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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  August 21, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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big ben chimes 157 years old, it has been training on the hour since the 11th ofjuly
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1859 and in one hour's time, now slightly less than one hour, we bring you the final time big ben will chime on a daily basis, it will come back for remembrance sunday and new year's eve and the like, but on a daily basis the final time it chimes for possibly as many as four mac years as they start undertaking repairs. that is at the palace of westminster. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11.00. the hunt for the driver suspected of killing 13 people in last week's attack in barcelona is extended across europe. ten american sailors are missing after a us destroyer and an oil tanker collided, in seas to the east of singapore. rescue teams from three countries are searching for survivors. the ship did sustain some serious damage on the port side, including to the areas of the crew's sleeping
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quarters and some communications equipment also damaged. also, hate crimes committed online should be treated as seriously as offences carried out face to face. that's according to new guidelines for prosecutors in england and wales, encouraging them to seek tougher penalties for abuse on social media. this was issued by the crown prosecution service. more people will die from fires started by faulty white goods if ministers do not act to implement safety guidelines, safety groups say. good morning. it's monday 212017. welcome to bbc newsroom live. spanish police are exploring a possible link between thursday's attacks in spain and assaults by so—called islamic state in brussels last year.
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authorities believe the imam, abdelbaki es satty, may have radicalised younger members of the cell, which carried out the las ramblas and cambrils atrocities. they're also investigating whether he was involved in the bombings at brussels airport and a metro station in the city, which killed 32 people. mark lobel reports. dean while, the search for younes abouyaaquoub, —— meanwhile, the search for younes abouyaaquoub has been extended right across europe. the suspected mastermind of the barcelona and cambrils attacks, abdelbaki es satty, is the imam of this mosque in ripoll, in north—western spain. he is being blamed by his father of two of the attackers for radicalising his sons. translation: he took these young, impressionable minds, messed around with their brains, and now they're dead. the imam is believed to have been killed in an accidental
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explosion at a bomb factory, south of barcelona, a day before the attacks there. police are now investigating his movements across europe prior to last week's attacks. according to the mayor of the belgian town of vilvoorde, he was there betweenjanuary and march last year, right before the deadly attacks on the maalbeek metro station and the brussels airport. 32 people were killed in those attacks. it is being reported that the audi used in the attack was caught on camera earlier in paris, and one of the members of the cell visited zurich last year. police believe the suspected driver of last week's van attack may have escaped to france, and are now probing the attackers‘ links across europe. 14 1a victims have been identified from
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seven countries. 0ur europe correspondent gavin lee is in barcelona. and a lot of lines coming out this morning, a press conference in a short while as well, but the most urgent is focusing presumably on the hunt for younes abouyaaquoub on the run? yes, and to clarify it is not known... there is no reason to believe he is in france or that he has left the wider region where he was moving from around catalonia. what the police have said and repeated over the weekend and in the past have an hour is that the movement of him, they lose him two hours after the attack and he has not been seen since. in a nutshell, 12 people behind this terror cell, based in a house 120 kilometres south of here, an explosion on wednesday and it is believed the
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person organising this, abdelbaki es satty, was killed in that explosion, essentially accidentally killed himself, until the other 11 attackers sprang into action. according to the police they were trying to set of three different vehicle bomb attacks on what happened, the police confirming in the past hour today, the chief suspect on the run, younes abouyaaquoub, is also the man who drove the vehicle. cctv footage has emerged as well today and leaving just behind on las ramblas, going past a famous market, trying to get away. police are looking at the lane that he walked for an hour and a half and stabbed and killed a driver and took his car and fled. batman, a 34—year—old man, —— that man, a 34—year—old man, —— that man, a 34—year—old man, —— that man, a 34—year—old man named peres, they are trying to see whether this part was part of the attack and it so the death toll rises to 15. but we expect another conference.
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has anybody answered the question as to whether the spanish authorities had a massive feeling of intelligence after that gas explosion last wednesday? yes, it is being asked in spanish media. there are steps we can look at to analyse what possible accountability spain has. in 2007 first, way before the round of european attacks in berlin and brussels and paris and nice, was a warning from the american authorities to say they believed, this is what americans have said, that particularly in the catalonia region, some of the places had jihadists activity they were concerned about. it is claimed in american media that the spanish had ignored this. this is something becoming an issue today, and secondly, as to whether they could have prevented something in las ramblas itself, because after the paris attacks in november 2015, there was a discussion between the spanish government in madrid and the cata la n
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spanish government in madrid and the catalan government for protective street barriers to prevent that. but they thought it would ruin the spirit of catalan, so they did not do that. earlier we were hearing they will not install street furniture in the future, but will have police on the scene. they say you cannot shield the place for attacks and must carry on life as normal in the midst of this madness. with people in barcelona in the region... somebody i spoke to last week said this was an attack on a tourist area. mostly tourists were caught up in it. it perhaps people who live in barcelona a little bit of time to realise the magnitude of what had happened. do you get any sense of how people are feeling now? you know the red this because you we re you know the red this because you were there with me in paris after the attacks at the bataclan and in nice as well. you can see how busy this place with tourists and people just getting on. but it is brightening. 0ver just getting on. but it is brightening. over the weekend there was a noise and many people fled
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from las ramblas in thousands because they were worried because they had heard a noise, is it that man who had a —— is it that man on the run? north appeared there were helicopters. it may come to nothing but people are on edge. a separate incident with apparent reports of a bus crash in marseille. people are aware of it here, while this manhunt continues. thank you, a reporter in barcelona. as you mention, a press conference coming up and we will bring news of that. at least one person has been killed and one person is injured in the french city of marseille, after a car crashed into two bus shelters. police say the driver has been arrested, but did not say whether the incident was being treated as a terror attack or an accident. the suspect in last week's stabbing attack in finland that left two people dead and eight injured has been identified in court documents as 18—year—old abderrahman mechkah. police described the man as an asylum seeker from morocco
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who had "deliberately targeted women" in a stabbing spree on a market square in the south—western town of turku. the attack is being investigated as the country's first terror incident. rescue teams from malaysia, singapore and the united states are searching for ten missing us sailors, after a collision between an american destroyer and an oil tanker. the uss mccain collided with a merchant vesseljust before dawn to the east of singapore. its hull was damaged and compartments flooded. the tanker sustained damage near the front of the ship, but none of its crew were injured and there were no oil spills. the uss mccain collision marks the latest in a number of incidents involving a us navy warship in the past year. in august last year, a nuclear ballistic—missile submarine, and a military support vessel collided while conducting routine operations in the strait of
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juan de fuca off the coast of washington state. in january this year, the guided—missile cruiser uss antietam ran aground while trying to anchor in tokyo bay. on may 9th, the guided—missile cruiser uss lake champlain was struck by a small fishing boat off the korean peninsula. and onjune 17, the uss fitzgerald collided with a container ship off the coast of japan. that collision resulted in the deaths of seven us sailors. the u theuss the u s sjohn s mccain has arrived ata the u s sjohn s mccain has arrived at a naval base in singapore are now to be assessed for damage. 0ur correspondent is on board a vote near there. the collision occurred in the early hours of monday morning between the us warship thejohn s mccain and a commercial tanker, a much larger oil and chemical tanker. now, you can see the us warship, thejohn s mccain, is docked over there at the changi naval base here in singapore. it came to true that area just about an hour or so ago
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and what we understand, what we saw earlier, i should say, is that there was a crane on top of the us warship, presumably to carry out some repairs. there were some sailors that were also on the deck at the time. what the us navy's public affairs department has been able to tell us is that the ship did sustain some serious damage on the port side, including to the areas of the crew's sleeping quarters and some communications equipment were also damaged. it's not clear how this collision happened, however, but it took place out there, hundreds of miles away, in one of the world's busiest shipping lanes, in the straits of malacca. a quarter of the world's trade goes through those straits and it is very congested. there is heavy traffic they are all the time. now, this collision occurred in the early hours of the morning, as i was saying, so it was still dark, but there is no indication that there was any bad weather at play.
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there is no clear indication as to what caused this collision between the us warship and the oil and chemical tanker. singapore authorities have been able to tell us that there is no sign of any oil spilled out into the waters, but ten american sailors are still missing, and there is a massive search and rescue operation under way that involves notjust the americans but also the singaporeans and the malaysians, and some real questions are likely to be asked aboutjust how this could happen so soon after and other accident back in june, when another us warship collided with a merchant vessel which led to the loss of seven american sailors‘ lives. many concerns here aboutjust how effective the world's most powerful navy is in this part of the world. 0ur reporter reporting. you have to feel for her camera crew trying to move around on a boat.
