Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 23, 2017 4:00pm-5:01pm BST

4:00 pm
cyclist cleared of manslaughter after he knocked down a pedestrian who later died from her injuries. he was found guilty of a lesser charge. theresa may insists the supremacy of eu judges will end after brexit. under government proposals, the rights of eu citizens in the uk would be dealt with by britishjudges. when we leave the european union, we will leave the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice. the home office admits sending letters to some eu citizens in the uk, wrongly telling them that a decision had been made to deport them. when i opened this, i could not believe my eyes. seeing words like "a decision has now been taken to remove you from the united kingdom". as the 20th anniversary of princess diana's death approaches, prince harry talks to the bbc about the night of that fatal car crash. she'd had quite a severe head injury, but she was very much still alive on the back—seat, and those people that caused the accident,
4:01 pm
instead of helping, were taking photographs of her dying on the back—seat. photographs of her dying on the back-seat. regional leaders meet in leeds to demand the same investment in transport links as in london. also in the next hour, flooding in northern ireland. firefighters rescued 93 people who were trapped in cars or houses after heavy rainfall last night. and england pulse nightclub goal—scorer wayne rooney announces he is retiring from international football, with immediate effect. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. a cyclist, who knocked down a mother—of—two as she crossed the street, has been found guilty at the old bailey of "wanton and furious driving". but charlie alliston, who was 18 at the time the incident took place, has been cleared of manslaughter. danjohnson has more on the case.
4:02 pm
it was a split second encounter with a bike that ended cambridge's life. she was crossing a busy london street in her lunch break when she was hit. charlie alastair and was the cyclist, 18 at the time, a former career, who said he tried to swerve. but the bike he was riding should never have been on the road. it was designed for the velodrome. without gears, and crucially no brakes. charlie alastair and claimed he did not know he needed a break to ride on the road —— charlie alliston. he was doing about 18 mph as he approached this junction. alliston. he was doing about 18 mph as he approached thisjunction. the lights are green. he said he saw kim brake stepping out into the registry on the crossing, looking at her phone. he called out and slow down to less than 1a mph, called out again and swerve to avoid her, but
4:03 pm
he told the court she stepped back into his path. after the crash, charlie alliston shouted at kim briggs. he didn't realise how seriously she was injured but she had suffered catastrophic head injuries and died a week later in hospital. he was charged with manslaughter, and under a law from 1861, with causing bodily harm by wa nton 1861, with causing bodily harm by wanton orfurious 1861, with causing bodily harm by wanton or furious trading. but the jury wanton or furious trading. but the jury —— driving. but the wanton or furious trading. but the jury -- driving. but thejury decided charlie alliston was not responsible for the death of kim briggs. he has been cleared of manslaughter but convicted of injuring her by riding recklessly. he could now face two years in prison. on the evening of the crash, charlie alliston wrote online, yes, it is herfault, but no charlie alliston wrote online, yes, it is her fault, but no she charlie alliston wrote online, yes, it is herfault, but no she did not deserve it. hopefully it is a lesson learned on her behalf. he later deleted those words and other comments, and told the court they we re comments, and told the court they were stupid and not thought through. the previously mentioned this sort
4:04 pm
of video where he wrote online that he had taken a break of another bike, but in court he denied riding recklessly. this has been a controversial case and now kim briggs's family believes cycling laws should be changed to stop any more lives being lost. our correspondence sophie long is at the old bailey for us now. so tell us more about events in court today. old bailey for us now. so tell us more about events in court todaym the last quarter of an hour or so, we got those verdicts, and charlie alliston from bermondsey in south london, 20, was found not guilty of manslaughter. he was, though, found guilty by unanimous verdict of the second charge that he faced, the lesser charge of causing bodily harm by wa nto n lesser charge of causing bodily harm by wanton or furious driving. there was very little reaction from charlie alliston or any members of the public in court at the time. we are expecting to hear from matt briggs in the next few moments, that is kim briggs's husband of some 18
4:05 pm
yea rs, is kim briggs's husband of some 18 years, but a statement from him has just been read out in court. the court heard they had been together for 26 years, they said they were straightforward london family enjoying life but that all ended last february. the kids had to say goodbye to their money as she lay in intensive care. he says i lost my wife, my best friend, my children lost their comforter and cheerleader. charlie alliston has been bailed. he will reappear in court in september for sentencing. we are expecting to hear from matt briggs, kim briggs's husband, in the next few moments and also from the police as well. sophie, will come back to you. thank you for the time being. the prime minister says the uk will "take back control" of its laws, when the country leaves the european union. the government has published a paper on how disputes could be resolved in the future trade relationship with the eu — which stresses that the uk will leave the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice. ministers have pointed out that the ec] has no influence over the eu's trade deals with canada or singapore, so the uk could adopt a similar model. the government has also stressed
4:06 pm
that the rights of eu citizens living in the uk after brexit will be protected by the british courts. critics say european judges could retain some influence. our political correspondent leila nathoo reports. it's the eu's highest legal authority. the european court ofjustice settle the splits within the eu, interprets and enforces all its rules. judgments handed down here in luxembourg are binding on the uk and all member states. the government has long been clear that after brexit that will have to change. we will take back control of our laws and bring an end to the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice in britain. leaving the european union will mean that our laws will be made in westminster, edinburgh, cardiff and belfast. and those laws will be interpreted byjudges not in luxembourg but in courts across this country. and so today proposals for a new way forward, new arrangements
4:07 pm
