Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 19, 2017 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

10:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines... the spanish government says the terror cell responsible for two van attacks has been dismantled as the hunt continues for the suspect who may have driven the van. a war of words between professor stephen hawking and the health secretaryjeremy hunt over the state of the nhs. thousands of anti—racism demonstrators have gathered in boston to oppose a rally featuring far—right speakers. good evening and welcome to bbc news. in a few minutes, viewers on bbc one willjoin us for a full roundup of the day's news with kate silverton. but first, our top story... spain's interior minister says the jihadist cell behind the vehicle attacks in barcelona and cambrils has been dismantled.
10:01 pm
his remarks have been downplayed by regional officials in catalonia, who say a manhunt is continuing for at least one suspect. five islamists were shot dead in cambrils yesterday. four other suspects have been arrested — including three moroccans. earlier, i spoke to counter—terrorism expert loretta napoleoni. i think spanish anti—terrorism is perhaps the best in europe. they have foiled several of these attacks. in 2016, they foiled 12. some of them even in placa de catalunya, a very symbolic important place for a terrorist attack. unfortunately, they only have to get it right once and this is what has happened. i just want to show our viewers the images on las ramblas. a remarkable scene, huge numbers of people who have been there all day and continue to be there all night. many coming to pay their respects, laying candles and flowers.
10:02 pm
some shopping, others continuing with their holiday or their day in defiance of terrorism. are you saying that they are right not to be fearful in las ramblas or anywhere else in spain and europe? absolutely. yes. some people said, they knew that placa de catalunya and las ramblas were the most important targets, therefore they should have blocked the entrances of las ramblas or to placa de catalunya after the cia had alerted them, but the truth is if we agree to live in a fortress, they have won their battle. we have to go on living our life because we are stronger. this is our life, our city, our world. we cannot just protect ourselves by accepting that they are a threat
10:03 pm
that we cannot handle. i would say that the spanish authorities, the spanish anti—terrorists and the local police in barcelona have done a fantasticjob. unfortunately, you cannot prevent everything. the spanish government says the terror cell responsible for the attacks this week that left 14 people dead has been broken up. this evening the king and queen of spain laid flowers on las ramblas, where so many of the victims were killed and injured. new footage has emerged as the hunt continues for one suspect who may have driven the van. we'll be reporting from the small spanish town where many of the young men who carried out the attacks had lived. also tonight... a war of words between professor stephen hawking and the health secretaryjeremy hunt over the state of the nhs. and at edgbaston, england crush
10:04 pm
the west indies in the first day—night test in britain. good evening. spain's interior minister says the terror cell behind the attacks there this week has been broken up. officials believe the cell consisted of 12 young men, most of them moroccan nationals. one man — younis abu—yaqub — is still at large. police searching for him say they believe he may have been the driver of the van which mowed down so many people on thursday in barcelona, killing 13 and injuring 130. from there, james reynolds reports. the king of spain. determined to
10:05 pm
show that barcelona has nothing to fear. symbols of rule from the capital in madrid are not always welcome in the catalan region but in the aftermath of thursday's attack, king felipe vi is met with cheers. this footage from a museum security camera appear to show part of the assault on las ramblas. the attackers‘ van cares down the avenue. passers—by run for their lives. the authorities say they have broken up the network responsible for the attacks in both barcelona and the coastal town of cambrils. at first, investigators believe that one of the cambrils suspects, 17—year—old moussa oukabir, was also the barcelona attacker but now they are investigating the possibility that 22—year—old younis abu—yaqub may have carried out the attack and sell. he is currently at large. the
10:06 pm
authorities have announced greater security at spain ‘s borders and in places where tourists gather. the new measures have come too late for andrew cadman, from britain and australia. he has done in to find her seven—year—old son, julian. there is still no confront word on the boy ‘s whereabouts or condition. these survivors told their stories to the king and queen. here, on a tour of barcelona‘s hospitals. translation: this violent, cowardly attack, this assassination that has killed and injured many people and has made us all will not defeat us 01’ our has made us all will not defeat us or our values. barcelona, for so long free from attacks, now has to rewrite its own history. the mayor has opened a book of condolence.
