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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 17, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and tina daheley. the long wait is over for hundreds of thousands of teenagers across england, wales and northern ireland who get their a—level results this morning. for the first time students in england have been sitting a new style of exams, putting more emphasis on the final test. there's been a drop in university applications meaning more options are available. we'll be live in one clearing centre. good morning. it's thursday, the 17th of august. also this morning, "suffering in silence," a warning that older people aren't reporting problems with their nhs care. how quickly do you expect to get your online groceries? and the bbc understands that eu
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nationals will still need permission to settle here after brexit. good morning. how quickly do you expect to get your online groceries? well, i'll be finding out about a new click and collect service in half an hour. in sport, it's sensational celtic. the scottish champions almost guarantee their place in the champions league group stages, thanks to a 5—0 home win over astana. and carol has the weather. good morning. currently we have rain pushing off in the direction of the north sea. as that clears we are into sunshine and showers, but parts of southern scotland and northern england will miss those showers altogether. i will have the details inis altogether. i will have the details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. students across england, wales and northern ireland will receive their a level results today, determining their admission into higher education. in england, it's the first year that students will get results after major reforms to a—levels, including a move away from coursework, modular exams and separate as—levels. here's our education correspondent, gillian hargreaves. three months ago they were busy
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showing what they had learnt. now the students at this college in east london are about to find out if the ha rd london are about to find out if the hard work paid off. in england recently is to a—levels mean these are the first students to sit one exa m are the first students to sit one exam at the end of two years on study. less emphasis on coursework, and as—levels no longer count towards the final grading 13 subjects. the new type of a—levels are unsettling for some students. subjects. the new type of a—levels are unsettling for some studentslj think the new system wants us to memorise stuff rather than learn. they are just trying to make it harderfor they are just trying to make it harder for us they are just trying to make it harderfor us and they are just trying to make it harder for us and it they are just trying to make it harderfor us and it is going to get harderfor us and it is going to get harder each year. wejust harderfor us and it is going to get harder each year. we just have to accept it. we are like the guinea pigs. we have no past papers, so we have no practice. even our teachers, there are so many new things in the sylla bus there are so many new things in the syllabus that the teachers are struggling to teach it as well. but the change of direction has been welcomed by some heads. the new
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system is good. it prepares students well for university and for employment. the key challenges for awarding bodies to make sure that they are marking with a consistently high standard, so the students get the results they deserve. there has been a drop in the number of stu d e nts been a drop in the number of students applying to university this year, so it is expected there may be more places available to young people who want to shop around. in around 15 minutes, we'll be at birmingham city university, as they begin to hear from students who are accepting or looking for a place. that's at 6.20. far too many older people are suffering in silence when things go wrong with their nhs care, according to the parliamentary and health service ombudsman. it says it's often their relatives who have to step in to complain, but even when they do, many don't believe it makes a difference. simonjones reports. afraid to raise the alarm. there are
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far fewer complaints from all the people then expect it, given their high usage of the nhs, according to the ombudsman. —— expected. high usage of the nhs, according to the ombudsman. -- expected. elderly people are reluctant to complain because they think it is difficult, because they think it is difficult, because they think it is difficult, because they feel that their care may be compromised, and because they don't think that it will make a difference to their situation. so these are unfortunate circumstances. often theirfamilies these are unfortunate circumstances. often their families have to intervene. the ombudsman and the social networking sites gransnet survey their uses. 58% complains, but 67% of them did not believe it made a difference. —— complained of. the ombudsman says the nhs must make it clear how to complain, and those who do must be convinced that future ca re who do must be convinced that future care will not suffer. in response the department of health said that
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when things go wrong it is incredibly important to listen to the concerns of patients and their families. by learning from mistakes, you can improve treatment. thousands of low—paid workers are to receive more than £2 million in back pay as a result of tax investigations by the government. around 230 employers were found to have paid workers less than national minimum wage. among the worst offenders was the retailer argos, which has been fined £800,000. the south korean president has said he doesn't think the united states intends to use military force against north korea, and if they do they must get seoul's "consent." marking his first 100 days in office, president moonjae—in said he could "guarantee" there wouldn't be another war on the korean peninsula but said the leadership in pyongyang was nearing a "red line." britain will look to keep visa—free travel to the uk for european visitors after brexit, the bbc understands. the proposals could mean visitors from countries within the eu would only need to seek permission if they wanted to work, study or settle in britain.
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our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, joins us now. eleanor, what do we know about the government's plans? well, they are due to be published in autumn. we understand that the idea of visa free travel is on the table, and as you said, that would mean that if you are visiting from the eu and you are just mean that if you are visiting from the eu and you arejust on a mean that if you are visiting from the eu and you are just on a holiday 01’ the eu and you are just on a holiday or here for a short amount of time, you wouldn't need a visa. but if you wa nted you wouldn't need a visa. but if you wanted to come here on study or work 01’ wanted to come here on study or work or stay here long—term, you would need to apply and get permission. the idea being that an employer, for example, couldn't just take the idea being that an employer, for example, couldn'tjust take somebody on who was visiting here for a short time. it does, though, seem to leave open the possibility, and of course we are waiting for all the details on this, that people from the eu could come here looking for work without having first applied for a working visa. and there are questions on how this will be in forced and how much the onus will be
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on employers. —— enforced. the government's argument when it comes to controlling immigration is that you don't need physical borders to do that. through work permits, and limiting them, and also through the meeting benefits, you can control the number of people coming here. all of this will need to be signed off by ministers. they will need to be convinced by the plans, as will all those people who voted leave during the referendum, because they wa nted during the referendum, because they wanted to cut immigration. a week of national mourning has been called in sierra leone, in the wake of the flooding and mudslides that claimed hundreds of lives near the capital, freetown. officials say more than 100 children are among the 400 people who are known to have died when part of a mountain collapsed onto a settlement. at least 600 people are still missing. and at 6:a0 we'll be hearing from a charity about how residents are dealing with the tragedy. president trump says he is shutting down two business councils after a raft of resignations by the leaders of some of america's biggest companies. around a dozen company heads quit their roles following the mr tump's decision
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to blame left—wing protesters as much as right—wing supremacists for the violence which erupted in charlottesville at the weekend. david willis reports. at the top of our agenda is the creation of great high—paying jobs... set up to help the president deliver on his promise to help make america great again, the business advisory councils brought together the heads of some of the biggest companies in the us. who would have thought, then, that the racial clashes in cha rlottesville thought, then, that the racial clashes in charlottesville on saturday, in which one person died, would have proved there on doing? the president's response to this violence shocked members of his own party and unnerved many of corporate executives. once the country's most prominent african—american businessmen, pharmaceutical ceo can phrase you, announced that he was leaving, others swiftly followed. —— ken frazier. we believe the
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symbolism of being associated with that spirited defence of racism and bigotry was just unacceptable. as that spirited defence of racism and bigotry wasjust unacceptable. as a trickle of resignations turned into a flood, a close ally of the president, blackstone ceo steve schwartzman, rang to tell him that members were threatening to quit en masse, at which point the president took to twitter to pull the plug. a large crowd took to the streets of cha rlottesville a large crowd took to the streets of charlottesville once again last night. a peaceful protest this time in memory of the 32—year—old woman, heather hayer, who died in saturday's clashes. but with racial tensions simmering once more in the united states, few believe the debate will end here. most of the historic world war ii aircraft that make up the battle of britain memorial flight have been grounded because of engine issues. the hurricanes, spitfires
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and a lancaster bomber are all affected, and one display has already been cancelled, with others under threat. the raf is unable to say when the planes will be back in the skies. the aircraft are more than 70 years old. tom cruise has broken his ankle whilst trying to undertake a daring stunt during filming in london at the weekend. cruise attempted to leap between the roofs of two buildings, but he fell short of the mark and hit the building. filming for the latest installment of mission impossible has now been suspended. ouch. yeah, awfulwhen ouch. yeah, awful when that happens, when you are leaping between buildings. happens to me all the time. who needs the bus, you know? isn't that what you have a stuntman for? apparently he does his own stu nts. for? apparently he does his own stunts. a brave man. what do you have for us? celtic. the football season doesn't seem that all but we
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are already talking european football, with championship qualifying under way. celtic have a foot in the group stages already. an impressive win. it looks like they will qualify, and i think this will bea will qualify, and i think this will be a real test for them this season. domestic leave our season they were undefeated. they wrapped up the league in superquick time with matches to spare. seeing how they fa re matches to spare. seeing how they fare in europe will be a big test for brendan rodgers. at the got the job done last night. —— but they got the job done. what a night it was at celtic park, as the scottish champions thrashed their opponents astana of kazakhstan 5—0 in the first leg of their champions league qualifier. the hosts were in control throughout in glasgow, as two scott sinclair goals helped them to a comfortable victory and almost certainly put them in the lucrative group stages of the competition. edgbaston is the scene for the historic first day—night test as england's cricketers face the west indies. in a move designed to attract more fans to the game, the match will start at a later time of 2:00 and will be played with a pink ball which shows up better under the floodlights. england and ireland can
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reach the semi—finals of the women's rugby world cup later. england take on usa, knowing victory would mean they automatically qualify for the last four while ireland must beat france to beat the semis. and serena williams revealed in a magazine article she plans to play tennis again within three months of giving birth to herfirst child! the 23—time grand slam champion called it "the most outrageous plan." she went on to say, "either i win, or i don't play." she won the australian open when she was two months pregnant, so if anybody can do this it would be serena williams. see you in a bit. thank you. you are watching brea kfast thank you. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories: hundreds of thousands of stu d e nts stories: hundreds of thousands of students in england, wales and northern ireland will get there a level results this morning. a warning that too many elderly
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patients are suffering in silence when things go wrong with their nhs care. when things go wrong with their nhs ca re. let's when things go wrong with their nhs care. let's find out what is happening with the weather. good morning. good morning. after we lose the rain it doesn't look too bad today. we have heavy rain crossing towards the north sea. behind that we have sunshine and showers. not all of us will catch the showers. heavy rain through the course of the night, moving from the west towards the east. quite a bit of that is still with us. through the morning most of that will tend to push off into the north sea. the further west you are, the brighter the start of the day is likely to be. a rather cold start already. —— not a cold start already. —— not a cold start already. north in scotland and northern ireland, patchy mist and fog. that will clear in the next couple of hours, leaving a fair bit of sunshine around. the does not
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necessarily mean it will stay dry. you can see the rain continues to move off into the north sea. there will be cloud left behind. a breezy day as well. the sun will come out and then we will see showers developing. not all of us will catch a shower. this line is coming up through dorset, somerset and the home counties, and that could be happy. but we might well miss them all together in northern england, southern and eastern parts of scotland. in the sunshine it will feel pleasant. we heard john talking about the cricket at edgbaston. it should stay dry. you will be lucky —— unlucky to catch a shower, although we cannot rule them out. through the evening and overnight, we lose some of these showers, but more come in from the west. another breezy night. temperatures staying in double figures, those are overnight lows, of course. these are indicative of what you can expect in towns and cities. that takes us into tomorrow, a blustery day with gusty winds. also some showers. a line of
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rain coming in across northern ireland, crossing the irish sea and getting into northern england in south—west scotland. elsewhere, we have that mix of sunshine and showers, except in the north—east, where we have rain. temperatures up to 21 celsius. a bit cooler than we are expecting today. today we might hit 25. on the weekend it will still be quite breezy. saturday's not looking too bad. lots of dry weather around, afair looking too bad. lots of dry weather around, a fair bit of sunshine. sunny spells and temperatures between 15 and 21. lots of festivals are taking place this weekend. the further south you are, the dry is likely to be. sunday, a bit of a change. quite a bit of dry weather around but it looks like we are going to see some rain coming in across northern ireland. that is going to be pushing north—east as we going to be pushing north—east as we go through the latter part of the day. again, the further east you are, the dry it is likely to remain.
