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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 20, 2017 7:00am-8:01am BST

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i'm afraid that's all we have time for in the shortcut of click, the full—length version is for you on iplayer to watch right now and there's loads of extra photos from our trip to india on twitter @bbcclick. thanks for watching and we'll see you soon. hello. this is breakfast, with ben thompson and tina daheley. a british paramedic stabbed four times in the finland terror attack insists he's no hero. hassan zubier was attacked while he tried in vain to save a woman's life, but tells the bbc he wouldn't hesitate to do the same again. two women were killed and seven people wounded in what was finland's first terrorist attack. good morning.
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it's sunday the 20th of august. also ahead: the king and queen of spain will attend a memorial service in the next few hours for the victims of the barcelona attack. a crackdown on cold callers. the government tries to put a stop to pensions scams. more unrest in the united states as thousands of protestors take to the streets of boston to oppose a far—right rally. good morning. in sport, stuart broad stars as england thrash the west indies by a record margin. broad moves to second on the list of england's all—time wicket takers, as they win the first day—night test. very windy with giants is. giant seas. wild weather. good morning. a
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dry sunday for many. rainclouds gathering from the south—west later on. the details on that and potentially warm weather as well. i will see you in 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. a british paramedic, stabbed repeatedly during a terror attack in finland, has described how he tried in vain to save the life of one of the victims. speaking from his hospital bed, hassan zubier has told the bbc he wouldn't hesitate to do the same again, but insists he is no hero. two women died and eight other people were wounded in the city of turku on friday. simonjones has this report. the market square that became the scene of a terror attack. hassan zubier was on holiday in turku. he tried to protect his girlfriend and help those who had been injured, kicking the attacker. speaking from his hospital bed, he said despite his efforts, one of the women died in his arms.
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i'm nota hero, i'mjust a human being who cares for other human beings. maybe it sounds silly, but that's me. i would do it again, anytime, because the world is such a dark place. and if we don't help each other, who is going to help us? at the same time, a girl lost her life. i feel so upset that i could not save her. this is the world we live in at this time. tributes in the square to those who lost their lives and were injured. the attack was witnessed by many. i was in the back with my wife. people were running from here. the window, from the window, i saw people just running there. i thought, what's happening? i came out. the guyjust stepped from out the front of the bank. police say the attack are deliberately targeted women. an 18—year—old moroccan was arrested
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after being shot by police. four other suspects are being held. this is the first terrorist attack in finland. of course, the whole nation is mourning now, and so the whole europe is mourning with us. hassan zubier, who now lives in sweden, is being offered support by the uk embassy in finland. simon jones, bbc news. the spanish king and queen are expected to attend a memorial service this morning for the victims of the barcelona terror attack. the special mass will take place inside gaudi's famous sagrada familia church. king felipe and queen letizia showed their support for the city yesterday by laying flowers at las ramblas, and visiting the wounded victims who are still recovering in hospital. meanwhile, police in spain continue to hunt for the driver of the van which ran over dozens of people on thursday. 22—year—old moroccan younes abu yaaquoub, is the main suspect. the spanish interior ministry says the rest of the terrorist cell has been dismantled.
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fraudsters aiming to scam people out of their pensions savings could soon face fines of up to £500,000. the government will introduce new measures to protect older savers, such as a ban on cold calling and tougher hmrc rules for those setting up pension schemes. almost five million has been taken from pension pots this year. here's our business correspondent, joe lynam. for thousands of pensioners, a ringing phone has become something to dread rather than look forward to. that's because fraudsters are preying on older people on an almost industrial scale, trying to get their hands on their pension savings. the government is acting, though, by introducing new laws. banning anyone calling you without express permission to sell you an investment. you'll soon only be able to transfer large sums to proper companies with up—to—date accounts.
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and convicted fraudsters could face fines of up to half a million pounds. the government is reacting to a situation we have found by way of consultation and evidence gathering. we're responding to what the police and pensioners organisation have said. it is massively supported by organisations like aiduk. but there is little the government can do to prevent criminals overseas contacting older people. so the message from aiduk is always be vigilant, and if in doubt, hang up. joe lynam, bbc news. in five minutes‘ time we will speak to an expert to see if this is enough to stop people losing out on pension savings. tens of thousands of anti—racism protesters have ta ken to the streets of boston to oppose a free speech rally featuring right—wing speakers. more than 30 arrests were made following clashes between the police and some anti—rally protesters. police said that officers had had rocks and bottles of urine thrown at them.