for policing ourfuture relationship with the eu. what we have done today is issued a paper, which shows a number of ways in which it will be possible to resolve disputes. i think what businesses want to know is that in future relationships if a dispute arises, how will it be possible to resolve that? we are very clear we won't have the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice, we will put in place arrangements to ensure that businesses have the confidence of knowing they can continue to trade across the european union. the european court ofjustice is the bedrock of all eu institutions, its reach is extensive. ministers' promise today to end specifically the direct jurisdiction of the court has prompted claims of a climb—down. pragmatism has won out, and the prime minister's earlier position, making this a red line, was always impracticable. and i think now we are moving to a sensible position, indeed, we said at the time this
4:08 pm
is where we would have to end up, to have some compromise. what the prime minister is now recognising is that there will be a role for the european court, whether it is for instance in relation to the withdrawal agreement, the transition period or even post—brexit, in terms of the ec] law that we have incorporated into uk law. restoring the sovereignty of this place, our parliament deciding our laws, was one of the key promises of the leave campaign. for leavers, it goes to the heart of what brexit means. so any suggestion the european court ofjustice could still hold sway in the uk is unlikely to satisfy brexiteers. we wish to be independent again because european law and budgets and requirements don't always suit the uk, and i think we are getting in the way of their progress towards a political union, so we want to take back control and that means ending the rule of the european court. theresa may insists she is sticking to her red line that that
4:09 pm
could prove a stumbling block in the negotiations. brussels wants a future role for the european court and wants divorce matters dealt with first. it won't be an easy ride. leyla nd leyland daf two, bbc news, westminster. let's talk to pauljenkins who was the uk government principal initial from 2014 to 2016, live from west camp —— webcam in east sussex. what do you make of this paper?|j camp —— webcam in east sussex. what do you make of this paper? i think actually it is very good. i might put a actually it is very good. i might puta plug—in actually it is very good. i might put a plug—in for the government lawyers who are used work with, they have done a tremendous job. it sets up have done a tremendous job. it sets upa very have done a tremendous job. it sets up a very wide and competence of range of options, which will be necessary to explore as part of the next age of the process. how do you see that exploration process unfolding from here? well, what you
4:10 pm
see in the paper is a perfectly sensible amendment of options. any brexit treaty, any agreement we have in the future with a 27, needs to have some sort of dispute resolution, some means to police it. and it is perfectly right that if we have left the european union, it shouldn't be the court ofjustice of the european union that is the police of that role, not least because we won't have a judge in the court once we have left. we need some alternative mechanism. what this does is set out a menu of options, whether it is the leading canada trade agreement, the european free trade agreement area, it sets out a range of options and during negotiations would imagine they would be explored. probably a little early view to answer this, but having looked at those options, is
4:11 pm
there one that you favour?|j having looked at those options, is there one that you favour? i think a lot of us have fought for a very long time even during the referendum campaign, we thought that the efta model was by far the most sensible model. the european free trade agreement. yes, the european free trade agreement model is the most sensible. what you actually see here is any future agreement with the 27, with the eu, ministers have said they want to avoid hardball. so we're looking at something as close as possible to the current customs union and the single market, not the current bull market, something pretty similar. if it is pretty similar it will replicate a lot of current eu rules and what we need is some mechanism that interprets those which are carried forward into the bilateral agreement between eu and
4:12 pm
the uk. if we copy a lot of them forward , the uk. if we copy a lot of them forward, if you have two separate dispute mechanisms, the danger is they drift apart. that becomes a big problem. what you see with efta is exactly this. it doesn't drift very far away. wehrlein is a little bit shaky but i just far away. wehrlein is a little bit shaky but ijust wanted to ask you one thing specifically about eu citizens living in the uk, are you seeing any further clarity on that specific issue at the moment? that is the one solution that does not lea p is the one solution that does not leap out from this paper. the european union, the 27 are as i understand it saying that eu citizens living in the united kingdom must have the right to have their legal position determined by their legal position determined by the court ofjustice of the european union. don't immediately see how
4:13 pm
that works on the options the british government have set out today. we will live there that thank you for coming on, sir pauljenkins in east sussex. with me, the conservative mps carizza billings, who campaigned for brexit during the eu referendum. how much time have you had the look of this paper?” read it when it came out, so a few hours. what stands out for you? it isa hours. what stands out for you? it is a good paper, it sets out a good range of options. it is clear that if we are to have a conference of free trade agreement with the european union, we will need some form of dispute resolution, it is clear from the paper that should not be the european court ofjustice and we have got some sensible options, as to what it might look like in practice. but there would be a eu element to that, because if there is a dispute, the eu is part of the dispute by definition. indeed, and the justice minister donnacha ryan has been talking about the
4:14 pm
arbitration agreements which are very much a nominee from this third country. i think it could work. i think clearly there is a lot of detailed work to be done. the key thing is the government has confirmed again today we will leave the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice because that is crucial to implementing the result of the referendum. that arbitration model you talk about. therefore it is still referring to the european court ofjustice. the idea there is no influence on the future is not right. there will obviously still be a relationship between the uk and the eu. i think it is very different from the current situation were the european court of justice from the current situation were the european court ofjustice has the power to strike down laws made in
4:15 pm