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—— dry out. a quick look at some of the pages, and were start with the front of the daily mail, and an interesting story, a lot from yesterday, sarah champion resign from the shadow cabinet because of comments in connection with the pakistani men and grooming gangs. front page of the sun, the great british back—off, this is about scheduling. channel 4 has pitted the great british bake off against the bbc‘s show, the bbc is moving nadia's show to thursday, which is good if you are a fan of cooking programmes. there was a moment when the shows were going to be on simultaneously, which was not in the interest of the audiences. yeah. the front of the times, also
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about sarah champion, and eu migrants can come to live in britain after brexit, which we will talk about with our political correspondent, suggesting arrangements will be in place suggesting eu citizens can travel through the uk, restrictions will be related to work, and we will have that through the programme. the front of the daily mirror, the alton towers crash victim, near washington, on holiday with other half — you can see her with her prosthetic leg, and she says she doing this because of pictures portraying unrealistic body images. the interview and more pictures inside. in the sun today, there is an interesting story about car loans. they have been going up dramatically. more people taking out loans to get new cars. the latest stats show a little drop. it looked like a bubble that was going to
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burst, so it looks like fewer people have ta ken out burst, so it looks like fewer people have taken out car loans. they say it has been a real driver behind sale. more and more cars mean more people can access them with cheap credit available, when you don't have to pay the loan back for a while. and a nice story about barbecues, £428 million of barbecue feud ending up in the bin. chiefly because people are not excellent at cooking, maybe they cremate it rather than cook it. i quite like it like that. invite us around! it is better to be overcooked rather than undercooked. that is true. sport wise, there is a certain bout between floyd mayweather and conor margreitter. mayweather, 49 fights, undefeated, against mcgreggor. just to show how lucrative this will be, floyd mayweather is expected to make
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$15 million from the advertising on his shorts. i know that macro —— boxers don't wear a lot of them. on top of the $100 million they are each getting. he will get $240 million in total. sponsorship on his shoes and socks. his shorts alone will make $25 million. all the people say that the fight is an absolute nonsense as a sporting event. they say that it is not a sporting event, it is more of an event, if you like, it is entertainment. there is going to be integrity in it. surely it makes it a sporting event. it depends if mayweather tries to eat out the fight, then you look at the integrity... when is it? august, and it is in the states.
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it's a day most of us never forget, exam results day. today, the class of 2017 find out if they've studied hard enough to get a university place after their a—level results. this year, universities are under pressure to widen participation, ensuring more pupils from poorer or ethnic minority backgrounds come to their campuses. our reporter lara rostron is at birmingham city university for us. and are you in the area where the query will be happening? we can see them at their computers and phones. clearing is happening as we speak. this is the nerve centre of birmingham city university. congratulations to everyone opening results this morning and commiseration to those who did not get the grades they expected. this is birmingham city university, one of the most diverse in the country. something like 48% of students come here from a bme background. elsewhere in the rest of the country
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at uk universities, black teenagers in particular are underrepresented. keran dreams of going to cambridge. he is mixed race, he has been in ca re he is mixed race, he has been in care most of his life and went to an inner—city comprehensive. but it is a university where traditionally minority groups have been underrepresented.” minority groups have been underrepresented. i really want to have this opportunity to study at cambridge, at a top university and get a feel for that as an experience in my life. a lot of people who come here have top of the range tutors, have been going to private schools where they pretty much have separate sort of lessons where theyjust teach you how to get through the interview process. in london comprehensive schools, thatjust isn't really available. cambridge says one in five of its students is 110w says one in five of its students is now from a black or minority ethnic
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background, which roughly reflects the wider population. but this week researchers at bath university say many bme students still feel uncomfortable applying to older institutions and are likely to be concentrated in new universities in london or big cities. ciaran‘s shown around by peter, who posed for this photograph along with all the other black men at cambridge in his year. they hoped it would encourage more people like them to apply. on a social level and maybe on a cultural level someone like myself — you are ina level someone like myself — you are in a totally different place. meaning there are not as many people who are like you. within cambridge, rather than perhaps those that are like you at home. if you don't feel that the people you go to the university, then you won't. it is all about visibility. the number of black students at the top four universities in the country has increased 100% in the last ten yea rs,
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increased 100% in the last ten years, from 3% to 6%, those universities formed the russell group, which is investing millions of pounds to improve access, but more needs to be done. there is some evidence of unconscious bias going on and if they apply they don't get excerpted in such numbers. people are making incremental changes. the problem is quite a large one. therefore we need to make a much more significant change. i don't wa nt to more significant change. i don't want to hear lipservice, i want to see action. universities working closely with schools is one way to improve access and another is using mentors who have been through the system already. i think for minority students, sometimes they get caught up students, sometimes they get caught up in expectations of teachers in terms of courses that they might not necessarily want to do but that is all they know about. for ciaran, if he gets one a and two a stars, he is into cambridge. no longer dreaming of cambridge student life but
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leaving it in one of the most prestigious universities. —— living. and of course i will let you know what ciaran got. take a look at this who is answering the phones, the one and only lenny henry, the chancellor at birmingham city university. i am the chancellor! we will catch you later. let's talk to the head of admissions. julie mason, it is good to see you. how are you doing so well at attracting bme students to this university? we value the wonderful diversity of the city and outreach work is with 13,000 schoolchildren every year through oui’ schoolchildren every year through our local 100 schools and colleges that we work with, so we naturally work with institutions with a widening participation agenda. brilliant, well, you're certainly doing very well. we are in the call centre today and obviously people are already taking calls even though it is only 6:30am in the morning, it
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is so busy. it has slightly changed, though, hasn't it? it has, in that we are taking calls from applicants who maybe have not been through thus farand are now who maybe have not been through thus far and are now looking at coming into higher education. they have their exam results and maybe did better than expected and we are here to talk to them about the opportunities available to them. to talk to them about the opportunities available to themm might even be bme students who traditionally would not have considered university, then they get amazing results and give you a call. absolutely. we would welcome them giving us a call. we are a 50% bme student body and we understand the barriers to higher education. if you're from a low income family, or if you have no experience of family members going into higher education. and we want to talk to you. absolutely, and it is a buyers‘ market as well. it is, more institutions and courses in clearing, so plenty of choice.
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please, give us a call. it is time to hand it back to you now, but we will be back here talking to the one and only lenny henry. lovely, thank you very much. and the reason is he is chancellor of birmingham city university, and now very much one of the people who encourages youngsters to go into the system, because he didn‘t when he was younger and finally he got a degree at 48. in his 405, yeah. and a nervous wait in lots of households this morning. absolutely. good luck if you are waking up to your a—level results. you‘re watching breakfast. still to come this morning: they were designed to transport goods but increasingly people are setting up home on canal boat5. we‘ll look at the strain its causing on our waterways. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m sonja jessup. the bbc has learned that the london fire brigade was closely consulted over the refurbishment of the grenfell tower. at least 80 people died when a fire engulfed the block two months ago.
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the london fire brigade say they do not have legal powers to inspect structural changes to buildings or to sign off refurbishment. a south london hospital trust has been told it needs to improve patient care for the third time in three years. an inspection of lewi5ham and greenwich nhs trust by the care quality commission has again identified numerou5 failings in patient care. the report found there were poor standards of cleanline55, and patients with tb were not being properly isolated. a campaign‘s been launched to save unique railing5 across london that are made from world war two stretchers. the stretchers were recycled as fences after the war ended, but many have now started to rust. campaigners are calling for them to be restored rather than removed. these stretchers are a really important part of a mac sort of communal history and they represent
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something very important. some people on estates know about them. some people remember them. i think more people in the recent past who grew up in estates are familiar with their history. travel now. there‘s been a signal failure on the bakerloo line. part of it was closed for a time. it‘s reopened but with severe delays northbound. southern trains have no london bound service between tonbridge to redhill following a points failure. this is how it looks at the blackwall tunnel: northbound traffic is slow as usual from blackwall lane. whitehall is still closed for maintenance works. and a horse is loose on the m25, there are delays in both directions through junction 3 for swanley while they attempt to round it up. it‘s near the anti clockwise entry slip. let‘s take a look at the weather now. over to lucy martin. kello, good morning. a gradually improving picture today. some rain this morning but it will clear eastwards to allow for dry and bright whether in the afternoon. so we could see some heavy bursts this
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morning. an umbrella is recommended. it is becoming more drizzly and light and then we see improvements coming from the west with sunny spells developing. just the chance of the odd scattered light shower into the afternoon with highs of around 23, perhaps 24 degrees. as we go through this evening and overnight, then, one or two showers to look out for. it will become mostly dry. some clear spells, although temperatures won‘t fall too far with overnight lows in the teens, a minimum of 15— 16 degrees. we start the day tomorrow with some sunshine around. there will be a bit of cloud bubbling up through the day. one or two showers to look out for. but it is a different feel to things. there is an increasingly strong breeze, so not feeling as war with highs of around 19 degrees. i will leave you with the outlook as we move into the weekend — a fairly breezy start on saturday but things will settle down, becoming dry and bright with good spells of sunshine.
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and at the moment although there is uncertainty with rain in the north, there is sunshine around as well. i‘ll be back in around half an hour. for more news, travel and weather you can take a look at our website. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and tina daheley. it‘s 06:30 on thursday the 17th of august. we‘ll have the latest news and sport injust a moment. coming up on breakfast today, click and collect your groceries in 30 minutes. we‘ll take a look at the latest moves by the supermarkets to win your loyalty. they are one of our most loved animals but have been in decline for years, discover how building or buying a home for a hedgehog could help our spiky friends in the future. from wizardry to wounded detective. asjk rowling‘s novel, the cuckoo‘s calling, hits the small screen, find out how its star avoided being intimidated by the harry potter author. all that still to come. but now, a summary of this morning‘s main news. students across england, wales and northern ireland will receive their a level results today. in england, it‘s the first year that students will get results after major reforms to a—levels,
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including a move away from coursework, modular exams and separate as—levels. here‘s our education correspondent, gillian hargreaves. three months ago they were busy showing what they had learnt. now the students at this college in east london are about to find out if their hard work paid off. in england recent changes to a—levels mean these are the first students to sit one exam at the end of two years on study. less emphasis on coursework, and as—levels no longer count towards the final grading of 13 subjects. the new type of a—levels are unsettling for some students. i think the new system wants us to memorise stuff rather than learn. they are just trying to make it harderfor us and it is going to get harder each year. we just have to accept it. we are like the guinea pigs. we have no past papers, so we have no practice. even our teachers, there are so many new things in the syllabus that our teachers are struggling
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to teach it as well. but the change of direction has been welcomed by some heads. the new system is good. i think it prepares students well for university and for employment. the key challeng is for awarding bodies to make sure that they‘re marking to a consistently high standard, so the students get the results they deserve. there has been a drop in the number of students applying to university this year, so it is expected there may be more places available to young people who want to shop around. far too many older people are suffering in silence when things go wrong with their nhs care, according to the parliamentary and health service ombudsman. it says it‘s often their relatives who have to step in to complain, but even when they do, many don‘t believe it makes a difference. the department of health says when things go wrong, it‘s important to listen to the concerns of patients and their families. afraid to raise the alarm.