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prosecutors in england and wales are being told to treat online hate crimes as seriously as those committed face—to—face. the crown prosecution service says it will seek tougher penalties for abuse on social media, which it says could lead to the type of extremist violence seen in charlottesville in the united states. these include offences against bisexual people for the first time. rhodri colwyn philipps, the fourth viscount st davids, jailed last month for racially aggravated threats on facebook against gina miller, the businesswoman behind the brexit legal challenge. she said she felt violated by his shocking comments, just one of many online attacks she suffered. now, the crown prosecution service says these kinds of crimes must be dealt with as robustly as offences on the street. it is promising a tougher response, to build public confidence. there were more than 15,000 hate crime prosecutions in 2015—2016, the highest number ever, and a third of those convicted saw their sentence increased. but the number of cases referred by police to persecutors fell
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by almost 10%, a drop the cps says it is investigating. with the explosion in the use of social media over the last few years, it is very important that the prosecuting authorities, the cps, the police, are as up to date as possible in making sure that they're using the law to its fullest extent. there's no hiding place for these perpetrators. the law is clear, and if you persist in this sort of behaviour, you'll be detected, caught and punished. some critics say that police and prosecutors moved too slowly to apprehend online abusers, and that means people are reluctant to come forward. but the cps hopes its new guidance will create the best possible chance of achieving justice for all victims. dominic casciani, bbc news. to get more on this story, i'm joined from our salford studio by rose simkins, the chief executive of the charity stop hate uk, which supports
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victims of hate crimes. thank you forjoining us. presumably you welcome what the cps is saying this morning. absolutely. people need to know that crime is being committed and there is no hiding place. for too long people have thought they could just get away with things and are in their own home and can say they like. what but it is a public place, the internet, so why wouldn't you be prosecuted if you break a law? and the damage that is caused by the abuse online, and threatening behaviour, the killing as though you are being stalked or harassed —— feeling as though you are being stalked or harassed is not good. we do understand what can be prosecuted. police need to be clearer as to this being a crime, anything in the past people have been able to get away with it
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because of lack of understanding. how to find the perpetrators... and being on social media is something thatis being on social media is something that is so normal and for us now, we wa nt to that is so normal and for us now, we want to be safe on there. so things are changing and this is really welcome. you mentioned lack of understanding by the police the past. has there perhaps been also a lack of understanding from people on social media that they might be considered victims? that this is something they could report? absolutely. most hate crime goes unreported, and at stop hate uk a lot of our work is trying to get people to report. most hate crime goes unreported online. people think they have to put up with this and don't realise that the social media companies... twitter and facebook are really... they have improved how they deal with things. so there are different things we can do. to try to get things down or see whether a crime has been committed and someone needs to be prosecuted. so we
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encourage people to report all those incidents, and organisations like stop hate uk and the areas we are funded to work in, we can help with that. and to actually help people be safer and help gather that evidence, and to know how to present things to the police, so that we can end in prosecutions where appropriate. it interesting you say that some of the social media companies are doing more now to help. presumably you would argue, even more could be done. when you think that they have begun to change what they do, how they try to stamp this out online. absolutely, there has been a significant change in the last 12 months, and i have heard both twitter and facebook talk about their responsibilities. and how they are looking at making reporting easier and encouraging that reporting, and how they consider when they can take things down. there are a lot of things which have a long way to go, but some of the
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social media platforms aren't even in that discussion. so there is a lot of criticism of twitter and facebook, but at least they are at that table and they are talking to us, and they are appreciating the harm that is being caused. and they are beginning to recognise that laws are beginning to recognise that laws are broken and people don't have the right to say what ever they want in the uk, any more than they would on the uk, any more than they would on the street. we have offences such as public order that can be used on the street, so you are not safe when you are sitting in your front room or your bedroom to do what ever you want. people need to realise that. thank you, representative from stop hate uk, for joining thank you, representative from stop hate uk, forjoining us, and we will be having one of the more high—profile victims of hate crime here on the programme injust high—profile victims of hate crime here on the programme in just about an hour's time. military exercises, by south korean and american armed forces, are going ahead despite protests from north korea. the drills are conducted every year to prepare for an attack by the communist dictatorship. the latest come amid heightened tensions following an exchange of threats between
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pyongyang and washington. the united nations says 111,000 people have fled from the iraqi city of tal afar, where government forces have launched a major offensive against so—called islamic state. about 2000 militants remain in the city which has been bombed by us and iraqi warplanes. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the hunt for 22—year—old moroccan younes abouyaaquoub, the driver suspected of killing 13 people in last week's attack in barcelona, is extended across europe. ten american sailors missing after a us destroyer and an oil tanker collided in seas to the east of singapore, and rescue teams from three countries search for survivors. hate crimes committed online should be treated as seriously as offences carried out face—to—face, according to new cps
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guidelines per persecutors in england and wales. and in sport, antonio contact is warning that other clubs will be inspired to play tottenham at wembley. they are using the national stadium at their home ground this season but lost 2—1 to chelsea yesterday. mo farah ended his british track career with victory in the 3000 metres at birmingham. he is switching to a road racing. 0ne birmingham. he is switching to a road racing. one person wants to play in the 2019 ashes in australia. the 30 when moved ahead sir ian botham's scorer in infant's first test lashing. more about edgbaston. i will have more just after 11:30am. big ben will fall silent this lunchtime — and won't sound again until 2021. it's part of a major refurbishment of the houses of parliament, which could see the bells muted for longest period in their history. some mps have criticised the silencing of the
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bells as unnecessary. emma vardy reports. big ben chimes since 1859, big ben has chimed through the reign of six monarchs and two world wars, with only a handful of interruptions. however, parliament says the bell now needs to be disconnected for the safety of construction workers during major renovation work. but the plan to silence big ben has caused, well, rather a ding—dong. there has been a backlash from the public and politicians. the prime minister, theresa may, says she has asked the speaker of the commons to look into the matter urgently, to see whether big ben could continue to be heard. for now, big ben is due to be silenced until 2021, except for special occasions, such as new year's eve and remembrance day. people are invited to gather in parliament square to hear the final bongs at noon, before the great bell is taken out of action.
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and as we have been telling you, at midday we will be taking you those last regular bongs for some while. the london fire brigade, the mayor of london and safety groups have warned that more people will die from fires started by faulty white goods, if the government doesn't implement guidelines, made more than a year ago. they've sent a letter to theresa may in response to the grenfell tower fire, which it's thought was started in a fridge—freezer. it warns some products are still being sold with a flammable plastic backing. the latter also refer to a fire in august 2016 in shepherd's bush which began ina august 2016 in shepherd's bush which began in a tumble dryer. let's talk to robert chantry—price, the lead officer for product safety at the chartered institute for trading standards. good morning.
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hello. this is a problem, obviously, we have known about for some time, over a year. how serious a problem is it? it isa is it? it is a serious problem when something goes wrong, obviously. the big problem has been with bridges and fridge freezers with a plastic backing rather than a metal backing. if they can to catch fire, and it is only occasionally do, the older ones that do, then the fire can spread quickly. with a metal backing to the product, the fire is less likely to spread and be severe. this letter that has now been sent from various authorities in london, stressing the need for the government to get moving on this, is that something you would echo? definitely. anything that will improve product safety is to be applauded. why the delay? there are certain structural reasons but i am disappointed that the government has been so slow to act
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on this, when london fire brigade have known for quite some time that particularly french freezers and fridges have been susceptible to fire. —— particularly french freezers. it can be devastating in the kitchen and knock on, like at g re nfell tower, the kitchen and knock on, like at grenfell tower, which can be a serious buyer. and the fact that these white goods, there will be those that are in people's homes across the country at the moment. i wonder what your advice would be to them, she said at the beginning, you don't... them, she said at the beginning, you don't. .. it's them, she said at the beginning, you don't... it's not them, she said at the beginning, you don't. .. it's not bad them, she said at the beginning, you don't... it's not bad until something bad happens, but what could happen could be catastrophic. yes. the first thing is, if you're buying a new fridge or fridge—freezer, by one with a metal back rather than a plastic or full back, because that will minimise the chances of a serious buyer. the other thing is to have a look at your fridge—freezer and check there are not any hotspot at the back. what does that mean? be precise. it isa what does that mean? be precise. it is a matter of the running your hand over it and seeing if anything
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is warm and likely to get hot. if it is warm and likely to get hot. if it is getting hot you should discontinue using the product. the other thing is, move it away from anything likely to be flammable, particularly things like curtains or drapes or anything that is in close proximity to the fridge—freezer, that if there was a fire, it would immediately accelerate the process. at home we have a fridge—freezer and yes, it has a plastic back, but we haveit yes, it has a plastic back, but we have it six inches away from some curtains, which are flame retardant. it isa curtains, which are flame retardant. it is a matter of trying to take sensible precautions. it won't guarantee you won't have a problem but minimises the risk. that is like good advice. thank you, robert. a pleasure. here's a very good example of why not to use a mobile phone while on the move. look what happened when a sinkhole opened up at this crossing in china without warning. a scooter driver who was on his mobile didn't realise — and drove straight in. amazingly he walked away unharmed. just take a look at that. you can
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actually see the smartphone in his hand, there is a globe from it. astonishing. very lucky indeed. now let's take a look at the weather. we have not been lucky with the weather so far this august. it has been pretty dreadful, and while over the next few days it will warm up, it is not going to be necessarily sunny. this morning we had a lot of cloud and mist and fog in folkestone. cloud as you can see, fabrics of rain as well. some areas poking out in sunshine, the north—east of england in north—eastern part of scotland have sunny spells. this is hartlepool at the moment, enjoying the sunshine. that will last for much longer, because this warm front moving its way north were, it will slowly introduce more cloud into northern areas, but behind this warm front we have tropical are coming in from the
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south, making it feel humid and muggy. lots of cloud, but there will be some holes in that car developing, and we get holes in the cloud temperatures could get up 22 oi’ cloud temperatures could get up 22 or 2a celsius, but particularly average is around 18 or 21 celsius usually. into north wales and north—west england, some heavy rain here this afternoon, and that spread into the south west of scotland as well. in the north—east of scotland, there will be sunny spells and tempered as here, 1a or 16 celsius. in america, they have the total solar eclipse later this afternoon. for us in the uk we will get a partial solar eclipse, about 10% of the sun will be covered by the moon. looking towards the bottom left—hand side of the sun, safely with those glasses, to see it. some clear skies here and there but for many of us it is pretty cloudy, around 8pm this evening when there might be a chance to see that. for the rest of the night, staying cloudy and misty and murky conditions, temperatures