out power to strike down laws made in our parliament. some brexit supporters, not all, might look at this and think that is not what we voted for, we wanted rid of this body, and that's the end of it. the principle is still very clear that we leave the jurisdiction of the european court of justice we leave the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice but it does also provide some options and it is pragmatic. we are in a negotiation which requires compromise. what about what sir paul was saying, where he clearly sees a gap in what is being put forward, do you acknowledge that? there is a difference of view between the uk and the eu. this paper confirms the government's position that the rights of eu nationals will be protected in our court. that is entirely reasonable. our courts are respected around the world, no one can possibly say they are not independent of government, not least because the rule against the government on a regular basis. the
4:16 pm
application would be that in that case uk citizens living in the eu would still be beholden to eu courts? i think we could go down those lines. if we expect eu nationals in the uk tim ryan our courts, it is reasonable to expect the courts and the european union to respect and enforce the rights of british nationals living overseas. but that is another example of influence that perhaps people didn't vote for. i think it is not unreasonable for people living in the eu to rely on the courts of the european union. i think both jurisdictions are well developed with serious court systems that i think well able to protect the rights of nationals living overseas. you talk finally about pragmatism, and clearly most of what you have said the last minutes would illustrate that. but i suppose what might cross the minds of some people is that during the campaign on either side there wasn't so much evidence of pragmatism, it was much more black—and—white. that is why i raised the possibility of some voters, some pro—brexit voters, being to an extent frustrated by what they are now seeing. this is a
4:17 pm
big step forward to confirm we are leaving the jurisdiction of the european court of justice. leaving the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice. that is crucial to taking back control of out crucial to taking back control of our own laws but we need to find a new arrangement, a new partnership with the eu that works, and that involves a dispute resolution mechanism. thank you for coming in. some breaking news just mechanism. thank you for coming in. some breaking newsjust coming in from police in greater manchester. they are saying that heroin found at an industrial unit in salford this week was worth £100 million, and is thought therefore to be one of the largest ever seizures in the uk. four men were arrested following the raid on saturday. police originally estimated the value was £20 million, but apparently tests on the purity of the drug lead them to revalue the hall, and the four arrested have been charged with conspiracy to charge a class a drug, and illegal importation of a controlled drug. time to the headlines now on bbc news will stop a cyclist has been cleared of manslaughter after he knocked down a pedestrian who later died from her injuries. he was found
4:18 pm
guilty of a lesser charge. theresa may insists the supremacy of eu judges will end after brexit under government proposals, the rights of eu citizens in the uk would be dealt with by britishjudges. the home office admits sending letters to some eu citizens in the uk, wrongly telling them a decision had been made to deport them. in sport, the end ofan made to deport them. in sport, the end of an era, england was ‘s all—time record goal—scorer wayne rooney retires from international football after turning down the chance to be part of the squad for next month's world cup qualifiers. the fall of thejoin next month's world cup qualifiers. the fall of the join celtic in the group stage of the champions league. they face hoffenheim at anfield with a 2—1 lead from the first leg qualifier in germany. and conor mcgregor arrives in las vegas ahead of this we can's fight against floyd mayweatherjr. despite an expected £5 million pay—per—view purchases there are still reportedly still 2400 tickets left inside the arena. the home office has sent around
4:19 pm
a 100 letters "in error" to eu citizens living in the uk telling them they are liable for "detention" and that a decision has been made to "remove" them from the uk. the mistake emerged after finnish academic dr eva johanna holmberg, went public when she received the letter from the home office after applying for a "qualified person certificate". she is married to a uk citizen and has the right to live in the uk. in response, a home office spokesperson said: dr eva johanna holmberg gave her reaction to the letter. my my first reaction, seeing the
4:20 pm
envelope, was her i mistaken, have i forgotten envelope, was her i mistaken, have i fo rg otte n to envelope, was her i mistaken, have i forgotten to apply for some travel expenses or something? why am i getting a letter from sheffield, expenses or something? why am i getting a letterfrom sheffield, but when i open this, i could not believe my eyes, seeing words like a decision has now been taken to remove you from the united kingdom, in accordance with section ten of the immigration act. on the next page, here it is, it says that i am specifically considered a person liable to administrative removal, andi liable to administrative removal, and i am liable to be detained. u nless and i am liable to be detained. unless i move myself from the uk in the next month. so how did you then try and pursue what had urged in that letter to try and get some clarity? i spent most of the last weekend e—mailing and trying to get
4:21 pm
into co nta ct weekend e—mailing and trying to get into contact with people, instances, the home office. me and my husband contacted the home office. me and my husband co nta cted a the home office. me and my husband contacted a lawyer, who explained that this removal decision is invalid, in many ways, at least in two very important legal bases. it is unlawful, arbitrary and clearly disproportionate reaction. i applied for a certificate, which the home office itself currently doesn't even encourage people to apply for because the new system is supposedly to be in place next yearfor eu citizens. that was dr is a holmberg speaking to me early on. princes william and harry have described their bewilderment when they encountered grieving crowds, on the day of their mother's funeral. speaking in a bbc documentary, marking 20 years since the death of diana princess of wales, they say walking behind her coffin was a family decision. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. it was the week when a nation
4:22 pm
mourned, and the monarchy faced sharp criticism. at its heart were two boys, william and harry, then aged 15 and 12, grieving for the loss of their mother, but required by their royal position to appear in public and help assuage the public sense of loss. in a bbc documentary, william and harry speak about the numbness and confusion they felt when they were told that their mother was dead. and, in harry's case, it's clear that there is still anger towards the french photographers who were pursuing diana's speeding car in the crash in the alma tunnel in paris. i think one of the hardest things to come to terms with is the fact that the people that chased her into the tunnel were the same people that were taking photographs of her while she was still dying on the back seat of the car. and william and i know that, we've been told that numerous times by people that know that was the case.