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elderly people are reluctant to complain because they think it‘s difficult, because they feel that their care may be compromised, and because they don‘t think that it will make a difference to their situation. so these are unfortunate circumstances. thousands of low paid workers are to receive more than £2 million in back pay as a result of tax investigations by the government. around 230 employers were found to have paid workers less than national minimum wage. among the worst offenders was the retailer argos, which has been fined £800,000. the south korean president has said he doesn‘t think the united states intends to use military force against north korea, and if they do they must get seoul‘s "consent." marking his first 100 days in office, president moonjae—in said he could "guarantee" there wouldn‘t be another war on the korean peninsula, but said the leadership in pyongyang
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was reaching a "red line." britain will look to keep visa free travel to the uk for european visitors after brexit, according to the bbc. the proposal could mean visitors from the eu would only need to sit mission if they wanted to work, study or settle in britain. —— seek permission. a week of national mourning has been called in sierra leone, in the wake of the flooding and mudslides that claimed hundreds of lives near the capital, freetown. officials say more than 100 children are among the 400 people who are known to have died when part of a mountain collapsed onto a settlement. at least 600 people are still missing. and in a few minutes we‘ll hear from a charity how residents are dealing with the tragedy. president trump has said he is scrapping two business councils after around a dozen bosses quit over the way he handled
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the violent clashes in virginia. business leaders left the white house manufacturing council following mr trump‘s decision to blame left—wing protesters as much as right—wing supremacists for the violence which erupted in charlottesville at the weekend. last night hundreds of people took pa rt last night hundreds of people took part in candlelit vigils in the town, to remember heather hayer, who died when a car ploughed into a cloud of antiracism protesters. —— crowd. most of the historic world war ii aircraft that make up the battle of britain memorial flight have been grounded because of engine issues. the hurricanes, spitfires and a lancaster bomber are all affected and one display has already been cancelled with others under threat. the raf is unable to say when the planes will be back in the skies. the aircraft are more than 70 years old. tom cruise has broken his ankle whilst trying to undertake a daring stunt during filming in london at the weekend. cruise attempted to leap between the roofs of two buildings, but he fell short of the mark
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and hit the building. filming for the latest installment of mission impossible has now been suspended. for anybody looking for the best that urban living has to offer, the a nswer that urban living has to offer, the answer again seems to be to head to australia. on a ranking of the world was make most liveable cities ivy economist, melbourne has come out on top for a record seventh year in a row. the criteria included healthcare, education, row. the criteria included healthca re, education, and infrastructure. london is one of only two uk cities to feature and came 53rd out of 140. i know what you‘re thinking, what was the other uk cities is to either need to think, manchester. you are right. i am right! well, there you go. let‘s talk football, charlie grice celtic. football season has onlyjust begun, but we are already talking european
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football. celtic have made a blistering start and it looks like they will be going through to the group stages, after winning against aston a re group stages, after winning against aston are last night. —— astana. they had a sensational season last year, undefeated in the scottish premiership. the real test for brendan rodgers is how his side goes in europe. celtic look all but through to the champions league group stages after an impressive 5—0 victory over asta na of kaza hksta n. the scottish champions were in control of the first leg qualifier throughout, as scott sinclair scored twice to help put them three up. before late goals from james forrest and a deflected leigh griffiths strike made the scoreline even better. the second leg is next tuesday. everton have signed gylfi sigurdsson from swansea city for a club record fee believed to be around £45 million. the iceland international has signed a 5—year deal, he says he hopes to "create goals and score goals". sigurdsson was an important player for swansea last season, scoring nine times as he helped them avoid relegation. england‘s cricketers begin their first day—night test this afternoon, against west indies at edgbaston. in a move designed to attract more fans to the game,
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the match will begin at two o‘clock and will be played with a pink ball which shows up better under the lights. the west indies team already has experience of playing a day—night test, but it‘ll be a step into the unknown for the hosts. it is hard to think of test cricket, playing it any differently to how you would normally. ultimately it is still the same game. you have to adapt to the conditions. we have managed to do that well and should be in managed to do that well and should beina managed to do that well and should be in a good addition. —— position. it is something the game needs. test cricket is not suffering in england, but in many territories around the world, the fans are slowly but surely decreasing. sol fans are slowly but surely decreasing. so i think this adds something to test cricket. we will be speaking a bit more about that new pink ball later on. scotland‘s catriona matthew has been called up to replace the injured suzann pettersen in
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europe‘s solheim cup team. 47—year—old matthew has played in nine solheim cups. norwegian pettersen has been receiving treatment for a recurrent back injury. the event takes place in iowa from tomorrow until sunday. england and ireland can reach the semi—finals of the rugby world cup later. england, the defending champions, have made six changes for their match against usa in dublin. victory would guarantee them a place in the last four. the host nation ireland know they have to beat france to reach the semis. wales also play, but they can‘t progress. kei nishikori has torn a tendon in his wrist, which means he‘ll be yet another top ranked tennis player to miss the rest of the season due to injury. the world number nine heard a pop in his wrist but will not have surgeryjust yet, opting for a cast instead. he‘ll join novak djokovic and stan wawrinka in missing the us open and sitting out the rest of the year. while serena williams has revealed in a magazine article that she plans to play tennis again within three months of giving birth to herfirst child. the 23—time grand slam champion called it "the most outrageous plan."
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she went on to say, "either i win, or i don‘t play." jo pavey says she‘s looking to defend her 10,000 metre title at the european championships in germany next yearjust a month before her 45th birthday. pavey won european gold in zurich three years ago, aged 40. the british five—time olympian missed the world athletics championships in london with a heel injury and has ruled out competing at the commonwealth games in australia next year but insists she has no plans to retire. now, before i go let me show you these spectacular pictures. the queen‘s baton relay for the 2018 commonwealth games in australia reached new heights when an raf display team jumped with the baton from 10,000 feet. it was safely tucked away during the skydive. i was going to say, i can‘t see it! i suppose it would be impressive if
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you had it in your hand, but if you dropped it, it good luck finding it again. it has to arrive in australia by christmas eve, when it will be carried across the country. but we are assured it is tucked away in there. more than 100 children are among the 400 people known to have died after mudslides devastated parts of sierra leone‘s capital, freetown. the disaster happened on monday, and more than a year since the country was declared ebola free. rescue teams are still searching for at least 600 people who are missing. jeremy taylor is from the charity, tearfund, and hejoins us now. good morning. you are co—ordinating your charity‘s work from here in the uk. thus your assessment of how the situation stands today? we have teams on the ground saying that there is widespread devastation in and around freetown, the capital city. as you have said, there are hundreds dead and hundreds still missing. what we are hearing from
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our staff on the ground with tearfund, our staff on the ground with tea rfund, there are our staff on the ground with tearfund, there are whole families in morning who have lost loved ones, and in some cases whole families have been wiped out by this crisis. —— in mourning. have been wiped out by this crisis. -- in mourning. it is heartbreaking to see the photos and footage of utter devastation. what are the biggest challenges for teams on the ground right now? as i said, there is widespread devastation. just moving around is difficult. but we are working with our local partners, who are already opening up their churches and their schools to be able to house people, and we are assessing to work out how we can best meet their needs at this time. as we are looking at those pictures, it is often the case with these very desperate major mudslides or landslides, it is really hard to work out, you know, what was there before, and what you are looking at when you see those situations, such as the scale of the chaos. yeah.
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freetown is a really hilly city. it isa freetown is a really hilly city. it is a really difficult place to work in that respect. the authorities and the other aid agencies and ourselves have in working really hard to get access to all the different areas. one of the benefits of tearfund is that we were really right in there in the communities. we know the communities. some of the communities we have been working with have been com pletely we have been working with have been completely wiped out. one community of 60 people, they are all dead. another 300 have had their homes destroyed. is there anything that could have been done to prevent this from happening? so, um, part of the reason for this is the underlying poverty that is there. that is what tearfund poverty that is there. that is what tea rfund tries to poverty that is there. that is what tearfund tries to address, the underlying poverty. there are many contributing factors to this, but it is always the poorest who are the
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worst hit. that is who we are trying to support at this time. the images we are seeing now, presumably there must be real fear is looking forward about health issues being thrown up, dirty water and that sort of situation. immediate concerns are certainly about clean water and hygienic facilities. again, that is what we are trying to do as much as possible, make sure people have a safe place to stay, and we are co—ordinating with the government and with other agencies to make sure that they can get clean water and clea n that they can get clean water and clean facilities. these latest reports we are hearing today, the number of children who have been caught up in this, it is really harrowing. i suppose it is often the case that those who are least able to escape, initially, other ones most vulnerable. yes, that is what we have seen. we know of one whole family, you know, known very well by our staff out there, the whole house at 22 people in it and it wasjust washed away. so it is really
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heartbreaking, yeah, to be faced with these stories. and bridge of your staff are working in very difficult conditions. we often talk about this, but it must be very hard for them? yes, they know many of the families that have been completely killed, or have many members of theirfamily killed. killed, or have many members of their family killed. so killed, or have many members of theirfamily killed. so i think it is heartbreaking to be able to work out how they can help, at this time when they themselves are deeply affected by it. and more worryingly, we are hearing fears of a second mudslide, potentially? yeah, we are hearing that it is likely the rains will continue. part of what we will be doing, and what others will be doing, is to make sure that those who are still at risk can be best supported. jeremy, thank you for your time. let‘s go to carol to look at what is
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happening with this morning‘s we. let‘s go to carol to look at what is happening with this morning's we.- the moment we have a hurricane in the moment we have a hurricane in the atlantic. this is hurricane gert, it is a category 2 hurricane, which isn‘t particularly big. it stayed offshore, but causing some large waves. what impact does it have on us? well, it is going to be absorbed by an area of low pressure. over the next few days it will travel over the atlantic and reach our shores later on sunday. the releva nce to our shores later on sunday. the relevance to us is tropical air will be embedded in this and warm air actually means we will see heavy rain - actually means we will see heavy rain — and heavy rain will come our way across northern ireland and some will see heavy rain on monday as well. it is a bit of a way off. today what we are looking at is rain moving away from the south and the east and then behind it we will see some sunshine and showers. some of
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the showers could be heavy. across wales this morning a bright start, cloud for south—west england, then cloud for south—west england, then cloud and rain. but i‘m of course is 8am and it continues as we move into northern england. for scotland and northern ireland, patchy mist and fog first thing, clearing readily, then sunshine coming through. the far north of scotland into the northern isles we also have some rain. the rain clears the east through the morning with some cloud left behind and it is also going to bea left behind and it is also going to be a breezy day and we will see sunshine develop quite widely. equally we will see some showers as well. a line could form from somerset to dorsett into the home counties. somewhere, from northern england, southern and eastern scotland, could be dry. enjoy the sunshine, there could be highs between 20— 24. through the evening and overnight the showers will fade. further showers or develop in the west. still it is a breezy night as well. showers will merge as they move west to east during the course
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of the night. temperature—wise in towns and cities, 12— 50, so not particular call, though in rural areas it will be cooler than the nightjust gone areas it will be cooler than the night just gone —— areas it will be cooler than the nightjust gone —— 12—15. then another band comes in across northern ireland and it will follow a similarcourse, a northern ireland and it will follow a similar course, a cross the irish sea into northern england, southern england. on either side we have sunshine and showers. what one —— one thing you will notice is it will bea one thing you will notice is it will be a breezy day. for saturday it is a mixture of sunshine and showers. and another breezy day. further south you are, the less likely you are to see the showers. and then behind it you can see what i was talking about — area of low pressure coming through later in the date with ex— hurricane gert absorbed by it and with ex— hurricane gert absorbed by itand in with ex— hurricane gert absorbed by it and in tropical air, with tropical rain, and that will move from the west to the east on sunday and into monday. thank you very
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much. we will speak to you soon. the world we live in, everyone wants everything now, don‘t they, right now? supermarkets are heading in that direction. it certainly is, yeah. sainsbury‘s has launched a new service that lets customers click and collect groceries just half an hour later. it‘s being trialled in london for now but, with our increasing appetite for online shopping, we may well see services like this spreading across the uk. and we really do love filling up our virtual shopping baskets online — the latest figures from mintel show 14% of brits currently do all of their grocery shopping online, up from 7% three years ago. online grocery sales are expected to reach £11.1 billion in 2017, and 53% of customers say it‘s important to have the ability to have online grocery orders delivered on the same day. retail analyst kate hardcastle joins me now. thank you very much for being with us. there is a real battle between
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supermarkets to be the fastest and the first to deliver, at least to provide access for people to click and collect. it is fascinating what‘s happening in grocery. it used to bea what‘s happening in grocery. it used to be a level playing field of a couple of main names. now we‘ve got such a marketplace, mainly because as consumers we want everything how we wa nt as consumers we want everything how we want it — i think we cite all of the change down to the german discounters, the aldis and lidles, which has an economical offer that is great quality. we are eating out more. we are more savvy as customers. we have amazon coming into the market. and we have seen amazon delivering within the hour — is it pressuring supermarkets? exactly. the big five have additional pressures. they can‘t stand for one thing. it can‘t be "we
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will offer the cheapest price". customers want so much more. it has to be experiential, it has to be theatre — we have cooking schools at waitrose. if it is the cheapest, it has to be the best quality, like the discount stores. as saying —— sainsbury‘s are doing, you know, groceries will be ready in 15 minutes. before long the fridge will talk to the supermarket to tell them what to orderfor you. talk to the supermarket to tell them what to order for you. at the moment at sainsbury‘s it is only in city centre stores for a number of items — will you see it rolled out wider and other supermarkets doing the same thing in half an hour? and other supermarkets doing the same thing in half an hour7m and other supermarkets doing the same thing in half an hour? it is a london store with a high demand for it and people are on the move, and that‘s not going to be relevant to a lot of us. we don‘t want a 30 minute click and collect service. sainsbury‘s are saying "look how much we are listening because we wa nt to much we are listening because we want to make sure it is about choice for you". they are not the only ones. we have german discounters not
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just offering price but quality and other brands offering so much more in their remit, then it is such a churned up market and we are so fickle as customers that we show no loyalty a nd fickle as customers that we show no loyalty and we will go where we feel suits us best. thank you very much. really interesting at the moment with supermarkets not necessarily making much money, though they feel like they have to fightjust making much money, though they feel like they have to fight just to making much money, though they feel like they have to fightjust to win our custom. thank you very much. for some, living on a canal boat is an opportunity to live life at a slower pace, but for others it‘s a way to escape rising property prices. with more and more houseboats on our waterways, the canal and river trust is asking anyone thinking of swapping bricks for boating to think carefully before considering a life on the river. breakfast‘s tim muffett reports. the trent and mersey canal in staffordshire, where kerry and pete have a lot of work. when it comes to boats sinking we‘re definitely getting busier. they run river
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kennet rescue helping boat owners in trouble teaching canal users basic rules which to the exasperation many are unaware of —— canals. rules which to the exasperation many are unaware of -- canals. you drive on the right—hand side when you are passing another boat so it is port to port, left to left. these are metal boats. they rust in the water. if you don‘t take it out of the water and treat it it will rot away to nothing the boat sinks. after yea rs of to nothing the boat sinks. after years of neglect, many canals are busy once more and those who look after them say that canal users, especially those new to all this, need to ensure they know what they are doing. well, one of the issues that we have is the sheer popularity of ca nals that we have is the sheer popularity of canals means it is used by more and more people. the canal and river trust manages 2000 miles of waterways in england and away from the dangerous misuse of lochs to the dumping of waste — the boom in canal use has many downsides. all you have here is two whitebeam boats china, which is quadruple mooring, causing
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obstruction for other craft trying to get through. the trust records incidents when it came but in london, where the problems are the most severe, it is a huge task. vote compass have risen by 72% since 2012 to more than 4000 —— boat numbers. the majority in london have what are known as continuous cruiser licenses and only today for a permanent mooring but the boats can‘t stay in the same place for more than 14 days. just moved out of a flat in brixton because i can‘t afford to live there any more and here there isa live there any more and here there is a boat. nick is typical of many that are new to the canals, attracted by a lower cost of living. it is comfortable. we don‘t have a toilet on—board. we don‘t have a shower. at the moment the motor is broken. we don‘t have any electricity. there is no power. you prefer it to paying money on a flat? for the moment, yes. nick and his friends stress they are responsible
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users, though they will have to soon move on from the spot and find another, which won‘t be easy. sarah manages a private mooring site and believes many canal newcomers have thought things through. believes many canal newcomers have thought things throughm believes many canal newcomers have thought things through. it is not theirfault. thought things through. it is not their fault. there is thought things through. it is not theirfault. there is nothing in place to say, ok, you need to know this before you put a boat on the water. you only learn it as you go along. it is baptism by fire. three quarters of the boats moored in the capital are now being lived in according to the canal and river trust. a transport system built to carry goods buckling under pressure from people. it isa it is a whole different kind of lifestyle. you‘re watching breakfast. still to come this morning: we‘ll peer through the windscreen of the taxi of mum and dad. it‘s the documentary that examines how parents and their children catch—up in the car. yeah, travelling with family members can be stressful. let us know if you provide a taxi service for yourfamily, who for, and where does it take you? we‘d like to know if it is
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an opportunity to bond or argue with your captive audience. it is all about those conversations — some good, some bad, that can happen in those circumstances. yeah. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m sonja jessup. the bbc has learned that the london fire brigade was closely consulted over the refurbishment of the grenfell tower. at least 80 people died when a fire engulfed the block two months ago. the london fire brigade say they do not have legal powers to inspect structural changes to buildings or to sign off refurbishment. a south london hospital trust has been told it needs to improve patient care for the third time in three years. an inspection of lewi5ham and greenwich nhs trust by the care quality commission has again identified numerous failings in patient care. the report found there were poor standards of cleanliness, and patients with tb were not being properly isolated. a campaign‘s been launched to save unique railings across london that are made from world war two stretchers. the stretchers were recycled as fences after the war ended,
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but many have now started to rust. campaigners are calling for them to be restored rather than removed. these stretchers are a really important part of our, sort of, communal history, and they represent something very important. i mean, some people on estates know about them. some people remember them. i think more people in the, sort of, recent past who grew up in estates are familiar with their history. travel now. there‘s been a signal failure on the bakerloo line. part of it was closed for a time. it is all back to normal. southern trains have no london bound service between tonbridge to redhill following a points failure. whitehall is still closed for maintenance works. and a horse is loose on the m25, there are delays in both directions through junction 3 for swanley while they attempt to round it up. it‘s near the anti clockwise entry slip.
