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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  August 23, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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today at five. the prime minister says the uk will take back control of its laws after brexit. a paper published today stresses that the european court ofjustice should have no directjurisdiction over the uk. when we leave the european union, we will be leaving the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice. what we will be able to do is to make our own laws, parliament will make our laws, it is britishjudges who will interpret those laws, and it will be the british supreme court who will be the ultimate arbiter of those laws. we'll have the latest on the government proposals — and ask what the impact could be on uk citizens. the other main stories on bbc news at five. a cyclist, charlie alliston, is cleared of manslaughter, after he knocked down a pedestrian who later died from her injuries — he was found guilty of a lesser charge. president trump launches a lengthy tirade against the media — saying mostjournalists are bad people who hate america. princes william and harry speak
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of the days following the death of their mother, princess diana — and the role of the paparazzi. she had a severe head injury but was very much alive on the back seat and those people that caused the accident instead of hoping they were taking photographs of her dying on the back she had a severe head injury but was very much alive on the back seat and those people that caused the accident instead of helping they were taking photographs of her dying on the back seat. gang members in birmingham thought to be involved in gun and drugs offences are banned from a city's streets — in a landmark court injunction. and england's all—time leading goal scorer, wayne rooney, announces his retirement from international football. our main story at five.
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the prime minister says the uk will "take back control" of its laws, when the country leaves the european union. the government has published a paper about how disputes could be resolved in the future trade relationship with the eu. the document stresses that once the uk leaves the eu, it will leave the direct jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice — a phrase which has raised questions about what indirect jurisdiction the eu court could be left with. the document also states that legal disputes involving individuals and businesses operating in the uk — should in future be decided within the uk judicial system, with the supreme court as the final arbiter. the government has also stressed that the rights of eu citizens living in this country after brexit will be protected by the british courts. our political correspondent leila nathoo reports.
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it's the eu's highest legal authority. the european court ofjustice settles disputes within the eu, interprets and enforces all its rules. judgments handed down here in luxembourg are binding on the uk and all member states. the government has long been clear that after brexit that will have to change. we will take back control of our laws and bring an end to the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice in britain. leaving the european union will mean that our laws will be made in westminster, edinburgh, cardiff and belfast. and those laws will be interpreted byjudges not in luxembourg but in courts across this country. and so today proposals for a new way forward, new arrangements for policing ourfuture relationship with the eu. what we have done today is issued a paper, which shows a number of ways in which it will be possible to resolve disputes. i think what businesses want to know is that in a future relationship if a dispute arises, how will it be possible to resolve that?
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we are very clear we won't have the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice, we will put in place arrangements to ensure that businesses have the confidence of knowing they can continue to trade across the european union. the european court ofjustice is the bedrock of all eu institutions, its reach is extensive. ministers‘ promise today to end specifically the direct jurisdiction of the court has prompted claims of a climb—down. the government is clearly backtracking on its red lines and saying there has to be some resolution through some form ofjudicial process. and that obviously is the case and we have indeed said that all along. do you think the prime minister is fudging? what the prime minister is now recognising is that there will be a role for the european court, whether it is for instance in relation to the withdrawal agreement, the transition period or even post—brexit,
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in terms of the ec] law that we have incorporated into uk law. restoring the sovereignty of this place, our parliament deciding our laws, was one of the key promises of the leave campaign. for leavers, it goes to the heart of what brexit means. so any suggestion the european court ofjustice could still hold sway in the uk is unlikely to satisfy brexiteers. we wish to be independent again because european law, european budgets and requirements don't always suit the uk, and i think we are getting in the way of their progress towards a political union, so we want to take back control and that means ending the rule of the european court. theresa may insist she is sticking to her red line but that could prove a stumbling block in the negotiations. brussels wants a future role for the european court and wants divorce matters dealt with first. it won't be an easy ride. our political correspondent emma vardy is at westminster for us this evening. the problem for the government is