4:23 pm
she'd had quite a severe head injury but she was still very much alive on the back seat. and those people that caused the accident, instead of helping, were taking photographs of her dying on the back seat. and then those photographs made their way back to news desks. william and harry were at balmoral when they heard the news from paris. they speak up in support of their grandmother for her efforts to shield them. and of theirfather, "he tried to do his best for us", says harry. applause. we love you, william... bless you. god bless you, william. when they moved from balmoral to london, they encountered grieving crowds. and it's clear that they found the experience bewildering, with so many people sobbing and wanting to touch them. of the decision to walk behind their mother's coffin, both say it was a collective, family decision, and both say they felt a strong sense of duty, even then. when you have something so traumatic as the death
4:24 pm
of your mother when you're 15, as, very sadly, many people have experienced, and no one wants to experience, it leaves you... you know, it will either make or break you. and i wouldn't let it break me. i wanted it to make me... i wanted her to be proud of the person i would become. i didn't want her worried, or her legacy to be that, you know, william and/or harry were completely and utterly devastated by it and that all the hard work and all the love and all the energy that she put into us when we were younger, would go to waste. they were children, coping with their own grief, and the attention of a grieving nation, and two kept going to honour their mother's memory. nicholas witchell, bbc news. identity theft is reaching epidemic levels, according to a leading fraud
4:25 pm
prevention organisation. it says it is seeing nearly 500 cases a day, and that there were nearly 90,000 cases in the first six months of this year — a record high. our personal finance reporter, kevin peachey has the details. our digital footprints are getting deeper the more we go online. fraudsters harvest personal details used on computers and phones and then use them to apply for loans and insurance products in our names. for one victim, nick, it took five months to get it all sorted out. a bank account was set up in my name. subsequently i was nominated as a guarantorfor a payday loan. i don't know whether that was an online application or not. an application for a credit card was made in my name. and goods were purchased in my name. the most targeted group was 31 to 40—year—olds, with cases rising 1.5% to nearly 19,000 in the first half of this year. whereas the over 60s, often considered the most vulnerable to fraud, saw cases drop 6%,
4:26 pm
the only age group to see a fall. many people don't even realise their identities have been stolen. fraudsters hack computers and trawl social media to try and build up personal details. but they also buy and sell information on the dark web, the part of the internet that is not available through a conventional search. so how can you police this growing threat of fraud? the perpetrators of online fraud are in china, russia, america. so if the police try to follow up some online fraud will find it very difficult to identify any individuals who have perpetrated the fraud. one think tank says it special constables could fill the gap. police forces need skills to meet cyber crime. one way of doing this is to use volunteers. we looked at countries like estonia which are employing 1% of their it professionals as volunteers. and if that was translated to england and wales that would be 12,000 people.