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let‘s take a look at the weather now. over to lucy martin. hello, good morning. a gradually improving picture today. some rain this morning but it will clear eastwards to allow for some dryer and brighter weather into the afternoon. so, we could see a few heavy bursts this morning. an umbrella definitely recommended. it‘s becoming more drizzly and light, and then we see improvements coming from the west, some sunny spells developing. just the chance of the odd scattered light shower into the afternoon with highs of around 23, perhaps 24 degrees. as we go through this evening and overnight, then, there will still be one or two showers to look out for. but it will become mostly dry. some clear spells, and temperatures won‘t fall too far, with overnight lows in the teens. a minimum of 15—16 degrees. we‘ll start the day tomorrow with some sunshine around. there will be a bit of cloud bubbling up as we move through the day. one or two showers to look out for. but there will be
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a different feel to things. an increasingly strong breeze, so not feeling as warm, with highs of around 19 degrees. i will leave you with the outlook, then, as we move into the weekend. a fairly breezy start on saturday, but things will settle down, becoming dryer and brighter with good spells of sunshine. and, at the moment, although there is uncertainty with rain in the north, there is sunshine around as well. i‘ll be back in around half an hour. for more news, travel and weather you can take a look at our website. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and tina daheley. the long wait is over for hundreds of thousands of teenagers across england, wales and northern ireland who get their a—level results this morning. for the first time students in england have been sitting a new style of exams, putting more emphasis on the final test. there‘s been a drop in university applications meaning more options are available — we‘ll be live in one clearing centre. good morning, it‘s thursday
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the 17th of august. also this morning: "suffering in silence" — a warning that older people aren‘t reporting problems with their nhs care. hundreds of people have taken part in a vigil in charlottesville just days after violence erupted in the town. in the latest of our chats with inspirational businesswomen i‘ll be talking to someone who‘s convinced she can teach us all computer coding in a day. in sport, it‘s sensational celtic. the scottish champions almost guarantee their place in the champions league group stages, thanks to a 5—0 home win over astana. and carol has the weather. will have a breezy day and sunshine
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and showers. southern scotland and northern england could miss the showers. first, our main story. students across england, wales and northern ireland will receive their a level results today. in england, it‘s the first year that students will get results after major reforms to a—levels, including a move away from coursework, modular exams and separate as—levels. here‘s our education correspondent gillian hargreaves. three months ago they were busy showing what they had learnt. now the students at this college in east london are about to find out if their hard work paid off. in england recent changes to a—levels mean these are the first students to sit one exam at the end of two years on study. less emphasis on coursework, and as—levels no longer count towards the final grading of 13 subjects. the new type of a—levels are unsettling for some students. i think the new system wants us to memorise stuff rather than learn. they are just trying to make it
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harderfor us and it is going to get harder each year. we just have to accept it. we are like the guinea pigs. we have no past papers, so we have no practice. even our teachers, there are so many new things in the syllabus that our teachers are struggling to teach it as well. but the change of direction has been welcomed by some heads. the new system is good. i think it prepares students well for university and for employment. the key challeng is for awarding bodies to make sure that they‘re marking to a consistently high standard, so the students get the results they deserve. there has been a drop in the number of students applying to university this year, so it is expected there may be more places available to young people who want to shop around. in around 15 minutes, we‘ll be at birmingham city university, as they begin to hear from students who are accepting or looking for a place.
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that‘s at 7.20 far too many older people are suffering in silence when things go wrong with their nhs care, according to the parliamentary and health service ombudsman. it says it‘s often their relatives who have to step in to complain, but even when they do, many don‘t believe it makes a difference. simonjones reports. afraid to raise the alarm. there are far fewer complaints from older people then expected, given their high usage of the nhs, according to the ombudsman. elderly people are reluctant to complain because they think it is difficult, because they feel that their care may be compromised, and because they don‘t think that it will make a difference to their situation. so these are unfortunate circumstances. often theirfamilies have to intervene. the ombudsman and the social networking sites gra nsnet 35% said there were times when they
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cared about care of their relatives. 58% complained, but 67% of them did not believe it made a difference. the ombudsman says the nhs must make it clear how to complain, and those who do must be convinced that future care will not suffer. in response, the department of health said that when things go wrong, "it is incredibly important to listen to the concerns of patients and their families — by learning from mistakes, you can improve treatment." the south korean president has said he doesn‘t think the united states intends to use military force against north korea, and if they do they must get seoul‘s consent. marking his first 100 days in office, president moonjae—in said he could guarantee there wouldn‘t be another war on the korean peninsula but said the leadership in pyongyang was reaching a red line. britain will look to keep visa—free travel to the uk for european visitors after brexit, the bbc understands. the proposals could mean
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visitors from countries within the eu would only need to seek permission if they wanted to work, study or settle in britain. our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, joins us now. eleanor, what do we know about the government‘s plans? we are due to get the full detail in the autumn in a few weeks but this idea of visa — free travel is on the table and that would mean thatjust as now, people from the eu want to come here to visit and on a holiday would be able to do that without a visa however if you want to come here and work and study will stay here and work and study will stay here for much longer period, you would need to apply to do that and get permission. this is all meant to make sure that employers would not be able to take somebody on into a newjob he wasjust be able to take somebody on into a newjob he was just here visiting but it does leave open the question
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of people looking to come here for work without having first applied for a work bees are and how is this going to be enforced? is this going to mostly be on employers to check on the status of people? the government‘s article is that you don‘t need physical borders to do it, controlling access to work in the labour market, access to benefits, you can back down on freedom of movement. all this will need to be signed off by ministers, and as for all those people who voted to leave in the referendum, they wanted immigration to be cut. a week of national mourning has been called in sierra leone, in the wake of the flooding and mudslides that claimed hundreds of lives near the capital, freetown. officials say more than 100 children are among the 400 people who are known to have died when part of a mountain collapsed onto a settlement. at least 600 people are still missing. our correspondent
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martin patience reports. breaking news. firefighters in glasgow attack —— tackling a blaze in the east end of the city. this story, breaking in the last half an hour with reports the fire broke out inafruit hour with reports the fire broke out in a fruit farm in the early hours of this morning. some nearby residents have reported hearing some explosions but you probably get a sense from those pictures, the scale of the fire. this is a fruit market in glasgow, a fire which has erupted in the last hour or so. you can see many of the emergency services on the scene we will keep an eye on that for you. president trump says he is shutting down two business councils after a raft of resignations by the leaders of some of america‘s biggest companies.
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around a dozen company heads quit their roles following mr trump‘s decision to blame left—wing protesters as much as right—wing supremacists for the violence which erupted in charlottesville. last night hundreds of people gathered for a candlelit vigil in the town to remember heather heyer who died after a car ploughed into a group of anti—racism protesters. david willis reports. at the top of our agenda is the creation of great high—paying jobs. set up to help the president deliver on his promise to help "make america great again," the business advisory councils brought together the heads of some of the biggest companies in the us. who would have thought, then, that the racial clashes in cha rlottesville on saturday, in which one person died, would have proved their undoing? the president‘s response to this violence shocked members of his own party and unnerved many corporate executives. once the country‘s most prominent african—american businessman, pharmaceutical ceo ken frazier, announced that he was leaving, others swiftly followed.
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we believe the symbolism of being associated with that spirited defence of racism and bigotry was just unacceptable. as a trickle of resignations turned into a flood, a close ally of the president, blackstone ceo steve schwarzman, rang to tell him that members were threatening to quit en masse, at which point the president took to twitter to pull the plug: a large crowd took to the streets of charlottesville once again last night. a peaceful protest this time in memory of the 32—year—old woman, heather hayer, who died in saturday‘s clashes. but with racial tension simmering once more in the united states, few believe the debate will end here. tom cruise has broken his ankle
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whilst trying to undertake a daring stunt during filming in london at the weekend. cruise attempted to leap between the roofs of two buildings, but he fell short of the mark and hit the building. filming for the latest installment of mission impossible has now been suspended. it gets better soon. we will have all the sport coming up a little later and carol has the weather for us as later and carol has the weather for us as well. having an elderly relative spend time in hospital can be upsetting, but would you complain about it? new research by the parliamentary and health service ombudsman suggested both patients and family members find it difficult to raise concerns, because of fears their treatment will be compromised, and as a result they are suffering in silence. we can talk now to caroline palmer, who had worries when her mother was in hospital, and from westminster, the health ombudsman rob behrens.
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caroline, tell us what happened. my mum was in and out of hospital for the last two years of her life between 2014 and 2016. she had quite a rare neurological condition which meant that she was losing the ability to talk so i was there to explain to the doctors and nurses what kind of care she required and whether she had any concerns about how she was being treated. she would tell me. she was having problems getting anyone to understand because it was quite difficult. what then happened, did you complain?” it was quite difficult. what then happened, did you complain? i got to the stage where they would see me coming and go, it‘s her again. i would have to go up and say, this has happened or mum is a little concerned about this. i find that
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with overstretched shaath —— staff and shift changes, i would be repeating myself or coming back and having to say it again because they hadn‘t been able to do anything the first time and one particular case, when i had cause to complain about a discharge that was unsafe, a social worker put me onto how to make an official complaint and having chased it up official complaint and having chased itupa official complaint and having chased it up a few times, unfortunately no response to it. i didn‘t have the time or the energy while i was looking up to mum to actually trace it up further. re: official complaints, let‘s speak to the nhs ombudsman. the issue about people, what badly, in those moments in time, the main thing you want to do with a relative is look after them. taking to an official complaint, thatis taking to an official complaint, that is not the first thing in your priority. is that part of the
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problem, that people don‘t have the time or the energy? that is exactly pa rt of time or the energy? that is exactly part of a problem and i'm sorry to you about the experience we have just listened to. people in hospital are very distressed, they are worried, those looking after them are concerned about their treatment. and this is the time that hospitals need to listen and respond to concerns survey need to listen and respond to concerns survey to become complaints and unfortunately, practising the nhs is consistent in this way. something tells me that one of the things people want, what caroline wa nted things people want, what caroline wanted its somebody do something right then and right there. in people‘s heads, they are thinking, ifi people‘s heads, they are thinking, if i put in an official complaint, it would go to a committee. that does not solve the problem you have in front of you there and then.