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around 1516 celsius, and to tuesday, this warm front moves northwards. more of us under the influence of this warm sector, the tropical are coming from the south. a lot of cloud again, some outbreaks of rain, particularly in northern ireland, western scotland, some cloud breaking up, though, and that is where temperatures can reach 25 a26 celsius, the warm are not reaching that far north—eastern of scotland. then, from midweek, the warm air will slowly be pushed away, so from wednesday onwards, this cold front moving in from the west. that introduces fresher conditions behind that. we noticed the change to the end of the week. the humidity starts to disappear and the temperature will drop. still some sunny spells, one 01’ will drop. still some sunny spells, one or two will drop. still some sunny spells, one 01’ two showers will drop. still some sunny spells, one or two showers around, but on wednesday and thursday, a look at the temperatures, between 17 and 20 celsius. see you later. bye—bye. this is bbc newsroom. the headlines:
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the hunt for the driver suspected of killing 13 people in last week's attack in barcelona has been extended across europe, catalan officials say. authorities earlier said they could not rule out the possibility that he had slipped across the border to france. ten us navy sailors are missing and five have been injured after a us destroyer and an oil tanker collided near singapore. us military helicopters as well as the singaporean and malaysian navies and coast guards are currently conducting search and rescue operations. 0nline hate crimes should be treated as seriously as abuse committed face—to—face, prosecutors in england and wales have been told. more people will die from fires started by faulty white goods if ministers do not act to implement safety guidelines. that's according to
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the london fire brigade, the city's mayor and safety groups. let's catch up with all this board. -- all let's catch up with all this board. —— all the sport. chelsea manager antonio conte is warning tottenham other clubs will relish the atmosphere at wembley. marcos alonso scored twice as the blues beat spurs 2—1 in their first league game at the national stadium. spurs have won only two of the 11 games they've played at wembley since it was re—opened in 2007. conte says the atmosphere is great for visiting teams. but the tottenham manager insists his players can cope. it doesn't affect me. i know that eve ryo ne it doesn't affect me. i know that everyone needs a job. today i think
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it is not the reason, i think the tea m it is not the reason, i think the team played really well and does not fear to blame wembley because wembley is one of the best places in the world to play football for me. neymar showed paris st germain just what they're getting for £200 million. playing in his first home game since leaving barcelona, the brazilian put together a dazzling showcase of his talents. in addition to his two goals neymar set up two more and won a penalty as ten—man psg thrashed toulouse 6—2. neymar has already scored three goals in two league games. zlatan ibrahimovic has been showing offjust how strong his knee is. almost strong enough to return to football maybe — by posting a video of himself kicking a punching bag. he posted the pic with the words "which knee?". the 35—year—old suffered knee—ligament damage in his first season at manchester united. he remains out of contract and without a club but is still
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wanted byjose mourinho if he can get back to full fitness. former england manager steve mclaren has been appointed coaching consultant to israeli club maccabi tel aviv. the 56—year—old's most recentjob was a second ill—fated stint as manager of derby county, from which he was sacked in march after a poor run. stuart broad says he wants to play in the 2019 ashes against australia, after passing sir ian botham on the list of england's all—time test wicket—takers. the 31—year—old bowler moved ahead of botham's 383 wickets in the first—test thrashing of the west indies at edgbaston. he is second only to team—mate james anderson, who has a92 wickets. andy murray's reign at the top of tennis is over, after rafael nadal returned to the world number one spot for the first time in three years today. the spaniard said it was "unbelievable" to be tennis's top ranked rank man again, having first achieved
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the feat nine years ago. it's been a great year for nadal, who won his 15th grand slam title at the french open injune and also reached the australian 0pen final in january. mo farah's glittering track career will come to an end over 5,000m at the diamond league final in zurich on thursday. yesterday he won his last ever track race in britain with victory in the men's 3,000 metres at the birmingham diamond league meeting. the 3a—year—old is turning his attention to marathon running but has yet to announce exactly when he'll be hitting the road... this difficult it is difficult to predict how much wear and tear there is the system when that will have a negative effect on performance. i think one of the great things at the moment it is both physically and psychologically robust. hopefully that resilience psychologically, emotionally and physically will
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continue and if it does i can see why he can't have an excellent marathon career. that's all sport for now. britney you up—to—date with one of the investigations that the victoria derbyshire programme was investigating. an investigation by the victoria derbyshire programme has found scammers are increasingly taking advantage of the good will of people looking to make donations to help in the aftermath of major tragedies. the uk's fraud reporting centre — action fraud — has highlighted examples of fake fund—raising websites set up in the aftermath of the grenfell tower fire that they've managed to take down. but the investigation also found examples of organisations, which look like charities but aren't, raising money on the street. so how can people be sure that money donated is going to legitimate causes? sure that money donated sean dilley reports: sure that money donated with more than 200,000 registered charities in the uk,
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you're not going to struggle to find a good cause to donate your hard—earned cash to. last year, the british public donated around £10 billion to good causes. so how can we be sure that the money we give on the street or online is actually going to the causes we want to support? 0h, right? superman here is salim sayed, or super si. he is raising money for something called the happiness foundation, which claims it buys mobility scooters for local people. that sounds great, but it might not be the case. this happiness foundation is not a registered company or charity. fundraising like this is not illegal, but it makes it very hard to check that they do what they claim. 0nline, a number of people have raised concerns about this happiness foundation. there was two complaints in 201a on the happiness foundation facebook page. and this has been a problem for a not—for—profit company also called the happiness foundation. we were presenting to football's governing bodies, and i felt embarrassed. why should i be embarrassed?
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i haven't done anything wrong. but i felt embarrassed because i knew that if they did a search, perhaps that would come up. we tried to talk to salim sayed, but he hasn't responded to our messages. we did manage to track down one of the men behind the happiness foundation, marcus leavsley. he told us they weren't pretending to be kath temple's happiness foundation, and they do provide mobility scooters for disabled people — though he wouldn't show us any evidence for this. hello, is marcus leavsley around, please? thank you. door slams. are you there, mr leavsley? i've spoken to a man who admits he used to steal money from charity collections. we'll call him steve. he worked for companies that raised money for armed forces charities through bucket collections and competition ticket sales. but a big chunk of the cash ended up in his and his colleagues' pockets. the term was a brucie bonus.
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was that a one—off, or was this more widespread? pretty much. i would say a good 80% of us were doing it. did you not feel that you were taking advantage of the public‘s generosity? yes, at times. i mean, it was. solicitor robert craig is a specialist in charity law. he says the public need to take a careful look before donating to apparently good causes. i don't think you can expect the police to do much more than deal with very obvious cases. it's to do with, what's the public interest in pursuing it? and how likely are they to get a conviction? there were more than 800 reports to action fraud about suspected charity scams in the last year. some of them were trying to profit from recent disasters. a very recent example, and a very tragic example, would be websites and just giving pages being set up in support of the grenfell tower incident. we set up a process where we could monitor any new websites that were being set up with a link to grenfell tower.
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on the first day we set up the process, one that we did establish was a fraudulent website, we managed to get that website taken down on the same day and the bank account blocked. so, how do we avoid being duped by fake charities? the regulator, the charity commission, has this advice... check that street fundraisers have a charity registration number. that they are happy to give further information when asked. and when donating online, avoid requests to give cash via money transfer companies. this is a common scam. the vast majority of fundraising is legitimate. but we found grey areas where it's all but impossible to check where your money ends up. and there are scammers that are prepared to go to ever more sophisticated lengths to snatch money from those who most need it. with authorities' resources stretched, it increasingly falls to us to make sure that our cash is going where we want it to. as we've been hearing, big ben, and the other bells
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in the elizabeth tower of the houses of parliament, will ring out at noon — the last time the sound will be heard for four years. they will be using it for special occasions but nothing more? that is what we are told. it will be taken out of action for the longest period in its 150 year history. to sound at noon today will be a moment and quite some crowd that has gathered here to hear it. i'm joined byjames manning from time out magazine. what will this mean for visitors? the funny thing is is it is not the bells at the problem. they can't actually go about big ben if you order to dust. the thing —— if you are to dust. —— if you are a
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tourist. scaffolding will make main difference if you are a tourist. i don't think you will see any drop in visitor numbers. there was considerable controversy last week when this was first announced and a lot of mps were very upset and was quite backlash. what do you make of that reaction? i think it is definitely sad it will not be sewn into the next few years and i'm a londoner and i grew up with its own. i think for people it has a symbolic value. it has to do with freedom and for world war ii. i think i was up there last week and talking to some of the clock engineers and it is in need of an overhaul. every data is
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all open to the area so the water can get in and the elements can get in. ithink can get in and the elements can get in. i think it is very important it does get sadness deliberately as pa rt does get sadness deliberately as part of scheduled works rather than conking out in 15 years' time which should be much more of a symbol of british ignominy than taking it out of action deliberately. the elizabeth tower as it is commonly called is the most photographed building in the uk. i do think that is such a draw? it is everywhere. it is such a draw? it is everywhere. it is what everybody sticks of visually when they think of london. that'll be the image is that millions of people round the world have of london. they don't know about any of the other things and anything that's more than 150 years old. it is all about the victorian heritage. ideally we would like to keep it that way, i would think. do people maybe who've booked holidays from
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america that they will not get to hear the clock? you think the news has got out? probably they will know that but what they will actually see is something much greater which is the sight of big ben under scaffolding. i've seen a few photographs from 1985 and 92 when it was last covered up and this interest to see the photos because they really marker moment in time so i think will likely be quite interesting to have this four—year period when it will be under wraps and silent and it is a bit of a historical moment in itself. if this plan does go ahead for it to be silenced forfour years, plan does go ahead for it to be silenced for four years, that is of course, apart from special occasions like remembrance day and new year's eve. when those bells chime at noon today we can expect them perhaps the next time to be the 11th of november at remembrance day when we will next year. there they go. that is the quarter hour you're hearing now. the second to last time we will hear
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them today. we are of course as you would expect heading back to you in a0 minutes time. —— 1a minutes time. we can hear those bowls for the last time as they go out regularly. —— bongs. we can see what the reaction is from mps and others to that. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first — the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the hunt for 22—year—old moroccan , younes abouyaaqoub — the driver suspected of killing 13 people in last week's attack in barcelona — is extended across europe. ten american sailors are missing after a us destroyer and an oil tanker collided, in seas to the east of singapore. rescue teams from three countries are searching for survivors. hate crimes committed online should be treated as seriously as offences carried out face to face, according to new cps guidelines for prosecutors in england and wales.