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crowd chanting: we can't hear you! it was a day of taunting america's far—right. this was their so—called "free speech rally" that, after recent violence, many had been worried about. but this was the city's response. a massive counter—protest of bostonians condemning hate—speech and racism. crowd chanting: the people united will never be defeated! i am outraged. outraged. we have to make a difference. i can't believe in 2017 that we are still marching for rights. when faced with the option to stand and say what is right and wrong, i cannot sit home and keep my views to myself, when there is hate out there. they certainly have the right to speak but we also have the right to congregate and to show that we do not support what they have to say and i think the numbers bear that out today. the two demonstrations, one outnumbering the other by many
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thousands, were kept apart to prevent trouble, but the far—right demonstrators, often wearing from trump hats, were unapologetic. i'm a racist. though that defiance often angered those around. just one of those so—called free—speech protesters has just come out into the crowd and has had to be escorted by police through this very angry crowd, who have been chanting anti—racism and anti—trump slogans all day. the president has been underfire for failing to unequivocally condemn the far—right activists that protested in charleville, last week, even after a counter—demonstrator, heather heyer, was killed. today, donald trump tweeted this. there were moments of tensions but, on the whole, the day was peaceful,
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and much more about being a huge statement from people here that, whatever their president does, they'll come out in their droves to condemn bigotry when they see it. aleem maqbool, bbc news, in boston. firefighters in essex are battling a huge fire at a packaging warehouse. around 100 firefighters were called to the blaze as it tore through the building on festival way in basildon. eight fire engines remain at the scene. the warehouse was "completely alight" and a neighbouring industrial unit was also affected. essex police said there are not believed to be any casualties. a british man has been charged with the murder of a hair stylist in chicago. 12—year—old rahul doshi from north london has been crowned child genius champion. the channel 4 competition tests 20 youngsters aged eight to 12 on their spelling, maths, memory and knowledge of science and history. rahul took the title ahead of his nine—year—old fellow co ntesta nt rona n.
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in the first five months of this year, scammers have managed to trick pension savers of almost £5 million from their pension pots, with victims losing on average of 15 thousand pounds each. in an attempt to stop people being ripped off, the government is proposing a ban on cold calling in relation to pensions, including sending e—mails and texts. we can talk to pensions expert tom mcphail, about the changes. it is good to see you. we will talk about the numbers. £15,000 on average people are being conned out of. that adds up to a huge amount of muggy. do these proposals go far enoughit. it? it will never stop them entirely. i don't want to criticise the measures. it is
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important. it will help. there is an element of whack a mole about this problem. whenever you come up with a measure to stop fraudsters, eventually they will find a new way. it is just about making it as hard as possible and sending as clear ray message is possible to cold calling people and regulated financial institutions. in that respect, all of this today will help. why has it taken so long? this is nothing new. why now? there has been a particular escalation since 2015 and the new pension freedoms came in. there was a rapid escalation in the use of cold calling and the targeting of older people. the government was consulted last year. then we had the general election and everything got delayed. there were repeated calls
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from the pensions industry asking the government to act on this issue and from consumer groups. it is good news to see the government introduce these measures now. it is still relatively early on in the term of this new parliament. it would have been good of the previous other men did something sooner, but it is good we are here now. —— parliament. did something sooner, but it is good we are here now. -- parliament. can these changes be confusing for people? how much money you need, what you need to contribute, these are difficult questions. if someone comes to you with a proposed dancer, you might be tempted to take it because you don't have any idea what you should be doing anyway. —— answer. that is part of the problem. we have millions of people who historically never had to take us stability retirement savings —— responsibility for. the world is changing. we are moving to a world where we have money paid in in your
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responsibility. a lot of people are not used to that and don't fully understand how the stock market works, how to buy and sell funds. when people come with is plausible sounding propositions were they promise to get rich quick, it is not surprising that some people get taken in with that. it will take a long time before we fully solve this problems. we will have to raise levels of financial literacy and competent. in the short—term, if something sounds too good to be true, it probably is. if someone is cold calling you, hang up. if they ring up offering you a scam, don't listen to them. wherever possible, deal with regulated, respected, well—known financial institutions. they are not the kind of people that are going to rip you off. briefly, is there a danger we throw out the baby with the bathwater and people cannot get what they desperately