4:27 pm
in the meantime, fraud prevention groups suggest people change passwords regularly, notjust to their date of birth or the names of their children. kevin peachey, bbc news. with me is detective superintendent andy fife from the economic crime unit at london police. how seriously are you taking this? very seriously. it is related to all of the frauds and cybercrime, pervasive in all we do. very serious farce. why is it getting so much worse? because there are so many ways in which identities can be acquired or stolen from innocent members of the public, whether by social media, people revealing too much about themselves on the likes of facebook or you do
4:28 pm
get hacking and data thefts occurring against big organisation to hold lots of data themselves. people having weak passwords. allowing villains to steal their data in that way as well. there are many ways in which personal information can be acquired. and wa nt information can be acquired. and want it is acquired it is frankly horrifying to see how far the criminals can take it and exploit people, isn't it? yes, not only about exploiting people particularly but people can use false data to acquire bank accounts, other financial services, make claims on a benefit system and health services, by things like phones, or simply go online and shop com using someone else's data. what is the advice to people? we saw reference to regularly changing passwords and things, most people are aware of that, we don't always do it. what
4:29 pm
else can we do? one of the things people can do, as well as keeping passwords safe, having very strong passwords, avoiding giving away to which detail about yourself on social media. when you are filling in some kind of survey or making some kind of purchase, make sure you tick the box that says you don't wa nt tick the box that says you don't want your details shared by a company with their partners or other organisations. and the last one, perhaps just as important, organisations. and the last one, perhapsjust as important, with organisations. and the last one, perhaps just as important, with your computer make sure you maintain strong antivirus software and patches that are provided to you to keep your software say. just a final point on the level of sophistication of those doing this, clearly pretty high, how able are you as those trying to counter it, at keeping up with their level of sophistication? we don't do it alone, we work with other agencies such as the national crime agency, the rational cyber security centre and overseas
4:30 pm
jurisdictions to go after organisations, organised crime gangs as much as we can. thank you for coming in. let's pick up on the weather. thank you. good afternoon. gradually we are brightening up from the east through the day today. we have seen fairly heavy outbreaks of rain, a lot of rain has fallen in a short amount of time across northern england, that rain and cloud tending to edge eastwards as we have moved through the day. brightening up with some fresher air in the east. through the rest of the day today that cloud and rain will find itself confined to the far northern isles. some showers pushing into northern ireland and into the west as we move through the early hours. drooi weather, particularly the further east you are, and feeling britisher overnight with lows around 12—14. tomorrow a day of sunny spells and showers. low pressure sitting in the north—west. the majority of the showers will be in the north and
4:31 pm
west. across northern ireland, parts of scotla nd west. across northern ireland, parts of scotland and england, they'll edge eastwards as we move through the day. for wales and central and southern england we will see plenty of dry, bright weather. temperatures not as warm as today, a maximum around 22. there isjust a chance not as warm as today, a maximum around 22. there is just a chance of seeing the odd isolated shower the further south you are. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. a cyclist accused of knocking over and killing a mother of two as she crossed the street, has been cleared of manslaughter by a jury at the old bailey. the government has published a paper outlining its desire to end the "directjurisdiction" of the european court ofjustice over uk law after brexit. the home office says it has sent around 100 letters "in error" to eu citizens living in the uk telling them that
4:32 pm
a decision has been made to deport them. prince william and prince harry have been talking about their sense of bewilderment at the grieving crowds in the week between their mother's death and her funeral. now time to catch up on the afternoon's sports news. good afternoon. england's all—time record goal scorer wayne rooney has retired from international football with immediate effect. the everton striker was asked by england boss gareth southgate to be involved against malta and slovakia but says now is the time to bow out. he's been described as an icon by fa chairman greg clarke. i'm joined by a man who worked with rooney as first team coach at manchester united, rene meulensteen. he was going to be involved in that england squad under gareth southgate, how big a surprise is this for you? i think for a lot of people, because he sort of — southgate are going to speak to him,
4:33 pm
i thought there was all the right noises that he wanted to be involved, it comes not only as a surprise to me but a lot of people. when you look at his recent form at everton and still only 31, could he still do a job for england?” everton and still only 31, could he still do a job for england? i think he could have. i think definitely he could have. i mean, he has had some really long times to think about what he is going to do beyond manchester united. he made a decision to go and play for everton, coming home as he calls it. everybody can see he plays with energy, plays with a smile on his face. so, that would be very welcome to the england team, as well. i think he has had a chance to think about this decision, as well. he thought it really through. he made a decisionjust to call thought it really through. he made a decision just to call it a day. did he get the credibility he deserves on the international stage?” he get the credibility he deserves on the international stage? i think everybody recognised how important he has been for england and the caps he has been for england and the caps he had and goals he scored. i think there was sort of a collective frustration maybe disappointment with everybody, the fans, but also players, and i think including wayne
4:34 pm
himself, they never really were able to wina himself, they never really were able to win a big international prize with the national team. to win a big international prize with the nationalteam. ericsson described him as fearless. in euro 2004 he was ready for it as a kid. what extra did wayne rooney do you thought this guy will go far? first and foremost, he always wanted to know what we were going to do. he come up to me or mick and say what are we doing today, every single day. if you really explained to him, when there were specific aspects in training that related to him and other players, he would buy into it. hejust other players, he would buy into it. he just loved football. anything you wa nted he just loved football. anything you wanted him to do even after training he would stay behind, no problem. how annoyed will wayne rooney be he has won nothing with england?” think very annoyed because he is a player that wants to win all the time. never mind in training, he has
4:35 pm