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in the business news, chinese car giant great wall motor says it's interested in buying some or all of american car giant fiat chrysler. it's asked for further talks with chrysler — after the two sides reportedly met to discuss the sale of its jeep brand. shares in fiat chrysler jumped 3.5% on the news. more on that shortly. we spent even more on credit and debit cards this year with the number of transactions up by 12% in the year to the end ofjune. that's the highest annual rate since 2008. lenders are facing tough new rules to prove to regulators that they are not lending recklessly but critics have warned that the lending boom bears many of the hallmarks of the financial crisis which hit in 2009. more than 100 leading robotics experts are urging the united nations to take action in order to prevent the development of "killer robots".
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in a letter to the organisation, artificial intelligence leaders, including the billionaire elon musk, have warned of "a third revolution in warfare". could the italian american car giant fiat chrysler soon have a new owner. a chinese one? the chinese carmaker great wall motors says it's interested in buying fiat chrysler — the world's seventh—largest car maker. it follows reports that the two sides met to discuss the sale of chrysler'sjeep brand. jeep, which celebrated its 75th birthday last year, is considered the most saleable brand and is one of the most ‘all—american' names in car making. shares in fiat chryslerjumped 3.5% in milan on the news. but president trump has criticised similar deals in the past and vowed to bring more manufacturing jobs, including car making back
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to the united states. so what will he make of the news? this is another thing he will want to try and protect. it is about the headline, not necessarily fit into of the deal. it is a psychological aspect. chrysler, you look at all the cars and the emotion behind the brand within the usa. trump made the fa ct brand within the usa. trump made the fact all dismissed that because he does not want to see the chinese ticking over such a large part of americana. with brexit trade is the thing. businesses trying to move money around the world. that will be the major dominator of global
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business moving forward. —— delineator. most businesses have no strategy for dealing with a cyber attack. we are bringing in new laws to fine companies that do not take a cyber security seriously. for good business reasons we want them to be able to use that data in a flexible and innovative way of the need to keep it secure and this report shows that has been progress but there's
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more to be done by uk businesses and charities. the man in charge of negotiating the uk's trade deals once brexit is finalised, starts his job this week. crawford falconer will take up the post of chief trade negotiation adviser at the department for international trade. leaving the single market would mean the uk has to establish new bilateral trade agreements, but cannot formally do so until after brexit. the average pay packet for ftse100 bosses in the uk has fallen by nearly 20% over the past year. deloitte says the figure fell to $a.5m from $5.5m. the accountancy firm says it appears that policies which were introduced to limit bosses' pay appear to be working. owners of electric cars are unlikely to be able to rapidly charge their vehicles at home at the same time as boiling a kettle, according to a warning by national grid. it says using a powerful and fast electric car charger at home will trip a main fuse if vehicle
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owners are also using other "high demand" items, like kettles, ovens and heaters. a quick look at the markets and see what is happening over the course of the morning. the talks between fiat chrysler and great war mortars at a very early stage between midnight. there's not a lot of moving in the markets. —— great wall motors. the markets keeping an eye and president trump and if he can get any ‘s policies
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through with all the turmoil in the west wing. psychiatric problems, we are told, drove into a bus shelter, he was driving a white renault van. it was in an industrial park area and he injured woman there and drove off around the periphery around the ring road of marseille to another district and drove into another cred of people at a bus stop there and in this case killed —year—old woman. it
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then, it seems he drove towards the centre of marseille. as you may know it is built around the old port and where there are many tourists. at this point he was stopped and the registration plate had been recorded and the police were on this case. the car was spotted driving down one of the main roads towards the old sport and the car was stopped by police and he was arrested. initially, of course, everything suggested because of the modus operandi, that this was a copycat terrorist act by a man who had perhaps been influenced out what happened in barcelona and other attacks with people and drove them into a crowd. —— with people of drove them into a crowd. —— have driven. we have had the man has
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psychological problems. we should probably not rush to draw too many conclusions and rushed to say this is terrorism. maybe we shouldn't rush in the other direction to rule out completely some sort of influence and this man's mental make—up by what has happened in barcelona and elsewhere. certainly seems to be no evidence of a network behind all of this but whether on whatever personaljourney of his own he has been influenced by what has gone on in barcelona, we do not know. kent police have arrested a man believed to have been on the run for 22 years after he absconded from sudburyjail in 22 years after he absconded from sudbury jail in derbyshire. 22 years after he absconded from sudburyjail in derbyshire. he was sentenced for drug offences over two decades ago when 1995 with 18 months of his sentence to go the field to return to the prison after being
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released on a temporary licence. he is charged with escaping from unlawful custody. the united states will experience a coast to coast total solar eclipse for the first time in almost a century later today. the path of totality",when total darkness falls, will hit 1a american states, starting in oregon. the eclipse will be viewable all the way to south carolina, on the atlantic coast. our reporter nada tawfik sent this piece from hopkinsville in kentucky, which will experience the fullest eclipse. eclipse—mania has arrived, and in the small town of hopkinsville, kentucky, this is the largest party they have ever thrown. officially eclipseville for the big day, here is where the best of the darkness will be, and locals are over the moon. nobody now has two ever ask again
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where is hopkinsville? it is a fantastic atmosphere. i love it. it's bringing out the best in everybody, and everybody's together, and i love it. to deal with the overwhelming preparations, this quiet community of 30,000 appointed a special solar eclipse co—ordinator, and mayor carter hendricks says this has been years in the making. about ten years ago, we got a phone call from a scientist asking about the eclipse, and if they could book hotel rooms. that was the first we'd heard of it. with its expansive farmland this is the perfect location to host visitors from around the world. the moment of totality will last two minutes and a0 seconds, here, but the memory will leave a permanent mark on this rural community. big ben is to fall silent in just a few minutes' time — at noon — to allow construction workers
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to carry out extensive repairs. it won't chime again regularly until 2021. let's cross over to westminster, where our political correspondent, emma vardy, is outside parliament. i have many other people turned up? there are crowds behind me and that crowd stretching right up to the other end of parliament square. it looks like lots of tourists and lots of people who looked like they have come out of the office just too much this at this moment. it will be quite a moment because the chimes of big ben are a big part of life here in westminster and a very famous pa rt in westminster and a very famous part of life in london and internationally, of course. this is the most photographed building in the most photographed building in the uk and for anybody who walks past that, quite often like myself and other colleagues, you usually have to fight your way through a lot of self we outside this building. in its 150 year history the chimes of
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big ben had been taken out a handful of times but for them to be silenced forfour of times but for them to be silenced for four years, that'll be the longest period they would stopped chiming in that 150 year history. so there was quite some controversy when this announced last week. quite a backlash with mps and the public saying is this really necessary? we would also told it was actually signed off by three parliamentary committees and the suggestion is that mps didn't quite realise it was going to mean it will be silenced forfour going to mean it will be silenced for four years. let's not forget it will still chime on special occasions like new year's eve and remembrance sunday but apart from that as the bandstand at the moment when those bells chime at noon today that will be the last time he will hear them for a little while. 157 yea rs hear them for a little while. 157 years old. the first time we had the bell strike was on the 11th ofjuly
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18 59. the quarter bells which we had just 50 minutes ago first child on the 7th of september but never before has big ben fallen silent for so long, not during war or during previous repairs. we will let you listen to the entirety of this last mid—day chime for some time. big ben chimes
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the city, out across london. and we can't see the bell now, which is going to be part of the restoration process. the restoration process is not just focusing on process. the restoration process is notjust focusing on the tower but also the houses of parliament. some people up there, looks like they do not need ear defenders. that is part of the reason why the bells are going to fall silent for the majority of the next four years, because the workers working on the restoration, both of the clock itself, the clock mechanism, and the tower, they would not, it was thought, be safe enough if those bells were sending out on the hour. parliamentary authorities also point out there was no way they could just finish work at 530 and then get them
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going again at six, it takes so long to get the mechanism up and running again. emma, it is not as if that pa rt again. emma, it is not as if that part of london will have fallen silent at that moment. but how did it feel down their? many people stood very quietly as big ben rang out. there were phones held aloft, filming the moment, by many people. and then, when the final bong sounded, there was a round of applause, which rippled across the parliament square, and now people are starting to go back about their day once again. i am joined here by people from washington. what made you come down to witness this moment? we are on vacation from virginia, and we heard that the final bong was going to take place today, so we came on down to parliament square. what you make of the fact that this iconic landmark will fall silent? it is... it is appropriate but it is
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also sad time that it is quick to be done because it is one of the symbols of the country. will it put people off coming here, not to hear big ben? there is more to see here thanjust the bongs big ben but it will be missed. why is it such a big draw for tourists? it is almost in the centre of the city, one of the symbols of the city, one of the symbols of the city, along with westminster. what make of the atmosphere as it rang out for a final time? it felt quite significant, didn't it? i was not sure how people would react. it was very quiet so everyone could hear the final bongs, and then everyone breaks out in cheers, charming. since the news was announced last week there has been a backlash from some newspapers and mps and elected politicians and the public, so what do you make of the reaction british people have had ? do you make of the reaction british people have had? i be disappointed and upset this will happen?