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that it has become a red the problem for the government is that it has become a? that minister said in a number of speeches and at the tory party conference that you would end the jurisdiction party conference that you would end thejurisdiction of party conference that you would end the jurisdiction of the european court. now today the language has changed slightly, saying we will in the directjurisdiction of the european court. so many questions, people trying to interpret what exactly that will mean. the government has set out a number of ideas today the prime minister said ina number of ideas today the prime minister said in a number of speeches and at the tory party conference that she would end thejurisdiction of tory party conference that she would end the jurisdiction of the european court. now today the language has changed slightly, saying we will end the directjurisdiction of the european court. so many questions, people trying to interpret what exactly that will mean. the government has set out a number of a flexible arrangement of justice would continue to have some influence. but the question will be just how much the european court of justice would continue to have some influence. but the question will be just how will that be. , their political opponents have criticised the government with jeremy corbyn saying the prime minister is backtracking. the, their political
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opponents have criticised the government withjeremy opponents have criticised the government with jeremy corbyn saying the prime minister is backtracking. way to get back sovereignty, have control over our laws but still it eu group open europe have said it is a climb—down. the government is trying to find a way to get back sovereignty, have control over our laws but a method to enable it to resolve disputes within the eu going forward within any future trade agreement. the government has that there are with the which have agreements with the eu but european court of the european court this overriding effect does not have this overriding effect does not have this overriding effect does not have this overriding effect country and its away from a0 years or so of these eu directives. and we're just starting to see what a big task that that means breaking away from a0 years or so means breaking away from a0 years or so of these eu directives. and we arejust so of these eu directives. and we are just starting to see what a big task that is. joining me now from westminster is lord falconer. in the labour government of tony blair he was lord chancellor, and the first ever secretary
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of state forjustice. i think we want to reach agreement with the i think we want to reach agreement with about things like how citizens who here and how uk citizens who here and how uk citizens in the european union and have the right to stay here and how uk citizens in the they have how we trade with the eu, and consumer rights which we want to preserve stay. how we trade with the eu, and consumer rights which we want to there will be disputes about what that cover the uk means in the uk means ultimatelyas will need to be some kind of court or body that resolves disputes. that is notjust the uk courts, they specifically identify in this paper were the kind of agreements were dealing with are those of the uk have been dealing with for years. it may be that the best court to ask for an opinion about that is the european court of
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justice. so of course it will have an influence and will impact on our laws. although not as directly as it has impacted whilst we were a member of the eu. i think the climb—down and it is clear from the speeches theresa may was making injanuary, she said everything would be done by the english courts but that will not be the case. it will be caught in the uk identifying what the law is but when there is a dispute between us but when there is a dispute between us and europe about what these agreed laws mean, then it will be some kind of court listening to what the ecj says that will resolve the dispute. as time progresses the uk could possibly set up its own regulatory bodies, its own statutes and overtime distances self identify theirfrom and overtime distances self identify their from the ecj 7 and overtime distances self identify theirfrom the ecj? would
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and overtime distances self identify their from the ecj? would that ultimately be practicably possible? there will always be the need for the resolution of disputes between the resolution of disputes between the eu interpretation of the agreed laws and the uk interpretation. it will never go away that you will need this cord tight body that is parallel to the european union system and parallel to the uk system that for example is saying what does the eu uk agreement on citizenship mean. so when an individual for example says i have been wrongly deported from the uk because it is not giving effect to the agreement that has been waged about the rights of eu citizens to stay, and the british courts come to a particular conclusion but the person being deported says that is not the court agreement. then that person must be able to go to a court that in effect will bind both the eu and the uk and said what this citizen agreement means. there will always be need for
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that, whether about trade or other rights. so if people watching with voted to leave in the referendum and for them that was one key reason that they voted that way, they wa nted that they voted that way, they wanted the uk to have its own laws and statutes, to be functioning entirely in this country and nowhere else, do they have a right to feel that they were misled? what then they should argue for which i would oppose is let us not have any agreement with the eu going forward, let's not do a trade deal or citizenship deal, that's not agree on aircraft flying regulations. because only if you completely withdraw from agreements that was all citizenship, trade, consumer rights, can you break away from the situation where the european courts
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can have an influence on what our law is. thank you very much. and we will be speaking to the mp peter bowen later for his take on those pronouncements today from the government. the home office has sent around a 100 letters "in error" to eu citizens living in the uk telling them they are liable for "detention" and that a decision has been made to "remove" them from the uk. the mistake emerged after finnish academic dr eva johanna holmberg, went public when she received the letter from the home office after applying for a "qualified person certificate". she is married to a uk citizen and has the right to live in the uk. a cyclist accused of knocking over and killing a mother of two as she crossed the street, has been found not guilty of manslaughter by a jury at the old bailey. but charlie alliston was found guilty of the lesser charge of "wanton and furious driving." alliston, who was 18 at the time of the incident last year,
