Skip to main content

tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  August 15, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

9:00 am
hello, it is tuesday, it is 9am, i am joanna gosling. in his first bbc interview we hearfrom phil green, the agent who was managing model chloe ayling when she was lured to milan for a photo shoot and then kidnapped and held at a remote italian farmhouse. he was the one who received the ransom demands — which included a photo of chloe which he describes as "incredibly sinister". it frightened the life out of me, i did not want to look at it any further. it turns out, are not photograph, it was chloe and she had been photographed while unconscious. you can hear our full interview with phil green in a few minute's time. taylor swift has won a case against a former radio dj who groped her four years ago. david mueller had originally sued her, claiming that her allegation cost him his job. but she counter—sued, and yesterday a jury found in her favour. we hearfrom an american journalist who was in court as the verdict came through. i would get people who would say i am not even a fan of taylor swift
9:01 am
but i believe in her cause and what she is doing. it transcended her as a star, and it came down to the fact that a woman has the right to go after someone who was sexually assaulted and she was sexually assaulted. we'll be speaking to a journalist who was in court when the verdict was read out. also one of australia's leading cosmetic surgeons tells this programme that the link between textured breast implants and cancer is more common that doctors originally thought — although it's still extremely rare. we speak to him, and a woman who developed the disease. hello... welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning. also there have been two incidents involving trains at london stations this morning — a train has derailed just outside waterloo station after hitting a freight train at low speed — no—one was injured in the incident, though passengers have been advised to avoid the station all day. that was at 5.40 this morning, and in the last hour a train is reported to have hit the buffers at kings cross. we will have latest on both incidents throughout the programme. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning —
9:02 am
use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. the top story today... the government is to outline plans to negotiate a temporary customs relationship with the eu, immediately after brexit. ministers want to ensure that an arrangement, similar to the current customs union, will remain in place until a final trade settlement takes effect. the brexit secretary — david davis — says it will mean businesses avoid "unnecessary disru ption". our political correspondent leila nathoojoins me now from westminster. what is the shape of what they're talking about? awana, this is designed to represent a plan, to show there is something the government is united around, cabinet is united around, something in place to go to brussels and take to brussels when it comes to ensuring goods move freely between the uk and
9:03 am
the eu after brexit. the government is putting forward this idea of a temporary arrangement saying there should be a similar arrangement of what there is now, a temporary customs union designed to reassure businesses there will be no change in rules and then further down the line, after that temporary period of perhaps 2—3 years is over, there will be new customs arrangements in place. but i think what the government is trying to do is present this as an achievable, practical way for what they are confident will be, then brussels agrees to these proposals but it depends very much on what brussels thinks and the indication we had so far is that brussels is not prepared to entertain any talk of future arrangements until there is progress on the divorce bill, on issues like the said assen is so i think this is the said assen is so i think this is the government trying to be on the front foot really and push the negotiations towards where they want to go. thank you very much. we will
9:04 am
talk more about that later in the programme and will also hear from the brexit secretary david davis. rachel is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the days news. good morning. a train has partially derailed at waterloo station in london, following an "operational incident." the south west trains service struck a freight service at low speed at boxall and waterloo stations, three people checker injuries but did not need further treatment. 13 platforms out of use and disruption expected to last until the end of today. in a separate incident a train appears to have hit the buffers at kings cross station. this image posted in social media appears to show a train being examined by workers at the end of a platform. mudslides and floods in sierra leone are now known to have killed more than 300 people on the outskirts of the capital, freetown. thousands more have been forced to flee from their homes. government officials have warned the number of casualties is expected to rise, with hundreds of bodies thought
9:05 am
to be still trapped under the debris, as greg dawson reports. while some stare in stunned silence at what is left of their home, others, with their bare hands, are still searching and hoping. but the grim reality is that beneath the tons of mud, many more lives and homes lay. amid the destruction, the grief. this man says he has lost all eight members of his family. i first saw the body of my sister. i called on people to help me. we laid her on the floor. then i started hearing other people crying. i've lost all of my family. many died in bed. this is an overpopulated city, with many living on the hillside
9:06 am
in flimsy and unprotected shacks that were crushed by the mud. the red cross estimates up to 3000 people have lost their homes. those that aren't completely destroyed are ca ked in mud and debris. this is a city well used to heavy rains, but the scale of the damage took everyone by surprise. many roads and towns are either cut off or transformed into raging rivers. the challenge for rescuers is simply trying to reach those who are still trapped, awaiting supplies of food and clean water. greg dawson, bbc news. north korean leader kimjong un, has been briefed by the country's military leaders on how they could fulfil his threat to fire missiles near the american island of guam in the pacific. according to north korea state media the report said he would watch us actions before making a decision. last week tensions escalated when
9:07 am
pyongyang threatened to fire four missiles into the sea off guam. the pop star taylor swift has won a sexual assault case against ex—radio dj david mueller, who she said had groped her at a 2013 concert. his claim for damages, on the grounds that his reputation had been destroyed by false allegations, was thrown out. he's been ordered to pay a token one—dollar in damages. taylor swift said she took the action against him to give other victims of sexual assault the confidence to pursue their claims. a pensioner who was stabbed while trying to save the life of labour in june cox has died. 79—year—old bernard kenny was awarded the george medalfor his bravery bernard kenny was awarded the george medal for his bravery after he intervenes when a right—wing extremist attack the mp in the run—up to last your‘s eu referendum. mr kenny was seriously injured in the attack but because of his death not believed to be related to the incident. rail passengers will learn this morning how much more they'll be paying for some of theirjourneys from january next year.
9:08 am
regulated fares which account for almost half ticket will go up by the rate of inflation, the exact figure will be published this morning. it is expected to be around three and a half percent, well above average pay rises. a girl has died after a man drove a car into a pizza restaurant near paris yesterday evening. twelve other people were injured in the attack, four of them seriously. police said they're treating the incident as deliberate, but not related to terror. the driver of the car, a 32—year—old man, has been arrested. the fat but fit the theory that overweight people can still be healthy is nothing but a myth, according to researchers from two top uk universities. scientists found carrying extra weight can increase the risk of heart disease by more than a quarter, even in people who are otherwise healthy. 0ur health correspondence will be
9:09 am
and has more. suggests even a blood test are within the normal range excess weight is still a normal helpless. the rink —— linked people with bmi is over 35 who are healthy but overweight to an estimated increased risk of coronary heart disease of 26 and 28% respectively. and third to those with a healthy body weight.- the beginning of the study they were classified as healthy and then they probably went on, and became unhealthy and then eventually some of them developed heart disease, heart attack. the researchers believe excess fat may well store up health problems for the future and getting down to a healthy weight for whatever your sport is vitally important. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. a stuntwoman has been killed in a motorcycle accident in canada
9:10 am
while making the sequel to the superhero film, deadpool. witnesses described how the woman lost control of the bike, jumped a kerb and crashed intoa building. the film's lead actor, ryan reynolds, said the cast and crew were "heartbroken, shocked and devastated" by the death in vancouver. iran says it could abandon its nuclear deal with world powers "within hours", if the united states continues to impose new sanctions on them. president hassan rouhani told the country's parliament. the deal which was struck in 2015 saw the lifting of most international sanctions in return for curbs on its nuclear programme. a box filled with essentials for newborn babies will be arriving at the homes of new parents in scotland from today. the ‘baby boxes‘ are inspired by a scheme in finland to give all new mums a starter pack of things like clothes, a blanket and toys. but the box also doubles up as a cot, as the scottish government wants to promote safe sleeping in a bid to reduce the risk of cot death. and how do you say the name of this
9:11 am
budget retailer, primark? the budget retailer has said the pronunciation straight, and said it liked to use a particular pronunciation. many users took to social media to express their preference. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. a great way to get us talking about their brand. the latest inflation figures due out at 9:30am, experts predict inflation will outstrip growth in pay packets. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport. hi, reshmin. liverpool managerjurgen klopp has a lot on his plate so early into the football season? liverpool hoping to rid the group
9:12 am
stages of the champions league, they are in germany tonight. plenty for managerjurgen klopp to ponder and he made it clear that night's matches the only thing on his mind of the future of midfielder philippe coutinho. the brazilian is a target for barcelona but liverpool rejected two bids for other highly influential playmaker before continues admitted a transfer request last week which the club dismissed. he did not feature in the draw at watford because of a back injury, jurgen klopp admitting why he no speculation surrounding continual is rife, his sole focus is on the game ahead. i really understand everybody is interested in this but i can say in this moment iam in this but i can say in this moment i am really inking about it. —— i can't say. i am here and i will a nswer can't say. i am here and i will answer questions but in the car, on the way to this conference, i did not think what can i say because i have to think of other things. honest and animated as ever. chelsea
9:13 am
have a battle on the hands trying to get diego costa to report for training, he is still in brazil? the chelsea striker rarely far from the headlines. his —— he is more notable because of his absence, understood he has been ordered to return to the premier league champions up to being fined forfailing to premier league champions up to being fined for failing to report for pre—season training. he was told by the manager antonio costa bath—macro antonio conte back in a text message that he was not part of his plans for the season. the striker is currently in brazil, threatening to set out the remaining two years of his contract if he is not allowed to leave. it's been mooted he has his heart set on legal action as he wa nts to heart set on legal action as he wants to return to atletico madrid. andy murray losing his number one slot to rafael nadal. he has been blighted by injury, knocked out in struggling all season and andy murray set to lose his number one
9:14 am
status in the world, taken by rafael nadal who will take the mantle for the first time since 2014. it would have been wimbledon champion roger federer but the swiss has pulled out of the cincinnati masters, no andy murray there either, rafael nadal who reached round to their with these claimed the spot almost by default, being as humble as he is, says he is sorry it comes at the expense of his top rivals. thank you so expense of his top rivals. thank you so much. now let's go back to the extraordinary story of chloe ayling. she jetted off to milan for what she thought was a photoshoot, but instead says she ended up being drugged and kidnapped and held for six days by lukasz herba, a polish national from birmingham. she claims he told her she was going to be sold into sex slavery then issued a ransom note to a number of people in the uk for her release. one of those was phil green, her agent at the time —
9:15 am
who had initially booked her on the job with lukasz, who was posing as a photographer named andre. in his only bbc interview, phil green — that former agent — spoke with me yesterday. he praises chloe's bravery throughout this ordeal and claims she has been offered counselling but has refused, despite her now being afraid to go anywhere alone. i began by asking phil what the arrangements were around the booking. first of all, from my point of view, the photographer, a man called andre lazio — he called himself — specifically asked for chloe to do a photoshoot in paris. with all clients, particularly new clients, i carry out due diligence checks. i asked him who he was, where he was, does he have a website, had he done work previously, what this particularjob was for, where the studio is, check it out on google maps, does it actually exist? then we start talking about arrangements for the shoot, which would include fees, expenses, and then the travel arrangements for the shoot,
9:16 am
would she be required to arrive the day before, would the photographer pay for the flight costs and everything? so all that information came together and it ticked every box, you know? so you had no... there were no alarm bells ringing at any point? nothing flagged up whatsoever to make me suspicious that this man wasn't who he said he was. what checks had you carried out to make sure that this was what it was supposed to be? because she's been speaking and says you didn't carry out all the correct checks? that is not true. she wouldn't necessarily know the checks that go on in the agency. we, as i said, carry out due diligence checks and we wouldn't expose anyone to a situation like that without fully knowing who the client was. how did the checks all pass, though, when he was not what he said he was? the photographer had a website which told me he'd done previous work, there were models on there who he'd...
