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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  August 22, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11. "fight to win", president trump indicates more us troops will be sent to afghanistan as he steps up the war against the taliban. we are not nation—building again. we are killing terrorists. four men accused of belonging to the terror cell behind the attacks in spain which killed 15 people are due in court in madrid. cash for your old car, ford becomes the latest to offer customers an incentive to trade in older models in the drive for cleaner air. also this hour, remember me? george osborne urges theresa may to commit to building high—speed rail across northern england. the former chancellor tells the prime minister to back hss, saying it would be be a good way to "relaunch her premiership" and "rebalance the economy". # nothing i can say, total eclipse
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of the heart # and bonnie tyler belts out her classic total eclipse of the heart to lucky fans chasing the eclipse, as it sweeps over the us. good morning. it's tuesday 22nd august. welcome to bbc newsroom live. president trump says the us will "fight to win" in afghanistan, as he unveils a new strategy in the war against the taliban. in a major speech last night he said that he had changed his mind about withdrawing troops from the country. he also called on nato allies to do more. our washington correspondent aleem maqbool reports. the man who always said he didn't want to intervene abroad came to announce the intervention
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in afghanistan is going to ratchet up. but said it was for the right reasons. we are a partner and a friend, but we will not dictate to the afghan people how to live, or how to govern their own complex society. we are not nation—building again. we are killing terrorists. he announced the lifting of a cap on the number of us troops in afghanistan, and that there would be no time limit on them staying there. my original instinct was to pull out, and historically, i like following my instincts. but all my life, i've heard that decisions are much different when you sit behind the desk in the oval office. a very different donald trump to the one who said this kind of thing right through the obama years. and that is the basis
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on which he campaigned as a presidential candidate, that he wouldn't spend american resources abroad, but here at home. he says he now realises that pulling out american troops from afghanistan would leave a vacuum for militants. our primary mission for coming into afghanistan after 911 was to kill terrorists, and i think he's going back to that original purpose, that the reason we came into afghanistan was because of what happened on 911, and the fact that afghanistan was being used as a sanctuary and safe haven for terrorists. the toughest words of his speech were directed at afghanistan's neighbour, pakistan. we have been paying pakistan billions and billions of dollars, at the same time they are housing the very terrorists that we are fighting.
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but that will have to change, and that will change immediately. how the president expects pakistan to comply, and more broadly, how he believes the us will in his words fight to win in afghanistan, wasn't made entirely clear. the only thing that is certain is that there's still no end in sight for americalongest war. aleem maqbool, bbc news, in washington. in the hours since he made his speech, we have been getting reaction from around the world, not least from afghanistan. let's talk to our correspondent in kabul, sekunder kermani. at the moment we are waiting for the afg ha n at the moment we are waiting for the afghan president to address the nation and give his response to president trump ‘s announcement. i've been speaking to the former head of the afghan army and he told me he welcomed what president trump
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had to say. the afghan foreign minister has also said he welcomes it. as you say, security has been steadily deteriorating in afghanistan. last year saw nearly 3500 civilians die as a result of the violence. there had been concerned here that if america were to make a complete withdrawal from the country, then that could boost the country, then that could boost the taliban. instead, president trump seems to be quite clear that he doesn't want to see the taliban ta keover he doesn't want to see the taliban takeover afghanistan. at the same time he says he believes eventually some form of political settlement with the taliban will be necessary in order to bring about peace. but is pretty much the position of the afg ha n is pretty much the position of the afghan government here. overall things are being very much welcomed in afghanistan. let's talk to colonel richard kemp, former commander of british forces in afghanistan. good morning. our correspondent was
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talking about the security situation deteriorating in afghanistan over the years. first of all, you and soldiers serving under you fought in afghanistan for territory. how do you nowjudge the situation to be there? the situation has certainly deteriorated since even the days soon after we went into afghanistan in 2001. the reality is the taliban have control of a very large area of the country, and have every intention of gaining control of even more of it. it's only really because of the presence of international forces in afghanistan that they haven't taken over the whole place. i think it's important that president trump's new strategy makes an effort to push them back now, not just a hold on to what is there but to push them back. i was pleased to see that he's said he's going to
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focus on killing terrorists, not an nation—building which i think has been a mistake made over many years 110w been a mistake made over many years now in afghanistan. i think perhaps the most significant thing he said was the importance he was placing on stopping pakistan from supporting the taliban. they've been on the wrong side of this war since it began, and it's time that stopped. it will require a huge amount of diplomatic and political effort, and it may not be possible because pakistan provide safe haven to terrorists in afghanistan, they provide support to them. unless that is stopped, i didn't see how we can stop this situation from deteriorating further. we've heard pakistan's reaction to his words. they say they aren't safe haven, as they have frequently done in the past they have that. how do you put pressure on pakistan to start helping more, which is clearly what president trump believes needs to happen? well, it has to be an
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international effort. i think the first thing that has to happen, if persuasion doesn't work, and it's not going to be easy to persuade pakistan, is that the us and other countries are providing various forms of aid money in vast amounts to pakistan. they need to reconsider that and see whether or not they should curtail it or significantly stop it. if that doesn't work, the next step is of course moves like international sanctions against pakistan for supporting terrorism. neither of those two things are desirable, but i think if there is a significant threat they might happen, it could persuade pakistan. pakistan have got much bigger concerns than perhaps even their international aid, and the main reason why they are interested in maintaining stability in afghanistan is because of their paranoia, shall we say, about aggression from india.
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they are looking to use afghanistan as many displays if they get attacked by india. briefly, on this troop surge such as it may turn out to be in afghanistan by the us after president trump as—macro speech, you talked about the fact you welcome the fact president trump is now focused on killing terrorists, presumably that has to go hand—in—hand with nation—building effort? i think it has to go hand—in—hand with building up the afg ha n hand—in—hand with building up the afghan national security forces. the senior american commander has said he believes he has enough combat power to deal with us combat missions which may include special forces and air operations. what he wa nts forces and air operations. what he wants extra forces to do is to help increase the capability of the afg ha n increase the capability of the afghan national security forces,
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which is the primary role. of course, some effort on nation—building is required as well. aid agencies are doing a very good job in many parts of afghanistan, that needs to be continued and protected where possible. i think we've made the mistake in the past of making that the priority, rather than the priority being to eliminate and destroy the taliban, al-qaeda and destroy the taliban, al-qaeda and islamic state which is getting and islamic state which is getting an increasing presence there. colonel richard kemp, thank you for joining us. four men accused of being part of a terror cell which killed 15 people in spain last week have been appearing in court this morning. the suspects arrived at a jailjust outside of the city last night. the judge questioning them is deciding what charges to press. police in catalonia say they shot dead the suspected driver of the van which ploughed into pedestrians in barcelona on thursday. younes abouyaaqoub was found hiding in a vineyard 30 miles west of the city. the government is publishing another paper giving details of its brexit negotiating strategy.
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it covers arrangements for consumers and businesses who need to resolve cross—border legal disputes after the uk leaves the eu. at the moment the eu decides which court cross—border legal disputes are resolved. thejustice secretary david lidington has been speaking to our political correspondent iain watson. if you're arguing about who has custody of the children, if you are a consumer and you think you've been diddled by a company that sold online in another country, you've got a system that says right, these countries' courts are dealing with it under these circumstances, that's how it will be handled. no need for extra bureaucracy, no need to have different court cases in different countries and arguments about who scored counts the most. it seems to me this is something that will work well for every european country. it's putting our citizens first. so effectively we will still be
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after brexit accepting the verdicts of foreign courts? you do that under international conventions anyway, on a global basis. what we're about is having the right swift, clear mechanisms, so that when there is a cross—border dispute, because so many people live their lives across borders. marriages of people from different nationalities, long—distance marriages indeed. companies selling more and more across national frontiers, and that is happening more with online trade. you need a system that says if something goes wrong, if there's a dispute, whose courts is it that have the final say on this. and so what we want is a deal where everybody knows what the procedures are, so if you're a german wife divorcing a british husband, if you are a british parent whose kids are in greece and you're arguing about custody, if you are a consumer and you bought from a company in sweden and you're not happy with the product, there is a clear mechanism for address for arbitration, for settlement, without extra hassle,
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without extra court proceedings. david lidington on the government's latest indications of how they are going to try and negotiate our deal with the eu when we leave. some other news that's been developing comes from italy where there has been an earthquake. at least two people have died and at least 25 people are injured after an earthquake hit the italian island of ischia in southern italy. the tourists and residents ran into the streets as buildings collapsed when the quake hitjust before 9pm local time. mark lobel reports. the earthquake struckjust as local families and tourists on the holiday island sat down for dinner. houses were flattened. people were evacuated from buildings, including the local hospital. one woman was killed when rubble fell from a church.
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at least 20 other people were injured. ischia is an hour's ferry ride from naples and lies about seven miles from the epicentre of the earthquake. the islands northern town of casamicciola was the worst hit. in the village, firemen located a baby trapped beneath the rubble. after a delicate operation, a welcome sound. baby crying. some firemen were already on the island to deal with wildfires. others flew in. italy's beautiful islands are a draw for visitors, but unfortunately in an area prone to seismic activity, they can often cost lives. after this latest earthquake, one resident said it looked like a bomb had hit. the headlines on bbc newsroom live.