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i was surprised that apparently they did not realise how long it was going to be silent, and we were also a little bit surprised that the committees that decided this had been shut down before the election, because that is not the way it operates in the us. so it was a bit funny to hear that they did not really realise what they were approving. and it is better than the news we get in the usa. thank you very much forjoining us. you witness the moment. and there it is, it sounded for the final time. we expect we will next to them on remembrance day in november. thank you, mr, down at westminster. thank you, mr, down at westminster. thank you, mr, down at westminster. thank you very much indeed. rather soothing looking at this. perhaps we should do that more often. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at midday. the hunt for the driver suspected of killing 13 people in last week's attack in barcelona
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is extended across europe. ten american sailors are missing, and five are injured, after a us destroyer and an oil tanker collided, in seas to the east of singapore. rescue teams from three countries are searching for survivors. the ship did sustain some serious damage on the port side, including to the areas of the crew's sleeping quarters, and some communications equipment was also damaged. also, hate crimes committed online should be treated as seriously as offences carried out face to face. that's according to the crown prosecution service, which has issued new guidelines for prosecutors in england and wales encouraging them to seek tougher penalties for abuse on social media. and more people will die from fires started by faulty white goods if ministers do not act to implement safety guidelines, according to safety groups. good afternoon.
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it's 21 august. welcome to bbc newsroom live. spanish police are exploring a possible link between thursday's attacks in spain and assaults by so—called islamic state in brussels last year. authorities believe the imam abdelbaki es satty may have radicalised younger members of the cell, which carried out the las ramblas and cambrils atrocities. they're also investigating whether he was involved in the bombings at brussels airport and a metro station in the city. meanwhile the search for younes abouyaaqoub, who's suspected of carrying out the attack in barcelona, has been extended across europe. mark lobel reports. the suspected mastermind of the barcelona and cambrils attacks, abdelbaki es satty,
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is the imam of this mosque in ripoll, in north—eastern spain. he is being blamed by this father of two of the attackers for radicalising his sons. translation: he took these young, impressionable minds, messed around with their brains, and now they're dead. the imam is believed to have been killed in an accidental explosion at a bomb factory, south of barcelona, a day before the attacks there. police are now investigating his movements across europe prior to last week's attacks. according to the mayor of the belgian town of vilvoorde, he was there betweenjanuary and march last year, right before the deadly attacks on the maalbeek metro station and the brussels airport. 32 people were killed in those attacks.
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it is being reported that the audi used in the attack was caught on camera earlier in paris, and one of the members of the cell visited zurich last year. police believe the suspected driver of last week's van attack may have escaped to france, and are now probing the attackers' links across europe. 1a victims have been identified from seven countries. police are looking into the attackers' wider links with militants across europe. we can speak to liesbeth van der heide, a research fellow from the international centre for counter terrorism at the hague. thank you forjoining us. there will be people who look at the events of recent months and in their minds begin to draw connections between them all. either connections from them all. either connections from the research you carry out? yes, andi the research you carry out? yes, and i think we have already heard a lot about these connections,
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so on the one hand we see a lot of things that we have seen before in europe. one of the things it is not clear yet at this moment whether it is inspired or instructed by islamic state or not. it is again a cell, a group of people, close links between family members and friends, something we have seen before. as you just reported, a lot of these individuals have been traced back to other cities in europe, and have lived in other places in europe. there is obviously a link with north africa, wary number of these attackers were from originally. i wonder about that... you mention north africa there. there is inevitably also... we all know about the movement of migrants across the mediterranean into southern europe. is there anyway of ascertaining how many or whether people are also coming across the mediterranean with a view to carrying out attacks?
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no, there is not. that is one of the most worrying points and also one of the points that will be discussed much more intensely, i believe, over the coming months. basically what we see is that we have already been focused over the past two years very much on the influx of immigrantss from northern africa, and there has been worried before, we have seen attacks in britain... people who we re attacks in britain... people who were involved in attacks. we have seen were involved in attacks. we have seen links and much stronger now and this attack, but also for example in the manchester attack when one of the manchester attack when one of the attackers came from libya. with the attackers came from libya. with the numbers of returnees to tunisia, morocco, libya, it will be much more difficult to keep track of who is coming in and with what purpose. because a year or so ago we were focused on the fact there was radicalisation that was going on in syria, parts of iraq as well, where so—called islamic state had set up
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their basis, if you like. they now looks like that radicalisation is far more widespread than many thought just a year ago. yes, that is also the biggest issue here. if you go back and look at the history, first we were worried about the fact that so many people left for syria and iraq, and that came as a surprise for many countries. then we started worrying about what we do with these people coming back? then we started worrying about the people we started worrying about the people we stopped from going there, because they might end up frustrated, clearly they had an incentive to eitherjoin a terrorist group or at the very least they might have been radicalised already... and then we examine to looking at supervisors. the last number of attacks in europe, we have seen involvement of returnees, we have seen groups like this group, where we don't know yet but it does not look like any of them have actually been to syria or iraq, but these are sympathisers or
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home—grown terrorists. the group keeps expanding and we said they can't keep up with the security services looking at every individual. thank you, liesbeth van der heide. from the international centre of counterterrorism at the hague. thank you very much. the suspect in last week's stabbing attack in finland that left two people dead and eight injured has been identified in court documents as 18—year—old abderrahman mechkah. police described the man as an asylum seeker from morocco who had ‘deliberately targeted women' in a stabbing spree on a market square in the south—western town of turku. the attack is being investigated as the country‘s first terror incident. rescue teams from malaysia, singapore and the united states are searching for ten missing us sailors, after a collision between an american destroyer and an oil tanker. the uss mccain collided with a merchant vesseljust before dawn to the east of singapore. its hull was damaged and compartments flooded. the tanker sustained damage
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near the front of the ship, but none of its crew were injured and there were no oil spills. the uss mccain collision marks the latest in a number of incidents involving a us navy warship in the past year. in august last year, a nuclear ballistic—missile submarine, and a military support vessel collided while conducting routine operations in the strait of juan de fuca off the coast of washington state. in january this year, the guided—missile cruiser uss antietam ran aground while trying to anchor in tokyo bay. on may 9th, the guided—missile cruiser uss lake champlain was struck by a small fishing boat off the korean peninsula. and onjune17, the uss fitzgerald collided with a container ship off the coast of japan. that collision resulted in the deaths of seven us sailors. the ussjohn s mccain has arrived at changi naval base in singapore are now to be assessed for damage.