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was riding on a bike with no front brakes when he crashed into aa year old kim briggs as she crossed the road during her lunch break in east london. alliston, who's now 20, wrote online on the evening of the crash that it had been his victim's fault. 0ur correspondent sophie long is at the old bailey. explain the verdict this afternoon? well earlier this afternoon the jury returned to court number 11 at the 0ld returned to court number 11 at the old bailey after 12 hours of deliberation and said that they found charlie alliston not guilty of manslaughter. they found him unanimously guilty however that second and lesser charge of causing bodily harm by wanton or furious driving. the bicycle that he was riding when he ran into kim briggs last year should not have been on the roads, it was designed for the velodrome and crucially it had no front brakes. kim briggs, she sustained catastrophic head injuries
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including skull fractures, she died six days later in hospital. it was a split second encounter with a bike that ended kim briggs‘ life. she was crossing a busy london street in her lunch break when she was hit. charlie alliston was the cyclist, 18 at the time, a former courier, who said he tried to swerve. but the bike he was riding should never have been on the road. it was designed for the velodrome. without gears and, crucially, no brakes. charlie alliston claimed he did not know he needed brakes to ride on the road. he was doing about 18 mph as he approached this junction. the lights were green. he said he saw kim briggs stepping out into the road on the crossing, looking at her phone. he called out and slowed down to less than 1a mph, called out again and swerved to avoid her, but he told the court she stepped back into his path. after the crash, charlie alliston shouted at kim briggs. he didn't realise how seriously she was injured but she had suffered
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catastrophic head injuries and died a week later in hospital. he was charged with manslaughter, and under a law from 1861, with causing bodily harm by wanton or furious driving. but thejury decided charlie alliston was not responsible for the death of kim briggs. he has been cleared of manslaughter but convicted of injuring her by riding recklessly. he could now face two years in prison. 0n the evening of the crash, charlie alliston wrote online, yes, it is herfault, but no, she did not deserve it. hopefully it is a lesson learned on her behalf. he later deleted those words and other comments, and told the court they were stupid and not thought through. he previously mentioned this sort of video when he wrote online
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that he had taken the brakes off another bike, but in court he denied riding recklessly. this has been a controversial case and now kim briggs‘ family believes cycling laws should be changed to stop any more lives being lost. there was little reaction from charlie alliston as the verdict was read out but the judge granted charlie alliston as the verdict was read out but thejudge granted him bail until the 18th of september but said she had seen no remorse from him during the trial and she would be considering a custodial sentence. later the husband of kim briggs came outside the old bailey and said his family would be calling for a radical change in cycling laws. he said he wanted people to remember kim briggs not to this trial but for the beautiful and fun loving person that she was. thank you. this is bbc news at five — the headlines. the prime minister says the uk
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will take back control of its laws after brexit — as a new paper states the european court ofjustice should have no directjurisdiction over the uk. a cyclist, charlie alliston, accused of knocking over and killing a mother of two as she crossed the street, has been found not guilty of manslaughter by a jury at the old bailey — but guilty of a lesser charge. nadeem muhammad who tried to smuggle a pipe bomb onto a plane at manchester airport has just been jailed for 18 years. and in sport the right time to bow out, the english all—time record scorer wayne rooney retires from international football after turning down the chance to be part of the squad for the world cup qualifiers next month. liverpool to join celtic in the group stages of the champions league, they face hoffenheim tonight at anfield. and conor mcgregor
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arrives in las vegas ahead of the sabre fight against floyd mayweather junior this weekend. there are reportedly just junior this weekend. there are reportedlyjust under 2000 tickets left to be still sold for inside the arena. more on the story that we had in the headlines. in the last few minutes a man found guilty of trying to smuggle a pipe bomb on board a plane has been jailed for 18 years. nadeem muhammad was stopped by security at manchester airport in january and found to be carrying a crude improvised explosive device in his hand luggage. judith mauritz has been following the story. remind people about this case? in the last few minutes the sentence was passed
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by thejudge, 18 few minutes the sentence was passed by the judge, 18 years in few minutes the sentence was passed by thejudge, 18 years in prison few minutes the sentence was passed by the judge, 18 years in prison for nadeem muhammad. it relates to something that happened back in january this year when he was trying to get to italy. he was in the process of going through the security systems at manchester airport with the intent of getting onto a flight to italy. as he went through with his hand luggage, the security staff spotted that in the lining of his case there was what has been described as a crude device, an improvised explosive device, an improvised explosive device which was built up out of the barrel of a marker pen and had some batteries and wires attached to it. at the time that device, security staff considered suspicious, but ultimately he was not arrested and was allowed to go to italy. a week or so later it was forensically examined and it was discovered that the tube of the pen had explosive