9:17 am
i assumed he'd photographed previously. and every check regarding his studio and location, there was nothing being flagged up for me to think or even suggest that there was anything suspicious about him or what he was proposing. so you and she were very happy when she went off to milan for the photoshoot. what was the first that you knew that there was a problem? yeah. well, there was a meeting in paris three or four months before the ordeal in italy took place, so therefore the attacker, we'll now call him, actually saw face to face the model in paris. 0n the eve of the shoot, there was a terrorist attack in paris on the champs—elysees, a policeman got shot. there was a lot of police activity around that night. and i'd given each other their phone numbers. i said if there's a problem, phone each other and you
9:18 am
can keep in contact. while you're together in paris. and a call came through, i think it was a text to begin with, to chloe, from the photographer, saying my studio's been ransacked while all this activity was going on last night. they've taken things from my studio and i'm not able to do the shoot tomorrow. the photographer, in inverted commas, met the model and they had a brief conversation and 100 euros were handed over to say, well, that will keep you going with food and taxi fares during the day. you know, to be honest, both chloe and myself felt sorry for him. his studio had been ransacked, he'd already paid for the shoot and, you know, we thought he's getting nothing for his money. he said, well, look, i'll rearrange the shoot, i won't ask for my money back. so how... how ironic that then he would set this up in milan and the same situation, same kind of shoot, the same fee was involved.
9:19 am
he also paid travel, hotel. but the outcome was very different. you received an e—mail from the kidnapper. what did it say? erm... the evening of the shoot i was contacted by chloe's mother to say chloe hadn't gone home. and i was saying to her, well, perhaps she's either missed the flight or the flight‘s delayed, or she had a shoot the next day in ibiza, she might have thought i'm going to fly straight from milan to ibiza. so i was trying to sort of play it down, there must be a reason why she hadn't gone home that night. but then the next morning came and we checked, she actually wasn't on the flight. the phone was ringing still with an overseas ringing tone, and we kind of thought that, still, she could possibly be on her way to ibiza. but i said to her mother, look,
9:20 am
i think you'd actually better inform the police. in her area it's the metropolitan police. she went to croydon police station and told everybody there. it wasn't until just after 10am on july the 12th, the day after the shoot, when i opened my e—mail inbox i found something incredibly sinister and worrying. it was the first e—mail contact from someone on behalf of the black death group saying to me, chillingly, that they'd taken chloe and i was to find some ransom money for her. what detail was in the e—mail that you got? who they were, the black death group, they gave me the names of three businessmen, uk businessmen, i think that chloe had given them the names of. and said i was to contact any one of these three or all three
9:21 am
to raise the ransom money. at that stage no figure was mentioned as to how much they wanted. but there was a deadline, the deadline was four days later on the sunday when they were going to say if you don't pay any money by then we're going to offer chloe to option, where she may be sold to russian mafia. to auction, where she may be sold to russian mafia. how seriously did you take that e—mail? my first thought was to ring the police in italy, and i did that. i then rang the british consulate in milan, because i knew there was a consulate office there. i did that. they took it extremely seriously, rang the foreign office special crimes division who then contacted me to discuss the details of what had happened. and then i was contacted by my own force, special operations from east midlands, where i'm based, who came to the office because this is the place where i'm receiving the e—mails and they then
9:22 am
took over the case. did you receive any more e—mails? i did, the very next day. more or less the same time, three e—mails came through simultaneously. and they were just sort of ratcheting up the pressure. 0ne e—mail was from supposedly a different person saying are you aware chloe's been taken? the second e—mail then contained an attachment, well, two attachments. in the attachment was a press release. it said this is chloe ayling, she's aged so—and—so, her measurements are blah blah blah and she will be offered to auction this sunday. more or less saying express your interest in this now. then the other attachment, slightly more sinister, was a photograph that had been taken of chloe.
9:23 am
i took a very brief look at. i must admit, i didn't identify her from the brief look i had of the photograph. in fact, it frightened the life out of me. i didn't want to look at it any further. it turns out on that photograph was chloe. she'd been photographed while unconscious and... where was she? well, i didn't know at the time, obviously, but i was told later it was at the studio where she was taken. how much time elapsed, then, between you getting these e—mails and what happened next in terms of her finally being released? what were the next steps? well, we've now reached day three following the kidnap and the police were keeping up this sort of dialogue with the kidnappers. how were they having a dialogue? via e—mail? via e—mail, intercepting my e—mails and sending them e—mails
9:24 am
as though they were from me. and making some kind of offerjust to keep this attacker interested in keeping this dialogue. and these kind of conversations, i mean, they were few and far between, you know? there might be an e—mail sent in the morning and it might not be until the evening that a reply was given back. so it was tremendously frustrating for everyone involved. it was being treated with extreme seriousness and it wasn't until the sunday, this is following the kidnapping on the tuesday, the sunday we heard there was some activity on the ground. it turns out that the early hours of monday morning, the attacker, this lukasz herba, walks into the consulate office with chloe and says, "i'm herfriend, she's the girl
9:25 am
who's been kidnapped, i've brought her through for safety." and you can watch the second part of our interview with kidnapped model chloe ayling's former agent phil green after ten on the programme today, where he tells us what happened after chloe arrived at the consulate and says that after her ordeal she is now scared to go anywhere alone. still to come: we speak to one of australia's leading breast surgeons about the link between implants and cancer, and a woman who developed a rare form of cancer from her breast implant. we pay tribute to bernard kenny, the pensioner who was stabbed trying to save the life of mpjo cox. here's rachel in the bbc newsroom with a summary of todays news. the government is to outline plans to negotiate a temporary customs relationship with the eu, immediately after brexit. ministers want to ensure
9:26 am
that an arrangement, similar to the current customs union, will remain in place until a final trade settlement takes effect. the eu commission said the move was a positive step towards phase one of the negotiations and will study the paper carefully. the brexit secretary — david davis — says it will mean businesses avoid "unnecessary disru ption". we sell about 230 billion euros of goods and services to the european union each year. they sell 290 billion to us. i was in bavaria two or three weeks ago. they sell bmws, electronic goods, they have got an incredibly strong interest in something like this so there's an interest on both sides of not doing each of the harm if you like. both to do with customs arrangements but also to do with having a free trade
9:27 am
area in the first place. thousands have been forced to flee from their homes in freetown. government officials said the amount of casualties is expected to rise with hundreds of bodies thought to be trapped under the debris. atrain a train has partially derailed at waterloo station in london following an operational incident. the service struck a freight train at low speed between waterloo and vauxhall stations. three people were checked for injuries but didn't need further treatment. disruption is expected to last until the end of today. ina in a separate incident train appears to have hit the buffers at king's cross station. this picture appears to show the train being examined by workers at the end of the platform. taylor swift has won sexual assault
9:28 am
case against david mueller. who she said had groped her at a 2013 concert. his claim for damages, on the grounds that his reputation had been destroyed by false allegations, was thrown out. he's been ordered to pay a token one—dollar in damages. taylor swift said she took the action against him to give other victims of sexual assault the confidence to pursue their claims. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10am. let's go straight tojoanna. we just want to bring you some breaking news on the london underground, we are hearing that smoke has filled a train carriage at holborn station. some are saying there was a loud bang, then smoke and the station has been evacuated. we are also hearing that two fire
9:29 am
engines have been sent to holborn underground station. the fire service saying two fire engines have been sent. reports on social media are potentially of a bang and then smoke filling the platform so we will of course keep you updated. here's some sport now with reshmin thank you. the liverpool manager jurgen klopp insists the champions league fixture tonight in germany is the only thing on his mind and not the only thing on his mind and not the future of philippe coutinho. the brazilian is eyeing a move to another club butjurgen klopp says his mind is firmly on the fixture. diego costa being ordered to return to chelsea after failing to emerge for pre—season training. he's been to force a move back to atletico
9:30 am
madrid after telling and being told by the chelsea manager he's not part of plans for this season. premier league clubs are to discuss closing the summer transfer window. currently runs until august 31, they said to vote on the idea next month and rafael nadal will take the world number one ranking from andy murray this week. but after roger federer pulled out of the cincinnati masters. a quick update? thank you. just to let you know, we will keep you updated on what is happy make at holborn station, the underground station evacuated after reports of a loud and, after which smoke filled the platform. british transport police have treated to say we are at the station after reports of smoke ona train the station after reports of smoke on a train line, the station closed while officers and london fire investigate and london fire brigade have separately said they are investigating reports of smoke on the platform, two fire engines have
9:31 am
been sent to investigate. we will of course keep you updated. let me also bring you the latest inflation figures. the office for national statistics just putting out the latest inflation figures, the rate of retail the retail price index inflation, the rpi, which is used to set real season—ticket prices rose to two points 6% injuly, but according to the 0ns. that's the first figure. we will get other figures around inflation. —— three points six. it had been anticipated inflation figures which show inflation figures which show inflation outstripping wage growth. the rpi figure at the moment. we will bring you more on that, and we'll be talking to our business correspondent for further analysis. one of australia's leading cosmetic
9:32 am
surgeons has told this programme the link between breast implants and cancer is more common than doctors initially thought — but stresses the condition is still extremely rare. women who have breast implants run the risk of developing a type of blood cancer called anaplastic large—cell lymphoma — or alcl. most surgeons believe the disease affects around 1 in 300,000 patients with breast implants — however, health authorities in australia estimate it affects around 1 in 5,000. the mhra — which is responsible for ensuring medicines and medical devices work in the uk — says its investigation into alcl is "ongoing". welljoining us is one of australia's leading breast surgeons — dr daniel fleming - who played a key role in the country's health authorities increasing their official advice on this issue. sandi currie — who developed a rare form of cancer from her breast implant last year. and - mr kevin hancock - a consultant plastic surgeon and a member of the british association of aesthetic plastic surgeons.