beenin time. never mind in training, he has been ina time. never mind in training, he has been in a very successful period with manchester united, won a lot of things, premier leagues and trophies, champions league. i am sure that is one of the reasons why he says listen, i want to help everton to win a trophy. i think he is disappointed it never really happened for england. when we talk about his achievement as a goal scorer, 53 goals and 119 games, you have to scroll down that list far to another guy you know well, danny welbeck who is still involved with the england squad, on 14 goals. yeah, a long way to go. it shows, obviously some of them were competitive and some were friendlies, but still it's an unbelievable record. it shows what he has done for england and again i come back to the one thing, it's frustration for everybody that he has never really been able to really make that happen at the big international tournaments which is a shame. finally, in his statement he says one day i would dream of watching england again, or in any
4:36 pm
capacity. what do we read into that, could he be involved in the england coaching set—up, has he got that mentality, you know him well, to be a coach? i think this was a tough decision for him to make. i think the toughest decision is yet to come. hopefully it will come in a few yea rs' come. hopefully it will come in a few years' time, when he decides to hang up his boots. there is already a sort of common way, i don't want to leave football, i want to carry on, we have a few other examples of ex—players that have done that in different capacities. wayne has this love and passion for football and england, i could definitely see him in some shape or form. thank you for coming in. that's the former manchester united first teach coach rene meulensteen. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has accused the prime minister
4:37 pm
of "backtracking " on her red lines over brexit negotiations. mr corbyn was speaking after it was suggested the uk might have to keep half an eye on rulings from the european court ofjustice after it leaves the eu. theresa may has insisted he ecj's jurisdiction will come to an end following brexit. meanwhile mr corbyn — speaking during a visit to the western isles — declined to say whether his party would vote against the brexit bill when it comes before the commons. government is clearly back—tracking on earlier red lines and saying there has to be some form of dispute resolution through some form of judicial process and that obviously is the case and we have said that all along. you think the prime minister is fudging?” all along. you think the prime minister is fudging? i think she is finding that the absolutism of the lancaster house doesn't quite work. has it got to a point where the fudge is so substantial labour might vote against the brexit provisions when they come to the house? we get the brexit bill to the house when we go back in september. ourfirst concern is parliamentary scrutiny. we will be ensuring that parliament has a right to vote on every single section of the bill. we don't want the return of henry viii and decisions by the executive over an
4:38 pm
elected parliament might you vote against? we will make that decision before the vote. our primary concern at the moment is to ensure there is proper parliamentary scrutiny so every mp can take part and vote. president trump has used a realliy to launch a blistering attack. tea rgas and trouble on the streets of phoenix. the clashes didn't last long, but for a short time they were intense, as riot police cleared protestors from the street after a presidential rally. the police have formed a line here. there have been announcements telling people to go home, telling protestors to leave the area. for a few minutes it was pretty unpleasant, with some
4:39 pm
tear gas in the air, which was stinging my eyes. but also, the eyes of the people it was aimed at. for the moment it does seem to have worked. it seems to have driven them off down the street. inside, it had been an animated donald trump who had rallied his supporters by denouncing the news media. mr trump quoted himself at length, aiming to demonstrate he had wholeheartedly condemned the actions of neo—nazis in the city of charlottesville, when a counterprotester was killed. what happened in charlottesville strikes at the core of america. and tonight, this entire arena stands united in forceful condemnation of the thugs who perpetrate hatred and violence. but the very dishonest media, those people right up there with all the cameras... booing. they make up stories. they have no sources in many cases. they say, "a source says", there is no such thing. but they don't report the facts.
4:40 pm
just like they don't want to report that i spoke out forcefully against hatred, bigotry and violence, and strongly condemned the neo—nazis, the white supremacists and the kkk. if you want to discover the source of the division in our country, look no further than the fake news and the crooked media, which would rather get ratings and clicks than tell the truth. president trump took his war with the media to a new level tonight, attacking journalists again and again. he clearly regards the best way to defend against criticism of his presidency, as a full throated attack on the messenger. james cook, bbc news, phoenix, arizona. the organisation which was in charge of running grenfell tower before the fire — has been stripped of its power. the decision comes as the prime minister met
4:41 pm
victims of the disaster, and the local council unveiled some of the new homes it's bought for survivors. here's our political correspondent karl mercer. from the chandelier shop across kings road, these are flats bought as new homes for victims of the grenfell tower fires. there are 30 homes here, bought for around £20 million. three families from grenfell have said they want to live here. today, the leader of kensington and chelsea visited the site. the morning after grenfell residents had met the prime minister to tell her how unhappy they were with the council response to the fire. i spoke to the prime minister this morning. i accept there is a legacy of lack of trust left over from how the council performed after the fire. but look here, look at what we are doing today. look at the flats, the quality of the offer, the fact so many
4:42 pm
people have engaged with us. we're getting there. i accept it is slow but we're getting here. the prime minister revealed she told residents that the body that rend grenfell tower for the council would be stripped of its power over the estate. i was able to tell them that the tenant management organisation will no longer have responsibility for the lancaster west housing estate. people were pleased to hear that. what we were also able to do was to hear from some specific issues that individuals had at that meeting. the council said it will eventually take over all of the stock from the organisation but will do so in stages. so far, only nine of 180 families that need rehousing have accepted permanent new homes. the transport secretary, chris grayling, says politicians in the north of england should find their own solutions to the region's transport problems —
4:43 pm
not central government. writing in the yorkshire post, mr grayling said: "the success of northern transport depends on the north itself." the article comes as northern leaders are meeting in leeds calling for more money and a commitment from central government to help improve transport links in the region. overnight torrential rain has flooded homes and businesses in the north west of northern ireland. rescue services were put under severe pressure with more than 400 emergency calls during the night. the fire service and coastguard rescued more than 100 people trapped in cars or homes. keiron tourish has spoken to some of those caught up in the floods. dramatic pictures from near the village, this is a local bridge on a road that collapsed during the storm last night. several inches of rain fell over a short period and the effects were devastating. around 100 people were trapped in their cars or their homes. some people were this morning frantically searching