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president trump indicates more us troops will be sent to afghanistan as he set in mac os x that the war against the taliban. four men accused of belonging to the terror cell behind the attacks in spain which killed 15 people appear in court in madrid. ford becomes the latest car manufacturer to offer customers a cash incentive to trade in all the models in the drive for cleaner air. and in sport. wayne rooney insists he is focused on his club career rather than an england recall. kick it out says the fa should conduct a comprehensive review into the claims of eniola aluko's claims against mark sampson. england will have wing
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lydia thompson fit for their rugby world cup semi final against france tonight. coach simon middleton is promising no more rotation. he's going to pick his strongest side fo rthe match in belfast. more on those stories just after 11:30am. let's bring you up—to—date on a story developing all of yesterday. the us navy has ordered a worldwide "operational pause" of its fleet after a destroyer collided with a tanker near singapore, leaving ten sailors missing. five other sailors were injured in the incident involving the guided missile destroyer ussjohn s mccain. it was the fourth us navy ship to crash this year, and the second in the past two months. our asia correspondent karishma vaswani is in singapore. i understand us divers are now joining in the search? that's right.
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from what the us navy has been able to tell us is earlier on in the morning today, us navy divers and us rink or diversjoined in morning today, us navy divers and us rink or divers joined in the search for the ten missing sailors. they are searching inside the warship. the ussjohn are searching inside the warship. the uss john s are searching inside the warship. the ussjohn s mccain made its way to assure here in singapore to the naval base where it has been docked for the last 2a hours. these divers are going into the ship. they are looking through the flooded areas. we were told that some of these flooded areas were sleeping compartments, machinery room, communications room. there is significant damage in this ship. they are hoping, presumably, to find any signs of these ten missing sailors either dead or alive within the ship. that doesn't mean that the search and rescue operation is an extensive one. it doesn't mean that has been completed. in fact it
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continues, despite the fact it's been more than 2a hours since the collision happened. it's involving the american, the malaysia and singaporean navies ships and aircraft from all of these navies, and in the east of the straits of malacca in singapore where the collision first took place, all searching for these missing sailors. an astonishing story especially bearing in mind the scale of the us fleet. ford is the latest car company to launch an incentive for uk consumers to trade in cars over seven years old, by offering £2,000 off some new models. the scheme will run until the end of the year. and unlike similar scrappage schemes by bmw and mercedes, which are only for diesels, ford will also accept petrol cars. andy barratt is managing director of ford in britain ford if you move to a modern car they are
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more efficient, they require less servicing. they may be cheaper to insure because of latest technology as well. you have to take the cost of motoring into account to make your decision. it's not for everyone but we are inviting those that are interested to come forward. one of the things andy barrett was saying this morning that "removing generations of the most polluting vehicles will have the most immediate, positive effect on air quality". do you think the scheme will? they would say that, wouldn't they? in fact, will? they would say that, wouldn't they? infact, ford will? they would say that, wouldn't they? in fact, ford doesn't have any hybrid or battery car to sell the retail customer. the current generation of year raised six diesels which inaudible they are five times more polluting on the
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road. i don't think this is going to do very much for cleaner air. it's more about selling cars in a declining market. indeed. we are told that in july, declining market. indeed. we are told that injuly, new car registrations fell for the fourth consecutive month in a row. they've been hit by a variety of factors. how much is this, do you think, about another manufacturer trying to get people to buy a new car? almost 100% is the answer. this is a reputation early damaged industry. it's looking at a psychical turn down. the car market has always been psychical but it's been complicated because people have been confused about diesels. the current generation is still dirty, people are worried about residual value and diesels. but the car manufacturers are doing is force—feeding the dealer networks with diesel cars to
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sell and incentivising customers to buy cars. to buy cars that they can supply this year, which will keep the cash flow and the sales going until they can make the transition to the electric future. thank you. a bit of breaking news coming to you. the former owner of the collapsed retailer bhs is to be prosecuted this. the pensions regulator say they have decided to ta ke regulator say they have decided to take action against dominic chapel after he failed to provide information and documents requested during olympic and macro investigation into the sale of the chain. bhs went into administration with the lost of several thousand jobs. but developing story that the former owner of the collapsed retailer bhs is going to be prosecuted. the former chancellor,
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george osborne, has called on theresa may to commit to building a high speed rail line across the north of england. as the chairman of the northern powerhouse partnership, mr osborne has written in the financial times that more money needs to be spent on public transport outside of london. the government has said it is investing billions of pounds across the north. last month, the think—tank ippr north launched a petition calling for more investment in transport in the north of england, which was signed by nearly 30,000 people. luke raikes is a senior researcher there and joins us live from salford. good morning. how is needed, first of all, is this sort of development? a high—speed rail link across the north. it is very much needed. it's not the only thing the north needs but it is one of the top priorities. if the north had received the upper capita that london has received over the last ten years, we would have
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received £59 billion more. it's good for people in london and across the country if we invest in the north as the chancellor suggests. country if we invest in the north as the chancellor suggestslj country if we invest in the north as the chancellor suggests. i remember doing the route and it's one of those weeks i think george osborne has mentioned this morning, i went from liverpool to hull. it involved a change in manchester and it took a long time. the train was absolutely packed. perhaps for those who don't travel cross—country, could you describe the difference between the north south routes and the east—west routes? the north-south routes are quite pleasant and comfortable, they ta ke quite pleasant and comfortable, they take 2—2.5 hours to get from manchester to london. across the north it takes far longer and the carriages are decades old. it is really dire, i would encourage people to have a look and see what we mean. your research is suggesting that it wouldn't just we mean. your research is suggesting that it wouldn'tjust be beneficial for commuters, that it would generate an awful lot in terms of
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economic advantage for the north. that's absolutely right. what we've seen today's 70,000 people sign the petition, also businesses across the north supporting it. businesses need this investment to grow. it's not just about any tours but the businesses that rely on them and alter the people who want to travel for various reasons. how much would you estimate its holding back business in the north? we can't put a figure on it but we know the north and the country could be much better off if we had the investment that is needed. thank you forjoining us. instant divorce amongst muslims, where men can terminate their marriage simply by uttering the word "talaq" three times, has been outlawed in india. in what's being seen as a major victory for women's rights activists, the country's supreme court has declared the practice unconstitutional. it is presently banned in pakistan and bangladesh. our correspondent, shalu yadav, is in delhi. if you could just give us an
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indication of what this means, as far as women's groups are concerned. as far as women are concerned, it means that this is a landmark judgment. they used to see this practice of instant divorce as discriminatory and something that violates their right to equality. this is being hailed by them as a historicjudgment. it's something they have been fighting for three yea rs they have been fighting for three years in india. it's something that india's government didn't really interfere in because india is a secular country, and the government mostly stayed away from religious matters. in this case also, as india allows religious institutions to
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govern on matters like divorce and marriage. in this case a muslim law board had the authority of the divorces and allowed muslim men to simply get divorced from their wives by uttering these three words "talaq" which translates as divorce in english. can you give us an illustration of what the debate is right in the country now? is it widely supported or is it roaring a full line through the country? —— drawing a fault line. this has been a very sensitive issue because religion is involved. it has certainly divided people in the country. it became religion versus women's rights. on the one side people are saying this is something that needs to be abolished, to give women in their right to equality which is enshrined in the constitution. on the other hand muslim scholars had been defending this practice, saying that this is something which is personal to them
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and neither the state nor the court should be allowed to interfere in this. thank you forjoining us on that important developing story. this is bbc news. coming up. chasing the moon, catching the sun. we are high in the skies with the lucky few who court yesterday's solar eclipse before anybody else in the usa. just before anybody else in the usa. just before we go to the weather i'm going to run one of the funniest jokes from the fringe. let's see what you make of this as a joke from the fringe festival. we've had the top 20. as a vegan, i think people who sell meat are disgusting. but a p pa re ntly who sell meat are disgusting. but apparently people who sell fruit and veg are grocer. laughter
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i won't tell you anyjokes, i'll just get on with the weather. we've got misty and murky conditions around coastal parts of the uk. feeling quite tropical because we've got tropical air coming from the south. it's warm and humid despite these cloudy skies. gradually, we'll see the cloud breaking up to bring sunshine. sunny spells developing across wales, eastern parts of england. one or two showers but quite heavy rain spreads into northern ireland and the west of scotla nd northern ireland and the west of scotland later. that could cause a few problems. a bit of localised flooding perhaps. it could be even higher than 2a degrees across southern parts of england in the sunshine. through the evening the rain will continue to spread into western and south—eastern scotland, causing a few problems. heavy rain on wednesday morning expected from northern england, gradually clearing
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away. pressure conditions coming into the west. sunny spells and one or two showers. goodbye. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 11.30: president trump suggests more us troops will be sent to afghanistan to fight the war on terror. he says forces will stay and "fight to win" to avoid mistakes made in iraq. four men accused of belonging to the terror cell behind the attacks in spain last week, which killed 15 people, appear in court in madrid. the government calls for "close cooperation" with the eu in uk to resolve cross—border legal disputes after brexit. a new paper suggests agreement will be needed on how divorces, commercial disputes and consumer claims are handled beyond 2019. up to £2,000 for your old car — ford is the latest car company to launch a uk scrappage scheme for cars that are more than seven years old. the offer will also be the first to apply to petrol cars.