9:33 am
welcome, all of you and thank you for joining welcome, all of you and thank you forjoining us. welcome, all of you and thank you for joining us. daniel, welcome, all of you and thank you forjoining us. daniel, tell us more about the analysis you carried out and what it indicates on the risk of this particular form of and what it indicates on the risk of this particularform of cancerfrom breast implants? as you said it was initially thought this was extremely rare in the order of one in hundreds of thousands of patients, then it was one intensive thousands but the latest evidence from australia shows it may be as common as one in 1000 patients with textured breast implants but it's important to keep that in context. compare it to the risk of any woman with or without implants of developing breast cancer in her lifetime is one in eight, another way of thinking about one in 1000 is no denying .9% of these implants not getting the condition. it's rare and yet when the stats go from one in 300,000 to one in 1000 thatis from one in 300,000 to one in 1000 that is a dramatic shift, why? we
9:34 am
are looking for it. it usually presents with swelling around the breast, less swelling with —— less commonly with a mass. around 2008—9, when patients presented with that took the fluid off and didn't look for the condition but since then we are looking for it and we are finding it often. tell us about the condition, what is the prognosis? the other thing women want to know is what's going to happen to me if i am one in1000 is what's going to happen to me if i am one in 1000 to get it. some good news. for the vast majority of women who get this condition they will get a non—aggressive version of it, it's not going to threaten their lives and it will be cured by the removal of the implants and the membrane surrounding them. let's bring in sandy, you developed this condition from a textured implant, tell us what happened. pretty much i woke up one morning and my right breast had swolle n one morning and my right breast had swollen about two cup sizes bigger than the other so i rang my surgeon,
9:35 am
concerned with what was happening, i didn't know if i had a rupture so he sent me to get a needle aspiration and some ultrasound is done and he rang me five days later to say i did in fact have a lcl, this particular cancer. what happened then? were the implants taken up? it was out of his field, he wasn't confident, he was a cosmetic surgeon and i would suggest struggling to go to a plastic surgeon, struggling to go to a plastic surgeon, when he rang me he said he had forwarded all my files onto an oncologist in brisbane and i would then be dealing with the oncologist so then be dealing with the oncologist soi then be dealing with the oncologist so i went to see her, she ran more tests to verify i did have alcl and
9:36 am
the surgeons at the hospital removed both my implants. was that it, did that fix it? pretty much, i've had to go back every three months and have tests done to make sure it hasn't returned. and they will keep doing that probably until next year. just checking on me to see what in fa ct just checking on me to see what in fact is happening and it's, i suppose i am a bit of a guinea pig, if you want to look at it like that. daniel, the fact that taking up the implants can immediately fix this issue makes us, obviously, there is the direct correlation which makes you wonder whether they should be used and there are some calls to ban them, you have one of the implants here, it is the texture type. that's right. you think they should be banned? very interesting question,
9:37 am
three types of implant, a rough and service, smooth plastic bag type service, smooth plastic bag type service and another type of the polyurethanes foam. the question is why doesn't everybody has moved implants, the reason for that is the texture a nd implants, the reason for that is the texture and the polyurethanes exists to reduce the risk of complications which can shorten the length of time the implant blasts, visibly hardening of the implants in a condition called contracture. what we believe is that patients have two logical choice is, if you want minimum risk of alcl chooses move implant at except you have a higher risk of other convocations, if you wa nt to risk of other convocations, if you want to reduce that risk of complications choose the polyurethanes implant which reduces the risk of complications but has a similar risk of alcl as these implants. we would saber probably isn't a logical choice to choose a textured implant has little or no benefit the other complications and
9:38 am
still has this risk of alcl, albeit a lower risk. kevin hancock, an expert in this country says alcl linked to breast implants is a potential bombshell that husband swept under the carpet for five yea rs. swept under the carpet for five years. this is of course going to be worrying for anybody with textured breast implants. how do you see it? i think it's very difficult. this is something that was only first reported at the end of the 19 97, was the first case and as doctor fleming has said, we are really not sure yet about the significance of this disease. what we do know and what we should stress to patients is this is breast cancer, this is a cancer that arises in the fluid and the tissue surrounding the implant. and is thought to arise because of inflammation in that layer doctor fleming spoke about. he spoke about
9:39 am
the texturing to reduce the risk of capital sat hard on the implant. why is it daniel that the textured implant that is causing this problem... there are a couple of theories. we know that patients who develop alcl is the result of some sort of long—term inflammatory process and it also seems to be a genetic component in that, that's why some people get it, some don't, they process the inflammation differently and the idea is that they textured implant, the robins service me a retreat and cause long—term inflammation. the other theory is these microscopic eggs and crannies on the texturing might harbour small numbers of bacteria which could set up a long—term inflammatory process. kevin, what would you say to patients in this country, if you have the choice between an implant that will not cause you , between an implant that will not cause you, not likely to cause you this particular issue, does it make sense to avoid it? i think at the
9:40 am
moment we don't really know enough about this to make sweeping statements like that. all the professional associations have advised their members to discuss this with all patients having breast implants. and now we are very aware of the way this disease presents which is usually 7—8 years after the implants have been putting and as your other speaker said, presents as a swelling of the breast so now we are very tuned into this and we are very aware that anybody in that situation needs to be investigated further. when you say we are very tuned into it, it's not something that has been widely known about. is it certain that if someone has an issue and they go to their gp or surgeon issue and they go to their gp or surgeon and point it out but it will immediately be recognised ? surgeon and point it out but it will immediately be recognised? how much awareness is there? there is
9:41 am
certainly awareness in the popular press. this is again, it's important that patients have long—term contact with the surgeons that carried out the surgery so they are able to return to them if there are any concerns and we have seen in the past with the pip scandal that getting back to clinics and surgeons can be difficult for patients. how do you feel now about it? sandy, after everything that happened to you, do you wish you'd never gone down that path of having those implants? well, no, i mean, i never, when you first go to consult and explain all the pros and cons, anything is a risk, any surgery. and idid not anything is a risk, any surgery. and i did not expect to have this outcome so at that point in my life, i got my implants when i was 45,
9:42 am
quite late and the alcl appeared six years after the implantation. sorry to interrupt but was too mentioned to interrupt but was too mentioned to you as one of the potential cons? yes and you also get literature from your surgeon, yes and you also get literature from your surgeon, they do go through every thing, the pros and cons what can happen to you, the h and, mind did capture late and mine was brazilian textured implant and i... obviously... breasts are important to us otherwise we wouldn't be lining up to get them done. so, i have done it again, i have been reimplanted and i'm probably one of the few that have and i was lucky enough to find doctor fleming who is an expert with alcl. so with the new
9:43 am
implants, sorry, did you go for smoother texture? i rang doctor fleming, he graciously rang me back after hours and talked to the about it and then i had my consult with himl it and then i had my consult with him i said to him, at the end of the day i will be guided by what you tell me, if you are saying no, this isn't a good ideal tell me, if you are saying no, this isn't a good idea i will go with that because my options of howl isn't a good idea i will go with that because my options of how i was left was totally disfigured so my options were like, just do a complete hysterectomy or get reimplanted. because i am having to look every day at my breasts which we re look every day at my breasts which were disfigured, wasn't going to be much of a life for me. sol were disfigured, wasn't going to be much of a life for me. so i have taken the much of a life for me. so i have ta ken the course much of a life for me. so i have taken the course of being reimplanted andl taken the course of being reimplanted and i am watching even more closely to see what progress
9:44 am
that has. daniel, when sandy described she knew there was an issue, it was obvious, the breast has fallen dramatically, what should people look out for as a potential symptom? this disorder most commonly presents as swelling, an accumulation of fluid around the breast, most people with an accumulation will not have alcl but they should have checked, go see your doctor. does that emerge quite quickly? once the cancer is there are, it's not that it's been there and other symptoms won't have you noticed? we don't know the answer to that but when the swelling appears it is dramatic, orfor a day or two, it is dramatic, orfor a day or two, it can't morally present with a long switch if the patient presents with, they need to have that investigator but the other thing that is important, viewers who are watching and may have textured implants and are worrying... the recommendation is there is no need for any special investigation or screening for patients who don't have symptoms,
9:45 am
they should do the normal monthly checks for lumps and have a mammogram when they reach the aged necessary to have one. thank you all. the mhra — which is responsible for ensuring medicines and medical devices work in the uk gave us this statement: research into this area is yet to provide a definitive answer as to how alcl develops although there are several competing theories. alcl is very rare but it is important healthca re professionals and women who have implants know about it. if you develop a breast lump or swelling around your implant more than six months after having the breast implant you should seek advice from your surgeon or clinic. still to come. we hear from a journalist who was in court throughout the taylor swift sexual assault case. i hear people say i'm not even a fan of taylor swift but i believe in her cause, so it transcended her as a star and cause, so it transcended her as a starand came cause, so it transcended her as a star and came down to the issue of a
9:46 am
woman has a right to go after someone woman has a right to go after someone who sexually assaulted her, and she was assaulted. and the latest inflation figures have come out, showing living costs which are used to set rail season ticket prices rose to 3.6% injuly outstripping growth in pay packets. ben thompson is here. yes, it is more than average earnings. we are told rail fares will rise by more than 3.6% and it is more than double the increase we had last year, so again the pressure is on real commuters who will feel this more than most. we should be clear that this is what's known as regulated fa res, this is what's known as regulated fares, the ones which are limited. the rail companies have a cap on how much they can charge. the unregulated fares will be determined