4:44 pm
for their vehicles. in this waterside development, gemma tucker was cleaning up after what she described as a horrendous night. i have a five—month—old baby and my concern was to try and get him out of the house safely and the water seemed to be coming in really fast. it was coming in the back of the door, the front door and even at the front of the house. so i had to climb through the window to get back into the house to get my stuff gathered and get the baby out of the house. eventually we had to get him out of the front window. aaron blair returned to his house this morning, it was flooded and he had to get his young family to safety. i have two young children, a two—year—old and a four—year—old, and my wife was panicking because they gradually water was going up. the flow was too much, we eventually had to get them out. for other residents,
4:45 pm
it was a similar story. it is ruined, the new suite is ruined, everything. it is all going to have to be thrown out. what do you think of the authority's response? they were so slow last night. we got the sandbags after the house was flooded. the rescue services were under severe pressure with more than 400 emergency calls through the night. the city of derry airport was also forced to close with all flights cancelled. for many the sheer scale of this was overwhelming and they are just trying to get their lives back to normal. a father from sussex has been sent to a turkish jail for trying to take home some coins he found while snorkelling. toby robyns, an ambulance driver from southwick in west sussex was arrested as he made his way through security at bodrum airport.
4:46 pm
he found the coins on the seabed while swimming and packed them in his hand luggage. our correspondent piers hopkirk gave this update from outside the family home in southwick. toby robins had been on a two—week family holiday in turkey. either he ora family holiday in turkey. either he or a member of his family had been out snorkeling and while doing that had discovered these old coins on the sea bed. now as the family began their long journey home in the early hours of saturday morning these coins were discovered in luggage as they passed through security at the airport. and mr robins was arrested and detained. the coins were sent to and detained. the coins were sent to a local archeological museum for authenticification. mr robins is facing a charge of smuggling.
4:47 pm
clearly, hugely distressing for him, no less distressing for his family who are here at home in southwick. i went to talk to them this morning, they were cleerp enormously upset and distressed: they stpt want to talk to the media or give an interview. this is the situation they face, while they are here at home, the father of the family is thousands of miles away in a turkish prison and they have simply no idea of when he might come back. the family and mr robins himself are receiving consular assistance from the foreign and commonwealth office and their local mp is also representing them. he gave us a statement in the last few minutes. he told us this, he said, we are working with the foreign office to establish all of the facts. this was an innocent, albeit foolish mistake,
4:48 pm
and we now need to ensure mr robins is treated fairly and properly. in a moment a look at how the financial markets in europe closed the day. first the headlines. a cyclist has been cleared of manslaughter after he knocked down a pedestrian who later died from her injuries. he was found guilty of a lesser charge. theresa may insists the supremacy of eu judges will end after brexit. under government proposals, the rights of eu citizens in the uk would be dealt with by britishjudges. the home office admits sending letters to some eu citizens in the uk wrongly telling them that a decision had been made to deport them. coming up, going potty for owls. they've proved so popular to fans of the boy wizard in indonesia, there are now worries about their population in the wild. hello. let's look at how the markets in
4:49 pm
europe have ended. it's been a lacklustre day for london's ftse 100. the dax in frankfurt, as well. the ftse up marginally. not that much change for the dax in frankfurt. traders are waiting to see mode ahead of a global meeting of central bankers in the united states which starts tomorrow. on the currency markets the pound falling to an eight—year low against the dollar. laura ashley we will be talking about. let me talk about the pound. the share price has fallen of laura ashley. the retailer said it's to do with
4:50 pm
uncertainty over brexit. he has been explaining why the company has cut forecasts, shares have fallen by more than 11%. it was a market mover. the numbers show that demand fell for tv, online and print advertising. so let's try and unpick all of this with our guest today. simon derrick, we canjoin him shortly to talk about those stories. let's talk about the pound. it seems as though it's fallen dramatically today to this eight—year low. no real economic indicators from the uk today. it's more to do with what's happening in the eurozone. i think that's correct. there is an expectation over the course of the next few months, the european central bank,
4:51 pm
eurozone central bank, is going to start reducing some of the quantitative easing programmes that it's been following and that as a result of that interest rates will start to edge up slightly and make the euro a little more attractive. of course here we have the opposite story going on, the bank of england made it clear at its last meeting it wasn't going to get ready to hike interest rates soon. that's the thing more than anything else that's undermining sterling over the course of this month. today it was no more than the presidents of the european central bank saying nothing that helped this final move take place. let's talk about wpp, the world's largest advertising agency. the boss has blamed digital disruption for a cut in forecasts. do you think this is simply the fact that the traditional advertisers aren't keeping up with what's happening in the digital world? that's one way of looking at it. what was interesting to me he gave a number of reasons,
4:52 pm
he mentioned digital disruption, talked about google and facebook and also talked about a slowdown in global growth, he also talked about the fact that actually politically uncertainty in the us and the uk had made companies more cautious. i am wondering, what you typically see is big companies, one of the first things they pull back on is advertising spending. maybe the fact that wpp is struggling a little bit and it's the second time they've underperformed over the course of this year, maybe that's an early warning signal about the global economy, maybe we just are starting to see a slowdown and maybe these results from wpp are like the canary in the coal mine. thank you. on wall street stocks have fallen:
4:53 pm
warning from president trump he still plans to build a wall between the us and mexico and congress must find the money has caused jitters with traders. the us is approaching the so—called debt ceiling. if a deal on the wall can't be reached donald trump says he will shut down the government. it may be political posturing but plenty to digest for the financial markets. we had a nice look at your living room earlier! it was nice. i know you were worrying about those owls in indonesia. let me put you out of your misery. since the massive success of the harry potter books and films some young indonesians have been emulating their wizarding heros by buying owls as pets.