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ina in a moment more on the disappearance of a female journalist during a trip with an inventor on his submarine after police say the headless body of a woman has been found. now let's take a look at the sport. you are at there, another edinburgh fringejoke. there is only one in the top 15 relating to sport. 0k. it is by angela barnes. a friend tricked me into going to wimbledon by telling me it was a men's singles event. all in the delivery, matthew. timing, timing... doody sports. thank you. if i have time i might tell you a joke later. let's start with a man who now has 200 premier
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league goals,. it is his club will release says he is focused on and not an england recall. he became only the second player to reach 200. it came in everton's1—1 draw at manchester city last night, and against the same opponents as his 50th and 150th, claiming afterwards the red side of manchester would have enjoyed it. city were down to ten men after kyle walker was sent off, before raheem sterling equalised for the home side. rooney had a significant impact since returning to goodison park. he has proven he wanted to return here and when you have someone of this ability enjoying football, he did the most tonight. it is nice to see. i have been first and on the receiving end of the ball and in the back of the net is fantastic. 200 and hopefully many more to come. anti—racism campaign group kick it out have asked the fa to conduct "a comprehensive and independent review" into eniola aluko's claims against england boss mark sampson. the striker has accused sampson of "bullying and discrimination. " two investigations have cleared sampson of any wrongdoing and he vehemently denies alu ko's claims, but... we insist the timing of her being
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dropped is purely coincidental. the fa ct dropped is purely coincidental. the fact is that a week before i was dropped from the england team for the first time in 11 years i was given ——i the first time in 11 years i was given —— i gave my account of what i felt was disconnection towards the anti—bullying culture. whichever way you look at it, being part of that cultural review has cost me, potentially cost me my career. the player received a £80,000 settlement though a review concluded she had not been singled out. the fa said the settlement was made to avoid disrupting euro 2017. england and scotland havejust started their match in the women's eurohockey tournament that will determine if one reaches the semifinals. england only need a draw to make the last four, while a scotland win would send them through at england's expense. ireland play germany in the other pool b match.
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for us it is a four—year process, and the world cup next year. we are building game by game with our new tea m building game by game with our new team and squad. it is exciting because there is a lot of skill there and all those girls are getting more experience every game and we are growing. the potential is definitely there. for me i see it as we are a new squad and a new set of players in every game we step out on the pitch we don't take for granted. england women's rugby captain sarah hunter says being favourites in their world cup semifinal against france is irrelevant. they have already beaten today's opponents in the six nations this year, but this evening a place in the final is at stake. lydia thompson will start on the wing, having recovered from a knee injury. head coach simon middleton rotated his squad heavily throughout the pool stage, but has named his strongest squad for what will be their toughest test of the tournament so far. we had our combinations mapped out for all of the games, and it was to culminate to get into this stage now, and this is about putting in the best 23 that you feel
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are right for the job, and if you feel it's the right 23 for the next one you put them out again. if you don't, you make changes. it's as simple as that. we don't even need to think about the next game until we get through here. this is going to be huge and that's what we're focused on. just time before i go breaking news for formula 1, kimi ray corning has signed a contract with ferrari. italian race team in next year's f1 season. i have a job for you, one from a few years ago, i hope you don't mind. ijust switched from eating venison to pheasant, game changer. —— kimi raikonen has signed a contract with ferrari. that is your bestjoke yet so thank you very much. more sport in a little bit. donald trump has indicated that he'll send more american troops to afghanistan to fight the taliban.
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as a candidate, he'd called for a speedy withdrawal from a conflict that he called a "total disaster". but in a televised address last night, the president said a rapid exit would create a vacuum that terrorists would fill. our troops will fight to win. we will fight to win. from now on, victory will have a clear definition. attacking our enemies, obliterating isis, crushing al-anda, preventing the taliban from taking over afghanistan, and stopping mass terror attacks against america before they emerge. vince trump speaking last night. there has been reaction from around the world. —— president trump speaking last night. earlier our political correspondent iain watson spoke about the british response to the president's speech. michael fallon, the defence secretary, has responded he welcomes the president's ongoing commitment to afghanistan and he welcomes
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the commitment, as he puts it, to stay the course in afghanistan. this coming, of course, from a president who, as a candidate for the presidency, had suggested that involvement in afghanistan would be a waste of time. now, we heard the president there say that this wasn't about nation—building, it was about killing terrorists, but in a phone call with the us defence secretary james mattis yesterday, michael fallon discussed rebuilding afg hanistan's fragile democracy. but, as i understand it, in that phone call there was no specific demand request from america for britain to send more troops, and in fact actually we did send more troops in advance of the president's speech back in june, another 85, so just under 500 british troops are currently in afghanistan, including being involved in training missions. but it's certainly both nato allies united on being in afghanistan, and it now looks for the long haul. some of the reaction after president trump's speech last night. now to the case that has gripped and is now
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shocking denmark. police investigating the disappearance of a female journalist during a trip with an inventor on his privately—built submarine, say the headless body of a woman has been found. peter madsen, has been charged with killing kim wall. catriona renton reports. since kim wall went missing, the waters around sweden have been searched for her. now a female torso has been found. police said a cyclist saw a body in the sea and alerted them. this was kim wall and peter madsen on board his submarine the nautilus, pictured on the 10th of august. she had been researching a feature she was going to write about him and the 40—tonne submarine which he designed and built himself. she has not been seen since and was reported missing by her boyfriend, with divers, helicopters and boats out looking for her. peter madsen was spotted on the nautilus the next day. the submarine sank but he was rescued. peter. he initially claimed he had dropped kim wall off on one of copenhagen's islands.
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but now he says there was an accident, that she died and he buried her at sea, but he denies any wrongdoing. translation: my client has not confessed anything. my client still pleads not guilty to the charges against him. now police believe peter madsen sunk his own submarine and has been charged with negligent manslaughter. peter madsen hit the headlines in 2008 when he managed to build the nearly 80m long vessel using online crowdfunding. a postmortem is currently being carried out on the body that's been found, as the investigation continues into what happened to kim wall. catriona renton, bbc news. today marks three months since a suicide bomber detonated his device at an ariana grande concert in the manchester arena, killing 22 people and injuring many more. the memories of that night are likely to stay with those who were there forever, but medical experts say that
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if people are still being adversely affected by trauma they should seek additional support. graham satchell reports. the tears are never far away, really. suddenly you catch yourself thinking, oh, my gosh, martin would have loved this. it's a shame he isn't there. we're in st ann's square, in the centre of manchester. it became the focus of remembrance, where thousands of people left flowers. figen murray lost her son martyn hett in the manchester attack. she's been a therapist for more than 20 years, but has decided she can no longer do herjob. i don't think, with what happened to me, that i'll ever be in a position to offer psychological support to anybody else, because i think i'm so damaged through this. figen is meeting 18—year—old kaitlin. on the night of the attack, kaitlin was knocked off her feet by the force of the blast,
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but escaped without physical injury. she became withdrawn, started having nightmares, and is now seeing a counsellor. it wasn't until a few weeks, i'd say, after, where it really hit me, where the guilt at me. the guilt — tell me a bit more about that. that we managed to walk out without a mark on us. obviously there are people who lost their lives. do you have nightmares and flashbacks? yes, all the time. i have nightmares about people — violent nightmares about, obviously, people trying to blow me up. she's obviously suffering from survivor's guilt. a lot of martyn's friends had that, as well. and with the help of therapy, obviously it's helping her to, kind of, normalise that feeling. this is the manchester resilience hub.
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it's an nhs organisation coordinating mental health services specifically for people caught up in the attack. it's about 12 weeks now since the attack. is that, sort of, the time you are talking about, where people here may need to access help? yeah, we view the 12—weeks period, post—incident, as a significant milestone. if you're still exhibiting symptoms at the 12—week point, they're probably not going to resolve without some form of help or intervention. the hub is helping more than 200 people access psychological support, but wants everyone who needs help to come forward. figen hasn't had any counselling herself, but has decided she will get help. i will definitely access it. i know i need it because i'm, like so many people, damaged to some extent. back in st ann's square, the sea of flowers left by well—wishers has all but gone.
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the memories, the pain of what happened will never go, but, with the right help, the hope is that life will become easier for those left behind. graham satchell, bbc news, manchester. the liberal democrats new leader, vince cable says he continues to support the legalisation of cannabis. his comments come as a series of politicians from across the political spectrum tell bbc newsbeat it's time for laws relating to the drug to be looked at. jim connolly has the details. at the last election the liberal democrats made headlines with one of the most eye—catching manifesto promises, to legalise cannabis. lib dem insiders tell us it wasn't that popular. so is it a policy the party continues to back? the evidence is clear that if you want to stop abuse and damage to young people, you've got to bring the trade into the open and out of the hands of the criminal underworld.