9:47 am
in september, but 3.6% increase from january. it is known as the rpi measure, used to determine the train fa res. measure, used to determine the train fares. the cpr measure, which we pay attention to to get a better view of what's happening in the economy, that rose by 2.6%, still well above what we are earning so we will feel worse off in our pockets and our money is going less far. rail lobby groups are now saying you should be using the lower one, not the higher one. that is not fair to rail commuters. but nonetheless, as it stands at 3.6% rise in railfares for passengers from january. thank you. the government has been setting out its plans for the future of uk trade after brexit. it's been focusing on a temporary customs union which could be put in place to help prevent chaos
9:48 am
at britain's borders as the uk leaves the eu. my colleague adam fleming explains how the customs union works at the moment and how that might change. under the customs union, the eu has won external borderfor under the customs union, the eu has won external border for the import of goods from abroad. if import taxes — known as tariffs — are paid, they're paid when that product enters this area. it can then move around between countries with no further charges and very few checks. the british government wants something as similar as possible to this arrangement for a temporary period after brexit in march 2019. so how could a future customs union between the uk and europe look and how does the government see it working? our political correspondent emma vardy has more. david davis has been speaking, hasn't he? that's right, david davis will be sitting down in brussels to negotiate this at the end of this
9:49 am
month and he has talked about the option of this interim customs union being as close as possible to the current arrangements. he says that is to prevent this cliff edge for business, to allow them to adjust to any new regulations. so how long might it take he was asked this morning, said it was hard to say, maybe around two years, may be shorter. but that's all very well, this is the uk setting out what it once, how are we going to persuade the eu to agree to it? david davis said it is as much in their interest as it is in ours. we sell about 230 billion euros of goods and services to the european union each year. they sell 290 billion to us. i was in bavaria two or three weeks ago. they sell bmws, electronic goods, they have got an incredibly strong interest in something like this so there's an interest on both sides of not doing each
9:50 am
other harm, if you like. both to do with customs arrangements but also to do with having a free trade area in the first place. so you see his argument that if there is an interruption in trade, it hurts everyone. he will have to negotiate this, but this is one set of papers, proposals we will be getting, many more to come but it's taken a year since the referendum to start to get a clearer picture of what the uk foresees in brexit in 2019, and what we are getting today isa 2019, and what we are getting today is a real strong indication of the size of the challenge ahead. thank you, emma. we can speak now to stephen booth, who's the director of policy and research at thinktank, open europe, dr swati dhingra, from the london school of economics — both of whom have carried out significant research in this area. welcome, both of you. is this as much in their interests as ours, stephen? yes, i think so. the
9:51 am
question is on what terms do we reach a new agreement. i think the government acknowledges that at least in the short—term period we are going to want to keep things are similarto are going to want to keep things are similar to the status quo as possible. that helps business, business only has two are just once toa business only has two are just once to a new regime at the end of the transition period, and the eu would rather have one negotiation about a new arrangement as opposed to two negotiations about what we do for the next three years and what we do after that. but is it delaying the inevitable, swati? what it doesn't do is ask the real question, which is after those few years what is the new arrangement going to look like. there's a big concern that customs union or no customs union is going to make no difference to things like services, telecoms, and tariffs
9:52 am
don't matter there. it is very little in today's's report about that. what david davis has said this morning about what would come after a transition period is either a highly streamlined border with the eu ora highly streamlined border with the eu or a new partnership with no customs border at all, which sounds like having your cake and eating it, doesn't it? i think the first option sounds more achievable and practical. the second one is unprecedented and untested, and i think it is complicated to administer because businesses will have to work out whether their growth are destined for the uk or eu market. so describe away a streamlined border can work, because obviously for there to be easy transactions between the eu and the uk, products have to comply with regulations across different boundaries and that then takes you
9:53 am
into the territory of things being enforced by the ecj so it's quite difficult to unpick one part. there are examples of this around the world. it's about reducing technology, the amount of paperwork needed, moving away from physical tracks at the border to electronic checks so things can be preapproved. 99% of goods that come to the uk from outside the eu are already preapproved in seconds so a lot of this is possible but it requires both sides to negotiate this. the uk cannot do this unilaterally. at the moment we don't know what the eu side of the table once from the border, what do they want to enforce ? border, what do they want to enforce? how do you see it working, swati? i think it will be cumbersome. when we look at the norway example, we know that norway
9:54 am
still faces about 8% of its import value going into paperwork to be able to comply with rules and regulations to enter the uk market so regulations to enter the uk market so it won't be very different from that. if anything norway is in the single market so it probably has better access than what we can expect to have. those who want the uk out of the customs union say the downside is that we cannot have trade deals with the rest of the world while we are in it. is there enough of an upside to mitigate the downside of leaving? that is the question that only really time will tell but politically once you've taken the decision to leave the european union and have an independent trade policy, because we will be out of the eu common trade policy, we will have the flexibility to negotiate our own deals and whatever you think about the brexit decision, the logic of it is you have to boost the trade with the rest of the world and increase and diversify away from the eu which means the uk will have to have as
9:55 am
many tools in its tool box in order to negotiate with other partners and that means having more flexibility. we won't have all of that for the first three years but the government needs to make sure we have it after 2022. how do you see the position? it is unlikely we will be able to make up the losses from other countries. china and india, the rules and regulations are very different. opening our markets to them will be very big in terms of what happens to consumer safety, product safety. dealing with the us, the same kind of concerns come up as we saw in the chlorine chicken debate. this is a good idea to have, but there are games we will get from these new trade deals which will be small compared to what we lose from the eu if we don't get a good trade deal there. to have the sort of freedom of movement that there is
9:56 am
within the european union, we still have to be bound by the health and safety regulations that we are currently bound by, don't we? largely, we would probably have to comply with those. if you look at what canada did with the european union, they went through a lot of regulations they were happy to harmonise or mutually recognise, but then many others would have to be designed for the european market. when we sell to the us we would have a different set of regulations. so all of these things will still be applicable to uk businesses. thank you. ijust applicable to uk businesses. thank you. i just want to bring applicable to uk businesses. thank you. ijust want to bring you an update on what is happening at hogan tube station. the press office for transport for london has said the fire at holborn tube station is julie to a fault on the train. they
9:57 am
have ruled out terrorism as a cause. it is worth noting that last week there was a small fire on an underground train at oxford circus station that was on the bakerloo line train. that was caused by an electrical fault under the train. the pictures at the time looks pretty dramatic of smoke in a train carriage. four people treated for smoke inhalation and we don't have details of whether anyone has been affected by smoke inhalation in this latest incident at holborn but we will keep you up—to—date. the important thing to note is it is not being treated as suspicious. a retired seniorjudge denzil lush says people should be far more aware of the risks of a power of attorney, which is a legal document allowing someone to make welfare or financial decisions on your behalf, when you can no longer do so. he'll be joining us shortly. right now let's catch up with the latest weather update. it's going to be a lovely day if you
9:58 am
like sunshine and showers. if we ta ke like sunshine and showers. if we take a look around the country, you will see some of the weather watchers‘ pictures from earlier. this is kent, ramsgate. as we move across the country, we can see showers. we have the rainbow in hertfordshire, and a more current picture, this one sent in from durham with lovely blue skies. we are looking at a day of sunshine and showers, we will lose the rain from kent this morning. we could see 26 celsius here through the day, but you can also see a lot of dry and sunny weather as we sweep into south—west england. for wales, again some showers, they will be fewer and further between but more frequent across northern ireland and possibly more heavy here as well, but nonetheless still a lot of dry weather. a lot of dry weather across
9:59 am
scotla nd weather. a lot of dry weather across scotland but you will have more frequent showers, some will be heavy and thundery. in north—east england, heading down the eastern side of the pennines you can see a mixture of sunshine and showers but some of those showers could be heavy. through the evening and overnight the showers tend to fade and we are looking at clearing skies, a cooler night than the one just gone but by the end of the night we will have stronger winds and rain arriving into the west of northern ireland. that‘s courtesy of this area of low pressure with its weather front. the squeeze on the isobars is telling you it will be windy. gale is possible through the irish sea and with exposure in the west. the rain is coming in smartly across northern ireland and also scotland, but not as quickly across north—west england, wales and into south—west england. where we have this combination with lower temperatures, it will feel cooler, the coolness exacerbated by the rain and wind,
10:00 am
but as we drift east, increasing amounts of cloud ahead of this weather front. the further east you travel, the more likely you are to see some sunshine with temperatures up see some sunshine with temperatures up to 23. as we move into thursday, that rain crosses us overnight. we have the remnants during thursday, then it‘s replaced once again by sunshine and showers. showers fairly hit and sunshine and showers. showers fairly hitand miss, not sunshine and showers. showers fairly hit and miss, not everyone will catch one. if you are in the sunshine, high temperatures up to 24 in london, will feel quite pleasant, as in newcastle with high temperatures of 21. advice from your surgeon or clinic. as in newcastle with high temperatures of 21. memberjurors temperatures of 21. memberjurors temperatures down a touch, it will
10:01 am