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winner kamal assert that families and elderly relatives and hospital cover most of the time, they complaint and nurses and nurses to a wonderfuljob for the nhs. but the hospitals have to find a way to enable nurses and clinicians to listen carefully to patients so they can act when something is a concern rather than a complaint so it can be resolved in the hospital rather than having to go or come to us reading go to hospital. survey but a survey in 2015 found the same thing — we haven‘t moved on. i am determined there will be change. i on. i am determined there will be change. lam on. i am determined there will be change. i am not of them on the basis of the record that progress is going to be quick. very little seems to change since we did the big
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survey in 2015. it is incumbent upon hospitals, regulators, the ombudsman, to work together to make sure that this situation changes rapidly. and caroline, that is clearly very important, when their structures a re clearly very important, when their structures are made to work better, but did you have those concerns when he walked away from the ward that if you were complaining person, the one who you mentioned before, the look on the faces — that we could make these things worse? there was a bit of you that was a worry? luckily for me, no, not with the staff that she had around. for me i wasn‘t worried. the greatest concern i actually had was for those patients i could see who didn‘t have a version of me to speak up for them. my mum had me and
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she knew that i would go and say something on her behalf. there were an awful lot of people who don‘t have family members who can say something and nothing for them sometimes they feel a little concerned about raising any issues or saying something. it has been lovely to hear your story — thank you so much. thank you for your time this morning as well. it is a story that many people can relate to. let‘s have a look at this morning‘s weather. good morning. this morning weather. good morning. this morning we have heavy rain moving in the direction of the north sea. when that clears all of us will see a breezy day and sunshine and showers but by no means we‘ll be all see showers. you can see the amount of rain we have had through the night moving from the west to the east. it is still across eastern england, heading in the direction of sussex, for example. as we go through the morning the west will continue to brighten, nicely across south—west
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england and wales with sunshine. as the rain moves to the north sea there will be a lot of cloud left in its wake initially. and then into northern england we have the dregs of the rain in the far north of england, cumbria is brightening nicely and for northern ireland and scotla nd nicely and for northern ireland and scotland the patchy mist and fog won‘t last much longer and then it will be a sunny and dry start to the day with one or two caveats and the first is the showers here, developing through the afternoon in particular, a line from somerset through dorset into the home counties, one or two in wales, one or two counties, one or two in wales, one ortwo in counties, one or two in wales, one or two in northern ireland and western scotland, though you could be dry in eastern and southern scotla nd be dry in eastern and southern scotland and northern england, and in the sunshine it will feel pleasa ntly flies in the sunshine it will feel pleasantly flies up to 24, maybe 25 in the south—east —— pleasantly with highs. through the evening an overnight we lose daytime showers and we have more showers coming from
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the west, some will merge with longer spells of rain as they move across northern ireland into scotla nd across northern ireland into scotland and northern england. temperature—wise, 12— 15 will be the overnight lows. a little bit low in the countryside. tomorrow the rain continues to move north eastwards. we will see more coming across northern ireland, through the irish sea into a southern scotland and northern england. on either side of it some sunshine and showers but one thing you will notice will be the wind. it will be quite a blustery and gusty wind and that will have an impact on the temperatures, as indeed with the showers, we are looking at between 13— 21 degrees. on saturday there will be a lot of dry weather around. some showers still, it is still a breezy day. the v festival is on, another festival is on, you could well miss showers, up is on, you could well miss showers, up to 21 degrees, not as warm as it will be today. then behind me we can see the next system coming on sunday. that is an area of low
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pressure. it will have absorbed by then ex—hurricane bertha. the releva nce then ex—hurricane bertha. the relevance that has on us is that warm aircontains relevance that has on us is that warm air contains more moisture, so we will see heavy rain coming this way, the wind will be stronger, as they are going to be doing the course of the next couple of days. thank you. it is 7:19am and more than 10,000 workers will be refunded £2 million after their employer failed to pay them the minimum wage. we have more of that and the other stories. good morning. argos was among the worst offenders. the latest employment statistics show that the number of people from the eu working here in britain has hit a record high. but the rate of new migrants adding to that workforce through the spring has slowed. there‘s been a particular drop in those coming from poland, lithuania and latvia. and tesco has become the latest
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supermarket to trial and electronic pricetags on its shelves — everything on the digital display including crucially the price can be changed at the click of a button and i will have more on what all of that means for shoppers later in the programme. thank you. it‘s a day most of us never forget, exam results day. today, the class of 2017 find out if they‘ve studied hard enough to get a university place after their a—level results. this year, universities are under pressure to widen participation, ensuring more pupils from poorer or ethnic minority backgrounds come to their campuses. our reporter lara rostron is at birmingham city university for us. and very good morning to you. how are things going this morning? good morning. it is really hotting up
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with thousands of calls here at birmingham city university, which is where clearing is taking place here. now, this is a very diverse university, one of the most diverse in the whole country, in fact, 48% of stu d e nts in the whole country, in fact, 48% of students here are from a bme background. but there is concern across the country that bme students, especially black students, are underrepresented in many of the uk universities. ciaran dreams of going to cambridge. he is mixed race, he has been in care most of his life and went to an inner—city comprehensive. but it is a university where traditionally minority groups have been underrepresented. i really want to have this opportunity to study at cambridge, at a top university and get a feel
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for that as an experience in my life. a lot of people who come here have top of the range tutors, have been going to private schools where they pretty much have separate sort of lessons where theyjust teach you how to get through the interview process. in london comprehensive schools, thatjust isn‘t really available. cambridge says one in five of its students is now from a black or minority ethnic background, which roughly reflects the wider population. but this week researchers at bath university say many bme students still feel uncomfortable applying to older institutions and are likely to be concentrated in new universities in london or big cities. ciaran‘s shown around by peter, who posed for this photograph along with all the other black men at cambridge in his year. they hoped it would encourage more people like them to apply. on a social level and maybe on a cultural level someone like myself — you are in a totally different place. meaning there are not as many people who are like you.
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within cambridge, rather than perhaps those that are like you at home. then you won‘t. it is all about visibility. the number of black students at the top four universities in the country has increased 100% in the last ten years, from 3% to 6%. those universities formed the russell group, which is investing millions of pounds to improve access, but more needs to be done. there is some evidence of unconscious bias going on and if they apply they don‘t get accepted in such numbers. people are making incremental changes. the problem is quite a large one. therefore we need to make a much more significant change. i don‘t want to hear lipservice, i want to see action. universities working closely with schools is just one way to improve access — another is using mentors who have been through the system already.
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i think for minority students, sometimes they get caught up in expectations of teachers in terms of courses that they might not necessarily want to do but that is all they know about. for ciaran, if he gets a a and two a stars this morning, he‘s into cambridge. no longer dreaming of cambridge student life but leaving it in one of the world‘s most prestigious universities. don‘t worry, we will let you know his results and he will get them around eight o‘clock. it is very busy. look who is answering the phones as well, sir lenny henry, the chancellor of birmingham city university. good morning. over here is the vice chancellor, and i must admit, it is nerve—racking, because it is only your fourth day in the job. yes, and the most exciting day
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in thejob, because it is job. yes, and the most exciting day in the job, because it is when the stu d e nts in the job, because it is when the students get their results, so it is thrilling. the uni is doing well to attract students from a bme background, why is that? birmingham is one of the most successful and vibrant cities is one of the most successful and vibra nt cities and is one of the most successful and vibrant cities and we reflect this city so it is no surprise we find we area city so it is no surprise we find we are a university where the student make up is in line with that. clearing is different to how it used to be, because you‘re getting people who maybe have an even apply to you this year. and one of the pleasing things is even though we have a refreshed and level system students have done really well and we are getting people who perhaps didn‘t think of coming to university calling to say is it right for me to do? and that‘s what today, tomorrow and the weeks to come are about, getting the right student in the right place. last year you too 5000 calls on the first aid. i imagine we took even more in reality but it is very busy indeed. it is a pleasure
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to be at such a thriving place. thank you very much and we will catch up with sir lenny henry at 8:10am and now it is back to you. thank you very much. it is a bit of a surprise, isn‘t it, to have sir lenny henry answering the phone. that would be good. and good luck to everybody getting results today. absolutely. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m sonja jessup. the bbc has learned that the london fire brigade was closely consulted over the refurbishment of the grenfell tower. at least 80 people died when a fire engulfed the block two months ago. the london fire brigade say they do not have legal powers to inspect structural changes to buildings or to sign off refurbishment. a south london hospital trust has been told it needs to improve patient care for the third time in three years. an inspection of lewi5ham and greenwich nhs trust by the care quality commission has again identified numerous failings in patient care.
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the report found there were poor standards of cleanliness, and patients with tb were not being properly isolated. a campaign‘s been launched to save unique railings across london that are made from world war two stretchers. the stretchers were recycled as fences after the war ended, but many have now started to rust. campaigners are calling for them to be restored rather than removed. these stretchers are a really important part of our, sort of, communal history, and they represent something very important. i mean, some people on estates know about them. some people remember them. i think more people in the, sort of, recent past who grew up in estates are familiar with their history. travel now. the tube is all running well, as you can see. no reported problems on any of those lines there at the moment. this is how it looks on the a406 north circular — it‘s slow southbound, heading through park royal, from the abbey road underpass towards the a40 at the hanger lane gyratory system after an accident. there are clockwise delays on the m25 after a breakdown,
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with restrictions on the qe2 bridge — the queues are back tojunction 30 for the a13. and a horse is loose on the m25 — here it is spotted on the roadside earlier. it‘s causing delays in both directions through junction 3 for swanley. the northbound queue is now back to junction 5 for sevenoaks. let‘s take a look at the weather now. over to lucy martin. hello, good morning. a gradually improving picture today. some rain this morning but it will clear eastwards to allow for some dryer and brighter weather into the afternoon. so, we could see a few heavy bursts this morning. an umbrella definitely recommended. it‘s becoming more drizzly and light, and then we see improvements coming from the west, some sunny spells developing. just the chance of the odd scattered light shower into the afternoon with highs of around 23, perhaps 24 degrees. as we go through this evening and overnight, then, there will still be one or two showers to look out for. but it will become mostly dry. some clear spells, and temperatures won‘t fall too far, with overnight lows in the teens. a minimum of 15—16 degrees. we‘ll start the day tomorrow with some sunshine around.