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attitudes to cannabis are changing across the world. take, for example, north america. in the us, 21 states have decriminalised personal possession, and eight have legalised it. next year canada is expected to go further and make the drug legal across the whole country. back in europe, portugal has some of the most liberal drug laws. all substances are decriminalised. we've come to meet the man often described as the architect of the portuguese system. we had one of the highest rates of problematic drug use in europe by the late ‘90s. 15, 16 years later we can look back and say that we were... of course, it's not a solved problem in our society, but we have a lot of improvement. cannabis is the most commonly used illegal drug in the uk. take, for example, england and wales — in the past year, more than 2 million people have admitted using it, and there's a growing campaign
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to change the law on the substance. united kingdom cannabis social clubs is an umbrella group campaigning for the drug to be freely available. it went from no clubs back in 2011 to more than 100 this year. these brighton members get together to eat meals with cannabis put into them. take a look at spain, portugal, canada and america — they are all coming through with progressive, forward—thinking policies that are basically spreading more of a positive impact and utilising the cannabis culture for the positive it can do for local community, for the industry, for medical patients, for recreational users thatjust want to have a social experience but not be criminalised for it. the government says it's aware of different approaches being taken abroad, but won't be changing how things are done here, arguing it's overly simplistic to say that legalisation works. so, whilst there's no chance of a change of law any time soon, these users say they'lljust carry on regardless. jim connolly, bbc news. in a moment a summary
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of the business news this hour, but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live. president trump indicates more us troops will be sent to afghanistan as he steps up the war against the taliban. four men accused of belonging to the terror cell behind the attacks in spain which killed 15 people, appear in court in madrid. ford becomes the latest car manufacturer to offer customers a cash incentive to trade in older models, in the drive for cleaner air. in a moment, chasing the sun — james cook goes on board a flight for eclipse super—fa ns, as they get the chance to witness the event at 40,000 feet in the air. in the business news... owner of bhs, dominic chappell is
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being prosecuted for failing to provide pension documents to the regulator. they lost 11,000 jobs and there was a £571 million like all in there was a £571 million like all in the pension fund. shares in doorstep lender provident financial have slumped 58% after the firm issued its second profit warning in months. it says it now expects to make losses of £80 million to £120 million as its debt collection rates have dropped to 57% compared with a previous rate of 90% in 2016. its chief executive, peter crook, has resigned. sports direct has increased its stake in debenhams to 21%. the sporting goods group, which is majority owned by mike ashley, has increased its holding from 16% in the department store group. a few more lines on the prosecution launched into the former owner of
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bhs, dominic chappell. prosecuted by the pensions regulator over the failure to provide information into the sale of the retailer. you will remember he bought bhs from... excuse me. he bought it from philip green for £1 back in 2015. a lot of money involved in that deal and we know already that there is a black hole in the finances, £571 million missing. also under his tenure £8.4 million was taken out of the company. £6 million of it is still owed after the chain collapsed last year. this is what the pensions regulator wants to get to the bottom of and says it will investigate based purely on going to provide information but clearly there are questions about the collapse of the retailer last, put into liquidation in may. dominic chappell is a former bankrupt and says he will challenge the court ruling. more for you on that at the top of the hour at 12
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o'clock. car giant ford is the latest car company to launch an incentive for consumers to trade in their cars over seven years old, by offering £2,000 off some new models. unlike schemes by bmw and mercedes, which are only for diesels, ford will also accept petrol cars. ford said all of the part—exchanged vehicles will be scrapped, having an immediate effect on air quality. the boss of ford in the uk says it's not just about selling more cars and consumers have a role to play too. well, i think we've been doing lots about it over a long period. as you see, emission levels have been improving all the way through, and some of the cars that we're going to scrap to the new vehicles, the air quality is improved by 96% on some of the particulars, so we've gone a long way so far. but consumers have been slow to adopt new technology. only 5% of the car market today is either electric or hybrid, and that's driven by either the cost of the vehicle or things like range anxiety that some customers have. so it's got to be technology that's real, relevant, and available today that really
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enlightens the consumer. that is the uk boss of ford speaking to us earlier. ian plummer is from auto trader. how significant is this? board is not the first and probably won't be the last but there is a slight change from other firms that have done this, —— ford, they say it is accepting petrol and diesel cards. also including commercial vehicles. significant for a particular reason in the side and skill of ford, the market leader in the uk by some distance. what they do in the market has more impact. but equally it will bea has more impact. but equally it will be a closely regarded action by other manufacturers, who may look to follow. is it not to cut pollution? we heard from the boss of ford uk that it is about improving air quality but is it also just about selling cars?
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is it enough to cut pollution on its own? know. other manufacturers you mentioned also participate in similar schemes to have a significant impact. you would need a broader programme and perhaps that is the angle the industry and the government needs to look at any more coherent action that we were generally support in the automotive industry. it is about selling cars? clearly ford will be hoping to sell more cars for money but they will also be spending money to do theirs and they are taking the bold step of committing to scrap the cars which, as you said, other manufacturers are not. by making mass debating they will have a positive impact on consumer benefit who want cheaper ca rs consumer benefit who want cheaper cars as well as the pollution effect as recent vehicles they sell. they said they will extend the scheme if it is popular but how does this differfrom just a scheme if it is popular but how does this differ from just a general part exchange scheme? normally you sell your car exchange scheme? normally you sell yourcarand exchange scheme? normally you sell your car and you get a bit of money from the one you buy in future. how is this different?
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in this case clearly the car has been committed to scrap. it won't remain on the road so that older more polluting vehicle will disappearfrom our more polluting vehicle will disappear from our roads. more polluting vehicle will disappearfrom our roads. it is going to be replaced by a engine which... diesel has been unfairly demonised in recent times but diesel represents the greatest part of fuel type searches we see. but a lot of customers buying diesel attractive. the new engines are clearer in co2 terms than petrol. the nitrogen oxide, they are almost as clean as petrol. a clear demand is present for those vehicles and we need to do great work as an industry but combine with government forces to communicate those messages to consumers that have interest in understanding more. thank you. a quick look at the market numbers and look at that. nearly 2% fall in provident financial after the debt collection... basically a big falloff in the debts it is managing
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to collect. it has changed the way does that but shares are down a massive... near 72%. one does that but shares are down a massive... near72%. one price does that but shares are down a massive... near 72%. one price is creeping back up above 15, the ftse 100 up but they are keeping an eye on the central bank in wyoming. you are up—to—date. more later. we have been going through the top jokes at the edinburgh fringe this morning. i want to read this, the best one i get from a business perspective. it is by mark simmons. combine harvesters and you will have a really big restaurant. what? you see, there is laughter. you just don't get it. if the anatomy. harvesters as a restaurant chain that combine them and you get a really good one. very goal. it takes a while. think about it. quite. indeed. millions of people watched as the moon passed in front of the sun yesterday giving the us its first total solar eclipse in almost a century. but it actually began more than 800 miles from american shores — in a desolate spot over
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the north pacific ocean. a handful of lucky passengers — including media, scientists and employees of alaska airlines — got the chance to see the spectacle before anyone else. they watched in awe from a boeing 737 which chased the moon's shadow at 40,000 feet in the air. our north america correspondent james cook was on board. as the day dawned, the chase was on. the moon was after the sun, and we were on the tail of both. from portland, in the north—western state of oregon, the flight dubbed solar one struck out across the pacific. by the time we arrived, 800 miles from the shore, our satellite was already taking a chunk out of our star. ten, nine, eight, seven... and as the moment of totality drew close, time itself seemed to speed up. # it's the final countdown...# oh, my god! totality, totality. it's such an incredibly breathtaking experience.
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like, you cannot describe it. words don't do itjustice, and neither do pictures or video, or anything. it'sjust incredible to witness, really it is. it'sjust amazing. how was that? it was amazing. it was more beautiful than i had ever anticipated, more beautiful than any picture i have seen. it was diverse in colour and density, and it was just amazing. just too short, it was really just too short. jasmine shepherd and her brother were the envy of their fellow americans, having won a competition to see the eclipse fully 15 minutes before the waiting world. we're so lucky to have viewed the spectacular event. we'rejust in awe, and humbled and grateful. it was a great experience, and everybody on board was so excited. and the countdown to totality was very cool, so we were very excited. god is good, that's all we can say, god is good. that was a breathtaking moment, but it was over in a flash.
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the shadow is now reaching towards the united states, where millions more are watching and waiting. but only those on board could save that they were the first to see the spectacle, from a front row seat in the theatre of the heavens. james cooke, bbc news, above the pacific ocean. i will leave you to judge whether it was better to be on that train or a cruise ship where people combine to eclipse viewing with bonnie tyler. singing her classic hit total eclipse of the heart. # once upon a time, there was light in my life. # now there's only love in the dark. # nothing i can say. crowd: # total eclipse of the heart. come on! whoo! it is likely they know the words. i
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think she was losing her voice. now let's look at the weather. good morning. we have a bit of cloud across the uk and some misty and murky conditions this morning. feeling warm and humid out there at the moment. the mist is stubborn. this is in staffordshire. you can see grey skies. interesting clouds this morning, this is a certain type of cloud spotted in devon this morning. but not all doom and gloom because there is some sunshine out there. lovely beach scene in cornwall. that cloud across central and eastern and southern parts of england will thin and break. sunny spells coming through in that cloud. all under the influence of this warm tropical air influencing conditions at the moment. with all that there isa at the moment. with all that there is a bit of moisture and the risk of heavy and thundery showers pushing into northern ireland during this afternoon. eventually to the far west of scotland. scotland, rather
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cloudy and one or two showers. across northern england some showers and in the midlands and wales and southern england but mostly dry. and where that cloud breaks up you will get sunshine and it could turn fairly warm with the bridge is potentially at 25 or 27 celsius. good evening and tonight, as that heavy and thundery rain out of northern ireland pushes into scotland, could be problems. some localised flooding associated with that. warm and humid air at the moment, will gradually be pushed away towards the east and we find it fresh conditions. slowly moving in. that is wednesday. in the morning we start up wet across scotland and northern england with heavy rain around here and i gradually clears away out to the north sea. elsewhere plenty dry weather and sunny spells and scattered showers coming into the west. you notice it will feel pressure on wednesday with temperatures down by some degrees in north and western areas. still holding onto some want across the south—east of england. 2a or 25 celsius. the wednesday into
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thursday, fresher air firmly with us and we hope there will be some weather fronts coming in from the west later on thursday and friday. scattered showers likely on thursday. most of those across northern areas, and some could be on the heavy side, but still some dry and fine weather for much of england and fine weather for much of england and wales. temperatures down by some degrees to 17 or 22 celsius. by friday a similar picture with northern areas having the bulk of showers and further south it should be more dry with 20 or 2a celsius. into the bank holiday weekend, things looking very uncertain at the moment. if you have plans, stay tuned to the. bye—bye. —— stay tuned to the forecast. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at midday. "fight to win", president trump