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our correspondent spoke to us earlierfrom on board a boatjust of the port. the collision occurred in the early hours of monday morning between the us warship thejohn s mccain and a commercial tanker, a much larger oil and chemical tanker. now, you can see the us warship, thejohn s mccain, is docked over there at the changi naval base here in singapore. it came through that area just about an hour or so ago and what we understand, what we saw earlier, i should say, is that there was a crane on top of the us warship, presumably to carry out some repairs. there were some sailors that were also on the deck at the time. what the us navy‘s public affairs department has been able to tell us is that the ship did sustain some serious damage on the port side, including to the areas of the crew‘s sleeping quarters, and some communications equipment was also damaged. it‘s not clear how this collision happened, however,
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but it took place out there, hundreds of miles away, in one of the world‘s busiest shipping lanes, in the straits of malacca. a quarter of the world‘s trade goes through those straits and it is very congested. there is heavy traffic they are all the time. now, this collision occurred in the early hours of the morning, as i was saying, so it was still dark, but there is no indication that there was any bad weather at play. there is no clear indication as to what caused this collision between the us warship and the oil and chemical tanker. singapore authorities have been able to tell us that there is no sign of any oil spilled out into the waters, but ten american sailors are still missing, and there is a massive search and rescue operation under way that involves notjust the americans but also the singaporeans and the malaysians, and some real questions are likely to be asked aboutjust how this could happen so soon after another accident back injune, when another us warship collided with a merchant vessel which led
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to the loss of seven american sailors‘ lives. many concerns here aboutjust how effective the world‘s most powerful navy is in this part of the world. our reporterfrom our reporter from singapore there. some news coming in from the catalonian government following on from that set of two twin attacks last week in the area, and of course the car that ramped pedestrians in the car that ramped pedestrians in the las ramblas area of barcelona. the catalonian government now says they are treating the stabbing of a driver ina they are treating the stabbing of a driver in a car, who then died, as the 15th victim from those attacks. now 15 people being treated as having been killed in terrorist
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related incidents in barcelona last week. and they are also telling us from the press conference they have been holding in the last few moments that they are confirming a link between the car hijacking, and that is the car in which this 15th victim was found dead, there are confirming a link between that car hijacking in barcelona last thursday and the ban attack. the story such as it was was that one of the perpetrators, probably, prosecutors imagine, the person who was driving that van that hit so many people on las ramblas, that person then jumped out of the van and after it came to a halt ran through the streets of barcelona and then continued walking, possibly for up then continued walking, possibly for up to an hour and a half or so, stop a vehicle at some point, and then stabbed the driver of that vehicle, hijacking the vehicle and taking it on to another destination as he escaped. that particular man is still the subject of a police hunt
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that has been widened across europe. our correspondent in barcelona has been telling us they do not know at the moment... the police are not saying they perhaps believe that this attacker has escaped across the border into france but it is a possibility. a manhunt that has been widened across all of europe, but, asi widened across all of europe, but, as i say, in the last few minutes, the catalonian authorities telling us they are linking those two incidents and they‘re also saying there are now 15 people dead in that terrorist attack that happened last week in barcelona. we will bring you more from barcelona as we get it, of course, throughout the day, here on the news channel. now let‘s move to a story closer to home. prosecutors in england and wales are being told to treat hate—crimes online as seriously as those that happen in person. the crown prosecution service has issued tougher guidelines in response to the rise in abuse on social media. they include offences against bisexual people for the first time. dominic casciani reports. rhodri colwyn philipps, the fourth viscount st davids, jailed last month for racially aggravated threats on facebook against gina miller,
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the businesswoman behind the brexit legal challenge. she said she felt violated by his shocking comments, just one of many online attacks she suffered. now, the crown prosecution service says these kinds of crimes must be dealt with as robustly as offences on the street. it is promising a tougher response, to build public confidence. there were more than 15,000 hate crime prosecutions in 2015—2016, the highest number ever, and a third of those convicted saw their sentence increased. but the number of cases referred by police to prosecutors fell by almost 10%, a drop the cps says it is investigating. with the explosion in the use of social media over the last few years, it is very important that the prosecuting authorities, the cps, the police, are as up to date as possible in making sure that they‘re using the law to its fullest extent. there‘s no hiding place for these perpetrators.
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the law is clear, and if you persist in this sort of behaviour, you‘ll be detected, caught and punished. some critics say that police and prosecutors move too slowly to apprehend online abusers, and that means people are reluctant to come forward. but the cps hopes its new guidance will create the best possible chance of achieving justice for all victims. dominic casciani, bbc news. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the hunt for 22—year—old moroccan, younes abouyaaqoub — the driver suspected of killing 13 people in last week‘s attack in barcelona — is extended across europe. that is now up to 15 people, we hear. ten american sailors are missing after a us destroyer and an oil tanker collided, in seas to the east of singapore. rescue teams from three countries are searching for survivors. hate crimes committed online should be treated as seriously as offences
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carried out face to face, according to new cps guidelines for prosecutors in england and wales. now let‘s hear a bit about the sport. chelsea manager antonio conte is warning other clubs will relish the atmosphere at wembley, marcus alonso scored twice as the blues beat spurs 2-1 scored twice as the blues beat spurs 2—1 in the first league game at the national stadium. spurs won only two of the 11 games played at wembley since it was reopened in 2007. conde says the atmosphere is great for visiting teams but the tottenham manager insists his players can cope. it does not affect me. but i understand that we need to talk, and everyone needs to talk... but i think wembley ethics... it is not...
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it is not the reason, because we lose the game. i think the team played really well. it is not fair to blame again... to blame wembley, because wembley is, for me, one of the best places in the world, if not the best places in the world, if not the one place to play football. name art showed paris st germain just what they‘re getting for £200 million, playing in his first home game since leaving barcelona. the brazilian had together a dazzling showcase of his talents as well as two goals. neymar set up to more and won a penalty. they bashed the other tea m won a penalty. they bashed the other team 6—2. neymar already scored three goals in two league games. zlata n three goals in two league games. zlatan ibrahimovic has been showing off how strong his knee is..., strong enough to return to football, posting a video of himself kicking a punching bag. he posted the picture
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with the words, which need? he suffered knee ligament damage in his first season at manchester united remains out of contract at the club. he is the club. he still wanted by jose mourinho if they can get back to full fitness. andy murray, his reign at the top of tennis is over after rafa nadal return to the world number one spot for the first time in three years. the spaniard said it was unbelievable to be back at the top spot again, having first achieved the feat nine years ago. it has been a great year for rafa nadal, who won his 15 grand slam title at the french open injune, and reach the australian open final in january. stuart and reach the australian open final injanuary. stuart broad says he wa nts to injanuary. stuart broad says he wants to play in the 2019 ashes against australia after passing sir ian botham on the list of england‘s all—time test wicket takers, the 31—year—old bowler moved ahead with 383 wickets, thrashing at the west indies, at edgbaston. his second team—mate james anderson has a92
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wickets. .. at sully team—mate james anderson has a92 wickets... at sully sport ni will have more free you in the next hour. —— that is be sport ni will have more in the next hour. the london fire brigade, the mayor of london and safety groups have warned that more people will die from fires started by faulty white goods, if the government doesn‘t implement guidelines, made more than a year ago. they‘ve sent a letter to theresa may in response to the grenfell tower fire, which it‘s thought was started in a fridge—freezer. it warns some products are still being sold with a flammable plastic backing. the letter also refers to a fire in august 2016 in shepherds bush, which began in a tumble dryer. earlier i spoke to robert cha ntry—price, the lead officer for product safety at the chartered institute for trading standards who explained where the problems come from. the big problem has been with fridges and fridge—freezers with a plastic backing rather than a metal backing. if they tend to catch fire, and it is only occasionally they do, the older ones that do, then the fire can spread quickly. with a metal backing to the product, the fire is less likely to spread and less likely to be severe. this letter, that has now been sent
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from various authorities in london, is stressing the need for the government to get moving on this, is that something you would echo? definitely. anything that will improve product safety is to be applauded. why the delay, do you think? there are certain structural reasons, but i am disappointed that the government has been so slow to act on this, when london fire brigade have known for quite some time that particularly french —— fridge—freezers and fridges have been susceptible to fire. it can be devastating in the kitchen and knock on, like we‘ve seen at grenfell tower, and cause a serious fire. and the fact that these white goods, there will be those that are in people‘s homes across the country at the moment. i wonder what your advice would be to them, as you said at the beginning, you don‘t... it‘s not bad until something bad happens, but what could happen could be catastrophic. yes.