10:07 pm
translation: i came to express my sympathy with the victims. i also wa nted sympathy with the victims. i also wanted to show we are not afraid and that we will carry on. tonight, on las ramblas, the simple act of going for a walk becomes a powerful symbol. this city finds itself following the rhythms of mourning and defiance, so familiar to the rest of this continent. james reynolds, bbc news, barcelona. several of the men behind the attacks grew up in the small town of ripoll, north of barcelona. most were the children of moroccan immigrants. among them, younes abu—yaqub — now on the run — who, as we‘ve heard, may have driven the van in the barcelona attack. our correspondent, wyre davies, has been to ripoll to speak to people there about the extremists who lived among them. the small chocolate box mountain town of ripoll in the foothills of the spanish pyrenees. the last place you would expect as a breeding ground for a gang of radical islamist militants
10:08 pm
preparing to commit mayhem and murder. at least seven young men from this small town either died during the attacks or have been arrested since thursday. they include moussa oukabir, said aalaa and mohamed hychami. all three were killed by police in cambrils on friday morning. also from ripoll is younis abu—yaqub, who is still on the run. at the small mosque in ripoll, where the boys and young men sometimes prayed but were by no means devout, community leaders were almost speechless, distraught by what has happened. we didn‘t really know the boys or what they were up to, says this man, who has been in charge of the mosque says the imam left two months ago. they sometimes came to pray, he says. but if we had known their plans, we would have gone straight to the police. on the main road into town today, armed officers
10:09 pm
checking cars and lorries. as spain hunts down all of those responsible for the attacks in barcelona and cambrils. although the spanish government says the cell that carried out these attacks has now been dismantled, little is actually known about the small group of young men, mainly of moroccan descent, who apparently became radicalised and planned their attacks in the most unlikely of places. in the last two days, several suspects and known associates of the attackers have been arrested. the former imam‘s home has been searched and no one left in ripoll, a town where everyone knows everyone, can quite believe it. at the beginning, the people in ripoll were in shock because in a big town, in a big city, it is easier to find isolated communities. but not in a place like here in ripoll because... most of these young people will participate in many activities. a 22—year—old son of this town
10:10 pm
is currently the most wanted man in spain. after what he and the others are accused of doing, it will take ripoll years to recover. wyre davies, bbc news. our security correspondent, gordon corera, is in barcelona. the authorities there believe the network behind these attacks has been broken down. that must be reassuring. well, spain‘s interior minister earlier today said the country‘s threat level would not be raised to its maximum level although they have put in place extra security at popular destinations like las ramblas. that was, he said, because the cell behind the attack had been absolutely dismantled and these were his words. a few hours later at the local regional official in catalonia, where they sometimes have a difficult relationship with
10:11 pm
madrid, contradict that and said he could not be categorical b—cell had been dismantled and this is partly because he was still one individual on the run and a manhunt ongoing but there are also still unanswered questions. for instance, how did this cell go undetected for close to a year? because it was a small group of local men, young men from one town, ripoll, who radicalised each other and formed a closed group which the authorities did not know about? are worthy of some links and expertise provided from abroad, perhaps morocco, where the family links, or iraq, syria and so—called islamic state? that, tonight, is still an unanswered question. gordon, thank you. in finland, a british man was among those injured in yesterday‘s terror attack in which two women died. hassan zubier — a trained paramedic who now lives in sweden — was on holiday in toorku when the attack took place. he was repeatedly stabbed in the neck and chest as he tried to protect his girlfriend and help treat those who had been injured. he told a local newspaper that, despite his efforts,
10:12 pm
one of the women died in his arms. professor stephen hawking — one of the world‘s most famous and foremost scientists — has launched a stinging attack on the government over the nhs. he‘s accused the health secretary, jeremy hunt, of "cherry picking" evidence to justify the creation of a seven—day nhs. mr hunt has rejected that and accused the nobel prize—winning scientist of spreading falsehoods. sarah cambell reports. professor hawking acknowledged he would not be here today, were it not for the expert care he was given by the nhs. but he is concerned for its future and did not pull his punches, accusing the health secretary of abusing science to win the argument on whether levels of care at weekends are dangerously low. he has cherry picked research, and is bidding as a scientist, cherry picking evidence is unacceptable. —— speaking. applause.