feel that much cooler. as for the weekend, mixed fortunes, as you come further south, looking at sunshine and showers, a bit more rain showers in the north of the country, if you are wondering about sunday, the forecast changing but at the moment looks like for northern ireland, scotland, northern england and north wales, we will see some rain but try as we push further south! hello, it‘s tuesday, it‘s ten o‘clock, i‘m joanna gosling in for victoria... we hear more from the man who was chloe ayling‘s agent when the model was drugged and kidnapped in milan. phil green says she is coping well after her traumatic ordeal. she clearly had gone through a tremendous amount of suffering and had an horrific ordeal and i know that if that had happened to 95% of the other models in my agency they would have crumbled. you can hear the second part of our interview later this hour. also we speak to a retired judge who
10:02 am
says it‘s too riskyjust giving one person power of attorney which allows them to make welfare or financial decisions on your behalf. taylor swift has won her case against the former radio dj who groped her. we hear from an american journalist who sat through the court case and says this is a win for all women. she stood up for herself, notjust for herself and women in general and thatis for herself and women in general and that is what she spoke to, she maintained that stands and you could tell she was up there notjust speaking for herself but to show women out there it‘s ok to stand up for what you believe in. we've also hear from for what you believe in. we've also hearfrom a for what you believe in. we've also hear from a lawyer in this country who hopes it will empower more women in this country to speak out. good morning. here‘s rachel in the bbc newsroom with a summary of todays news. the government is to outline plans
10:03 am
to negotiate a temporary customs relationship with the eu after brexit. the mistress want to ensure an arrangement similar to the current customs union will remain in place until a final trade settlement ta kes place until a final trade settlement takes effect. be you commission says the move is a positive step towards a starting phase one of the negotiations. and they will study the position paper carefully. the brexit secretary david davis says it means businesses will avoid unnecessary disruption. we sell about 230 billion euros of goods and services to the european union each year, they sell 290 billion to us. i was in bavaria 200 —— i was in bavaria a couple of weeks ago, they sell alex on goods and they have an incredibly strong interest in something like this, there is an interest in both sides on not doing it the hard, both to do with customs arrangements and to do with customs arrangements and to do with having a free trade area in the
10:04 am
first place. mudslides and floods in sierra leone are now known to have killed more than 300 people on the outskirts of the capital, freetown. thousands more have been forced to flee from their homes. government officials have warned the number of casualties is expected to rise, with hundreds of bodies thought to be still trapped under the debris. the mayor of freetown says at least 270 bodies have been recovered so far. millions of rail users will see a 3.6% increase in many rail fares from january 2018. train operators are allowed to raise regulated fares — which account for nearly half of all tickets — by as much as the retail prices index figure forjuly, which rose by 3.6%. the headline consumer price index inflation was 2.6% in july, the same asjune. a train has partially derailed at waterloo station in london, following an "operational incident." the south west trains service struck a freight train at low speed between waterloo and vauxhall stations. three people were checked for injuries, but did not need further treatment.
10:05 am
thirteen platforms are out of use, with disruption excepted to last until the end of today. in a separate incident a train has hit the buffers at kings cross station. a spokesperson from great northern said the train came into contact with the buffers at low speed at twenty past six this morning. the rail accident investigation branch has been informed. london‘s holborn underground station has been closed as emergency services respond to a fire alert and reports of smoke. ten firefighters and two engines presented to the station, an eyewitness on a train at the station said smoke—filled one of the station said smoke—filled one of the characters. transport for london said the problem was caused by a defective train. —— smoke—filled one of the carriages. a pensioner who was stabbed while trying to save
10:06 am
the life of the labour mp, jo cox, has died. bernard kenny, who was 79, was awarded the george medal for his bravery — after he intervened when a right—wing extremist attacked the mp in the run—up to last year‘s eu referendum. mr kenny was seriously injured in the attack, but the cause of his death is not believed to be related to the incident. a girl has died after a man drove a car into a pizza restaurant near paris yesterday evening. twelve other people were injured in the attack, four of them seriously. police said they‘re treating the incident as deliberate, but not related to terror. the driver of the car, a 32—year—old man, has been arrested. iran says it could abandon its nuclear deal with world powers "within hours", if the united states continues to impose new sanctions on them. president hassan rouhani told the country‘s parliament. the deal which was struck in 2015 saw the lifting of most international sanctions in return for curbs on its nuclear programme. the pop star taylor swift has won a sexual assault case against ex—radio dj david mueller, who she said had groped
10:07 am
her at a 2013 concert. his claim for damages, on the grounds that his reputation had been destroyed by false allegations, was thrown out. he‘s been ordered to pay a token one—dollar in damages. taylor swift said she took the action against him to give other victims of sexual assault the confidence to pursue their claims. the fat outfit theory that overweight people can still be healthy is nothing but is according to researchers from two top uk universities. scientists from cambridge and imperial college london found being obese or overweight increases your risk of co ro nary overweight increases your risk of coronary heart disease by 28% even if you are otherwise healthy and act. that‘s a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30. still to come, we will hear from
10:08 am
phil green, the agent of the model chloe aileen who was kidnapped and taken to italy. here‘s some sport now with reshmin liverpool are hoping to rip reach the group stages of the champions league for the first time in three yea rs. league for the first time in three years. they are in germany this evening and jurgen klopp has made it clear the match tonight is the only thing on his mind and not the future of the leak could you. they‘ve bazillion is a target for barcelona but liverpool have rejected two bids for him before coutinho submitted a tra nsfer for him before coutinho submitted a transfer request which was dismissed. he didn‘t play at the weekend because of a back injury and the manager says he knows speculation is rife but his sole focus is on the game ahead.|j
10:09 am
speculation is rife but his sole focus is on the game ahead. i really understand everybody is interested in this but i can‘t say i am really thinking about it. it‘s just, in this but i can‘t say i am really thinking about it. it‘sjust, i in this but i can‘t say i am really thinking about it. it‘s just, i am here, but i am not in the car, on the way to the conference, i did not think what could i say if they ask or whatever because i have to think about other things. it's understood diego costa has been ordered to return to the premier league champions after being fined for failing to report for pre—season training. he was told by the miniature fire text injune that he wasn‘t part of his plans this season, the striker currently in brazil, threatening to sit out the remaining two years of his contract if he is not allowed to leave. the spanish international is considering legal action and has his heart set on returning to atletico madrid although chelsea are demanding his return before any decision on his future is made. premier league clubs are to take a vote on the idea of closing the transfer window before the start of the season. the window ru ns the start of the season. the window runs until august 31, it‘s been a
10:10 am
problem this season with the future of several high—profile players on results. under the proposals are new league sides would not be able to add to their squads once the season kicks off but it wouldn‘t apply to clu bs kicks off but it wouldn‘t apply to clubs from europe signing players from england. if it is past it would come into effect next season. kyle edmund continues to struggle in the build—up to the us open, beaten in the first round of the cincinnati masters by a portuguese opponent in three sets. he was knocked out of the first—round of the montreal masters last week. the final grand slam of the year begins at the end the month. andy murray will be replaced as the world war i by rafael nadal at the end of the tournament this week. andy murray is not playing because of an ongoing problem, the spaniard will top the world rankings for the first time in three years. england cricketers stepped into the unknown this week when they play their first day night test match, the first played in this country. the opening series against the west indies. the 2pm on
10:11 am
thursday, lunch at 4pm, plate finishing at 9pm. the game will be played with a pink box showing up at under the lights, a new experience for bowler stuart broad. the pink ball cou nty for bowler stuart broad. the pink ball county round, the guys said the ball county round, the guys said the ball went quite soft quite quickly, we arejust going ball went quite soft quite quickly, we are just going to have to be so adaptable on the day. we are going in with a completely clear mind, com pletely in with a completely clear mind, completely learning on the job, almost. the team that will, more successful this week is the team that reacts quicker. and that is all your support for now. i will be back with more later. thank you so much. power of attorney is a legal document that allows someone else to look after your property and financial affairs. it‘s increasingly common — used especially by older people who can no longer manage their everyday lives. nearly 650,000 applications were made last year in england and wales to register powers of attorney but the judge who wrote the legal guidebook to powers of attorney, who was the head of the court of protection for 20 years,
10:12 am
has told the bbc he would never sign one himself, they have few safeguards, and the ministry ofjustice is "disingenuous" in the way it promotes them. let‘s speak now to today programme correspondent sanchia berg who‘s been looking into this. tell us more about this, it is extraordinary when the judge europe and says he wouldn‘t have won. he says there are a few safeguards, although there is the office of the public partying, part of the ministry ofjustice which investigates complaints they will only investigate once someone alerts only investigate once someone alerts on to something. dental luxury for 20 years presided over more than 6000 of these ensuring our lasting power of attorney cases, he has seen many examples where problems arose
10:13 am
and they just weren‘t many examples where problems arose and theyjust weren‘t caught in time and theyjust weren‘t caught in time and you will hear from a viewer about a problem that went on for yea rs, about a problem that went on for years, her father‘s estate effectively looted and nothing they could do because the complaint were not investigated. now complaints are more likely to be investigated but nonetheless, the judge more likely to be investigated but nonetheless, thejudge believes people should be far more aware of the risks. 0k, thank you. joining us now, lesley willetts and her husband brian felton have experienced the problems of the power of attorney themselves. lesley‘s father, a dunkirk veteran with dementia was left destitute after he gave his neighbours power of attorney. denzil lush is a seniorjudge who headed the court of protection for 20 years and adjudicated 6,000 power of attorney cases. he says the power of attorney has few safeguards and he wouldn‘t use it himself. thank you both forjoining us. leslie, it sounds like you had a