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indicates more us troops will be sent to afghanistan as he steps up the war against the taliban. we are not nation—building again. we are killing terrorists. the former owner of bhs, dominic chappell, is to be prosecuted by the pensions regulator, following the collapse of the high street store. four men accused of belonging to the terror cell behind the attacks in spain which killed 15 people, appear in court in madrid. we'll hear from the british man who comforted a young victim caught up in the attack in las ramblas. also this hour, getting cash for your old car. ford becomes the latest to offer customers an incentive to trade in older models, in the drive for cleaner air. i'm not a fan of the new pound coin. but then again, i hate all change. so did it make you laugh? it worked for ken cheng,
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he took home funniestjoke award at the edinburgh festival fringe. good afternoon. it's tuesday 22nd august. welcome to bbc newsroom live. president trump says the us will "fight to win" in afghanistan, as he unveils a new strategy in the war against the taliban. in a major speech last night he said that he had changed his mind about withdrawing troops from the country. he also called on nato allies to do more. our washington correspondent aleem maqbool reports. the man who always said he didn't want to intervene abroad came to announce the intervention in afghanistan is going to ratchet up. but said it was for
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the right reasons. we are a partner and a friend, but we will not dictate to the afghan people how to live, or how to govern their own complex society. we are not nation—building again. we are killing terrorists. he announced the lifting of a cap on the number of us troops in afghanistan, and that there would be no time limit on them staying there. my original instinct was to pull out, and historically, i like following my instincts. but all my life, i've heard that decisions are much different when you sit behind the desk in the oval office. a very different donald trump to the one who said this kind of thing right through the obama years. and that is the basis on which he campaigned
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as a presidential candidate, that he wouldn't spend american resources abroad, but here at home. he says he now realises that pulling out american troops from afghanistan would leave a vacuum for militants. our primary mission for coming into afghanistan after 911 was to kill terrorists, and i think he's going back to that original purpose, that the reason we came into afghanistan was because of what happened on 911, and the fact that afghanistan was being used as a sanctuary and safe haven for terrorists. the toughest words of his speech were directed at afghanistan's neighbour, pakistan. we have been paying pakistan billions and billions of dollars, at the same time they are housing the very terrorists that we are fighting. but that will have to change, and that will change immediately. how the president expects pakistan to comply, and more broadly, how he believes the us will in his words fight
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to win in afghanistan, wasn't made entirely clear. the only thing that is certain is that there's still no end in sight for america's longest war. aleem maqbool, bbc news, in washington. our correspondent secunder kermani is in kabul and gave us the reaction from afghanistan to president trump's announcement. at the moment we are waiting for the afghan president ashraf ghani to address the nation and give his response to president trump's announcement. i've been speaking to the former head of the afghan army, and he told me he welcomed what president trump had to say. the afghan foreign minister has also said he welcomes it. as you say, security has been steadily deteriorating in afghanistan. last year saw nearly 3,500 civilians
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die as a result of the violence. there had been concerns here that if america were to make a complete withdrawal from the country, then that could boost the taliban. instead, president trump seems to be quite clear that he doesn't want to see the taliban take over afghanistan. at the same time, he says he believes eventually some form of political settlement with the taliban will be necessary in order to bring about peace. that is pretty much the position of the afghan government here. overall, things are being very much welcomed in afghanistan. with me now is james glancy, a former royal marines officer, who did three tours in afghanistan, operating across 1a of the country's 3a provinces, and also joining me the bbc‘s security correspondent frank gardner. if you could paint at a picture of
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the security situation in afghanistan at the moment? roughly 40% of afghanistan is now under taliban control, certainly by night. the rate of the afghan government doesn't extend far from coble and the provincial capitals. i think a lot of people thought it was probably going to go this way eventually. the main reason being that the local populace, very few have actually been to kabul. in the areas of southern afghanistan whether tanner barn are most active, people tend to... their world is around their village, their clan and their tribe. they see local police and law enforcement as a form of representing the government. in many cases those police are corrupt. they are kidnapping children, taking bribes, shaking people down at checkpoints. this is where we were in 1996 when the taliban came to power. which suggests that sending
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more troops in could be part of a solution? donald trump came to power suggesting he was going to withdraw american forces from afghanistan. the same way nixon did in vietnam. now his military advisers have said this would be a disaster, the taliban would gain control of afghanistan and allow ices freedom to operate. he asked his military generals for a solution and unsurprisingly they've given him a military option. this is a short—term solution and its welcome because it stops isis having a freedom in afghanistan but it's definitely not a long—term solution. so what is a long—term solution? presumably a concerted international effort to improve security on the ground and also rebuilt and also
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building institutions that people nationwide believe in? absolutely, it has to be regional. donald trump says we aren't there nation build. his out his military to essentially go terrorist hunting. in the long term that will be counter—productive. term that will be counter— productive. there term that will be counter—productive. there needs to be arrangement with the chinese, iranians, pakistanis and indians in order to create a solution. and potentially embracing the chinese economic initiative, extending that into afghanistan could be a solution for the future. one of the countries that came in for most criticism in the speech was pakistan, who he accused of harbouring terrorists. pakistani officials at the highest levels have again said they don't do that. how much of a problem is pakistan in this? it's both an ally and a problem for the united states and a problem for the united states and for afghanistan. the border is porous, that's a generous
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description of it. pakistan has been fighting its own insurgency. it's lost well over 1000 troops fighting the insurgency in the west of the country. but there's no question that there are countless cases of raiding parties coming from pakistani soil across the border into afghanistan, blowing things up, attacking and killing people and then retreating across the border into pakistan, into areas where the pakistani federal government don't really have control. so there is a problem for pakistan because they don't really have control in certain areas. is there anything diplomats suggest that could work in changing this combustible situation? you've got to remember that for pakistan, their big issue isn't afghanistan, not the taliban, it's india. india is their long—term folk. anything which makes life difficult for india, they are going to be
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interested in. they are very concerned about the idea of india building up influence in afghanistan. president trump is talking about forging closer relations with india is going to worry the inter—services intelligence group in pakistan who have got close links with some of the jihadists groups in that area. you mentioned vietnam's earlier. inevitably the longer american troops stay on the ground in afghanistan, comparisons will be made and people will ask whether it is worth it. having done three tours, do you believe that in the long run it is worth it? in the short term, the time british forces are in afghanistan, we noticed there we re are in afghanistan, we noticed there were not many attacks on uk mainland soil. in a sense we created a protective bubble for the uk where terrorists were attracted to fight off over there which is a good thing. but the money spent, the blood of soldiers lives lost, hasn't created stability. it hasn't built
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the nation in the way we hope to do so. the nation in the way we hope to do so. so the military strategy, we can clearly see from the soviet invasion, the military strategy isn't going to solve the problems of afghanistan and create stability. it has to be political and economic. do you see any signs of some sort of political and economic solution in the making? not with this intervention at the moment by donald trump because he has essentially handed authority and accountability for operations to the military. i do go back and speak to people in afghanistan. they have a great country with young people aspiring to have a successful society. that's what needs to be invested in. bombing terrorists, that will only work for the short term. in the long term, we have to engage with the nations around afghanistan and with the people. your final thought on
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what james has had the people. your final thought on whatjames has had to the people. your final thought on what james has had to say?” the people. your final thought on what james has had to say? i started with the ghost at the feast but don't forget isis. they are building up don't forget isis. they are building upa don't forget isis. they are building up a presence in afghanistan. the more they get driven out of syria and iraq, the more they will be interested in yemen and afghanistan. watch that one. thank you very much. the former owner of the collapsed retailer bhs is to be prosecuted. the pensions regulator say they have decided to take action against dominic chappell, after he failed to provide information and documents requested during an investigation into the sale of the chain. bhs went into administration last year, with the loss of about 11,000 jobs. let's cross live to our business correspondent ben thompson. remind us of the background on this and whether this announcement is much of a surprise? you may remember
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in 2015 dominic chappell bought vhs from sir philip greene. he paid £1 for it in 2015 —— vhs. the company was pretty heavily in debt. lots of questions about what deal was done at the time. the pensions regulator now says it wants further information. the deadline has passed for him to provide data to the pensions regulator and he didn't do so. so many questions as far as that deal is concerned, what money changed hands. when bhs fell into administration last year, 11,000 jobs were left hanging in the balance. there was also a black hole in the pension fund worth 571 million. that affected 19,000 pension holders who were either working or had worked at bhs in the past. they now clearly want answers. since then we know that sir philip green put his hand in his pocket and
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provided more money to try and plug that black hole. nonetheless the pensions regulator now says it wants further information. it wants to prosecute dominic chappell for failing to comply with the investigation. thank you. four men accused of being part of a terror cell which killed 15 people in spain last week are appearing in court this morning. the suspects arrived at a jailjust outside of the city last night. the judge questioning them is deciding what charges to press. police in catalonia say they shot dead the suspected driver of the van which ploughed into pedestrians in barcelona on thursday. younes abouyaaqoub was found hiding in a vineyard 30 miles west of the city. one of the people who was in las vegas when that attack unfolded was
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harry athwell. thank you very much for joining harry athwell. thank you very much forjoining us. how are you? still in shock i think. it's going to take a while to recover. one of the reasons that your presence in the city during the attack came to public attention was because you we re public attention was because you were photographed cradling a child in the aftermath of the attack. you weren't actually an las ramblas at the time that the van ploughed down, tell us what happened. the time that the van ploughed down, tell us what happenedlj the time that the van ploughed down, tell us what happened. i was with a group of friends, we were in a restau ra nt a n group of friends, we were in a restaurant an las ramblas. but we we re restaurant an las ramblas. but we were sitting on a balcony so we could see a bit of what went on. we heard the screaming. then we obviously saw the van compline down and hit pedestrians. we were
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u psta i rs and hit pedestrians. we were upstairs ina and hit pedestrians. we were upstairs in a first—floor restau ra nt. upstairs in a first—floor restaurant. then you saw the attack ta ke restaurant. then you saw the attack take place, what did you then decide to do? as soon as i saw the van ploughing into pedestrians, the first thing i thought was is this really happening? then i realised it was a terrorist attack. i turned to the group and said stay where you are. i ran outside to see who i could help. it was then that you saw this child lying on the pavement? yes, when i got down there i ran into the middle of las ramblas. i looked to my left and there were bodies on the left—hand side and on the right—hand side. i turned and click up towards the square, and there were bodies left and right. but i saw the body of a child in the middle and it was the only body there. i was drawn to it straightaway, at which point i ran
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to go and see what i could do with regards to this child. drawn to it simply to help? i've got a son who is eight years old. the moment i saw this child i thought of my son. i knew it was a boy. i could see he was wearing shorts. i immediately ran to see what i could do to help him. was there anything you could do? when i got there i checked his pulse, he didn't have a pulse. i put my hand on his back, he was lying on his front. i put my hand on his back to see if he was breathing and he wasn't breathing. i stayed with him for that full ten minute period and ididn't for that full ten minute period and i didn't detect a pulse or see that he was breathing at all. it's horrendous to think of what anybody goes through in a situation like this, especially when you are so close to those who have been physically caught up in the attack.