10:13 pm
there is a scientific argument, but suppressing some things and not others, that debases scientific culture. the issue of a seven—day nhs week has proved toxic in relations between the health secretary and much of the medical profession in england. it was at the heart of many recent strikes which led to cancelled operations. jeremy hunt tweeted that steven hawking is a brilliant physicist but wrong. citing a report published in the british medicaljournal, which suggested there were 11,000 excess deaths between those admitted to hospital friday to monday compared to midweek. the saturday admissions, they saw a 10% high risk of death on a wednesday and four sunday, a 15% higher risk.
10:14 pm
jeremy hunt has never shied away from confrontation with the medical profession and today it seems he is happy to take on arguably britain‘s greatest living scientist. professor hawking, a labour supporter, expressed concerns over creeping privatisation of the nhs and what he feared was a move towards a us style system where everyone has to be able to aff ord health insurance. the health most pernicious falsehood from government wants a us style insurance system. is it too much to ask him to look at the evidence? at the event itself the tone was less confrontational is idea that the government wants a us style insurance system. is it too much to ask him to look at the evidence? at the event itself the tone was less oui’ the event itself the tone was less our system of a taxpayer nhs at the point of use is a principle we have to fight for and continue to uphold. and that was made very clearly and in fact, that is something that all political parties have committed to nhs at the point of use is a principle we have to fight for and continue to uphold. and that was made very clearly and in fact, that is something that all political parties have committed
10:15 pm
many thousands of people have taken to the streets in the us city of boston to protest against a public meeting by right—wing extremists. a small group of white nationalists were attempting to hold what they called a "free speech rally". the protests followed last weekend‘s violence in virginia, when a young woman was killed by a car driven at a crowd of anti—racist demonstrators. from boston, aleem maqbool reports. the organisers wanted to spark debate over the future of the nhs. and that has certainly happened. sarah campbell, bbc news, at the royal college if we can‘t a day of targeting american‘s far—right it was a day of targeting america‘s recent violence, many had been worried about it. but this was the city ‘s this was the so—called free speech rally but after recent violence, many had been worried about it. but this was the city ‘s a massive counterprotest of bostonians condemning hate speech and racism. massive counterprotest of bostonians condemning hate speech and racismlj am to make a difference we have to make a difference. i cannot believe in 2017 were still marching rights in 2017 were still marching rights
10:16 pm
in 2017 were still marching rights in 2017 were still marching for and say what is right and wrong, i cannot stay at home and keep my views to myself when there is hate out there. we also have the right to speak but also to congregate and shall we do not support what they have to say. i think the numbers will bear that faced with the option to stand and say what is right and wrong, i cannot stay at home and keep my views to myself when there is hate out there. we also have the right to speak but also to congregate and shall we do not support what they have to say. i think the numbers will bear that out the two demonstrations, one odd numbering the other by many thousands, were kept apart to prevent but the far donald trump hats, were unapologetic have often whirling donald trump adds, were that defiance often angered those around has entered the crowd and had to be escorted byjust one of these free—speech protesters has entered the crowd and had to be escorted by police through this very proud. they are full of anti—racism and anti—full of anti—racism and has
10:17 pm