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there will be a bit of cloud bubbling up as we move through the day. one or two showers to look out for. but there will be a different feel to things. an increasingly strong breeze, so not feeling as warm, with highs of around 19 degrees. i will leave you with the outlook, then, as we move into the weekend. a fairly breezy start on saturday, but things will settle down, becoming dryer and brighter with good spells of sunshine. and, at the moment, although there is some uncertainty with rain in the north, there is sunshine around as well. i‘ll be back in around half an hour. for more news, travel and weather you can take a look at our website. for now, though, it‘s back to charlie and tina. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and tina daheley. the first students to sit the new a level exams in england are getting their results this morning. the changes include the removal of modules, as levels no longer counting towards the final grade
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and students sitting all their exams at the end. the shake—up doesn‘t apply in wales or northern ireland, where results are also published today. for those students chasing a university place, there are tens of thousands available through clearing. the big picture coming through is that there have not been many big changes. far too many older people are suffering in silence when things go wrong with their nhs care, according to the parliamentary and health service ombudsman. it says it‘s often their relatives who have to step in to complain, but even when they do, many don‘t believe it makes a difference. the department of health says when things go wrong, it‘s important to listen to the concerns of patients and their families. but the ombudsman thinks many don‘t complain because of a fear that their care might be affected. elderly people are reluctant to
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complain because they think it‘s difficult, because they feel that ca re difficult, because they feel that care may be compromised and because they don‘t think it will make a dip ——a difference to their situation is that these unfortunate circumstances. the south korean president has said he doesn‘t think the united states intends to use military force against north korea, and if they do they must get seoul‘s consent. marking his first 100 days in office, president moonjae—in said he could guarantee there wouldn‘t be another war on the korean peninsula but said the leadership in pyongyang was reaching a red line. britain will look to keep visa—free travel to the uk for european visitors after brexit, the bbc understands. the proposals could mean visitors from countries within the eu would only need to seek permission if they wanted to work, study or settle in britain. a week of national mourning has been called in sierra leone, in the wake of the flooding and mudslides that claimed hundreds
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of lives near the capital, freetown. officials say more than 100 children are among the 400 people who are known to have died when part of a mountain collapsed onto a settlement. at least 600 people are still missing. firefighters in glasgow are tackling a large blaze in a market in the east end of the city. there are reports the fire broke out at blochairn fruit market in the early hours this morning. glasgow fire service say that 90% of the building is on fire but there are no reports of any injuries. the armada road closures and you can get a sense of the scale. the fire is ongoing as we speak. president trump has said he is scrapping two business councils after around a dozen bosses quit over the way he handled the violent clashes in virginia. business leaders left
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the white house manufacturing council following mr trump‘s decision to blame left—wing protesters as much as right—wing supremacists for the violence which erupted in charlottesville. last night hundreds of people took part in a candlelit vigil in the town to remember heather heyer who died when a car he‘s me ploughed into a group of anti—racism protesters. most of the historic world war ii aircraft that make up the battle of britain memorial flight have been grounded because of engine issues. the hurricanes, spitfires and a lancaster bomber are all affected and one display has already been cancelled with others under threat. the raf is unable to say when the planes will be back in the skies. the aircraft are more than 70 years old. for anyone looking for the best that urban living has to offer, the answer seems to be, yet again, head to australia. that‘s because on a ranking of the world‘s most liveable cities by the economist intelligence unit, melbourne has come out on top for a record seventh year in a row. the criteria included healthcare, education,
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stability and infrastructure. london, one of only two uk cities to feature, came 53rd out of 140. if you are wondering, the other city was manchester which made the list. john is here. i am seeing them. here they are. any sport that changes the ball, people love things about it. cricket is moving with the times. they are using this in a test match. it isa they are using this in a test match. it is a move to try and progress with the times. it will be a day night test match because it will show up on the floodlights. it's been very controversial. celtic look all but through to the group stages. the scottish champions were in control throughout,
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as scott sinclair scored twice to help put them three up. before late goals from james forrest and a deflected leigh griffiths strike made the scoreline even better. the second leg is next tuesday. everton have signed gylfi sigurdsson from swansea city for a club record fee believed to be around £45 million. the iceland international has signed a five year deal, he says he hopes to "create goals and score goals". sigurdsson was an important player for swansea last season, scoring nine times as he helped them avoid relegation. scotland‘s catriona matthew has been called up to replace the injured suzanne pettersen as europe prepare to take on the usa in the solheim cup. matthew who‘s 47 has played in nine solheim cups. norwegian pettersen has been receiving treatment for a recurrent back injury. play starts in iowa tomorrow. england and ireland can reach the semi—finals of the rugby world cup later. england, the defending champions, have made six changes for their match
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against usa in dublin. victory would guarantee them a place in the last four. the host nation ireland know they have to beat france to reach the semis. wales also play — but they can‘t progress. kei nishikori has torn a tendon in his wrist which means he‘ll be yet another top ranked tennis player to miss the rest of the season due to injury. the world number nine heard a pop in his wrist but will not have surgeryjust yet, opting for a cast instead. he‘ll join novak djokovic and stan wawrinka in missing the us open and sitting out the rest of the year. serena williams though has revealed in a magazine article that she plans to play tennis again within three months of giving birth to herfirst child! the 23—time grand slam champion called it "the most outrageous plan". she went on to say "either i win, or i don‘t play." jo pavey says she wants to defend her ten thousand metre title at the european championships in germany next year just a month before
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her 45th birthday. pavey won european gold in zurich 3 years ago, aged 40. the british five—time olympian missed the world athletics championships in london with a heel injury and has ruled out competing at the commonwealth games in australia next year — but insists she has no plans to retire. england‘s cricketers play their first day—night test this afternoon, against west indies at edgbaston. in a move designed to attract more fans to the game, the match will begin at 2 o‘clock and will be played with a pink ball instead of a traditional red one because it shows up better under the lights. the west indies team already has experience of playing a day—night test, but it‘ll be a step into the unknown for the hosts. it‘s hard to think of test cricket, playing it any differently to how you would normally. ultimately it‘s still the same game. you have to adapt to the conditions.
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we‘ve managed to do that well and should be in a good position. it's something the game needs. test cricket is not suffering in england, but in many territories around the world, the fans are slowly but surely decreasing. so i think this adds something to test cricket. i know you're asking if there is a real difference in colour. but there isa real difference in colour. but there is a crease which has been added to the red ones that moisture does not get into the ball and it maintains a shine so because of the pigment, but greece can't be added. some of the players have used it say the pink one can degrade a little bit more. it starts playing well but the quality of the ball changes. you have a white ball as well. that is limited overs cricket. exactly. in
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the shorter formats of the game. that can't be used as in test cricket, you play with the traditional white. you are just showing off. look at that. they did try an orange ball as well but they picked the pink one. a bit of a juggle picked the pink one. a bit of a juggle them. wait for brent a bit later, as to how it is going to affect players. throughout the summer we‘ve been talking to some of the uk‘s most inspirational businesswom — colletta is here to tell us about today‘s guest, a woman on a mission to get us to better understand the internet. yes, most of us use the internet every day — you could even say we‘re tech addicts — but how the internet actually works is a mystery. our latest inspirational businesswoman wants to change that. catherine parsons is the ceo of a
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tech start—up she started with the aim of improving people‘s digital literacy. she says she wants to demystify the dark art of coding and came up with the idea of teaching coding in one day when others told her it couldn‘t be done. she doesn‘t have a traditional tack background, a cambridge graduate with a passion to languages. she says coding is another language. and she is making herself heard. she campaigned for coding to be added to the school curriculum in 2014 and is on the business panel advising the government on brexit issues. catherine parsons joins us. government on brexit issues. catherine parsonsjoins us. thank keep coming in. looking at your background, you are not, traditional tack background. what got you interested , tack background. what got you interested, what excited you?” studied the tin and ancient greek which seems is different to coding
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is possible but for me, technology is possible but for me, technology is another language and coding and i‘ve always been passionate about languages but it‘s the language of today, it‘s the language of billions, it‘s incredibly relevant and they wanted to decode it. you are considered one of the most influential women in tech at the moment. it‘s still a very male—dominated industry. how does it feel to be a senior figure and a woman in that industry? have you experienced discrimination? the whole scene has changed a lot in the last four years, especially the uk. no queue for the women‘s blue, which was a bit of a change. it feels really vibrant was a bit of a change. it feels really vibra nt and was a bit of a change. it feels really vibrant and diverse. it‘s an incredible place to be a woman. i know so many great female technology founders. i want women to know this isa founders. i want women to know this is a brilliant place for them. they
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can earn lots of money, start their own businesses and i‘m super proud that over 50% of the people we have taught have been female. that is great to hear but my degree was in computer science. look at me now! at the time, it was dominated by men and the stereotype of nerds working in the lab ‘5 24— seven was true to its good to hear it has changed. your big thing is you can teach people how to code in one day. quite a bold statement that it came back in 2000 when we are in shoreditch, east london, the world was changing, and if you closed underneath the surface, no one really understood how these technologies were being built. ijust how these technologies were being built. i just wanted how these technologies were being built. ijust wanted to learn. i didn't want to go back to university andl didn't want to go back to university and i didn't have three years. i wanted to learn now so i thought,
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could you teach me how to code in a single day? not turn you into a fully fledged developer but really transform your literacy and your confidence and give you that feeling of being able to have a conversation with a developer and it took a long time to create that but it resonates and its spread like wildfire so we taught in 85 cities across the world la st taught in 85 cities across the world last year and we are taking on all the digital dark arts, code, dato, a higher, you name it. your enthusiasm for what you do shines through. i am intrigued, when you step out of that environment, sated as you are, and you go into a studio government position, so you are advising the brexit panel example, but this is, we know that government can be slow to react. brexit is full of, as we are hearing, a lot of confusing messages. how easy is it for you? i
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suspect you are one of these people who says let‘s do this, let‘s do it now, let‘s get some answers. how frustrating is that? it's been amazing. to get more involved in those roles. it's really important the technology scene in the uk to champion its growth. it was incredible i could start a business with a credit card loan and a belief in 2011 and how it can create an environment that is conducive to start—ups, scale up and growing and attracting the best talent in the uk so all i can do is try to represent the voices of the technology industry and other people try to start businesses. behind the curve when it comes to technology. you are banging the drum and then you think they are behind where you are, that is what we hear?
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i think that 0.01% of people in the world say they can be confident about what is behind the screen and what has been satisfying about teaching lots of different governments in different countries has been everyone's left behind — there are very few people with the capabilities preparing them for the future of work, so every industry needs to be up skilling and i think it's a great sinai and involved. a—level results today — what advice to those who didn‘t get the grades they wanted, what is the appeal of working in tech? i was chatting to someone and set are quite remember the last time someone said about what i got for my a—levels. i would say congratulation. what an achievement. the future is in your hands. no one ever told me i could start a business. entrepreneurship was not something ever mentioned. i didn't even study computer science
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or technology. i am working with the lot of businesses globally with people trying to figure out what the future of work looks like. follow your passions, creativity, technology, communication skills — isa technology, communication skills — is a hybrid that people are looking for. and good luck. what a very positive message! what were the results ? positive message! what were the results? two as and a b. no one asked me what i got the b in. what was it? french. thank you. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: hundreds of thousands of students in england, wales and northern ireland will get their a—level results this morning. a warning that too many elderly patients are suffering in silence when things go wrong with their nhs care. here‘s carol with a look at this morning‘s weather. lots of people had some big storms
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last night? yes, some thunderstorms moving west to east, quite right. good morning. we still have the rain pushing to the north sea. it will clear. in the not too distant future, and then we have sunshine and showers. if we look at the rain through the night, it moved across northern ireland, scotland, and wales and behind it is brightening up wales and behind it is brightening up nicely. as we move away from the east you will notice the cloud behind it, it will break and then we see sunshine coming through and some showers developing as well. quite a breezy day you will notice if you are out and about with showers from parts of somerset, heading to dorset, the home counties, though they are showers and not all of us will see them. many will be dry with sunshine. temperatures could reach 24- 25 in sunshine. temperatures could reach 24— 25 in the south—east. the
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midlands into wales, a similar scenario. a lot of dry weather around. one ortwo scenario. a lot of dry weather around. one or two showers in wales. it could be dry in northern england. showers in northern ireland. a lot of showers in scotland. eastern and southern scotland could miss them altogether. it will be pleasant and the sunshine. these are the temperature levels, up to 25. this evening and overnight we lose many of the daytime showers and we see more coming in from the west, some merging across northern ireland into northern england and also scotland. we start with those tomorrow and continue to drift north eastwards. tomorrow is going to be quite blustery. quite gusty wind. we lose the first band showers. the next one coming in across northern ireland, the irish sea, into south—west scotla nd the irish sea, into south—west scotland and northern england. away from that, sunshine and showers. and it will be cooler than today with temperatures up to 21. temperatures are temperatures up to 21. temperatures a re low temperatures up to 21. temperatures are low anyway and they will be
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tempered by the breeze. from friday into saturday a gang lot of dry weather. we have low pressure sitting to the north—east of scotla nd sitting to the north—east of scotland —— again. it will produce outbreaks of rain for the northern isles. many of us will be dry with lots of festivals taking place on saturday. you could be lucky to miss them especially the further south you travel. there are highs up to 21. then we have the system waiting. that is for sunday later on. it is an area of low pressure. by the time it gets to us it will have absorbed the remnants of ex—hurricane bertha. the relevance is only that it will be containing tropical air. warm air contains more moisture than cold air so we will see heavy rain from that as it moves from west to east on sunday and monday. for many sunday will begin on a dry and bright note and later we see the rain come from the west. thank you very much. for some living on a canal boat is an opportunity to live life at a slower pace, but for others
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it‘s a way to escape rising property prices. with more and more houseboats on our waterways, the canal and river trust is asking anyone thinking of swapping bricks for boating to think carefully before considering a life on the river. breakfast‘s tim muffett reports. the trent and mersey canal in staffordshire, where kerry and pete have a lot of work. when it comes to boats sinking, we‘re definitely getting busier. they run river canal rescue, helping boat owners in trouble, teaching canal users basic rules, which, to their exasperation, many are unaware of. you drive on the right—hand side when you‘re passing another boat. so, it‘s port—to—port, left—to—left. these are metal boats. they rust in the water. if you don‘t take it out of the water and treat it, it will rot away to nothing until the boat sinks. after years of neglect, many canals are busy once more, and those who look after them say that canal users, especially those new to all this, need to ensure they know what they‘re doing.