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need? good question. the government needs to make sure it does not introduce unintended consequences. i hope we will consult these details as we go forward from here. hope we will consult these details as we go forward from harem hope we will consult these details as we go forward from here. it is really good to talk to you. thank you so much. and now for a weather update. hurricane gert causing humidity. yes. it will be more humid. good morning. quite a chilly start to come. this was taken in dorset. a cracking start to the day. reasonably sunny. a fair bit of cloud. isolated showers towards the north and east of scotland. the re m na nts of north and east of scotland. the remnants of hurricane gert. fairly fragmented. link to this cloud. no strong winds. cloud amounts increasing. we will see some of this
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developed in wales and heavy bursts around this area. the uk, staying dry. starting with sunshine. sunny spells into the afternoon. more grey skies. cornwall, somerset, south wales. the breeze will pick up. pretty strong sunshine. it will feel warm enough, even though temperatures are not high. a fine afternoon in northern england after some isolated showers this morning. isolated showers in scotland as well. if you are going to liverpool ina well. if you are going to liverpool in a short while to cheer off the yachts in the round the world clipper race, we will have more sunshine than at the moment. strong winds on the way as we go to the atlantic. back to us. this evening and overnight. rain in wales, the midlands, endorsing the northern ireland. some heavy rain. mist the
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in the south humid air. northern england and scotland, another cool like to come. the best of the morning brightness. sunniest here. lots of cloud across central and southern england and wales and northern ireland. heaviest in northern ireland. heaviest in northern ireland. heaviest in northern ireland. there will be quite a bit of cloud in the south. where it breaks through, humid so be the best of the sunshine. temperatures in the finals of scotla nd temperatures in the finals of scotland in the mid—teens. heavy rain in parts of central and northern scotland. dry for much of the day. elsewhere, cloud will break up the day. elsewhere, cloud will break up in places that the widely in the 20s. will have more details on hurricane gert later in the programme that could bring a lot of humidity rain.
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the fa described allegations of child sexual abuse in football as one of the biggest crises in the history of the game. today, an organisation set up to improve safeguarding for children in sport, will host a celebrity football match. the offside trust hopes to work with professional clubs and players to offer support and advice on ways to better protect children from abuse. we're joined now by founders of the offside trust, steve walters and chris unsworth. talking first about the charity, why you found it and how it came about? basically, after what we went through, wejust basically, after what we went through, we just wanted to turn a huge negative into a positive and make a difference. let our kids not go through what we went through. our ultimate aim really is to prevent kids from being abused in sport. the offside trust has been up and running for a while now, what has the response be mike? in the early
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days, it was quite slow, although it is great now. we had to get the momentum. we have got a great family behind us and some great people behind us and some great people behind us. why do you think it was slow to get started? reallyjust behind us. why do you think it was slow to get started? really just the stigma of the child abuse and of football, and in sport as well. we knew it would be tough to break through, but we are getting there. founded for three months, thousands of responses from people. were you surprised by that number, about 3000 responses? go, we had teammates from yea rs responses? go, we had teammates from years and years ago, we had old teammates get in touch with us. we wa nted teammates get in touch with us. we wanted to be the first port of call, they could pick up the phone or e—mail us, be that person who listens and believes in support
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them, and then send them on to the experts. the pfa and they have backed the trust, what has the response be mike from football clu bs ? response be mike from football clubs? it has been very slow, we have had to go out and try to get them involved —— been like? we have lots of things in the pipeline for next year, and we are just hoping that a lot of clubs willjump on board and work with us. you are working with everton at the moment, what is that process like? what work are you doing with them? it is very new at the moment, we have got things in the pipeline for next year. we would like to get in there, see where they are up to. they are right at the top of their game. we would like to work it out for other
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clubs, get other clubs up to their level. a challenging is it? you talk about the stigma attached, talking about the stigma attached, talking about these things, people are relu cta nt to about these things, people are reluctant to come forward. football clu bs reluctant to come forward. football clubs have been slow to get involved. how frustrating is that? it is very frustrating. the macho male personas need to be broken down, we have told people the truth about what happened, no charges, we had to go through it. nonetheless, we wa nt had to go through it. nonetheless, we want to break down the barriers, we want to break down the barriers, we don't want to cover things up. it needs to be out in the open. that is why we are offering support. we have a charity match today, taking on television celebrities. publicity and awareness of the campaign is great, what else does it bring? this week, i have had a couple of
