fall silent now. we will have more news at the top of the hour. well, tuesday's looking pretty good across most of the uk. the rest of the week, however, overall is still looking rather changeable. and actually, as we head into the weekend, it looks pretty blustery, as well. this is a gloomy picture from yesterday in aberystwyth, from monday. tuesday is going to be a lot sunnier across this part of the world. now, this is the satellite picture,
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from the last 12 hours or so. we had some rain sweeping across many western and northern areas. really quite heavy rain in some areas, and towards the early hours of tuesday morning, there still could be some heavier rain around across the far, far north—east of the country, and possibly the far south—east as well, and maybe even a crack of thunder. and the start to the day is a relatively mild one. 14,16 degrees, even up to 17 during the rush hour across the south. and really, it is starting pretty nice nad bright across most areas. there are a few showers around, here and there, but on balance, fine start from the south—east, the midlands, wales. a couple of showers there around the lake district, maybe a few dotted around in northern ireland and western scotland, but on the whole, a nice start to the day. and here is that overnight rain moving away towards the north—east, off the edge of the screen — good riddance. now, as far as tuesday morning, and the second half of the morning
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and the afternoon is concerned, showers are actually going to be brewing inland. so it is not a completely dry day. take a brolly if you are out for any lengthy period of time. sunny spells — plenty of them, yes, and feeling quite warm, but there will be showers breaking out. how are we doing compared to the rest of europe? well, london will be warming up to 24 degrees. we're on a par with paris, but some storms around here, similar to warsaw and moscow. but hotting up across spain and portugal, and in italy and rome, there, temperatures up to around 35 degrees celsius. anyway, back home, tuesday into wednesday, there will be a ridge of high pressure. high pressure usually means fine weather. so for many parts of england, i think, and eastern scotland, wednesday morning and afternoon is looking fine. but you can't miss this. this is the next low pressure, next weather front, moving in during wednesday morning and afternoon. so the weather will go downhill in belfast, in glasgow, around the irish sea, liverpool, western wales, and down into cornwall.
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but london is looking fine. temperatures could even be a little bit higher than 23 degrees celsius. but that rain will move through during the course of wednesday into thursday, and then it is a fresher day, i think, for most of us on thursday. slightly brisker winds, i think, with some showers. still temperatures getting up to around 24 degrees. i say fresher because the winds will pick up. and then by friday, really quite blustery, with sunshine and showers. this is breakfast. ministers set out trade plans for life after brexit, including a temporary customs union with the eu. critics say the plan is incoherent and inadequate and an attempt to paper over the cracks. good morning. it's tuesday the 15th of august. also this morning: more than 300 people have been killed and many more feared buried after heavy floods and mudslides hit
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the capital of sierra leone. the singer, taylor swift, wins a court case against the dj who groped her, and is awarded a symbolic $1 in damages.
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