been underfire anti—full of anti—racism and has been under fire for failing to unequivocally condemned the far right activists protested in cha rlottesville last right activists protested in charlottesville last week. even after a counter slogans. the president has been underfire after a counter slogans. the president has been under fire for failing to unequivocally condemned the far right activists protested in cha rlottesville last the far right activists protested in charlottesville last week. even after counterdemonstration was donald trump tweeted. .. after counterdemonstration was donald trump tweeted... it looks like many anti—police legislators are in boston. police are looking tough and smart. today, donald trump tweeted. .. it looks like tough and smart. today, donald trump tweeted... it looks like many anti—police legislators are in boston. police are looking tough and smart. thank there were moments of tension but on the whole the day was here than whatever the president does, they will come out in their d roves does, they will come out in their droves to condemn bigotry when with all the sport, here‘s karthi gna nasegaram at the bbc sport centre. kate, good evening. england have swept west indies aside with a mammoth innings and a 209 run victory in just three days. it‘s the first time that the west indies have lost 19 wickets in one day as england take a 1—nil series lead. our sports correspondent, joe wilson, reports from edgbaston. it was much more about being a huge
10:18 pm
statement from people here than whatever the president does, they will come out in their droves to condemn bigotry when they see flags can be waived in celebration raised in distress. hope had gone in the first over today. one anderson got kyle hope as a bowler and then in the next over, dismissed powell as the next over, dismissed powell as the next, roston chase, gone without a score. james anderson, the pink ball wasjermaine blackwood played a different game. 79 macro cummins was run out it was 168 all out in the first innings and the west indies, you are batting again. follow on and it went on. the second innings‘ but went quicker, in front of the big crowd now in playful mood. offering advice, try taking wickets with this ball. oh, well. thanks. nobody was going anywhere. apart from jermaine blackwood, stumped but when cummins was run out it was 168 all out in
10:19 pm
the first innings and the west indies, you are batting again. follow on and it went on. the second innings‘ wickets went quicker, in front of a big crowd now in playful mood. offering advice, try taking wickets with this ball. oh, well. thanks. nobody was going anywhere. apart from jermaine blackwood, the lights were taking effect and so was stuart from cook but minutes later, the big one, stuart broad, 38ath wicket in test matches two wickets in two balls, very good, the catch from cook but minutes later, the big one, stuart broad, 38ath wicket in test the second in england‘s all—time list, ahead of ian england won the test match at 8:56pm. it was excellent and poignant. the west indies once set the world standard in test matches. they had lost 19 wickets in one day. the teams shook handsthe pink ball feeling better all the time. england won the test match at 8:56pm. it was excellent and poignant. the west indies once set the world standard in test matches. they had lost 19 wickets in one day. the teams night experiment, i think the ground here and the people of birmingham really try to make it
10:20 pm
work. joe wilson, bbc news, edgbaston. it‘s time to pop out of the room if you don‘t want to know today‘s premier league results as match of the day follows soon on bbc one. jose mourinho‘s men have scored eight goals in two games at the start of the season after another a—nil win, with manchester united beating swansea today. the other premier league results... arsenal were beaten by stoke city whilst liverpool had their first win of the season, defeating crystal palace. defending scottish champions celtic beat kilmarnock 2—nil. callum mcgregor scored the second goal in a victory that means celtic are now unbeaten in 52 domestic games. there were also wins for aberdeen, hamilton, motherwell and saintjohnstone. rangers drew 0—0 with hearts. great britain are in the gold medal position in the team competition of the european eventing championships in poland. britain lead the way after the dressage and cross country with just showjumping to go. british rider nicola wilson is also in contention for an individual medal — she is in fourth place. and details of the day‘s other sports stories are on the bbc sport website, including an england victory and a scotland defeat at the women‘s eurohockey championships. and the usa lead europe by three points in the solheim cup.