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individuals come forward who said they wanted to have a chat with us today at the game. it is really reassuring. we need to raise some funds now so we can take it to the next level. since day one, we have not had a penny of financing, it has all been voluntary work. we want to raise some funds and moved to the next level. how important is that money in terms of what you're doing? it is vitally important, there are so it is vitally important, there are so many football clubs, 92 league clu bs, so many football clubs, 92 league clubs, as well is all that grassroots levels. there are thousands and thousands of kids out there. we need to take it to the next level. you guys are doing great work, thank you so much for coming in to talk to us. good luck tonight. many of us dream about quitting our jobs to go see the world. well one couple did that 17 years ago —
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and haven't been home since. the zapps left argentina in a vintage car injanuary 2000. since then, they've had 4 children as they crossed continents. now, almost two decades later, the zapps are here in the uk! emma glasbey went to meet them in north yorkshire. i7 17 years, 80 countries and four babies along the way. the zapps travelled the world in their vintage car, relying on the generosity of people they met. now they have arrived in north yorkshire to spend time ata arrived in north yorkshire to spend time at a farm. they say they are living the dream. everybody should follow our dreams. that is the reason why we follow our dreams. that is the reason why we are follow our dreams. that is the reason why we are here, on this planet. you must have had some difficult times? very difficult, very challenging times. sometimes i wonder why i have this challenge. i would prefer to be in my house. when
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the zapps left argentina, it was just two of them. their children we re just two of them. their children were born in the us, argentina, canada and australia. the children are taught by their parents on the road. she graffiti lessons are something special. i think if you have kids, you have a responsibility to show them the beautiful world we live in —— geography lessons. to show them the beautiful world we live in -- geography lessons. they will say, are we there yet? they know that we will get there. after a few days, they will be exploring the north of england, and then scotland. it is something of a change from some of their more recent tropical destinations. what do you think of the weather? it is very rainy. it rainsa the weather? it is very rainy. it rains a lot. it rains a lot, but it is really nice when it's funny. what
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do you think of the weather?m is really nice when it's funny. what do you think of the weather? it is like a woman. one day you are getting everything from her... the zapps are trying to fund the rest of their travels with a book about their travels with a book about their lives. at some point they will return home to argentina, but for now, there is so much more of the world to explore. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's time now for a look at the newspapers. tv and entertainment journalist emma bullimore is here to tell us what's caught her eye. good morning. a quick run through the front pages. on the daily express, sorry, the sunday express, more of the awful stories emerging from the tragic events in barcelona. the missing bit on still searching
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for her son, who isjust seven the missing bit on still searching for her son, who is just seven years old —— briton. for her son, who is just seven years old -- briton. the sunday telegraph, a crackdown on car and van rentals to help stop terror attacks. drivers will be handing over more personal information after the attacks in spain. british drivers also facing extra checks before renting vehicles to make sure they are not extremists. that is under government plans being developed at the moment. the same story on the express as the mail on sunday, a missing child and his mother who is suffering serious injuries. her husband is travelling from australia. the young boy has dual nationality. flying in from
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australia to find more information. the boy is described as missing by the foreign office. the observer, a foolish claim on eu court. theresa may's brexit strategy under fire, and the claim that the uk can break free of all european laws while continuing to get the benefits of the single market. talking about what's inside the papers. the observer, we have seen the a—level clearing and the like, applicants falling for universities. i find that hard to believe, because we have been told that universities have been told that universities have never been richer. there are fewer 18 —year—olds than usual this year. also with brexit, eu students
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are multiplying. they don't know if they are welcome in britain and if it is somewhere they should go to university. £40,000 worth of debt, people start to think, is it worth it? we are talking about universities that came up during the boom, the tony blair dry where eve ryo ne boom, the tony blair dry where everyone was going to university. people are starting to change their attitude. they wonder if they should go straight to the work place. attitude. they wonder if they should go straight to the work placem strikes me that there are more options. when i was leaving university, apprenticeships were a dirty word. that wasn't seen as something you should do. more firms say they are going to offer them now. they say, we can train you to do what you want. i think it is fantastic that people have that choice. i was the first person in my family to go to university, the thought of people being put off by the financial element is really upsetting. for the a-level students