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one of the things that i've found ex presses one of the things that i've found expresses the brutality of the sort of attacks much more than the images of attacks much more than the images of the violence or the discussion of the people who did it, is the compassion that people shown in these moments. did you find that you got support from people locally in the aftermath of this? i know that you decided as a family to stay in barcelona for a bit longer. there we re barcelona for a bit longer. there were three days of mourning in barcelona. across spain actually there were three days of mourning. we decided to stay because i think we owed it to barcelona. we owed it to those people killed and injured in the attack. and also to show the terrorists that we aren't going to change our way of life. this is who we are and we will fight regardless. you aren't going to kill our children. and we will do everything in our power to stand up against you. for me, i've had so many
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messages, i've had so many calls. the reality now for me is to try and awaken people and say we need to do something about it as the common person, the common man. we need to understand there are things we can do which is to be vigilant and see what's actually going on. open your eyes and ears and if you see something suspicious, report it. let's try and prevent these things from happening because inevitably they will happen again. just expand on that thought about what individuals can do, there will be many people who think they would never have done what you did which was to leave the balcony and go and see if you could help people. there will also be people who wonder what on earth they could do, and let's face it it's a very small chance this would happen to any individual watching this programme, but it is something that is happening time and time again. what would you say to people in terms of how individuals might approach going to tourist spots in major cities in europe at
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the moment? as i said, we shouldn't be hiding for these people. we've still got to go about our daily life. they want to put that fear inside, we can't hide. what we can do as individuals is to start to realise that how do we prevent this from happening. that's why we look within our own communities to see what is going on. they did not differentiate. i walked down las ramblas beforehand and there were people from all different faiths, from all across the world. they didn't differentiate between who was muslim, seek, christian. they ploughed into people and killed a lot of people and injured 120 people plus. they didn't differentiate. we need to start to come together, start to realise how we prevent this from happening. if you happen to be on holiday or you're out shopping, it's then aboutjust being the normal man and going to help people.
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ultimately that could be your family as well. is there a single image that sticks in your mind from these awful events last thursday?” wouldn't say sticks in my mind but any timei wouldn't say sticks in my mind but any time i see that photograph of me over the child, i think haunt is the better word. i can't look at it. every time i look at it it takes straight back. i can't look at that image right now. and when it takes you straight back what are you feeling? pain, anger, hurt, remorse. it takes me back to the child and brings back those emotions i was feeling at the time being there. but also now anger in the sense of how we can stop this, we can make these terrorists stop doing what they are doing. we have to fight them. and really make sure we stop this from
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happening again. harry athwal, it's going to take a lot of people a long time to come to terms with this and i'm sure it's going to take you a long time, look after yourself. thank you. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. president trump indicates more us troops will be sent to afghanistan as he steps up the war against the taliban. the former owner of bhs dominic chappell is to be prosecuted by the pensions regulator following the collapse of the high street store. four men are accused of belonging to the terror cell behind the attacks in spain which killed 15 people, appear in court in madrid. ina people, appear in court in madrid. in a moment, is it better transport key to the success of the northern powerhouse in england? we'll be live in leeds after the former chancellor tells the prime minister to back hs three. now for the sport. good afternoon. 200 premier league
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goals, including two in his first two games back at everton. it is cla p two games back at everton. it is clap that wayne rooney says he is focused on and not an england recall. he became only the second player to reach the landmark of 200 with a goal in everton's1—1 draw at man city. raheem sterling got city's equaliser. but it's wayne rooney who's had a significant impact since returning to goodison park. he's proven he wanted to come here and he's enjoying his football. when you've got someone of his ability enjoying his football. he ran around the most tonight as well. it's nice to see, when the ball comes in the box he is first on the receiving end, it ends up in the back of the net and it's fantastic. hopefully there's many more to come. antiracism campaign group kick it out have asked the fa to conduct a comprehensive and independent review
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into eniola alu ko's comprehensive and independent review into eniola aluko's claims against england boss mark sampson. the striker has accused him of bullying and discrimination. two investigations have cleared him of wrongdoing. he the —— he denies the claims. the fa insist the timing of her being dropped is purely coincidental. the fact is, a week before i was dropped from the england team for the first time in 11 years, i had given my account of what i felt was discrimination towards me, what i felt was a bullying culture. so being part of that cultural review has potentially cost me my england career. eni aluko perceived and £80,000 settlement following her initial accusations, although a review concluded she hadn't been singled out for criticism. the fa said the settle m e nt criticism. the fa said the settlement was made to avoid disrupting the england team's preparations for euro 2017. england are taking on scotland in a crucial
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hockey match in the netherlands. england only need a draw to make the semifinals, while a scotland win would send them through at england's expense. they've just returned from half—time and england had just taken the lead. 1—0 to england. ferrari has announced that kimi raikkonen will continue to race with them next season. his contract was due to expire at the end of the year. that's all the sport for now, more in the next hour. the former chancellor george osborne has called on theresa may to commit to building a high—speed rail line across the north of england. the government has said it is investing billions of pounds across the north, as the chairman of the northern powerhouse partnership, mr osborne has told the bbc more money needs to be spent on public transport outside london. i think the conservative government over recent yea rs i think the conservative government over recent years made a big commitment to the north of england, to the northern powerhouse. but if
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theresa may's government is serious about building the northern powerhouse, then they now need to commit this autumn to the high—speed rail links between the northern cities that will make the whole bigger than the parts and attract business and jobs to the north of england for decades to come. how would these proposals affect the main towns and cities in the north of england? our correspondent dan whitworth is outside leeds train station. for thousands of people, the reality of train travel across the north will be a daily occurrence but for those who don't know, please give us an illustration of a typical journey. some of the frustrations that people in the north of england feel are typified by this particular example. i basically had a look online this morning. from hull to liverpool, a journey of 130 miles, will take you 2.5 hours. a main line coming out of london to york, a much
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longerjourney of 200 miles, but in terms of the time it takes, it will ta ke terms of the time it takes, it will take less than two hours to get from london to york. that typifies the kind of frustration felt by a lot of people in the north of england about train travel across the north of england. you mentioned the liverpool to hulljenny, i did thatjenny and i had to make a change. it was awful and packed and people were complaining all the way —— i did the journey. there is a point that campaigners have and is there much expectation they can get the government to pay up? as we know, and as we said in your introduction, this isn't the first time we've heard this from george osborne. when heard this from george osborne. when he was the chancellor, he obviously launched the northern powerhouse initiative. no longer an mp but he's still chair of the northern powerhouse partnership. he is calling this morning on theresa may and the government to commit to that high—speed line between hull and
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liverpool with priority given to the electrification of the line between leeds and manchester. he says that happens, estimates of cost suggest around the £7 billion mark. but if that investment was made the return would be worth it and it would bring an extra 7 million people to within an extra 7 million people to within a90 an extra 7 million people to within a 90 minute journey an extra 7 million people to within a 90 minutejourney of an extra 7 million people to within a 90 minute journey of the an extra 7 million people to within a 90 minutejourney of the north an extra 7 million people to within a 90 minute journey of the north of england, and three times as many businesses as well. we've got the new metropolitan mayors meeting in leeds tomorrow where you are. presumably this sort of infrastructure initiative will be on their agenda? 10096 infrastructure initiative will be on their agenda? 100% it will be. the intervention of the former chancellor this morning, very interesting timing, bearing in mind that meeting of northern towns and cities, mayers and local leaders, happening in leeds tomorrow. part of their frustration that will be voiced is what they see as the government's privatisation of public spending money on public transport in london, to the detriment of elsewhere in the uk, certainly to
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the detriment of the north of england. i think that frustration from local politicians is mirrored in large swathes of the general public. 70,000 people have signed a petition demanding more money from national government to be spent on public transport projects in the north. as you say the government are saying they are spending billions already to better connect communities and to improvejenny times. thank you. breaking news, over the last 48 hours we've been talking about the ussjohn s mccain, the warship hit by a tank involved ina the warship hit by a tank involved in a collision with a merchant ship off the coast of singapore. there is news coming in from the afp news agency that divers who have been searching for ten missing sailors have found human remains. earlier our correspondent in singapore told
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as the divers were looking inside the us naval ship because parts of the us naval ship because parts of the ship had become flooded. but we are having word from the commander of the us pacific fleet that human remains have been found. the divers we re remains have been found. the divers were able to locate some remains in those sealed compartments within the ship during their search. admiral scott swift has spoken to reporters, referring to the search by divers of compartments of the damaged warships. this is bbc news, coming up, chasing the moon and catching the sun, the lucky few who caught the solar eclipse before anybody else in the us. now let's head over to the weather. thank you very much and good afternoon. a slow start this morning with misty weather and low cloud and some low cloud settling along the
