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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 20, 2017 11:30pm-11:46pm BST

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end of the weather front in the top end of the weather front wrapping around and back into northern ireland during thursday. elsewhere, thursday and friday, a mixture of sunny spells and showers. quite a bit going on if you want it at your place as ever. it is right there at the bbc website. hello there. this is bbc news with lu kwesa burak. hello there. this is bbc news with lukwesa burak. in a moment, we will be looking at tomorrow morning's papers. first, a reminder of the headlines at, just gone 11:30pm: seven—year—old julian cadman, with dual british and australian citizenship, has been confirmed as one of the victims to die in the terrorist attack in barcelona. police in spain investigating the terror attacks that claimed 14 lives have said they've seized more than 120 gas canisters in the house which exploded in alcaner on wednesday. fraudsters aiming to scam people out of their pension could soon face fines of up to £500,000, as the government
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introduces new measures to tackle cold callers. jerry lewis, the comedy legend who teamed—up with dean martin before starring in his own series of slapstick movies during the 1950s, has died at his las vegas home aged 91. hello there and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us first thing tomorrow morning. with me are the former fleet street editor, eve pollard, and thejournalist and columnist, yasmin alibhai—brown. lovely to see you both again. we will come back to our chat in a moment. first off, a quick look at the front pages. we start with the metro.
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they pay tribute to the british seven—year—old who was killed in the barcelona terror attack on thursday, after becoming separated from his mum while on las ramblas. the daily telegraph headlines comments made by the uk's chief trade negotiator in which he said post—brexit deals will make the world a safer place as britain forges alliances with other countries. the daily express, meanwhile, claims britain has seen a £50 billion foreign investment boom since the vote for brexit, quoting analysis carried out by a eurosceptic group. the financial times says the trump administration is to push hard for tax reform in a bid to win back republican voters. meanwhile, the daily mail writes that prince charles has seen a drop in his popularity rating in the run—up to the 20th anniversary of princess diana's death. the times says children are being exposed to an increase in gambling adverts as betting websites push for new customers. and the guardian says the crown prosecution service is to crack down on social media
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hate crimes, making them as serious as offences carried out face to face. that is one of the stories will be talking about in a moment. however, good evening do you both. we start off with the times. this fascinating link, the latest information on the spend terror attacks. to brussels, how is this be made? there it is an times, who is suspected. and good on the times, this is the first ever that has this on the front page. so an imam suspected of masterminding the us learn attack also travelled often to belgium, a connections to paris, and seems to have been a major, kind of, dark figure, a
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groomer, almost, of young men, into jihadism and terror. but they have made a number of links. what is fascinating is this a3, the audi, caught in cambrils, that has also been seen in france, as well. it is interesting, because one of the boys' father says that this imam spent a lot of time with the boys. the youngest attic was 18, that has been involved in thisjihadi terrorist attack. it is terrifying to think that someone who is supposed to be a man of religion is influencing and grooming these boys, usually boys are being in trouble, say you can repay your guilt by doing something wonderful, or whatever. but the man who drove his car is still at large. the one who
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is still at large, younes abouyaaqoub, is 22. but the others we re abouyaaqoub, is 22. but the others were really just lads, abouyaaqoub, is 22. but the others were reallyjust lads, who a p pa re ntly were reallyjust lads, who apparently in the small place they we re apparently in the small place they were growing up in play football and seemed happy enough. and we do have a problem, because there are many imams online and across europe, who have been flooded, as far as i know, because a lot are alleging this, by saudi arabia. they want their brand of islam to the eight conquering ideology. so they want to take over the world in terms of the minds and hearts of young people. what astonishes me is that across europe, this country is still a fond ally of oui’s. this country is still a fond ally of ours. and we should be doing
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something about saudi arabia. what is extraordinary is that i think saudi arabia is the chair of human rights and the united nations. it is extraordinary! and their royals and oui’ extraordinary! and their royals and our royals, and all the president of america, canada... we know why they suck up to them, but if they are serious about dealing with them, it is time. very quickly, just to finish off this story, what was fascinating about it was that they we re fascinating about it was that they were not on anybody‘s radar. the boys that did the attack, putting the imam a cypher, they did the attack, but they will won't be on watch. they led double lives. they went out and socialise and did not show any signs of being radicalised. —— putting the imam aside for a moment. yes. and of course, we have gchq in this country, across europe there is nothing like that. spain does have good intelligence, but the
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mistake that was made when they found that this house that blew up, they thought it was an accident. and i think that was a bad mistake. gate turning to mirror and one of the victims of the atrocious attack. one of the victims is featured on many the papers, julian cadman, the seven—year—old, separated from his mother. he was obviously hit by this car in some way. terrible, terrible story, when you think this is the way the little boy and his life. and his mother, of course, still in hospital. it is the soft targets, is the soft targets, isn't it? be random, soft targets.|j the soft targets, isn't it? be random, soft targets. iwas the soft targets, isn't it? be random, soft targets. i was there until friday. —— the random. we were staying near to where the van stopped. one street away. everybody who has been to barcelona, it is the loveliest, easiest, sort of global