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who are going through these exams for the first time, we have the first set of results. for them it means more choice. if there are fewer places available, if the universities are lowering their requirements for getting in, it gives them a better choice and more chance of getting in. clearing has been very significant this year. it is very good for those students. i worry about people having the choice. but as long as the choice is there that is fantastic. this is in there that is fantastic. this is in the mail on sunday, an artist had a painting appeared in the television series broadchurch. how much does she want for it? if you think about broadchurch, you probably don't remember that painting. there is a big rape storyline in that series,
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and she said it has damaged her reputation. she has said she wants £10,000 compensation. it was only on screen for five seconds. the actors get paid less than that. nobody was looking at the painting, but there you go. in the express, the doctor will e—mail you now? yes, online consultations. sometimes when you are sitting in the waiting room and you think, ijust need a prescription, why am i waiting around? i don't know how this is going to work in practice. every time you go to the doctor, they want to do something that involves physical contact. it is also worrying because a lot of the time, people will go for one thing they are worried about, but then they will find something else. online, it
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is very perfunctory. but i think it will work for some people. a lot of people going to the doctor, the elderly people, they may not even use e—mail. elderly people, they may not even use e-mail. it is good to have choice. being able to get that second opinion, i know it is really ha rd to second opinion, i know it is really hard to get that. queueing up at the surgery getting an appointment on the day. you don't need a full consultation, just a quick yes or no. that is what they are hoping to cover. it is so hard to get an appointment, especially if you work. it is hoped this could be a solution. thank you very much. and now we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. we will be on bbc news channel until nine o'clock. hello.
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this is breakfast, with ben thompson and tina daheley. coming up before 8am, matt will be here with the weather. but first at, a summary of this morning's main news. a british man injured while helping victims of a terror attack in finland has insisted he is not a hero. two women died and eight other people were wounded in the city of turkuu on friday. hassan zubier, who's a paramedic originally from kent, was stabbed at least four times in the attack and is recovering in hospital. i am not a hero. i am just a human being who cares for other human beings. that may sound silly, but that has made. i would do it again. the world is such a dark place. and if we don't help each other, who will help us? at the same time, i feel so upset i could not save her. this is the world we live in. tens of thousands of anti—racism protesters have ta ken to the streets
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of the us city of boston in opposition to a right—wing rally. more than 30 arrests were made after clashes broke out between the police and some protesters, with rocks and bottles of urine thrown. pension scammers who cold call people to steal their savings could be fined up to half £1 million and a new government rules. new measures would include a ban on all cold calls, text, and e—mails in relation to pensions. a british man has been charged with the murder of a hair stylist in chicago. andrew warren, a former oxford university employee, and us professor wymondham lathem are accused of killing trenton cornell—duranleau. the 26—year—old was found with 40 stab wounds at the end ofjuly. the two men handed themselves in following a nationwide manhunt. brexit secretary, david davis,
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has warned the european union that, "with the clock ticking," there is no point in negotiating aspects of brexit twice. his comments are seen as an attempt to push withdrawal talks towards discussions on a future trading relationship. this week, the government will will publish five position papers, further setting out britain's negotiating strategy in an attempt to add pace to the talks. these are my favourite pictures of the morning. i am sure you know how ha rd the morning. i am sure you know how hard it is to park in some tight spaces. take a look at this. spare a thought for the owners of these vehicles, who found the car park itself moved. as you can see, these vehicles were left dangling over the edge of a multi—story car park in nottingham,
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which partially collapsed yesterday. luckily no—one was injured, and, incredibly, it seems no cars were damaged either. imagine going back to your car to see that. that is how you park, isn't it? how very dare you, ben! i ama isn't it? how very dare you, ben! i am a good driver. but i would not be keen to get in my car if it looks like that. i would not get back into that vehicle. and now to move on to cricket. england, very good, west indies, very bad? that is the question on everyone's lips. i think it is both. the west indies have been dominant for so many decades, the 805, the 905. not that good any more. let's be honest. england have certainly proved very competent in their performance. there was talk
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about the pink ball and moving around. they have dealt well with it so far. i was talking about the bat5men and how good they are, now england's cricketer5 have 5wept west indies aside in just three days to take a 1—0 series lead. they won by a record margin: an innings and 209 runs. our sports correspondent, joe wilson reports on what has been the first, day—night test in england. flags can be waved in celebration or in distress. one of them went over on saturday. anderson got two in a row. he di5missed powell a5 a field. run out. yeah. gone without a score. james anderson, the pink ball wizard. blackwood played a different game.