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the first thing is, if you‘re buying a new fridge or fridge—freezer, buy one with a metal back rather than a plastic or full back, because that will minimise the chances of a serious fire. the other thing is to have a look at your fridge—freezer and check there are not any hot spots at the back. what does that mean? be precise. it is a matter of the running your hand over it and seeing if anything is warm and likely to get hot. if it is getting hot, then you should discontinue using the product. the other thing is, move it away from anything likely to be flammable, particularly things like curtains or drapes or anything that is in close proximity to the fridge—freezer that, if there was a fire, would immediately accelerate the process. at home we have a fridge—freezer and yes, it has a plastic back, but we have it six inches away from some curtains, which are flame retardant. it is a matter of trying to take sensible precautions. it won‘t guarantee you won‘t have a problem but minimises the risk. news coming in that police are
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searching for two men after an 11—year—old boy was beaten in the face by a boxer dog and needed plastic surgery. the incident happened outside a fish and chip shopin happened outside a fish and chip shop in north yorkshire lasts thursday. the boy from west yorkshire suffered significant facial injuries. these are images of the two men that are being looked for in connection with this incident. the police arejust putting out those images in the last few hours, following that attack on a boy last week. we started the hour, i can tell you exactly when it was, 28 minutes ago, with the last regular bongs from big ben in westminster, we crossed there
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are now with our political correspondent. i know you have a guess there are, but could you also tell us, is the scaffolding going to go any higher on the tower? well, i believe at the moment, yes, it is going to go higher than that, and there will also be work taking place on the exterior of the clock face. in terms of photograph opportunities, there will be some interruption, but look at it for now, still looking pretty fine. there was of course controversy last week when this news was announced, that it would be silenced for four yea rs a pa rt that it would be silenced for four years apart from special occasions. lets you what our conservative mp thinks of this. what was your reaction when you heard about this? about it was a silly season story. did not believe it. parliament has not discussed this. apparently the committee that allegedly made the decision did not even know the bells would be silenced for four years. you cannot have urgent repairs that ta ke you cannot have urgent repairs that take four years, it doesn't make any sense. what a thing will happen if the commission and the authorities
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will look at this in september and say, we need to find a different solution, and maybe big ben will be silenced for a while, but perhaps just until the end of this year, and then back again for the new year. something like that. it has been doing its best for over 150 years, probably not surprising it needs major renovation work. shouldn‘t we just accept this is the work that needs to take place? if there is urgent work to be done, it should be done quickly, and round the clock if necessary, to get it done. you saw the number of people that turned out here. ordinary people coming to listen to big ben strike 12 for the last time, allegedly for four years. and all the world's media was here. big ben and the palace of westminster is an iconic feature of britain, we need to make sure that stays predominant. we really don't need four years to repaira we really don't need four years to repair a clock. it is quite a bit of work, though, i‘m told, to disconnect the hammers that strike the bell and reconnect them, are wejust that strike the bell and reconnect them, are we just asking a bit too
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much of the work men here, just for the sake of, you know, the bongs? we know they are saying they can... the clock could strike, and big ben could bong on special occasions, so clearly ca n could bong on special occasions, so clearly can be done. i'm saying, yes, there is urgent work, let's absolutely keep big ben are selling for that period. get that urgent work done cost of a clock or wherever, and then start big ben again and the rest of the work out of earshot can be done. ijust do not think it takes four years to do urgent works. and you should not be silencing the chimes of big ben for that period of time. how on earth did this get signed? with mps completely unaware? the new these things are done by committee and the committee of twister. i'm sure reporting considerable to four years to repair the terror and of big ben. it was not mentioned it to anyone we would actually turn of big ben. —— prepare
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the clock tower and beg them. i'm sure the authorities will find a solution very quickly. there are lots of questions as to whether that period of four years silence will naturally ta ke period of four years silence will naturally take place. we will have to wait and see whether the public pressure and the pressure from mps will make a difference. thank you very much, emma. this is bbc newsroom live. coming up in the next few minutes, skywatchers in the united states are preparing for the spectacular sight of a total solar eclipse. those directly in the path of deepest shadow will witness our star‘s light blocked out for up to two minutes and a0 seconds. in the uk we will get hurtjust visible partial solar eclipse just before sunset. —— now let‘s see what
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the weather will be like. you need to get on a plane very quickly and get to oregon to see the best views. we have some quite humid again across the uk and for many of usa again across the uk and for many of us a lot of cloud. we are seeing brea ks us a lot of cloud. we are seeing breaks in cloud in the south—west we wasting the best temperatures today wasting the best temperatures today was top. we have had some sunshine and the cloud continues its journey north. wetter weather pushing its way through the ioc to south—west scotland. towards the south west a bit of sunshine and temperatures in the low 20s. rain continues northwards and overnight lose weight from northern ireland. where we have some breaks for the south it will fill up with misty weather and low cloud and hill fog. a one night of 15 degrees 16 degrees. tomorrow sta rts 15 degrees 16 degrees. tomorrow starts grey and misty and murky.
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more of england and will brighten and will introduce one or two showers. wetter weather will develop across northern ireland and waiting to south—west of scotland. sunshine for the south across england and wales and as temperatures of 26 or 27 celsius. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: the catalonian government said the person found dead in a carfollowing a stabbing attack is the 15th person to die in the attack. ten american sailors are missing after a us destroyer and an oil tanker collided, in seas to the east of singapore. rescue teams from three countries are searching for survivors. hate crimes committed online should
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be treated as seriously as offences carried out face to face, according to new cps guidelines for prosecutors in england and wales. it‘s issued new guidelines for prosecutors in england and wales encouraging them to seek tougher penalties for abuse on social media. more people will die from fires started by faulty white goods if ministers do not act to implement safety guidelines. that‘s according to the london fire brigade, the city‘s mayor and safety groups. big ben has fallen silent for four years after the the great bell‘s bongs at noon today as it undergoes renovation. the bell is now out of use — except for special occasions — to allow repairs to the surrounding elizabeth tower. skywatchers in the united states are preparing for the spectacular sight of a total solar eclipse. those directly in the path of deepest shadow will witness our star‘s light blocked out for up to two minutes and a0 seconds.
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the prime minister is said to be confident that the uk will make enough progress in brexit talks by october — to move forward to the next phase. in the past few minutes the british government has released more position papers on the movement and goods. including one aboutjudicial co—operation, amid continued controversy over the role of the european court ofjustice. i suppose the first question is, let‘s deal with the detail in a minute. the first question is, how many position paper and what exactly isa many position paper and what exactly is a position paper was to mark is the government giving away its negotiating stance? the european commission has published nine of them. i‘m not sure of the top i had them. i‘m not sure of the top i had the total the uk has published but
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by the end of the week it will be more than nine, i am assured. what these documents are is they are very dense and quite legalistic texts little on the table as part of the boat of negotiations. the eu side and david davis and british civil serva nts and david davis and british civil servants compare and contrast these documents and work out whether languages agree and where there are areas of disagreement. there is little process of each site educating each other about what each side cares about. we have had position papers and a whole series of things from how do you handle european arrest warrants that are outstanding on brexit to what are some of the outlines for the methodology for calculating the costs of the brexit bill and the uk's costs of the brexit bill and the uk‘s financial settlement for leaving the eu and the two big papers will have for both sides is what to do about citizens rights.
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the position papers are then superseded by a colour—coded spreadsheet which showed idiosyncratic and for the two sides agreed and it appears in your local where the two sides that they were getting and read weather was bad disagreement. this is my brexit folder which is getting bigger every week. —— and read where there was disagreement. it looks from headlines i‘m reading that the intention is to make sure the transition from being a member of the european union to longer being a member is as smooth as possible for those who are buying and selling goods. there are two ways of looking at this paper. to give it its technical name, goods on the market. the technical way of looking at it is just what you described, a way of making sure that items that are for sale in the uk and the eu in the
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run—up to brexit day in march 2019 will continue to be on sale in the days, weeks and months after brexit. it gives it a legal basis so you don‘t in the rest of the eu have to withdraw british product from the shelves and take european product off the shelves in the uk stop the agreement will mean legally those products can still be for sale. crucially it is for things that are up crucially it is for things that are upfor crucially it is for things that are up for sale already. things that are being sold by wholesalers are in better shops already. it does not include items and suppliers warehouses that haven‘t gone until already. it is designed to smooth over the initial process of brexit. the politics around this from the uk side as they are trying to do two things. one, they are trying to use this almost as the kernel for a
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future free trade deal. david davis wa nts to future free trade deal. david davis wants to use any opportunity can to talk of a feature trade deal between uk and the eu. —— feature. they are trying not just to uk and the eu. —— feature. they are trying notjust to make about goods but also services. —— future. that isa but also services. —— future. that is a much bigger part of the uk economy. he is saying as well as talking about goods we should talk about the supply of services alongside goods. for example, rolls—royce sells an aeroplane engine to an eu country. it also supplies it with services and the maintenance of that engine to david davis is seeing is right that the actual physical item is separated from the service across alongside the item? from the service across alongside the item ? that from the service across alongside the item? that isjust from the service across alongside the item? that is just one aspect of the item? that is just one aspect of the service industry. the uk wants to focus in this particular paper on goods. they think the stuff about
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services such as accountancy and against —— and about law is something else. what is the capital top? —— the tab at the top? something else. what is the capital top? -- the tab at the top? we have the eu council guidelines of the member states and instructions for the commission. we have the position papers. firstly that is the eu side and the second half is the uk side. i wonder how large the boundaries for david davis. —— the binder is. we have some more information coming out of barcelona after those attacks last week. with a confirmation that is coming through from the police and the press conference of some of the lines that have been around for the lines that have been around for the last two hours from media
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sources in spain. the latest one is that there is solid evidence that an imam linked to the barcelona attacks was one of the dead in an explosion on wednesday in house nearby. that is confirmation of one of the media ports around. we have updates on the death toll from the barcelona attack in the police are saying they are treating 15 people as having been killed in these two attacks. more now on the story that prosecutors in england and wales are being told to treat online hate crimes as seriously as those committed face—to—face. the crown prosecution service says it will seek tougher penalties for abuse on social media, which it says could lead to the type of extremist violence seen in charlottesville in the united states. i‘m joined via webcam