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hills but still tending to lift all the while over the next hours. a better chance of breaking up across england and wales through this afternoon. and some sunshine should feel quite warm. there are areas of rain. some showers towards the south—west and west country, slipping northwards. rain petering out across northern scotland and the main area of wet weather in northern ireland, could be heavy and thundery. lots of showers as you can see across the northern and western pa rt see across the northern and western part of england and wales. further east will be dry probably. a warmer day but a muggy day with 25 celsius or so. showers continue into the evening but wetter weather in northern ireland pushing into scotland, some heavy rain in western scotla nd scotland, some heavy rain in western scotland with thunderstorms and showers across the north of england. left with another warm and cloudy night like last night, 17 celsius. tomorrow a wet start for scotland and northern england, moving eastwards into the north sea, a band of cloud further south behind the sunshine coming through. some
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showers across northern ireland. the last of the warmth and humid air across east anglia and the south, otherwise turning fresher. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 12.30: president trump suggests more us troops will be sent to afghanistan to fight the war on terror. he says forces will stay and "fight to win" to avoid mistakes made in iraq. we are not nation—building again. we are killing terrorists. the pensions regulator has announced that it will prosecute the former owner of bhs, dominic chappell. he's accused of failing to provide information that was requested during the regulator's investigation into the sale of the company. four men accused of belonging to the terror cell behind the attacks in spain last week, which killed 15 people, appear in court in madrid. up to £2,000 for your old car — ford is the latest car company to launch a uk scrappage scheme
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for cars that are more than seven years old. the offer will also be the first to apply to petrol cars. a bit of breaking news from italy. you may be aware we have been telling you about the earthquake that happened on the island of ischia off the coast of naples at 9pm yesterday evening. we have seen television pictures of a seven—month—old child being pulled alive successfully from the rubble. now more good news. one person has died in that but there are people being pulled alive as we speak. at seven—month—old baby was pulled alive through the night. then a seven—year—old brother mattias and
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now the 11—year—old brother of both of those. they have managed to pull the last child free from the rubble after that magnitude for earthquake, which toppled. three children pulled alive from the rubble, three children from the same family. now the news from the united states overnight. donald trump has indicated that he'll send more american troops to afghanistan to fight the taliban. during the presidential campaign he had called for a speedy withdrawal from a conflict he named a total disaster. but in a televised address last night, the president said a rapid exit would create a vacuum that terrorists would fill. our troops will fight to win. we will fight to win. from now on, victory will have a clear definition. attacking our enemies, obliterating isis, crushing al-anda, preventing the taliban from taking over afghanistan, and stopping mass terror attacks against america
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before they emerge. as you imagine it would, reaction has been coming from around the world. earlier our political correspondent iain watson spoke about the british response to the president's speech. michael fallon, the defence secretary, has responded he welcomes the president's ongoing commitment to afghanistan and he welcomes the commitment, as he puts it, to stay the course in afghanistan. this coming, of course, from a president who, as a candidate for the presidency, had suggested that involvement in afghanistan would be a waste of time. now, we heard the president there say that this wasn't about nation—building, it was about killing terrorists, but in a phone call with the us defence secretary james mattis yesterday, michael fallon discussed rebuilding afg hanistan's fragile democracy. but, as i understand it, in that phone call there was no specific demand or request from america for britain to send more troops, and in fact actually we did send more troops in advance of the president's speech back in june, another 85, so just under 500 british troops
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are currently in afghanistan, including being involved in training missions. but it's certainly both nato allies united on being in afghanistan, and it now looks for the long haul. ian watson on the british government reaction. also reaction from those who have served in afghanistan. earlier today i spoke to colonel richard kemp, former commander of british forces in afghanistan. the reality is the taliban have control of a very large area of the country, and have every intention of gaining control of even more of it. it's only really because of the presence of international forces in afghanistan that they haven't taken over the whole place. i think it's important that president trump's new strategy makes an effort to push them back now, notjust to hold on to what is there but to push them back. i was pleased to see that he's said he's going to focus on killing terrorists, not on nation—building which i think has been a mistake made over many years now in afghanistan.
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i think perhaps the most significant thing he said was the importance he was placing on stopping pakistan from supporting the taliban. they've been on the wrong side of this war since it began, and it's time that stopped. it will require a huge amount of diplomatic and political effort, and it may not be possible because pakistan provide safe haven to terrorists in afghanistan, they provide support to them. unless that is stopped, i don't see how we can stop this situation from deteriorating further. we've heard pakistan's reaction to his words. they say they aren't a safe haven, as they have frequently done in the past denied that. how do you put pressure on pakistan to start helping more, which is clearly what president trump believes needs to happen? well, it has to be an international effort. i think the first thing that has to happen, if persuasion doesn't work,
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and it's not going to be easy to persuade pakistan, is that the us and other countries are providing various forms of aid money in vast amounts to pakistan. they need to reconsider that and see whether or not they should curtail it or significantly stop it. if that doesn't work, the next step is of course moves like international sanctions against pakistan for supporting terrorism. neither of those two things are desirable, but i think if there is a significant threat they might happen, it could persuade pakistan to rethink. that was the latest on president from's announcement on troops to afghanistan. closer to home... the government is publishing another paper giving details of its brexit negotiating strategy. it covers arrangements for consumers and businesses who need to resolve cross—border legal disputes after the uk leaves the eu. at the moment the eu decides which court cross—border legal
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disputes are resolved. thejustice secretary david lidington has been speaking to our political correspondent iain watson. if you're arguing about who has custody of the children, if you are a consumer and you think you've been diddled by a company that sold online in another country, you've got a system that says, right, these countries' courts are dealing with it under these circumstances, that's how it will be handled. no need for extra bureaucracy, no need to have different court cases in different countries and arguments about whose court counts the most. it seems to me this is something that will work well for every european country. it's putting our citizens first. so effectively we will still be after brexit accepting the verdicts of foreign courts? you do that under international conventions anyway, on a global basis. what we're about is having the right swift, clear mechanisms, so that when there is a cross—border dispute, because so many people
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live their lives across borders... marriages of people from different nationalities, long—distance marriages indeed. companies selling more and more across national frontiers, and that is happening more with online trade. you need a system that says if something goes wrong, if there's a dispute, whose courts is it that have the final say on this? and so what we want is a deal where everybody knows what the procedures are, so if you're a german wife divorcing a british husband, if you are a british parent whose kids are in greece and you're arguing about custody, if you are a consumer and you bought from a company in sweden and you're not happy with the product, there is a clear mechanism for address for arbitration, for settlement, without extra hassle, without extra court proceedings. with me now is the vice president of the law society christina blacklaws. thank you forjoining us this
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afternoon. thank you. a lot of these brexit position papers coming out seem terribly arcane to people and they think, hang on, aren't we getting away from the business some of us voted to leave the eu? why do we need to be worried about these particular areas? tell us why we need to be thinking about this aspect of the legal system. this is really important because it's about how we organise ourselves to resolve any problems or disputes we might have with somebody else in another eu or sometimes broader, because some of the things we signed up because some of the things we signed up to ensure we are covered for the whole of the world, so we know exactly what will happen and it will be as... nothing is particularly cheap but as cheap and easy and effective as possible, and it means that for business they have
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certainty. can you give an example? for example, if i allow my child to go and have a holiday in berlin with her dad who lives there, and he doesn't bring her back, that is against our agreement, and i knowi have got an effective remedy. i don't have to go to berlin or poland orany don't have to go to berlin or poland or any other european country. i can go to or any other european country. i can gotoa or any other european country. i can go to a british court and asked them to ensure that my child is returned. and that is the way it works at the moment? that is, yes. what are the options for the eu? we have heard a lot about transposing laws across. couldn't we say, we will carry on as we are? this is a really important consideration, not arcane, this is a really important consideration, notarcane, but this is a really important consideration, not arcane, but how we live our lives right here now today and affects every british citizen potentially. the rules we have at the moment, they do work well, so we need to either replace them or ensure that they can continue, and we have been lobbying ha rd continue, and we have been lobbying
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hard for the government to say this is important and this baby can't be thrown out with the bath water. we must ensure that british citizens' right are protected. in your lobbying do you get the impression the government, with everything else to think about when brexit, is listening? today's news means that it is and it isa today's news means that it is and it is a great step in the right direction. we want to ensure that we are continuing to work hard. to make sure they keep up with this commitment. thank you very much indeed. my thank you very much indeed. my pleasure. it's a case that's gripped — and now shocked — denmark. police investigating the disappearance of a female journalist during a trip with an inventor on his privately—built submarine, say the headless body of a woman has been found. peter madsen has been charged with killing kim wall. catriona renton reports. since kim wall went missing, the waters around sweden have been searched for her. now a female torso has been found. police said a cyclist saw a body in the sea and alerted them. this was kim wall and peter madsen
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on board his submarine the nautilus, pictured on the 10th of august. she had been researching a feature she was going to write about him and the 40—tonne submarine which he designed and built himself. she has not been seen since and was reported missing by her boyfriend, with divers, helicopters and boats out looking for her. peter madsen was spotted on the nautilus the next day. his submarine sank but he was rescued. peter... he initially claimed he had dropped kim wall off on one of copenhagen's islands, but now he says there was an accident, that she died and he buried her at sea, but he denies any wrongdoing. translation: my client has not confessed anything. my client still pleads not guilty to the charges against him. now police believe peter madsen sunk his own submarine and he has been charged with negligent manslaughter. peter madsen hit the headlines in 2008 when he managed to build the nearly 80m long vessel