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79 not out. when cummings wa5 gotten out, it was 168 all out in the first—innings. ye5, west indies, you're batting again. it went on. the second innings went even quicker. a big crowd in a playful mood. offering advice, try taking wicket5 with this ball. thank you. no one was going anywhere, except forjermaine blackwood. stumped. two wickets in two balls. stuart broad wa5 stuart broad was taken. very good. minutes later, the big one. stuart broad's 384th wicket in test matches, second in the all—time li5t behind ian botham. england got victory. excellent and poignant victory. the west indies once set the world standard in test matches.
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they lost 19 wickets in one day, the teams 5hook hands miles apart. we know there was reinvestment and restructuring going on in the caribbean. that will not help the west indies. there are two more to go. they will be conventional matches. a5 for the day—night match, i think that the people really tried to make it work. a fantastic effort from the whole squad. the way we batted a5 a side was fantastic. the application we showed. we took it from the last two games into this one. it is about continuing to do that. we wa nt it is about continuing to do that. we want to be more consistent. in the premier league, manchester united fans may well have their heads in the clouds after another impressive performance. liverpool also won, but arsenal came un5tuck at stoke. adam wild has the details. football is rarely straightforward. but it can look that way if you are doing well. 24—0 victory so far,
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manchester united are keeping things simple so far. i just want to let the horses run. they were magnificent. it took some time for swansea to find the freedom. running away with it. three goals in four rootless minutes. —— ruthless. romelu lukaku, paul pogba, anthony martial. things looked easy. 4—0 swansea! liverpool were made to wait as well against crystal palace. sadio mane got the right ball of the game. —— goal. just one goal at stoke where fans did not have to wait long to see
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what their new star could do. what a moment for the new boy! he only arrived this week. this was the perfect welcome. southampton, things appeared to be going to plan. 2—0 up against a west ham side reduced to ten men. javier hernandez scored twice. it took a late charlie austin penalty to turn it back. a thrilling afternoon! it was a day when some were making things look simple. but the saints won it the hard way. adam wild, bbc news. elsewhere watford won 2—0 at bournemouth, west brom beat burnley. and brighton lost 2—0 again, this time to leicester. in the scottish premiership, the champions celtic continued their amazing unbeaten domestic run, with a 2—0 win at kilmarnock. brendan rodgers made six changes to the side that won 5—0 in the champions league in midweek, but this was still business as usual for celtic.
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james forrest getting their first just before half time, while callum mcgregor rounded of the victory. celtic are now 52 domestic matches unbeaten. elsewhere in the scottish premiership, stjohnstone and aberdeen remain hot on celtic‘s heels at the top — they also have a perfect league record, with three wins from three. rangers could only draw 0—0 at home with hearts. chris froome's aim of becoming the third man to win the vuelta a espana and the tour de france in the same year got off to a good start, team sky finished fourth in the team time trial. several riders struggled with the technically challenging course in the french city of neem. but team sky crossed the finish line with five riders, nine seconds behind the leaders. froome leads his nearest challenger by 22 seconds in the general classification.