10:14 am
turbo situation, talk us through what happened to your father and power of attorney was given to a neighbour. -- a terrible situation. basically when the neighbour to guard a power of attorney in 2003 and he had a will made out at the same time it was effectively, we we re same time it was effectively, we were just literally hard from any protest, any insight into the financial affairs of my father, even his day—to—day care seemed to be lost to us in a sense. and the attorney was able to try and isolate him from our family attorney was able to try and isolate him from ourfamily and attorney was able to try and isolate him from our family and also effectively ta ke him from our family and also effectively take his money and concealed the fact he had taken the money. he had complete power and there was no further week ago, no one we could ask what do we do about this and was only when he registered the power of attorney in 2004, this was 18 months later, when in effect he had used all my father‘s savings
10:15 am
and in effect he had to sell my father‘s house, so he had to register the power of attorney for that, ourfamily register the power of attorney for that, our family objected register the power of attorney for that, ourfamily objected but that, our family objected but the registration went through nonetheless but the cause was yorkshire county council came on board at the time, they‘d had letters of concern by other neighbours that we decided to go for an appeal hearing in 2005. sorry to interrupt, it‘s absolutely extraordinary to hear you describe what happened and to hear you say your father‘s house was being sold under him and up until that point none of you knew what was going on and you were powerless to do anything? and it wasn‘t until the appeal hearing that we suspected there was financial abuse. we had to prove the unsuitability of the attorney which
10:16 am
is incredibly difficult to do. we didn‘t have any evidence, all we could do was protect ourselves and question why someone can get the power of attorney so easily. can i just say, at the appeal hearing the attorney was required to submit annual accounts which we were really relieved about, so at least we knew there was some accountability for his finances going on. when you say it was hard to question, well you question why it is that someone can get power of attorney so easily. this was a neighbour. how did it happen? it was literally groom, isolate, abuse. iwas happen? it was literally groom, isolate, abuse. i was groomed, happen? it was literally groom, isolate, abuse. iwas groomed, my father was groomed, i think social services were groomed. once that
10:17 am
happened, he was supposed to come down to us in 2003 but he was registered, who was in a psychogeriatric ward at the time. we had arranged to have him discharged to our care but for some reason social services allowed him to be discharged to the neighbour‘s care, registered them as his carer and within days were taken to a solicitor, had a power of attorney made out and will to his benefit. so this was someone you had all trusted absolutely? yes, well i this was someone you had all trusted absolutely? yes, welll so. will bring in denzel. you adjudicated over 6000 cases in that period where there have been issues and you now say you would not use one yourself. tell us more about your concerns. yes, i would tell us more about your concerns.
10:18 am
yes, iwould prefer tell us more about your concerns. yes, i would prefer not to use one myself because i would rather go for the default position, which is where the default position, which is where the court appoints somebody to look after a deputy to look after your property, and you are required to account annually. you have to give a security bond which is a sort of insurance policy that covers only default, and usually get a visit and support from the office of the public guardian. servers that effectively how it used to work and how you would prefer for it to continue working in your case? what's happened in frank willet's case would not happen to quite the same extent now. this was an enduring power of attorney, they have since been replaced in effect by things called lasting powers of attorney. the office of the public guardian tends to initiate
10:19 am
applications to the court of protection rather than relatives to where they are concerned that has been some misappropriation. where they are concerned that has been some misappropriationm where they are concerned that has been some misappropriation. in your experience of looking at these, have you seen experience of looking at these, have you seen many instances of where it has worked really well? because obviously there are people who are vulnerable, they cannot manage their affairs, family and loved ones need to work out a way of doing it in the best way they can. of course. i sort your liver pathology, if you are with me. i saw the cases where they all went pear shaped which is possibly why i wouldn't make one myself. i'm sure there are many cases, the majority of cases where these do work satisfactorily. cases, the majority of cases where these do work satisfactorilym there a way the system could be made better? because you are saying you would opt out of this particular way
10:20 am
of handling affairs. is it time for everybody to actually look to another direction? 0r everybody to actually look to another direction? or can this system be improved? because as it stands it has to be a case of where not only something has gone wrong but it has been discovered and you can but it has been discovered and you ca n prove but it has been discovered and you can prove what‘s happened and that ta kes a can prove what‘s happened and that takes a lot of time, expense and heartbreak. i think things can be improved. i think the office of the public guardian is looking into the possibility of possibly a security bond to cover attorney ships where there is a default position. also, in the republic of ireland they have a state—of—the—art piece of legislation which requires attorneys to produce accounts to their equivalent of the public guardian each year. when you hear leslie
10:21 am
describing what happened, that the neighbour could get power of attorney so easily, what do you think? it is surely not beyond the realms of possibility is to stop that happening? just make it harder? this is one of the big concerns, that the public guardian is keen to get as many possible lasting power of attorney applications done online and digitally and there are concerns that what existing safeguards there are are being dampened down all the time. so it could easily be the case that anyone watching this programme with anyone watching this programme with a vulnerable relative could give power of attorney to somebody who may not do the right thing by them
10:22 am
or theirfamily, there‘s may not do the right thing by them or their family, there‘s nothing may not do the right thing by them or theirfamily, there‘s nothing to stop that happening? yes, that is possible. one of the interesting things as well is leslie's father's case was a little unusual insofar as in my experience it is family members that are usually the abusers. i remember going to a co nfe re nce abusers. i remember going to a conference in melbourne, australia. and they came up with... the university did some research saying you are twice as likely to be ripped off by your son as your daughter and i thought that was fascinating, and icame i thought that was fascinating, and i came back and looked at my own statistics which run into many hundreds and more than that. and i worked out that 68% of the abusers of lasting powers of attorney are the child, the donor, the person who created the power, of those 36% are
10:23 am
sons, 22% are daughters, and the remainerare sons, 22% are daughters, and the remainer are sons sons, 22% are daughters, and the remainerare sons and sons, 22% are daughters, and the remainer are sons and daughters together. leslie, a finalfor remainer are sons and daughters together. leslie, a final for from you because people watching will be horrified to find out what happened to you and if they have vulnerable relatives they are concerned about, they could be worried about what might potentially happen to them. after what you have been through, what advice would you give? to be honest, i don‘t know. there‘s no where people can go to get independent advice. once you get entangled with the court of protection, it is very hard to manoeuvre your way around it and it can become extremely expensive. can i mention one thing thatjudge lush is bringing up, aboutjuicing accounts. my father ‘s attorney was ordered to produce accounts on an
10:24 am
annual basis and he duly did in 2005 and 2006, but when i became court deputy in 2008 when the attorney ship was finally revoked, it was obvious within days that the court accou nts obvious within days that the court accounts review obvious within days that the court accou nts review tea m obvious within days that the court accounts review team had ignored gross breaches of their own rules and regulations. i mean my father‘s proceeds from his house sales... lots of complex things were happening, how much was lost in the end and how much has it cost you? everything was lost. we have actually high court orders, one overturned the will and the other was a overturned the will and the other wasa high overturned the will and the other was a high court order that was 380,000, now stands at more because there‘s an 8% interest rate added to it, but do we get anything back? so far not and i‘m not terribly
10:25 am
helpful. the court of protection we are still fighting because they refuse to accept accountability. thank you, leslie, very much for joining us and is talking about your family‘s situation. in a statement a ministry ofjustice spokesperson said: "safeguarding vulnerable people is our priority. we take swift action if any abuse is reported and have a zero tolerance approach to any attorney or deputy who breaks the law. if there is evidence that someone has abused their position, we can refer cases to the court of protection to urgently revoke a lasting power of attorney or deputyship order." let us know if you have had any experience of this, good or bad. still to come... we hear the second part of our exclusive interview phil green the agent of chloe ayling the model kidnapped and drugged in milan. he talks about how she reacted to the ordeal. taylor swift has won
10:26 am
a sexual assault case against a former radio dj, who she said had groped her after a one of her concerts in 2013. david muellerfrom colorado had originally tried to sue the american singer—songwriter saying her claims had cost him his david muellerfrom colorado had originally tried to sue the american singer—songwriter saying her claims had cost him his $150,000—a—yearjob. taylor was awarded a symbolic one dollar in damages, because she wanted to highlight the issue women are subjected to daily. the journalist from the us interactive show ‘daily blast live‘ was in court. when the verdict came, she was very happy. what had she been like throughout the hearings? she testified last thursday and she was very fierce, that‘s the way i would describe her. she was very
10:27 am
confident, unwavering in her stance, andi confident, unwavering in her stance, and i know the attorney of david mueller was trying to get her to appear weak. it is herjob to make her get flustered or say things differently to try to prove her case but she maintained her stance. i don‘t know what i can say on this programme, but she did not use the word rear end and she made sure to use profanity each time because she wa nted use profanity each time because she wanted it to be vulgar. she didn‘t wa nt wanted it to be vulgar. she didn‘t want it to be polite. she maintained that what happened to her was not polite and she needed to stand up for herself, not just polite and she needed to stand up for herself, notjust for herself but for women in general and that‘s what she spoke to and she maintained that stance. you could tell she was up that stance. you could tell she was up there notjust speaking for herself but to show women out there that it herself but to show women out there thatitis herself but to show women out there that it is ok to stand up for what you believe in and not have anyone tried to waver and say you were smiling in this photo in question.