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well, one of the issues that we have is the sheer popularity of canals means it‘s used by more and more people. the canal and river trust manages 2,000 miles of waterways in england, and, away from the dangerous misuse of lochs to the dumping of waste, the boom in canal use has many downsides. what you have here is two whitebeam boats, which is quadruple mooring, causing obstruction for other craft trying to get through. the trust records incidents when it can. but in london, where the problems are the most severe, it‘s a huge task. boat numbers have risen by 72% since 2012 to more than 4,000. the majority in london have what are known as continuous cruiser licenses, and don‘t need to pay for a permanent mooring, but the boats can‘t stay in the same place for more than 14 days. just moved out of a flat in brixton, because i can‘t afford to live
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there any more, and here there‘s a boat. nick is typical of many that are new to the canals, attracted by a lower cost of living. it‘s not comfortable. we don‘t have a toilet on—board. we don‘t have a shower. at the moment the motor‘s broken, so we don‘t have any electricity. there‘s no power. you prefer it to paying money on a flat? for the moment, yeah. nick and his friends stress they‘re responsible users, though they will have to soon move on from the spot and find another, which won‘t be easy. sarah manages a private mooring site, and believes many canal newcomers haven‘t thought things through. it‘s not their fault. there‘s nothing in place to say, "hey, you need to know this before you put a boat on the water." you only learn it as you go along. it‘s baptism by fire. three quarters of the boats moored in the capital are now being lived in, according to the canal and river trust. a transport system built to carry goods buckling under pressure from people. transporting teenagers around
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in the family car can be a thorn in the side for many parents but is it the best place to have a proper conversation with your children? to find out a documentary has peered through the windscreen and eavesdropped on catch—ups between parents and their children in the taxi of mum and dad. let‘s take a look. # get your sexy on. mum charlotte and 16—year—old mac ben are from market harbour. we need to get to the gay bars. i have never been to a 95v the gay bars. i have never been to a gay bar. should we go to a gay bar?
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why would i take my mum to a gay bar?! i can be nice! look at me. i have set my brother up. he got married. set flo up, she got married. set flo up, she got married. you're not setting me up. one of my friends went on tinder and she thought she was on...” one of my friends went on tinder and she thought she was on... i had it for a week. oh, did you? yeah. did you get matches. 106 in the first 24 hours. i don't want to blow my trumpet, but... so, you get the idea. especially with teenage children. yeah, exactly that. are you a cabbie to your children? pa rt part of the thinking is that it is not, if you like, confrontational.
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people have made reference to the fa ct people have made reference to the fact that because you‘re not looking at each it makes a difference. can teenagers can verse? it takes an effort just to look away from their phone or even a couple of seconds. —— converse? phone or even a couple of seconds. -- converse? one of the first things is they have to be talking in the first place. and when your children are busy on their phones, it might be little time you can spend together in the car on those journeys. emma says i love to transport my teenage son. it gives one—on—one time in a nonconfrontational space. yes, no force i contact. the trick is to put them in the car at the same time and go quietly and listen to the conversation. interesting. you think it is unethical. they knew about it, by the way. we will speak with a couple of people who took part in the programme later. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m sonja jessup. the bbc has learned that the london fire brigade
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was closely consulted over the refurbishment of the grenfell tower. at least 80 people died when a fire engulfed the block two months ago. the london fire brigade say they do not have legal powers to inspect structural changes to buildings or to sign off refurbishment. detectives investigating violence following a demonstration in east london last month have released four pictures of men they‘d like to speak to. fireworks and bottles were hurled at riot police in hackney and protestors blocked part of kingsland road and set mattresses alight. the violence broke out following a separate, peaceful protest at stoke newington police station. a campaign‘s been launched to save unique railings across london that are made from world war two stretchers. the stretchers were recycled as fences after the war ended, but many have now started to rust. campaigners are calling for them to be restored rather than removed. these stretchers are a really important part of our,
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sort of, communal history, and they represent something very important. i mean, some people on estates know about them. some people remember them. i think more people in the, sort of, recent past who grew up in estates are familiar with their history. travel now. the tube is all running well — as you can see, no reported problems on any of those lines there at the moment. in east london, this is how it looks on the highway — traffic‘s slow through wapping towards tower hill. a vehicle‘s broken down at the qe2 bridge, so the m25 has clockwise delays from junction 29 for the a127 southend arterial towards the dartford river crossing. and also on the m25, that runaway horse is still loose — you can see it there — it‘s causing delays in both directions through junction 3 for swanley. the northbound queue is now back to junction 5 for sevenoaks. let‘s take a look at the weather now. over to lucy martin. hello, good morning. a gradually improving picture today. some rain this morning but it will clear eastwards to allow for some dryer and brighter weather into the afternoon. so, we could see a few heavy
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bursts this morning. an umbrella definitely recommended. it‘s becoming more drizzly and light, and then we see improvements coming from the west, some sunny spells developing. just the chance of the odd scattered light shower into the afternoon with highs of around 23, perhaps 24 degrees. as we go through this evening and overnight, then, there will still be one or two showers to look out for. but it will become mostly dry. some clear spells, and temperatures won‘t fall too far, with overnight lows in the teens. a minimum of 15—16 degrees. we‘ll start the day tomorrow with some sunshine around. there will be a bit of cloud bubbling up as we move through the day. one or two showers to look out for. but there will be a different feel to things. an increasingly strong breeze, so not feeling quite as warm. highs of around 19 degrees. i‘ll leave you with the outlook, then, as we move into the weekend. a fairly breezy start on saturday, but things will settle down, becoming dryer and brighter with good spells of sunshine. and, at the moment, although there is some uncertainty with rain in the north, there is sunshine around as well. i‘ll be back in around half an hour.
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for more news, travel and weather you can take a look at our website. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and tina daheley. the long wait is over for hundreds of thousands of teenagers across england, wales and northern ireland who get their a—level results this morning. for the first time students in england have been sitting a new style of exams, putting more emphasis on the final test. we will be speaking with sir lenny henry, he is manning the phones in one university clearance centre, in birmingham, we will be speaking with
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him a little later on. good morning, it‘s thursday the 17th of august. also this morning, "suffering in silence", a warning that older people aren‘t reporting problems with their nhs care. hundreds of people have taken part in a vigil in cha rlottesville, just days after violence erupted in the town. good morning, today i'm talking about electronic price tags today. tesco has become the latest supermarket to trial electronic price tags on its shelves. i'll find out what that means for shoppers. in sport, it's sensational celtic. the scottish champions almost guarantee their place in the champions league group stages, thanks to a 5—0 home win over astana. you might be used to providing the "taxi of mum and dad", we‘ll discuss the documentary that
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examines what happens when people catch up in the car. rain currently moving east in the direction of the north sea, when that clears, breezy day for us all, with sunshine and showers, parts of southern and eastern scotland could miss the showers altogether. three months ago they were busy showing what they had learnt. now the students at this college in east london are about to find out if their hard work paid off. in england recent changes to a—levels mean these are the first students to sit one exam at the end of two years on study. less emphasis on coursework, and as—levels no longer count towards the final
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grading of 13 subjects. the new type of a—levels are unsettling for some students. i think the new system wants us to memorise stuff rather than learn. they are just trying to make it harderfor us and it is going to get harder each year. we just have to accept it. we are like the guinea pigs. we have no past papers, so we have no practice. even our teachers, there are so many new things in the syllabus that our teachers are struggling to teach it as well. but the change of direction has been welcomed by some heads. the new system is good. i think it prepares students well for university and for employment. the key challeng is for awarding bodies to make sure that they‘re marking to a consistently high standard, so the students get the results they deserve. —— challenge. there has been a drop in the number of students applying to university this year, so it is expected there may be more places available to young people who want to shop around. studio: far too many older people
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are suffering in silence when things go wrong with their nhs care, according to the parliamentary and health service ombudsman. it says it‘s often their relatives who have to step in to complain, but even when they do, many don‘t believe it makes a difference. simonjones reports. voiceover: afraid to raise the alarm. there are far fewer complaints from older people then expected, given their high usage of the nhs, according to the ombudsman. people in hospital are very distressed, they are worried, those looking after them are concerned about their treatment, and this is its activity on that hospitals need to listen and to respond to concerns, so they do not become complaints and unfortunately, practice in the nhs is not consistent in this way. often theirfamilies have to intervene. the ombudsman and the social networking sites gra nsnet surveyed 600 of its uses.
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the ombudsman says the nhs must make it clear how to complain, and those who do must be convinced that future care will not suffer. in response the department of health said that when things go wrong, "it is incredibly important to listen to the concerns of patients and their families — by learning from mistakes, you can improve treatment." studio: the south korean president has said he doesn‘t think the united states intends to use military force against north korea, and if they do they must get seoul‘s consent. marking his first 100 days in office, president moonjae—in said he could "guarantee" there wouldn‘t be another war on the korean peninsula but said the leadership in pyongyang was reaching a "red line."
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britain will look to keep visa—free travel to the uk for european visitors after brexit, the bbc understands. the proposals could mean visitors from countries within the eu would only need to seek permission if they wanted to work, study or settle in britain. our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, joins us now. eleanor, what do we know about the government‘s plans? the about the government‘s plans? detail will be publir autumn, the detail will be published in the autumn, ina the detail will be published in the autumn, in a few weeks‘ time, but we understand that this idea of these free travel is on the table, being discussed, that would mean that if you come here from the u—2 visit, you come here from the u—2 visit, you would not need a visa but if you wa nt to you would not need a visa but if you want to come here and work or study, or even settle for a longer period, you would need to apply and get permission, the idea that employers would not be to take someone on the fair were simply visiting. —— if you wa nt to fair were simply visiting. —— if you want to come here from the eu to
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visit. the government argument on all this, and controlling immigration is you do not need physical borders to do that, clamping down on access to the labour market and access to welfare isa labour market and access to welfare is a good way of controlling immigration. ministers will have two agreed to all of these plans, they will need to be convinced, but so will need to be convinced, but so will all of those leave voters who voted to leave the european union, because they wanted to clamp down on immigration. a week of national mourning has been called in sierra leone, in the wake of the flooding and mudslides that claimed hundreds of lives near the capital, freetown. officials say more than 100 children are among the 400 people who are known to have died when part of a mountain collapsed onto a settlement. at least 600 people are still missing. firefighters in glasgow are tackling a huge blaze in a market in the east end of the city.
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the fire broke out at the blochairn fruit market at around 4 o‘clock this morning. glasgow fire service say that 90 percent of the building is on fire, there are no reports of any injuries but there are minor road closures. you can see a lot of smoke coming out of the building, firefighters on the sinful is president trump says he is shutting down two business councils after a raft of resignations by the leaders of some of america‘s biggest companies. around a dozen company heads quit their roles after mr trump‘s decision to blame left—wing protesters as much as right—wing white supremacists for the violence in cha rlottesville. last night hundreds of people gathered for a candlelit vigil in the town to remember heather heyer who died in the violence. david willis reports. at the top of our agenda is the creation of great high—paying jobs.
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set up to help the president deliver on his promise to help "make america great again," the business advisory councils brought together the heads of some of the biggest companies in the us. who would have thought, then, that the racial clashes in cha rlottesville on saturday, in which one person died, would have proved their undoing? the president‘s response to this violence shocked members of his own party and unnerved many corporate executives. once the country‘s most prominent african—american businessman, pharmaceutical ceo ken frazier, announced that he was leaving, others swiftly followed. we believe the symbolism of being associated with that spirited defence of racism and bigotry was just unacceptable. as a trickle of resignations turned into a flood, a close ally of the president, blackstone ceo steve schwarzman, rang to tell him that members were threatening to quit en masse. at which point the president took to twitter to pull the plug:
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a large crowd took to the streets of charlottesville once again last night. a peaceful protest this time in memory of the 32—year—old woman, heather hayer, who died in saturday‘s clashes. but with racial tension simmering once more in the united states, few believe the debate will end here. studio: one of the story: tom cruise has broken his ankle whilst trying to undertake a daring stunt during filming in london at the weekend. cruise attempted to leap between the roofs of two buildings, but he fell short of the mark and hit the building. filming for the latest installment of mission impossible has now been suspended. get well
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soon, tom. coming up later, the sport, and the weather. there will be plenty of nervous students across across england, wales and northern ireland as they continue to find out what their a—level results are, many of them will be hoping to make the grade and get their university place of choice. diversity is a big issue on campuses this year, new figures show that the number of applications from black students has fallen by 8% in the last ten years. the chancellor of birmingham city university is working hard to change that. we can speak to him now, sir lenny henry. you are at the clearing office, is that right? i have been here from 6am, and! that right? i have been here from 6am, and i am knackered, honestly. it is very busy, they are fantastic, actually, doing a really good job. lenny, i‘m interrupting you, but we saw you answering some of the calls
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earlier on. this is a traumatic day for youngsters, can be, earlier on. this is a traumatic day foryoungsters, can be, can earlier on. this is a traumatic day for youngsters, can be, can be a wonderful day as well, but a lot of questions sometimes. yeah, if you didn‘t get the results you thought you were going to get, if you got better marks than you thought you would get, this is a fantastic day to make some decisions, whether you wa nt to to make some decisions, whether you want to go to university, change university, whether you want to restart your course, this is the date you do it. mothers and fathers, and young people, ringing up, trying to figure out what the rest of their life will be. what is good about the ecu, £260 million spent on facilities here in sites all over birmingham. —— bcu. first time i came you i was blown away by what is on offer. it is why i wanted to become chancellor. this is in its ordinary place. i think people are very enthusiastic and wants to come here, that is why —— they are besieging these callers, dressed in orange, they look like they have been tango‘d.