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by gina miller, who suffered a huge amount of online racial abuse and threats after taking the government to court over the brexit process. good afternoon to you. presumably this is something you have written about and have complained about, these online hate crimes to be taken more seriously. you presumably would welcome the news reading this morning? i'm very pleased, notjust for myself but all the victims who have to put up with abuse, violence and bullying online. this announcement is absolutely right when it says it is not about the medium but the message. whether it be face—to—face or online or in a letter should be treated in exactly the same way with the same amount of punishment, whatever the medium. that is excelling at this announcement is said today. one of
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the case that you take earlier this year against the viscount when he was making threats against you in social media, one of your criticisms of that whole process is that was being tried under the malicious limitations act rather than something more serious. do you believe that these cps changes will result in crime being treated under the correct tax? ——acts? result in crime being treated under the correct tax? --acts? the cps cannot be expected to do it on the lawn and legislations need to be updated in the view of online and virtual media threats. these were in the 1990s. we need legislative and policy reform and we actually need social media companies not to be let
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off the hook because they can‘tjust be up to the cps. the social media platforms and companies are making exorbitant amount of profit and yet they are not investing enough in my view on filtering and blocking some of the abuse that is happening online. we have from one of the campaign groups against a crime that they believed that organisations such as facebook and others were beginning to take these things more seriously and were beginning to clamp down on it. from what you‘re seeing you still believe it is still a long way to go. they are bowing to consumer pressure and i think you have to be more and more pressure on social media because they are doing the minimum in my view, not the maximum. they are seeing it‘s too difficult to track. my experience with cps and the police is that they have been very reluctant and slow supplying information, underlying information required by the police and cps, to progress against a lot of the people who are posting these
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hateful comments inciting violence. they have got to be better at policing their own platforms. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the hunt for 22—year—old moroccan, younes abouyaaqoub — the driver suspected of killing 13 people in last week‘s attack in barcelona — is extended across europe. ten american sailors are missing after a us destroyer and an oil tanker collided, in seas to the east of singapore. rescue teams from three countries are searching for survivors. hate crimes committed online should be treated as seriously as offences carried out face to face, according to new cps guidelines for prosecutors in england and wales. at midday today this familiar sound rung out
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across westminster for the last time before work begins. big ben chimes big ben isn‘t due to chime again — except for special occasions — until 2021. it‘s part of a major refurbishment at the houses of parliament, which will see the elizabeth tower, the clock and the bell frame are repaired and cleaned. let‘s cross over to westminster, where our political correspondent, emma vardy, is outside parliament. a short time an mp was saying he thought that little the end of the year and it thought that little the end of the yearand it can thought that little the end of the year and it can start up again regularly. the really does seem to bea regularly. the really does seem to be a bit? now whether the bongs will
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be a bit? now whether the bongs will be silenced for overfour be a bit? now whether the bongs will be silenced for over four years. a number of mps were aghast at this news and now ramping up pressure to save some sort of golf mice can be found in is that another way around this? the reason we are told that the bongs to be silenced as the need to disconnect the hammers from a mechanism which requires a lot of work. —— some sort of compromise can be found. it is a vital area of renovation for big ben if we want to preserve it for future generations. we have haired outrage from some politicians but we were told it was signed off by three parliamentary committees and we‘ve also heard from government democrat mp who cheer from one of these parliamentary committees. —— liberal democrat mp who cheers one of those parliamentary committees. we have scaffolding up the tower and people
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working on the scaffolding and they can be working in close proximity to bells which when the rain at 118 decibel is so that is not an a cce pta ble decibel is so that is not an acceptable working environment and first health and safety reasons the bells have to be stopped when those works undertaken. you hear the reasoning there and this work was signed off but there has been some outrage that we should lose our precious big ben bongs because of health and safety. we have also had from the architects in charge of this work expense by this is necessary. “— this work expense by this is necessary. —— explaining why this is necessary. —— explaining why this is necessary. it is part of the world heritage site and part of the palace and it is an international symbol of democracy and freedom. the bells especially of course during the second world war were picked up in prison camps around the world on crystal sets and people knew there was still something to fight for. it is and we are very conscious of that
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of that. that is the reason we will carry out this huge package of works to ensure their reserve for future generations which is part of of care. the bells have only been silenced a few times in big ben is 150 yesterday but we will have to wait and see whether pressure from politicians and the public will make any difference to the plans of the officials. at the moment they still stand. bongs we had today at noon will be the final apart from at remembrance day and new years eve. they will remain silent. there will bea they will remain silent. there will be a rather quiet atmosphere around parliament square and we will have to see whether all those calls about this can be changed after that that is alternative plan, whether those calls make a difference. we will be able to hear the traffic properly now without introductions. ——
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interruptions. motorists are being encouraged to share footage captured on dash—cams with police, in an effort to crack down on dangerous driving. in the last year, a pilot scheme in north wales has seen action taken against more than 100 drivers who were filmed by fellow road—users. our reporter, lorna gordon has more. an evening drive in fife earlier this year. violet was driving a short distance in her car on a road she knows well — when this happened. the driver of the other car blamed her for the crash, but violet used the footage recorded by her dashcam to show she‘d done nothing wrong. violet‘s car was written off, but the dashcam that proved her innocence followed her to her new one. ijust sat in the car for a few minutes. i was quite shaky, so obviously, with having the dashcam, i believed that helped me. cos they were disputing, the other party was disputing. so the dashcam definitely helped me.
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dashcams record what the driver of a car sees on the road ahead. when there‘s an accident, the footage the dashcame records can prove whether the driver is in the clear or, indeed, whether they were at fault. some footage has ended up showing questionable behaviour out on our roads which could have put others at risk. in north wales, police investigate footage sent in by motorists. it‘s resulted in action against some drivers and has been so successful the scheme is about to be expanded. the footage is varied, which we get, some of which has been horrendous and shocking, and it‘s only right that, as an organisation, we take it forward and prosecute that person. we cannot be everywhere for everyone, and it gives us an extra set of eyes on the road 2a/7 recording what these footage that can be used in court.
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insurers say dashcam footage can provide valuable evidence in the event of a crash. some companies lower their premiums for drivers who have the technology in their cars. an accurate record of what happened will mean the claim gets settled quicker. the second one is, if you are unlucky enough to be the victim of a cash—for—crash fraud scam, or even if you are being accused of something you have not done, you have really good evidence. we know know there have been court cases where people have used dashcam evidence to say, "this is what actually happened, and i know i wasn‘t to blame." campaign group big brother watch argues dashcams are a breach of privacy. violet connor says she would never drive without her dashcam now and believes our roads would be safer if we all had them in our cars. lorna gordon, bbc news. the united states will experience a coast to coast total solar eclipse for the first time in almost a century later today. the so—called "path
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of totality", when total darkness falls, will hit 1a american states, starting in oregon. the eclipse will be viewable all the way to south carolina, on the atlantic coast. our reporter nada tawfik sent this piece from hopkinsville in kentucky, which will experience the fullest eclipse. eclipse—mania has arrived, and in the small town of hopkinsville, kentucky, this is the largest party they have ever thrown. officially eclipseville for the big day, here is where the best and one of the longest views of the darkness will be, and locals are over the moon. nobody now has to ever ask again where is hopkinsville?
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it's bringing out the best in everybody, and everybody's together, and i love it. to deal with the overwhelming preparations, this quiet community of 30,000 appointed a special solar eclipse co—ordinator, and mayor carter hendricks says this has been years in the making. about ten years ago, we got a phone call from a scientist asking about the eclipse, and if they could book hotel rooms. that was the first we‘d heard of it. with its expansive farmland this is the perfect location to host visitors from around the world. the moment of totality will last two minutes and a0 seconds here, but the memory will leave a permanent mark on this rural community. do make sure your chin then to us on bbc news channel from six o‘clock this evening. —— do make sure you‘re tuned into us. that is the solar
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eclipse here live on the news channel. it is a very good example of not to use a mobile phone while on the move. you‘re about to see a sinkhole open up. this opened up in china with no warning. then in cause a scooter and its driver. if you look close enough he does not realise he will drive straight in. you can actually see the screen of the phone and there he goes into that sinkhole. amazingly he managed to walk away unharmed. in a moment the news at one with clive myrie. we will be saying goodbye to viewers on bbc two injust we will be saying goodbye to viewers on bbc two in just a few minutes time. first the weather with darren bett. we have humid tropical area moving
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across the uk at the moment. and for many of us comes with a good deal of cloud. ahead of that we have seen some sunshine across north yorkshire. that is before the cloud arrived pushing up across england and wales. some bricks beginning to allowed in that human tropical where in the south—west of england. in between secular workload with quite a bit of rain developing lung above the front moving towards scotland across northern ireland. towards the south—west we‘re seeing some sunshine already and it is quite warm and muggy here. in the west country and south wales temperatures could be into the low 20s. not as one where we keep the cloud across south—east and england there will be outbreaks of rain. wetter across the irish sea in northern ireland but it is quite cool. the south—west of scotla nd is quite cool. the south—west of scotland turning white but the north—east with fresh air and brighter with some hazy sunshine. rainbow push northwards further into scotla nd rainbow push northwards further into scotland overnight moving away from northern england and the way for
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northern ireland. when we have brea ks northern ireland. when we have breaks in the south it will get very misty and the mackie. low cloud and mackie. low cloud untilfork misty and the mackie. low cloud and mackie. low cloud until fork and we will be be left with a really warm night with temperatures of around 15 or16 night with temperatures of around 15 or 16 degrees or so. as we had to tuesday that rain continues north. it slowly brightens up across more and england and wales and some sunshine comes through, triggering one of two showers northwards. the wet as well it was northern ireland and the south—west scotland and the irish sea. in sunshine we‘re looking at 26 degrees across parts of england and wales. call for the north korea hang on to further cloud. most of the day we have in this warm humid air. it will get pushed away as this were the front rows a cross . pushed away as this were the front rows across. more of our band of cloud. across the west, particularly into scotland. then some sunny skies
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and a few showers. still warm across east anglia and the south of the mid—20s possible. we are all into fresh air on thursday and low pressure still there in the north west getting closer to northern ireland it is likely to turn wet. some showers around the north west and brighter in the south. the hunt for the driver of the van that killed 13 people in barcelona has gone europe wide. police say he may have escaped to france. younes abu—yaaqoub,who‘s 22, is believed to be the only member of the terror cell still alive. investigators say he later killed a man stealing his car, making good his escape. we‘ll have the latest from spain. also this lunchtime. ten us sailors are missing after the collision of the warship with an oil tanker in south—east asia stop treating abuse can be as devastating as shouting it, tough new guidelines to tackle aggressors on social media. we think far too often it's
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an underreported crime, people think they have to put up with low—level hate crime and don‘t realise it‘s a crime. how- cams are helping make the
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