4:54 pm
conservationists are worried about the impact on the population in the wild. researchers say they're usually taken as babies from the nest and brought here to be sold in these huge bird markets that you find across java. until recently it was rare to find owls on sale but we have quickly found this shop that is selling owls and the owner says the other owls have already sold out. he rushed out the back to get this beautiful bird that we thought i might be interested in. of course it has a huge impact on the wild population of owls, owls have a very important role to protect and keep the eco—system in balance. by removing so many owls from the wild to be sold on the bird markets is very, very concerning. a wiltshire farmer has caused
4:55 pm
controversy by serving up sausages to firefighters. seems harmless at first but rachel rivers made the gesture to say thank you for saving the very same piglets in said sausages from a burning barn in milton lilbourne back in february. on a social media post the firefighters said the bangers were fantastic. but the animal charity peta said the piglets were no better off for escaping the fire. make of that what you will. i will leave you with the weather. lucy is across the newsroom with the forecast. good afternoon. localised heavy rain across parts of northern ireland yesterday caused localised flooding overnight and today, parts of
4:56 pm
northern england saw heavy rain in a short amount of time. this photo sentin short amount of time. this photo sent in from scarborough. it hasn't been wet everywhere. we have seen dryer brighter intervals, as well. this photo sent in by a weather watcher in staffordshire. this area of cloud and rain further north is edging towards the east as we move through the day. behind it seeing brighter intervals developing. also some fresher air pushing in. as we move through the rest of today and overnight we will see that rain becoming increasingly confined to the far north and the northern isles. we will see a few showers pushing into northern ireland and into the west of scotland and wales. temperatures overnight fresher than last night. lows of around 12—14. that takes us into tomorrow. tomorrow is a day of sunny spells and showers. the majority of those showers will be the further north and west you are. we will see a few showers first thing across northern ireland and into western parts of scotland. one or two across northern england, as well. it will become
4:57 pm
dryer as we move further south for wales, the south—west and much of central and southern england. there could be one or two showers first thing but more in the way of dryer brighter weather first thing tomorrow, the further south you are. the showers in the north will continue to push eastwards as we move through the day. further south lots of dry weather and brighter intervals and sunny spells developing. temperatures tomorrow fresher than today. we are looking ata fresher than today. we are looking at a maximum of around 22 in the south—east. into friday we still have low pressure in charge sitting out again in the north—west. that will bring spells of rain across northern ireland and scotland. they could be prolonged into friday. elsewhere across much of england and wales dryer brighter weather and a touch warmer with highs of 24. into the weekend this weather front could bring heavy showers for scotland. we
4:58 pm
are starting to see more showers into the south—east. there is a potential for those. into saturday and sunday, there is uncertainty it looks like at the moment we will see showers in the north, it won't be a total washout. there will be sunshine around in the forecast. it will feel warmer in the sunshine, as well. the question is whether it will last into monday. today at five. the prime minister says the uk will take back control of its laws after brexit. a paper published today stresses that the european court ofjustice should have no directjurisdiction over the uk. when we leave the european union, we will be leaving the jurisdiction
4:59 pm
of the european court ofjustice. what we will be able to do is to make our own laws, parliament will make our laws, it is britishjudges who will interpret those laws, and it will be the british supreme court who will be the ultimate arbiter of those laws. we'll have the latest on the government proposals — and ask what the impact could be on uk citizens. the other main stories on bbc news at five. a cyclist, charlie alliston, is cleared of manslaughter, after he knocked down a pedestrian who later died from her injuries — he was found guilty of a lesser charge.
5:00 pm

22 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on