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orange, they look like they have been tango'd. we have been admiring their orange outfits, tell us about some of the issues, i know that it is partly to do with you getting involved in the university in the first place, because a black representation within universities, particularly at top universities, and the fact there is not enough. tell us about that. it is a major symbol, if the chancellor looks like me, i come from a working—class background, born in dudley, i left school without any qualifications and started my own education process at the age of 40. we have 40% mature stu d e nts at the age of 40. we have 40% mature students here, very bame—centric area in the midlands, almost 50% of stu d e nts area in the midlands, almost 50% of students are bame. appointing me as chancellor sends a message to people from low income and working—class background, that the opportunity is
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there for them as well. this university is working in many areas where perhaps university education is not on the cards, working on being interactive with those stu d e nts being interactive with those students and bringing them in at a later stage, and i think it is working, it is working very well. having me as a symbol of what can be achieved is a very good thing, it was brilliant at the graduation ceremony a couple of weeks ago to see bame students walking up onto the stage and looking at me like, what the hell are you doing here, it was brilliant, it is a really good message to send out. you mentioned that as a figurehead, that works, people see you, your story into education is fascinating, am i right in thinking that you first took your gcses late, but you were already working, at that time with cannon and ball, so on stage doing comedy and ball, so on stage doing comedy and then you came to education at that point. yes, doing summer season in black ball with cannon & ball! it was a 22 week season, i decided that
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i was going to basically hurl myself offa high i was going to basically hurl myself off a high building i was going to basically hurl myself offa high building if! i was going to basically hurl myself off a high building if i did i was going to basically hurl myself offa high building if i did not i was going to basically hurl myself off a high building if i did not do something, my mother always said, you must get your education so you have something to fall back on, so i decided to do my gcses in black ball. marvellous teacher, david emery, took me through them, i was sat in the middle of the and people we re sat in the middle of the and people were saying, is that the bloke from tiswas doing gcse english! it made me think, maybe there is something in this, maybe i should continue with my education. i began open university when i was 40, 2006. it has been a long journey, i now have my ama, i havejust has been a long journey, i now have my ama, i have just completed has been a long journey, i now have my ama, i havejust completed my ph.d.. i think education is for everybody. —— ma. ithink ph.d.. i think education is for everybody. —— ma. i think the education system has become more egalitarian, people now, if they wanted, with the weirdest of marx and results, there is a place for them, that is what clearing his
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four, one in eight people get university positions from clearing. you are not alone if your marks are all over the place, there is probably a place for you. give birmingham city university a try, there might be something here for you. there was a time when you felt like places like birmingham city university or other universities, i think, what was the phrase you used, not for people like me? what did you mean, and the thing that has changed? i am from a working-class background, the most we were going to do was an hnd or go to tech. the idea that university is now a possibility for all of us is a good message, and it means all of us, diversity and inclusion is a very easy phrase to understand. so if we are saying we are appealing to bame, people with disabilities, pcu has at
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least 10% disability people in its student body —— birmingham city university has. university is for all of us will £260 million has been spent on facilities at this amazing university, so it is open to enthusiastic students who want to change their lives forever. everybody. it's lovely hearing the buzz behind you, lives being changed, ina buzz behind you, lives being changed, in a way. those, stations, someone‘s life being changed, hopefully sorted out, it is great to hear. thank you very much, and you get mums ringing up and adds ringing up get mums ringing up and adds ringing up and young people ringing up, and they have got the result which is not quite the result they wanted all they want start again, or they are thinking this is much better than i thought, maybe i should go to university. and all these people are trained to deal with them. i have been sitting listening into some of the conversations, and it‘s brilliant. they add up their ucas points and then they transfer them
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to somebody who can navigate the system. and it needs navigating but it is not impossible. you have got to give it a try, it‘s brilliant. sur lenny henry, thank you for your time. thank you very much. just imagine calling the clearing helpline and lenny henry answering the phone, that would make you feel good. let‘s find out what is happening with the weather. good morning, carol. mixed fortunes with the weather this morning. you can see this beautiful picture sent in by one of our weather watchers in aberdeenshire. lovely start the day. further south into kent, a lot more cloud around and also some. that rain will clear, it is overnight rain will clear, it is overnight rain and then for most of us it will be sunshine and showers. but it did move from the west of the east, there were some thunderstorms embedded in it. it is clearing away now and you can see already in the
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west it is brightening up nicely. some sunshine coming through the cloud we currently have and as the rain clears away, although there will be rain behind it, —— cloud behind it, it will clear up. we could hit 24 or 25 somewhere in the south—east. a lot of dry weather across southern counties with one or two showers, dry too across the channel islands, and as we push in the south a mixture of sunny spells and a few showers, the showers fairly hit and miss. for wales, we are looking at some showers but a loss of sunshine, and then as we crossed the irish sea into northern ireland, again you have bright and some showers. don‘t forget it will also be breezy. for scotland, some of the showers are merging across the north—east but some parts of eastern and southern scotland could escape them altogether. as could some parts of northern england, and get away with a dry day. as we come further south, we see some of the showers moving across somerset, in
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the dorset and the home counties. they will all fade as we go through the course of this evening, but more showers will pile in from the west across northern ireland, into scotla nd across northern ireland, into scotland and northern england, some of them merging. temperature—wise, 12 to 15 will be the overnight lows, in the countryside a little lower. tomorrow we start of the showers continuing to drift north—eastwards. then another band comes in, showery outbreaks of rain across northern ireland, in the northern england and southern scotland. in between those bands, it is sunshine and showers, but tomorrow will be noticeably windy, quite blustery, gusty winds across much of the uk. that will peg back the temperature is a little so it will feel a bit cooler, but the top tempted to borrow is lower a nyway top tempted to borrow is lower anyway at about 21 celsius. as we head on into saturday, a lot of dry weather around, there will be some showers, still quite breezy. a lot of festivals taking place, the free
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festival, henley rewind, and one in devon called beautiful. the weather could maybe beautiful. temperatures are little disappointing. as we head into sunday, an area of low pressure will bring in some rain, embedded in this is a ex—hurricane gert. there will be tropical air in this, and warm aircontains will be tropical air in this, and warm air contains more moisture, so it will produce heavy rain. the winds will be strong on sunday, as on friday and saturday, and many of us will start off on a bright and cheery note, especially central and eastern areas. the owner of diy stores b&q & screwfix has said this morning that its revenues have fallen. colletta‘s here with more on that, and the other big business stories. the parent company of being cute and screw fix saw their revenue fall by nearly 3% over the last few months. it was two very different stories at its main diy brands though.
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sales at b&q fell, but sales at screwfix jumped by 11%. argos is among 230 employers who have been told to pay compensation to workers who weren‘t paid the minimum wage. in total, 13,000 employees will get a total of £200 million back. and tesco has become the latest supermarket to trial electronic price tags on its shelves. everything on the digital displays, including the price, can be changed at the click of a button. i‘ll have more on what that all means for shoppers in the next half hour. when we talk about housing, we don‘t tend to think about shelter for our small spikey neighbour — the hedgehog. once a familiar sight in our gardens, in recent years they‘ve been in decline. but thousands of people are building or buying hedgehog homes in an attempt to boost numbers. now a census has been launched to count how many
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there are and whether they do in fact help. let‘s speak to hugh warwick from the campaign, hedgehog street. good morning. is this one of your houses? this is a commercially available hedgehog house, a lot of people can build them or make their own, but you can buy them too. what we have done with the hedgehog housing census is to try to find out now whether hedgehog houses are good for hedgehogs, how they are best cited in gardens, what the best materials are made of, or make them out of wood. if you construct or by one of these for your garden, do hedgehogs like a hedgehog house? this is one of the things we need to find out. i have had friends complain bitterly about the fact they have made a beautiful hedgehog home in their garden and come and found the hedgehog actually building a nest behind it, not actually using it at all, others are used very well. hedgehog street campaign,
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which we have been running with the people‘s trust for endangered species now since 2011, we base what we do on conservation science. so one of the things behind all this is relying on, calling on citizen scientists all over the country to come in, share their knowledge and experience with a very simple straightforward online survey, through the hedgehog census. give us the information, then we can work out what is the best way we can advise other people to help hedgehogs in their garden. this is the first time i have seen a hedgehog house, especially a commercially available one. how popular are they? we don't really know. thousands are being sold, i bought this from a diy store, yesterday. they are easily doable. my yesterday. they are easily doable. my garden is full of hedgehog friendly things already, didn‘t need one myself. but what we know is that 44,000 people are signed up as hedgehog champions already through the street campaign, and of those
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many thousands already have these things but beyond that we know that thousands of other people get given these things, because anybody who ex presses a these things, because anybody who expresses a desire for a love of hedgehogs will be given hedgehog related stuff. i know that, having studied hedgehogs to 30 years and written two books about them, i have a lot of hedgehog stuff. i have log piles, piles of vegetation, brambles, if you want a need to garden, the things that the hedgehogs really need, have a think about their name, what does a hedgehog like best? hedges. they hog the hedges, that is their favourite place. if you don‘t have that sort of place in your garden you try to recreate it with something else, so this provides the shelter for a hedgehog. it can‘t operate on its own. they make the most amazing elaborate bedding, especially when it comes to later on in the autumn and early winter, they create what is known as a high vernacular. they
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pull in leeds when they hibernate, and they rotate their bodies around and they rotate their bodies around and around, creating this layered effect of all the leaves, using the spines as a comb to create it. you need vegetation, but you may want a tidy garden, in which case you can create the vegetation they need with a hedgehog house. this is all about growing the population of the uk‘s hedgehogs, because they are in decline. we talk about the stuff thatis decline. we talk about the stuff that is friendly, what is unfriendly in yourgarden? that is friendly, what is unfriendly in your garden? oh, so much. at the moment we are looking try to halt the decline, not grow the population. it has declined in urban areas by around a quarter since the turn of the century and by over a half in rural areas. a massive problem being faced by hedgehogs. your garden can be the most amazing wildlife friendly garden, but if it doesn‘t have a hole in the fence or the wall to let hedgehogs in, it
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will be useless for hedgehogs. ponds are vitalfor will be useless for hedgehogs. ponds are vital for wildlife will be useless for hedgehogs. ponds are vitalfor wildlife in will be useless for hedgehogs. ponds are vital for wildlife in gardens, hedgehogs can swim, but not forever, so they need to be to get out. netting around football nets. hedgehogs will get caught up in nose and eye. there are whole bunch of problems hedgehogs face. if you do any work lifting up a drain in your garden, put the lid back on it. my father—in—law found a hedgehog dead in one of those. we run a training programme, a daylong intensive training programme for landscape managers about hedgecock ‘s, and in the which are safe start thinking about hedgehogs. —— about hedgehogs. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. heavy rain around
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last night, thunderstorms which may have woken you up, rain is clearing to the east, and through today, looking at good sunny spells, and if few showers developing late on this afternoon, there is the rain, clearing away from eastern areas through the morning, then we are left with dry weather, with that sunshine, just a few showers as i mentioned developing into the afternoon and though showers, fairly few and far between but focus, really on parts of the west country, up really on parts of the west country, up into the home counties, but for most of us this afternoon, dry and fairly pleasant, temperatures 21 to 23, odd shower across wales, and
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across the north and the west of scotland, and one or two showers for northern good sunshine spells. chilly night 30 last night, just a bit more on cecil. far north of england. bit more rain starting his way here. early hours friday. eventually you will see a few showers cropping up, across england and wales, but still some good sunny spells, in the south—eastern particular. —— just a bit more on seaside. the odd shower around, fairly unsettled, maximum temperatures around 15 to 21. by
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sunday, starts try and bright, wind will pick up, and then we will see an area of heavy rain starting to spread its way into mainly north—western parts of the uk, you can find more about that on the website. that is it from me, goodbye. this is business live from bbc news, with ben thompson and jamie robertson. under pressure. another string of top bosses quit president trump‘s business groups, so he scraps them both. but can he stay friends with business after this? live from london, it‘s our top story on thursday 17th august. he called it "business—friendly" but
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the white house is showing cracks, with business leaders distancing themselves from the president. so can mr trump win back support of the business world? we‘ll assess what‘s at stake. also in the programme: "the worst deal ever".

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