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using online crowdfunding. a postmortem is currently being carried out on the body that's been found, as the investigation continues into what happened to kim wall. catriona renton, bbc news. now let's look at the headlines. president trump indicates more us troops will be sent to afghanistan as he steps up the war against the taliban. the pensions regulator has announced it will prosecute the former owner of bhs, dominic chappell, who is accused of failing to provide information requested during the regulator's investigation into the sale of the company. four men accused of belonging to the terror cell behind the attacks in spain, which killed 15 people, appear in court in madrid. ina in a moment, chasing the moon,
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catching the son, james cook goes on board a flight for eclipse super fa ns board a flight for eclipse super fans as they witnessed the event at 40,000 feet in the air. ford is the latest car company to launch an incentive for uk consumers to trade in cars over seven years old. it is offering people £2000 of some of its new models. the scheme will run until the end of the year. unlike a will run until the end of the year. unlikea similar will run until the end of the year. unlike a similar scrappage schemes by bmw and mercedes which were only for diesel cars, ford is also going to a cce pt for diesel cars, ford is also going to accept petrol cars. this is managing director of ford in britain. if you move to a modern car they are more efficient, they require less servicing. they may be cheaper to insure because of latest technology as well. you have to take the cost of motoring into account to make your decision. it's not for everyone but we are inviting those that are interested to come forward. earlier i spoke to a professor from
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the manchester business school and asked him whether the scheme by ford will have a direct impact on air quality. ford does not have any hybrid or battery car to sell a retail customer and the current generation of engines which will account for a large amount of the market this year, are five times or thereabouts more polluting on the road and the eu noxious limits. i don't think this will do much for clean air but it is about selling cars in a declining market. we are told that injuly new car registrations fell for the fourth consecutive month in a row and they have been hit by a variety of factors. how much is this, do you think, about another manufacturer trying to get people to buy new cars? almost 100%, is the answer. this is
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a reputational damage industry looking at the car markets which has a lwa ys looking at the car markets which has always been cyclical but it is, located. of course... people have been confused about diesel cars and the current generation of diesels is still dirty and people are worried about residual values of diesel cars and so car manufacturers... it is force—feeding networks with diesel ca rs force—feeding networks with diesel cars to sell and incentivising customers to buy cars. to buy cars that they can't apply this year which will keep the cash flow and the sales going until they can make the sales going until they can make the transition to the future. that was a professor from manchester business school. throughout the summer we have heard about forest fires in portugal but now croatian firefighters and military personnel are fighting wildfires across the adriatic coast. this is also
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including these places... the islands of hvar and brac. a dozen helicopters and join the fight to bring the fires under control. a trader has ripped through a town in china and this was ca ptu red through a town in china and this was captured by broadcasting media showing debris being stirred up as the traders well through a particular place, with reports of smashed windows on cars and apartments but it is unclear if there are any injuries. the tornado which struck on monday lasted around ten minutes. millions of people watched as the moon passed in front of the sun yesterday giving the us its first total solar eclipse in almost a century. but it actually began more than 800 miles from american shores —
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in a desolate spot over the north pacific ocean. a handful of lucky passengers — including media, scientists and employees of alaska airlines — got the chance to see the spectacle before anyone else. they watched in awe from a boeing 737 which chased the moon's shadow at 40,000 feet in the air. our north america correspondent james cook was on board. he had the luckiestjob in broadcasting probably. as the day dawned, the chase was on. the moon was after the sun, and we were on the tail of both. from portland, in the north—western state of oregon, the flight dubbed solar one struck out across the pacific. by the time we arrived, 800 miles from the shore, our satellite was already taking a chunk out of our star. ten, nine, eight, seven... and as the moment of totality drew close, time itself seemed to speed up. # it's the final countdown...#
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oh, my god! totality, totality. it's such an incredibly breathtaking experience. like, you cannot describe it. words don't do itjustice, and neither do pictures or video, or anything. it'sjust incredible to witness, really it is. it'sjust amazing. how was that? it was amazing. it was more beautiful than i had ever anticipated, more beautiful than any picture i have seen. it was diverse in colour and density, and it was just amazing. just too short, it was really just too short. jasmine shepherd and her brother were the envy of their fellow americans, having won a competition to see the eclipse fully 15 minutes before the waiting world. we're so lucky to have viewed the spectacular event. we'rejust in awe, and humbled and grateful. it was a great experience, and everybody on board was so excited.
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and the countdown to totality was very cool, so we were very excited. god is good, that's all we can say, god is good. that was a breathtaking moment, but it was over in a flash. the shadow is now reaching towards the united states, where millions more are watching and waiting. but only those on board could say that they were the first to see the spectacle, from a front row seat in the theatre of the heavens. james cooke, bbc news, above the pacific ocean. depending on your perspective they we re depending on your perspective they were either at the lucky ones or the people on a cruise ship. they combined eclipse viewing with bonnie tyler in person singing her classic hit total eclipse of the heart. # once upon a time, there was light in my life. # now there's only love in the dark. # nothing i can say. crowd: # total eclipse of the heart.
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come on! yeah! whoo! iam very i am very sorry. you will be singing that all day now. bonnie tyler on a cruise ship watching the eclipse. who would have thought it? a comedian called ken cheng has won the tenth annual funniestjoke of the fringe at edinburgh. the joke won 33% of a public vote on a short list of gags picked by comedy critics. have been reading some of the others this morning. earlier he told it to the bbc‘s victoria derbyshire programme. i'm not a fan of the new pound coin. but then again, i hate all change. how do people normally react to that? they usually groan. it's a groaner. it gets a lot of groans. it has won you the title at the edinburgh fringe. what did you think
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when you got that? did you expect it would be of the calibre to win such an impressive title? no. i was very shocked. i didn't even know it was being considered that much. did you put yourself up for it? did you have to campaign? no. i think someone saw my show and put it through and put it through. journalists put together the list. how did you come up with the joke? i think itjust came to me. i don't think there was any process where you sit down and come up with a joke. am i right in thinking that you came up with it some time ago? yeah, i came up with it when it first got announced there was going to be a new pound coin. it's nice i can bring it back now it's in circulation. that was in 2014. how many times have you told that joke? i didn't actually tell it on stage back then. i only introduced it in this show. i am doing a show at the friend
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and i thought i'd put it in. i am doing a show at the fringe and i thought i'd put it in. i expect you'll be telling it many more times after this. yes. do you think you will tire of telling it? yeah, i think i've already tired, just from doing it about ten times this morning. ok, have you got any other jokes that you'd like to tell us? yeah, i've got a knock knockjoke. do you want to hear it? yes, please. knock knock. who's there? auntie. auntie who? i should point out at this stage that my aunt's name is auntie hu. why don't players wear socks? because they have got bare feet. that is from my daughter. —— bearers. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. coming up next on the bbc news channel, it's the news at one with jane hill. now let's take a look at the weather. it has been a struggle this morning but we should see more sunshine
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breaking through the low cloud this afternoon to do wonders for the temperatures. 22 celsius in cornwall ideal weather for a temperatures. 22 celsius in cornwall ideal weatherfor a dog temperatures. 22 celsius in cornwall ideal weather for a dog walk but not ideal weather for a dog walk but not ideal earlier on today. in the staffordshi re ideal earlier on today. in the staffordshire hells in the peak district that low cloud was slower to left. but we shall see bright new skies across many parts of england and wales, already some bursts of sunshine. also some showers not far away from the south—west, heading into the west country up towards wells possibly. the main wet weather is developing in ireland heading towards northern ireland, this rain turns heavily to the afternoon, accompanied by some thundery bursts as well. still some bits and pieces of rain across the northern half of scotland, through the afternoon, and some showers developing as we warm up some showers developing as we warm upa some showers developing as we warm up a touch in northern england. some sunshine further south across wales and the midlands and southern england, can't rule out a shower. for the most part it will be dry with the bridge is widely 24 or 25 celsius. also perhaps a touch higher than that in some places. in warmer day and more humid. but with all
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this rain to look at, it moves through northern ireland and has been to scotland to get heavy bursts of rain and thunderstorms as well. could be an inch of rain in some places in western part of scotland. not much rain further south. some showers for northern england into wales perhaps but another warm and humid night like last night, 17 celsius. humid air ahead of this weather front here, and this is the main focus of change tomorrow. still heavy rain and perhaps across northern england, certainly across scotland, pushing out into the north sea. more cloud heading eastwards for the self. behind it sunshine returns and one or two showers. last of the humid air across the south—east and east anglia, importing fresh air on a westerly breeze. temperatures nearer 19 or 20 celsius. still pleasant in sunshine. that warmer air out on the way and into fresher conditions but they can we get to thursday. low—pressure sent into the northwest always —— all week, but you're turning wet thursday and friday. in general across the northern half of uk, more
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likely to catch a shower. heavier showers in scotland and northern ireland. drierfor showers in scotland and northern ireland. drier for england showers in scotland and northern ireland. drierfor england and showers in scotland and northern ireland. drier for england and wales particularly as you head for the self. to thursday and friday probably going to be completely dry. some cloud and sunshine but quite light. president trump says more us troops will be sent to afghanistan to fight the taliban the president says he's changed his mind — and that us troops are needed, to stamp out terrorism. we must ensure they have every weapon to apply swift, decisive and overwhelming force. our troops will fight to win, they will fight to win. we'll have the latest from washington. also this lunchtime... four men accused of belonging to the terrorist cell that carried out the barcelona attacks, appear in court in spain. rescue workers are searching for people trapped in collapsed buildings, after an earthquake hit the italian island of ischia, killing two people.
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a call to build a high—speed rail across the north of england —
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