10:28 am
because that did come up. why are you smiling, acting a certain way? she doesn‘t have to defend herself and she wasn‘t going to let anyone tear her down. did she get emotional at all? on the stands she did not, she did get emotional when she heard her mother speak or when david mueller‘s attorney was speaking saying this photo doesn‘t show her looking like she hasjust saying this photo doesn‘t show her looking like she has just been groped. even though she is fierce and confident on the stand, it was still something that was very emotional to her. still something that was very emotionalto her. she did not report this to police when it happened, it ended up in court with her suing him for a symbolic $1 because he was suing her. through the process though, in the eyes of her fans and other members of the public, has she effectively become a campaigner on
10:29 am
this issue? she really has. i have been live tweeting this quite a bit and you usually hear from both sides of someone defending mueller, someone of someone defending mueller, someone defending swift, but you have people saying i believe in her cause even though i am not a fan, so it transcended her as a staff and came down to the issue that a woman has a right to go after someone who sexually assaulted her, and she was assaulted. and she is an influential woman. what reaction has there been? after the jury went out and there was people leaving, and ran into one of her young fans who was there with her mother and had been going to court every day. she was so excited, she felt justice court every day. she was so excited, she feltjustice had been served. i noticed the best quality about this little interaction was that this
10:30 am
little interaction was that this little girl felt empowered. she wasn‘t afraid of mueller and she was so wasn‘t afraid of mueller and she was so happy swift stood up to that man. you could tell she was taking that in and if, god forbid she is ever in that situation, she felt ready and inspired by the actions of one woman that happened to be taylor swift. she has now said she will be donating to organisations in the future to help sexual assault and is defend themselves because she ignored she has —— she acknowledged she has the resources to do that. what else has she said? she hasn't been publicly speaking either in the media or on social media but i believe she intends to go into what organisations she intends to donate to in time, i think she will slowly roll this out at ink she needs to
10:31 am
decompress, it was a highly emotional case for her and i know it means a lot to her and i know she wa nts to means a lot to her and i know she wants to formulate a plan, she comes across to me as someone who wants to formulate a plan, she comes across to me as someone who wants a detailed plan of action and we will know it soon, i don‘t know whether it‘s within the next week but it will happen. i mentioned it she did not go to police when this happened four years ago, it was what‘s been talked about as a low—level sexual assault, someone dropping her under her skirt, what has she said about the impact on her that? the only time she has ever mentioned it, but i have heard, is in court, when her mother said when she found out, she felt like vomiting and crying at the same time, taylor swift has not been the same, the recent she doesn‘t go into crowds any more and when you see her and
10:32 am
you see her at need and greed is, she is there close to her fans. when i was she is there close to her fans. when iwas in she is there close to her fans. when i was in court, she looked up and acknowledged me and i am sure she did that to all the people, even if they were media or suppose that fans. they are curious to watch the case. she seemed like a very warm person and to show that she did not wa nt to person and to show that she did not want to go out into the crowds, so she would impact one person can have, it‘s the only time she said she has ever been groped and it still sticks with her to this day. why didn‘t she go to the police? still sticks with her to this day. why didn't she go to the police? the way she described it, it was very quick and there is a meet and greet, fa ns quick and there is a meet and greet, fans shuffling in and out within a second, if she would have stopped for one moment to say what happened, that would have destroyed the experience for all those fans, for her, she went and finished what she had to do, a dozen people left and
10:33 am
as soon as had to do, a dozen people left and as soon as the line finished she told everyone that was in the room, that crack —— guy totally grabbed my, she used the profanity and they saidi my, she used the profanity and they said i know. the photographer looked and saw the photo and her management went and they considered calling the police but they considered the best course of action was to just alert his bosses at the radio station. thank you. in the last 15 minutes, the government has announced some of the key details about the public inquiry into grenfell tower fire. it will look at not just the fire itself but the actions of the local authority before the blaze. our reporterjim reed is here. how wide—ranging will it be? how wide-ranging will it be? we have something from the chairman of the
10:34 am
inquiry and the prime minister, setting out the terms of reference, we happen waiting for these, the areas they will look into. it includes six, reading through, the cause and spread of the fire, we knew that, we expected that, the design construction and refurbishment of grenfell tower, the scope and adequacy of the relevant regulations relating to high—rise buildings across the country, whether relevant legislation and guidance was complied with in the case of grenfell tower that will be key. and also, we were not quite sure about this, to max —— two extra things they have added, the response of the london fire brigade and local government and amongst others, and the last elements could be key. will it satisfy residents who are concerned about what the inquiry will cover? these letters have only been released, campaigners keen this inquiry is as broad as possible, not just looking at the immediate causes, we know if rich freezer
10:35 am
caught fire, the cladding, but looks at the wider causes and on the face of it, the statement goes some way towards addressing that. —— a fridge freezer caught fire. the prime minister says she is adamant that the wider causes around this will be addressed, she will meet social housing tenants to see what further proposals can be made in due course. —— the housing minister will meet local residents. 0n —— the housing minister will meet local residents. on a first reading this seems to address some of the questions about the fire, not just the immediate cause but the actions crucially of the council before the blaze. thank you. now we return to the extraordinary story of model chloe ayling, who jetted off to milan for what she thought was a photoshoot, but instead was kidnapped and held for six days by lukasz herba, a polish national from birmingham. she says he told her she was going to be sold into sex slavery then issued a ransom note to a number
10:36 am
of people in the uk for her release. one of those was phil green, her agent at the time — who had initially booked her on the job with lukasz — who was posing as a photographer named andre. in his only bbc interview, phil green — that former agent — spoke to me yesterday. he praises chloe‘s bravery throughout this ordeal and claims she has been offered counselling but has refused despite her now being afraid to go anywhere alone. in the second part of this interview i began by asking phil what happened when chloe arrived at the consulate. it wasn‘t until the sunday, this is following the kidnapping on the tuesday, the sunday we heard there were some activity on the ground. it turns out that in the early hours of monday morning, the attacker, this lukasz herba, walks into the consulate office with chloe and says i‘m her friend, she‘s the girl who‘s been kidnapped, i‘ve brought her through for safety. well, the consulate staff immediately rang the police, he was arrested and then chloe had to face 16 hours... 16 hours of questioning by the police, who were offering a little support.
10:37 am
i had to say they were insensitive and didn‘t show much compassion during the time of the interviewing and, in fact, one of the magistrates in italy who she had to face doubted some of the elements of the story. and openly said to her you‘re lying, you know? how can this be true? and, of course, it is an amazing story. the italians didn‘t believe it. in fact, when the british police heard that this man had walked into the consulate with the model they thought, hang on a second, it looks like the photographer was kidnapped as well. did you ever doubt the story? when she gave me the whole version of events, from being attacked to being released, it did sound amazingly fantastic to be true. and i have to say... i mean, i keptan open mind.
10:38 am
equally so, i always kept staunchly loyal to chloe, who i represented. i didn‘t want to disbelieve her. she clearly had gone through a tremendous amount of suffering and horrific ordeal, and i know that if that had happened to 95% of the other models in my agency they would have crumbled and not reached a conclusion in this. ifeel that she has been incredibly strong — strong willed and strong minded — to try to get through this. she doesn‘t seem to have been fazed by the ordeal. when it first emerged, we saw pictures quite quickly of her in front of the media with the puppy, looking perfectly happy. yeah. has she been fazed at all? well, i know her, i‘ve known her for a year. i‘m very... i don‘t think i‘ve ever seen her fazed through any situation. i mean, she‘s been...
10:39 am
but this was a traumatic ordeal, was she not traumatised? my worry was that maybe she was psychologically scarred from this and, indeed, the police in this country said we‘re going to get her counselling. she refused that. and i think, you know, it might be a delayed reaction. but certainly right now there is no sign of any effects on her whatsoever. the detail of what she went through is distressing, it‘s shocking, and yet she doesn‘t seem to have much public sympathy. why do you think that is? i understand that, and it really is because of this lapse of time between the announcement. and thank you very much, the italian police, for making a press release. certainly chloe wouldn‘t have wanted that. when she spoke to me from her hotel room in milan after the ordeal she said, well, i don‘t want this going public. she said, i‘m actually humiliated by it, i don‘t want people to know what i‘ve been through. i want to just come back to the country and get back to my mum and my dog and just carry
10:40 am
on my life. but the italian police have a strange way of dealing with things. she gave her evidence... so she never wanted any publicity around this? she did not, no. she gave her evidence at a pre—trial review ten days ago and straight after the pre—trial review the prosecutor then called a meeting with the press in italy, first of all, and that meeting and that press release brought about attention from all over the world. but she, of course, didn‘t have to respond to that. she could have stayed quiet about it. she didn‘t have to respond, but you mention the stories and the speculation in the press. those stories have come about because the press didn‘t really know the full story. even the italian police were doubting her, don‘t forget, in the beginning. and it‘s only now through confirmation from her lawyer that people are now starting to believe that she actually went through this. you‘ve spoken to her.
10:41 am
does she feel like a victim? she doesn‘t get upset when we talk about it. she doesn‘t... she‘s not traumatised. the only thing we‘ve talked about, and she‘s said, i‘m afraid to go out alone, which she never was. i mean, she used to come up to see me at the agency and travel all the way by train alone. excuse me. and, you know, not be fazed by that. but now she‘s said i really don‘t want to get on a train or any public transport by myself. so that, for me, is the only outward sign i‘ve seen of it having any effect on her. she is now making money out of what she went through. yeah. what do you think about that? that was never the intention and, as i said, she‘s been called to the press to give her version of events.