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the united states needsjust three and a half points, to retain the solheim cup, after day two in iowa. they extended their lead over team europe to ten and a half, to five and a half. it's the first time since 1998 that the us has led going into the final day of singles matches. a great result for england, as they began the defence of their eurohockey title in amsterdam. they beat ireland 4—1. with england 3—1 ahead in the game, some quick thinking from alex danson from close range, secured the win. they'll play germany later today. some sad news overnight that all blacks legend colin meads has died after a long battle with cancer. he was 81. colin was named new zealand's best rugby player of the 20th century. nicknamed pinetree, he played 133 times for his country, including 55 tests. he once played an entire match with a broken arm. that is insane! really
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nice to see you, thanks very much. the clipper round the world yacht race starts in liverpool later this morning. 12 teams will spend a year sailing the globe in a 40 thousand nautical mile race, featuring 700 participants over eight stages. our reporter andy gill is at albert dock for us this morning. it's getting busy down there?m it's getting busy down there? it is, the race starts at half past 12. we have got to get these 12 clippers through the docks and through the gate into the river for the start of the first leg, all the way across the first leg, all the way across the atlantic to uruguay. you've never done anything like this before? know i haven't,
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never done anything like this before? knowl haven't, it is all new. why are you doing it? it is a new. why are you doing it? it is a new adventure, something different. it is different to normal, it is a really exciting experience. the people are great, bring it on. and your marketing manager, do you bring those skills to the boat? we will be doing communications back to the clipper race and to our friends and family. ican clipper race and to our friends and family. i can bring in some skills. 0k, what does that involve? family. i can bring in some skills. ok, what does that involve?|j family. i can bring in some skills. ok, what does that involve? i also have to provide all the food, we are stored for leg one and i really hope we don't run out. do you have to do the cooking as well? no, we take it
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in turns. everybody gets a chance to shine. it is a bit like a cooking show. this voyage is not without risks, is it? you are doing it all the way around the globe, what's your concern? i think the weather. when we know there is a big storm coming, we have to be prepared for that. i think that is what my biggest nerves from at the moment. what about the interaction between the crew? not everybody is doing the whole journey? you are the crew? not everybody is doing the wholejourney? you are in the crew? not everybody is doing the whole journey? you are in a the crew? not everybody is doing the wholejourney? you are in a confined space with people for a long time? yes, there are 22 of us on the boat. although they look big, below deck, there is not much space the crews are amazing, so i don't have any concerns. from liverpool back to you, the yachts are back next year.
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imagine asking your boss for one year of work to sail around the world. as far as excuses go, it is quite a good one. and now for the weather. can you tell us what it will be like for those people sailing from liverpool this morning? a challenge towards uruguay. it is pick storm season. —— peak. tropical storm colin hurricanes forming. one or two of them. we have one in the system at them. we have one in the system at the moment. this was hurricane gert off the east of the us. it got wrapped up with other cloud. it has been fragmented somewhat. it will influence the weather in the next few days. we will see it coming towards us in terms of rain. after
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sundays, we will start dragging up the humid airfrom the mid—atlantic. you will notice that in the next 24 hours. signs of that in the south—west with cloud and rain. that will spread across southern and western parts of wales. light showers in scotland and elsewhere. most will see the cloud break up and sunshine come through. a fine day. the south—west corner will become more and more grey. the wind will pick up. dry and sunny spells continuing into the afternoon. bright conditions in liverpool for the start of the race. the wind will start off light. staying dry to the north of ireland. rain in the south later on. a much better day. light wind. more warm. this evening and overnight, occasional rain in the
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middle. very misty and drizzly towards the east coast in south—west. humid air pushing an. temperatures not dropping too much. northern england and scotland and northern england and scotland and northern ireland, more fresh. single figures through the night like last night in the countryside. scotland, north—east england, a lovely start to the day. cloud increasing. northern scotland, sunniest of all. it is tied to the weather front which will bring heavy rain to south—west scotland and northern england during the afternoon. humid air pushing into the south. breaks in the cloud, temperatures could be higher than the chart. the best of the weather will be in the north of scotland. holding onto the sunshine into tuesday. spreading north. sunshine coming through. much more humid for everyone. 27 is the eventual high in south—east england. heating up. that sounds much better.