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cafe joint, if you like. that is what they hate. the puritans, they are real puritans. not unlike the american neo—nazis. they want the world to be not diverse, not to be internationalist. i was impressed by a piece in yesterday's times, we said now we need to protect these people. they put bollards up in places like france and on the thames, and it is good to change the way europe looks, but this is something we need to do. we are going to turn, now, to the guardian, which has another picture of the lovelyjulian cadman, which has another picture of the lovely julian cadman, but which has another picture of the lovelyjulian cadman, but the story we are going to be looking at is the online abuse. here we have somebody from the crown prosecution service, which says we are going to deal with
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social media attacks as if they were physical, to yourface social media attacks as if they were physical, to your face attacks, because often they end up with being physical attacks, and they are, of course, very, very dangerous, with young people, cyber bullying, all this goes on on social media. and stalking, it can be terrifying! frankly, it is about time we got to grips with social media. it is totally unfettered. television and radio had to check their facts, social media does not. —— have to. and because their real name. —— and nobody puts their real name. i remember hearing somebody said that every time is something on social media, they dreamt of the day they would have to put their name and address next to it. some of the
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strains of hate—crime, they say, racism, homophobic, sexism... but the mental abuse, i wonder how they will target, if they will, how they will target, if they will, how they will target. we are going to look at the mail now, and they have a story on the royal family. the mail now, and they have a story on the royalfamily. the the mail now, and they have a story on the royal family. the angle the mail now, and they have a story on the royalfamily. the angle is that charles and camilla are not too happy, allegedly, with the backlash following the documentaries. we don't know. the documentaries were about to cause a backlash. the whole country was totally shocked by the death of a member of the royal family, and a popular member of the royal family. family, and a popular member of the royalfamily. and family, and a popular member of the royal family. and i family, and a popular member of the royalfamily. and i am sure family, and a popular member of the royal family. and i am sure that this will be a passing stage. yes. deep pr machinery is brilliant. they have done a fantastic miraculous
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thing after she did die —— the pr machinery. underneath this, though, there is true. i want child to say, absolutely now, to remember diana and to say it, i made... i was not good to have. he would not do that. why not? all over the world, people have had bad marriages, done that things. which of us can say that we have never done anything bad?|j things. which of us can say that we have never done anything bad? i have not done anything this bad! i haven't! he has never talked about his side of the story. he has! 0k, he has a bet. i thought she was amazing. —— a bit. and look at her sons, they are doing wonderful things. but i am just saying that i
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think divorce is now very common, sadly, and i think, yes, she had a very bad time, but the she had a very bad time, but the she had a very bad time from childhood. very bad time, but the she had a very bad time from childhoodm would be good to have just a simple thing saying the boys have now spoken very honestly about their mother, their dad... beautifully, beautifully... mother, their dad... beautifully, beautifully. . . beautifully. mother, their dad... beautifully, beautifully... beautifully. and now they're dabney to say something. and what about the sun? duping people actually ca re what about the sun? duping people actually care about this? —— and now their dad needs to. —— do you think people actually care about this?” think it must be very upsetting for the boys to see all of this, as well as having spoken about their love for her. i think this 20 years on...
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we have to let it go now. that's it for the papers this hour. thank you eve and yasmin. it has been a pleasure, as usual. coming up next, it is the film review. enjoy it. cheerio. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this weeks's cinema releases is jason solomons. hello, jason, good to see you. hello. what have you been watching this week? this week on the film review we go to paris for the final portrait of swiss artist alberto giacometti and his very patient subject played by armie hammer. giacometti himself played by geoffrey rush and the film directed by stanley tucci. and then the weather is on the agenda as it always is at the weekend,
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but this time it's extreme weather as we follow al gore and a series of flip chart presentations around the sadly necessary an inconvenient sequel, a follow—up to his oscar—winning an inconvenient truth. and in the hitman's bodyguard, the bodyguard played by ryan reynolds meets a hit man played by samuel ljackson and it's love at first sight. well, not really. let's start with final portrait. i'm a massive stanley tucci fan as an actor. i know he's directed a few films before. i must confess i don't think i've seen any of them looking at the list. how does this work—out? there was a one called big night where he played a restaurant owner with his brother played by tony shalhoub. stanley tucci doesn't pop up in this film, although tony shalhoub, who played his brother, does, again playing a brother interestingly, of alberto giacometti, playing diego giacometti. this is a story that i didn't know and a story that stanley tucci, strolling along in paris 25 years ago in one of the bouquinistes along the seine, and picked up this memoir of this american writer called
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james lord, who'd sat for giacometti in his final days in paris. this is what the story is based on. james lord himself, it's his memoir, and played by actor armie hammer, who is the very patient subject of giacometti, who, if you know his work, and there is an exhibition currently at the tate, i do urge you to see that, it does

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