10:42 am
0k, she‘s been paid for it, you know... but notjust through the press, through public speaking, through topless photo shoots. people will presumably book her now because she is known because of what happened? yeah. well, all her modelling has been cancelled. there hasn‘t been any topless photo shoots since she got back, the press are wrong in saying that. she‘s with an agency now who specialise in public speaking. am i upset? yes. you know, after all we‘ve been through, a successful year and then the time she spent in milan, myself paying for her accommodation, her food and expenses, paying for her return flight ticket back, 24 hours after getting back to go and walk into another agent‘s office was deeply upsetting. do you feel any guilt around the fact that this all happens, effectively, on your watch? she was on your books, she was sent off on this photo shoot through your agency?
10:43 am
you have to feel a little amount of guilt. would i have done anything different? again, if the same situation arose, probably not. the same checks have been carried out by my agency on countless hundreds, maybe thousands, ofjobs over the last 30 years i‘ve had my agency. and we‘ve never had an incident, we‘ve never had to challenge a client or a photographer who we‘ve sent a model to saying that was inappropriate or, you know, they‘ve never been in danger of any sort. so, no. i think possibly, possibly on future jobs, certainly abroad, i might say to the model if you prefer, maybe think about taking a chaperone with you. it isn‘t something the agency offers, it‘s something we don‘t have, but if a model wants to take someone with her, maybe i ought to suggest that. and that was to ailing‘s agent phil
10:44 am
green talking to me about her ordeal. it has been 70 years since partition between india and pakistan came into effect. it was the largest mass migration ever recorded, 12 million people on the move across the newly formed borders. muslim isjourneyed to west and east, but and that now forms pakistan, hindus and sikhs headed in the opposite direction, hundreds of thousand of duck did or killed. —— abdul did. let‘s talk now to vinod chhabra who fled what is now pakistan for india when he was nine years old, his cousin ajay chhabra and his son diren. ajay says partition has lived with his family for decades, gurinder chadha who directed films
10:45 am
bend it like beckham and this year‘s viceroys house amongst otherjoins us from the wagah border which separates india and pakistan and has played host to events marking the 70th anniversary, and in leicester in professor gurharpal singh who has speciliasded in the history of partition. thank you forjoining us, it‘s great to have three generations of your family here to talk about what you went through. you were nine when partition happened, what happened? firstly i want to say happy independence day to all of those watching this programme. luckily it is 50 years today, it is the 15th of august i landed here in england on the 15th and that was one of those
10:46 am
days when my uncle brought me from the heathrow airport, and from onwards i have been here and in germany and all around europe and have been working here. these are the memories i will have to go back, imean the memories i will have to go back, i mean long dark about 60 years. and thatis i mean long dark about 60 years. and that is in my childhood. those are the memories which i personally think are still haunting, sometimes when i think about them. so what do you remember of that time? precisely i will tell you, because i was around eight or nine. i was not in a school because there were disturbed areas all around and actually we we re areas all around and actually we were not regularly going to school.
10:47 am
u nfortu nately were not regularly going to school. unfortunately that was... we work in one of the major cities in pakistan. sorry to interrupt, literally in an insta nt sorry to interrupt, literally in an instant your life changed from the ordered life you had known up until that point and suddenly it was gone, how did you cope with that? that point and suddenly it was gone, how did you cope with that7m changed to some extent that i would say at that time i didn‘t understand, but then when i grew up, isaid understand, but then when i grew up, i said how did that happen to our family? the factory and we were living there and asked to leave that place immediately. so you lost everything overnight? at the age i'm
10:48 am
talking about, we did not know what was happening tomorrow because we we re was happening tomorrow because we were shifting from that area to a place with military and rifles and everything. they said, don‘t go up, don‘t show yourfaces. everything. they said, don‘t go up, don‘t show your faces. that‘s why it was so scary, we were so don‘t show your faces. that‘s why it was so scary, we were so small and we didn‘t know what was happening all around. we have diren next to you. what do you think when you hear vinod talking about what he went through at the age you are?m vinod talking about what he went through at the age you are? it must have been horrible time for him. since he's my grandfather i know how it feels and i know him. when he left his home, he left everything, he only took the things he really needed. for example, some bedding,
10:49 am
the low and some clothes. you wouldn't need your bed frame, your fridge. you would just move and rush out. you would turn on your radio in the morning and here all of a sudden, "get out of india". you obviously know a lot about it, does yourfamily talk obviously know a lot about it, does your family talk openly about it? yes, my dad told me when i was eight or nine, and i intend now. iwent online and looked at it, how some people still have grandads still living now. gurinder, this is not something on curriculum is in a commonplace way, how do you see partition? you're
10:50 am
absolutely right, the british empire is rarely taught now in schools and i think the real question is, yes, there were terrible things that happen during partition but what my studio house looks at is the reasons these things happened. i don't think enough people are focusing on the fa ct enough people are focusing on the fact it was british policy at that time to have the divide, to make partition happened. people like the family of the guests in the studio and my own family, their concerns didn't really matter at the time when this policy to divide india was being planned by the british, way before 1947. what was your family's situation? my grandmother was in a place, which is now pakistan, with her five young children, and very similar. one day trucks and there's
10:51 am
too much violence and you have to leave so she was put on the trot with her children. they were on a train for three days with no food and water, and couldn't get off the train because there was cholera everywhere. eventually her milk dried up and her youngest child starved to death and they ended up ina starved to death and they ended up in a refugee camp for months on end. it isa in a refugee camp for months on end. it is a tragedy for my family, as it is for many people. but i want people to ask questions why it happened, and people are too busy focusing on the trauma of partition and not asking why it happened, because it's a lot to do with the geopolitics at the time between britain and america, much like we see happening in the world today where suffering is happening with refugees. how do you explain how it happened, professor?”
10:52 am
refugees. how do you explain how it happened, professor? iwould differ, in that i don‘t think you can entirely placed the blame on british raj. the situation in india after the second world war had become quite ungovernable and from almost a year before the events happened, there was widespread communal rioting. even in march 1947, many months before the partition actually occurred, indian politicians and politicians in punjab were clamouring for the division of the province. so i think in a sense there is a shared blame, and it‘s
10:53 am
not something most academic historians take seriously, but it was solely the responsibility of british government and the colonial administration in india, in particular mountbatten‘s decision to advance the transfer of power by several months. vinod. .. sorry to interrupt you but i want to go back to vinod because i was struck at the beginning by your immediate reaction to say happy independence day. when independence day came, we didn‘t know it was happy. one thing i tell you that we went through the trucks, we went through the road, we have seen a we went through the road, we have seen a train full of dead bodies
10:54 am
that we were not allowed to go there. actually our factory was nearby and i was not allowed to go to the station, which was almost walking distance, and they said no, you shouldn‘t go there. i could see the blood coming out of those compartments. the people were inside that we didn‘t know, and we were asking what‘s happening here. then we we re asking what‘s happening here. then we were put into the trucks with my grandmother, grandfather, brother, sister, everybody, into the trucks, and the trucks kept on going, going, going. people walking on the road, people not only walking, they were crying, feeling, there was no water given. also it was believe you me a terrible experience as a child. the
10:55 am
events you are describing are unimaginable. ajay, its understanding bitterness would trickle through the generations of a family, how do you see it?|j trickle through the generations of a family, how do you see it? i don't think... i have grown up in a family where bitterness did not exist, and in fact compassion and the things that hold us together, our cultural values, is the environment in which i grew values, is the environment in which igrew up values, is the environment in which i grew up in. i speak to other colleagues or friends or family who have had similar experiences. i think that metaphor repeats itself again and again and i think that's the incredible power of that place, of that community. i think our families didn't look back, they looked forward, they had to. as vinod described, the brutal images
10:56 am
that he lives with. for us, for myself it was important to convey some of that to my son because these are the missing pieces ofjigsaw in family narratives, you know, history repeats itself and these borders are artificial and it's important we reflect on all of these corners of history in order for our next generation, i suppose, to understand the world a better. so i'm really pleased that diren has understood this but also that the communities have looked forward and not back. gurinder, you have been attending events, what has the mood been there? last night i attended a candlelit vigil at the wagah border.
10:57 am
normally people come from pakistan with candles and also from india but sadly last night the pakistanis weren‘t allowed permission so just the indians were there, so that was quite sad. i think one of the things you will find in india, where i am now in punjab, is there are not a lot of initiatives between people and cultural groups to keep those ties strong, particularly through artists and poets, literature. there are great moves to say that yes, the land might be divided but actually our hearts are not and our culture. thank you, that is a good point to end the programme on. thank you, all, for your company. i will see you at the same time tomorrow, goodbye. todayis today is probably looking like being the best day of the week with
10:58 am
regards to sunshine. it will stage i foremost but there will be a few showers in the forecast, these mainly across northern england so quite a few around. land too, and a few the northern ireland but for much of england and wales a lovely afternoon. feeling warm too. we could see 26 celsius across the south—east, the winds will remain light. this evening any showers fizzle out and overnight it will be largely dry and clear one, but notice behind me the next weather system notice behind me the next weather syste m ma kes notice behind me the next weather system makes inroads. it means for wednesday we start off on a lovely note. central and eastern side of the uk with some sunshine. the wet and windy weather will slowly move eastwards reaching all but east and the south—east am here staying quite warm with sunny spells, cooler in the west for the wind and rain. this is bbc news and these
10:59 am
are the top stories developing at 11. the brexit secretary, david davis, says the government wants to negotiate a temporary customs union with the eu for when the uk leaves. there is an interest on both sides of not doing each other harm, if you like, both to do with customs arrangements but also to do with having a free trade area in the first place. millions of rail passengers will see fares rise by 3.6% when price changes come into force next year. the grenfell tower public inquiry will examine issues including the cause of the fire and the actions of authorities before the blaze, the government says. also this hour — more than 300
11:00 am
people are now known to have been killed in mudslides and floods in sierra leone. thousands more have been forced to flee from their homes on the outskirts of the capital, freetown.

142 Views

1 Favorite

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on