10:21 pm
kate. you can see more on all of today‘s stories on the bbc news channel. that‘s all from me. goodnight. hello, this is bbc news. the papers very shortly with tomorrow‘s front—page headlines. but first, let‘s take a look atjobs. with the average person taking on 11 jobs during their career, it seems the idea of a "job for life" is increasingly becoming a thing of the past. but with different employers come different pension pots — and that can make keeping track of your finances rather confusing. so — as moneybox presenter, louise cooper, has been finding out —
10:22 pm
the government is looking to simplify things. we have in front of us all your pensions paperwork... 55—year—old john from newbury has had eightjobs since he started work at the age of 20. he knows he‘s paid into a variety of pensions but keeping hold of all the paperwork has been a problem. as i was reaching 55, i decided to review my pension situation. it was then that i realised i know very, very little about mys pensions except for the fact i had one big pension when i worked in a company for quite a long period of time. the department for work and pensions estimate there is currently £400 million in unclaimed pension savings and john worries he might be adding to the pot. definitely when i worked as a nurse, i don‘t know what happened to that paperwork. no idea at all. later, when i worked in another company, i contributed, i have no idea — i have no paperwork with that. that was over 20, 25 years ago. no, i haven‘t got any
10:23 pm
paperwork for that at all. john‘s not alone. the government have recognised that this is a big problem, so they asked the association of british insurers to work with the industry to create an online dashboard, a place where people can log on and see all their pensions in one place. so this is the dashboard? right. for this hypothetical test person, we found eight pensions. eight? you can see? they are listed here. you can see that he‘s got his state pension from the department for work and pensions. he can get additional information there. we found that he also has two final salary schemes. and you have also five, another five job that‘s he had, defined contribution pension schemes. all of that together is added up and it says you‘ve gotjust over £4,000 a month to look forward.
10:24 pm
lucky noah. he‘s very lucky! he‘s doing just fine. currently, 16 pension providers have signed up, accounting for £34 million pensions overall, but this is less than half of all pensions. you have a coalition that are willing, that‘s great. ultimately there‘s inertia and people have other priorities. trustees have other priorities. there has to be a clear signal from government — this has to be done. if you don‘t do it you‘re breaking the law. then we will actually have that sort of service for people available. the dashboard should be available in 2019 and it‘s the type of service that people likejohn will find invaluable when it comes to working out their income in retirement. chris fawkes has the weather. it has been another day of sunshine
10:25 pm
and showers. one of our weather watchers photographing this cumulonimbus cloud which brought a heavy downpour into the highlands. the secondary heavy downpours in north and west of scotland overnight. one or two for wales as well but fading away. the cloud will break up and the weather will become dry. temperatures around 13 degrees in the towns but cooler in the countryside. looking at sunday, a few days ago we had this hurricane travelling up the eastern side of the united states. since then, it has passed underneath the jet stream where it got ripped to shreds by the winds. but the tropical air associated with it has worked his way into his weather fronts for sunday. after a bright start, we will see cloud encroaching. it will arrive quite late in the day and will probably bring outbreaks of
10:26 pm
drizzly rain and turning heavier towards the evening across parts of wales and south—west england. that leaves the majority of the uk with fine and dry conditions for most of the day. sunday the better day of the day. sunday the better day of the weekend. temperatures coming up quite nicely. cooler than that in scotla nd quite nicely. cooler than that in scotland but pleasant in the sunshine and fewer showers than today. into sunday night, the rain will get heavier across wales and southern counties of england. there are southern counties of england. there a re hefty southern counties of england. there are hefty burst mixed in with that tropical air. for northern ireland, rain arrives late at night and could be heavy. this band of rain pushes north and behind this warm front thatis north and behind this warm front that is where the really warm air is across wales and southern counties of england. even if we don‘t see a great deal of sunshine, it could be quite humid. further north, the air is that the cooler. next week, we
10:27 pm
will get the warm air wafting in with south—westerly winds. it will feel quite humid and temperatures will surge upwards on tuesday. depends on how much —— uncertain how much cloud there will be, but we could see temperatures reaching 29 degrees in southern parts of england.
10:28 pm
10:29 pm
10:30 pm

28 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on