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and if that is not good enough, we will have the travel show, where they are going somewhere warm, india. we are going a few hundred kilometres from the border with china. iam kilometres from the border with china. i am on the banks of the mighty river. i am going to a spiritual place, the biggest river island in the world. 150,000 people on the island. it is really crowded. look at the list of prices for all different categories. passengers, 15 pretty. animals have to pay. buffaloes have to pay 45. bull, cow,
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30, the poor elephant, 907 rupees. perhaps fortunately none of these creatures were travelling with us today. incredibly, after some last—minute panic, we are set to go. iclimb last—minute panic, we are set to go. i climb onto the corrugated aluminium roof to join i climb onto the corrugated aluminium roof tojoin man i climb onto the corrugated aluminium roof to join man who i climb onto the corrugated aluminium roof tojoin man who do this trip day in and day out. —— men. this river is nearly 2000 miles long. it is second only to the amazon and the volume of water that goes through it. we arrive, and it is turmoil again trying to get off the boat. there is a sneaky way out,
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climbing onto another boat. i will ta ke climbing onto another boat. i will take that one. it is just desert as far as i can see. this island is home to 22 monasteries, satras, initially established by this guru. the boys are instructor from a young age established by this guru. the boys are instructorfrom a young age in the religion he preached, an offshoot of hinduism. the monks are
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celibate, and according to their beliefs, they only worship one god, and follow a vegetarian diet. and here, the doctrine includes this special artform. this form of classical dance is now recognised by the authorities as a genre in its own right, and many of these monks have performed around these monks have performed around the world. that was amazing. thank you very much indeed. i know you
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have spent a lifetime learning the skills of this. can i have a go? can i try? like this? yeah is to be put your arms through here. thank you so much. one, two, three, four. there are 64 positions in this classical dance and i'm having trouble with the first two. it's very difficult. without the grace, as well. no grace whatsoever. he makes it look so easy. and it's incredibly difficult. i'm going to leave it to the experts. sometimes you have to give up and let them carry on.
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an exquisite performance. but there's one problem, one very big problem, and that is, that this island may simply not exist in just a few decades time. hard to believe at the moment but there is a genuine worry that majuli will be submerged and destroyed within 20 years. in the last 70 years it has shrunk in size by two thirds. and a majority of the original 65 monasteries have gone. every monsoon, the brahmaputra river swells, eroding the terrain around it.
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bit by bit, land is disappearing. but there is hope. so now, i'm on my way, in a tractor, to go and see a man whose life '5 mission has been to tackle the flooding that has afflicted this island. he is jadav payeng, basically assam's very own eco—warrior. jadav is known today as the forest man of india. he began planting trees so the roots would bind the soil, soak up excess water, and prevent the land from being eroded by flooding. from a barren landscape, he has created a forest the size of new york's central park. and he feels this will be more effective in saving nearby majuli then following government
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flood prevention schemes. so we are now going to do the ritual that every guest that comes here is asked to do, which is to plant a tree. what kind of tree is this? i'm going to put this in here... it's good. and so to my final day in assam, and a different kind of ritualistic celebration of nature. if there's one repairing theme throughout my trip in the north—east, it's the sense of community, everywhere, really,
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and there's nothing better to illustrate that than this... a local village going down to the river, to celebrate harvest. this community was started in 1939 by a young woman who came from the mountains in search of food. i believe she found that this place was better for her because it is coated in water, and civilisation needs water, she brought friends and family here, followed by a brother. the entire family of her own clan... all from that one woman? really, fascinating, wow. this is a much—loved annual celebration and people of all ages gathered to mark in, using fishing methods that have been passed down the generations. then you pull it towards you...
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pull the stick... and look! you can see this! it's full of fish, it's full of fish. this is today's catch... wow! that is pretty good. and this, you will cook, now? excellent. so my trek across india from border to border is almost over, and it's been a realjourney of discovery for me off the beaten track. this isn't india "on tap", instant gratification, which some people are accustomed to, but the rewards, if you make
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the effort, are immense. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and tina daheley. a british paramedic stabbed four times in the finland terror attack insists he's no hero. hassan zubier was attacked while he tried in vain to save a woman's life, but tells the bbc he wouldn't hesitate to do the same again. two women were killed and eight people wounded in what was finland's first terrorist attack. good morning. it's sunday 20th august. the king and queen of spain will attend a memorial service in the next few hours for the victims of the barcelona attack. a crackdown on cold callers.
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