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chemicals inside it. it was not until nadeem muhammad came back to the uk from italy that he was arrested. he was sentenced to 18 yesterday, the judge arrested. he was sentenced to 18 yesterday, thejudge in the arrested. he was sentenced to 18 yesterday, the judge in the case arrested. he was sentenced to 18 yesterday, thejudge in the case has made some strong remarks about both the security services at manchester airport and greater manchester police, he spoke about the fact that security staff he said reached a potentially dangerous conclusion and asa potentially dangerous conclusion and as a result one member of staff during the assessment of this pipe bomb put it in their own pocket and tested in the x—ray machine voting members of the public at risk. the judge said the situation was then compounded when the police became involved because they also accepted readily that it was not dangerous and allowed nadeem muhammad to travel onwards to italy. and he was not arrested and the opportunity was missed. thejudge said not arrested and the opportunity was missed. the judge said as a result of good luck rather than good judgment that the matter has come to
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a satisfactory conclusion. thank you. president trump has used a rally in arizona to launch a blistering attack on media coverage of his response to violence in charlottesville earlier this month. the president was accused of failing to condemn the white supremacists who clashed with anti—fascist protesters, and for saying that there was blame on many sides. but the president told supporters in phoenix that the ‘dishonest‘ media had been selective in its reporting. 0ur correspondent james cook sent this report. tear gas and trouble on the streets of phoenix. the clashes didn‘t last long, but for a short time they were intense, as riot police cleared protestors from the street after a presidential rally. the police have formed a line here. there have been announcements telling people to go home, telling protestors to leave the area. for a few minutes it was pretty unpleasant, with some tear gas in the air, which was stinging my eyes. but also, the eyes of the people it was aimed at. for the moment it does seem to have worked.
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it seems to have driven them off down the street. inside, it had been an animated donald trump who had rallied his supporters by denouncing the news media. mr trump quoted himself at length, aiming to demonstrate he had wholeheartedly condemned the actions of neo—nazis in the city of charlottesville, when a counterprotester was killed. what happened in charlottesville strikes at the core of america. and tonight, this entire arena stands united in forceful condemnation of the thugs who perpetrate hatred and violence. but the very dishonest media, those people right up there with all the cameras... booing. they make up stories. they have no sources in many cases. they say, "a source says", there is no such thing. but they don‘t report the facts. just like they don‘t want to report that i spoke out forcefully against hatred, bigotry and violence, and strongly
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condemned the neo—nazis, the white supremacists and the kkk. if you want to discover the source of the division in our country, look no further than the fake news and the crooked media, which would rather get ratings and clicks than tell the truth. president trump took his war with the media to a new level tonight, attacking journalists again and again. he clearly regards the best way to defend against criticism of his presidency, as a full throated attack on the messenger. james cook, bbc news, phoenix, arizona. let‘s speak to dr larry sabato, director of the center for politics at the university of virginia in charlottesville, where a woman was killed at a demonstration earlier this month. thank you for being with us.
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residents of all colours have had run—ins with the media from time to time, is this any different? you are correct that all presidents have criticised the media to some degree. some of them have been especially critical they tend to be republican presidents. there‘s never been anything this intense. this really is extraordinary and in part it is because donald trump is determined to have a devilfigure, especially for his rallies, the rallies of the true believers. for years he had barack 0bama then he went to hillary clinton and now of course it is the news media. he brings it along to the rallies as a kind of durdle dor and sticks pins in it throughout the valley and that is what he did last night. -- voodoo doll. but his
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supporters love all of that? the base of supporters to come to these rallies, yes. they‘re becoming an increasingly small minority in the country as a whole. maybe one third the population. he got a6% of the vote but his support has shrunk. and these are the people basically who man the beliefs for donald trump, twitter, they take care of his political needs and they are determined to support everything that he says is whether the facts back it up or not. you say that that is diminishing somewhat but recent polling i thought had suggested that the vast majority of people who voted for him in the elections are still happy that they did so. voted for him in the elections are still happy that they did som that changing, do you think? i think it is changing a bit, i do not think
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most of his supporters have dropped away but we had noticed the percentage of republicans who are supporting donald trump has declined. he got 90% of them on election day, depending on the polls, now it is either in the upper 70s or the low 805. it polls, now it is either in the upper 705 or the low 805. it does not sound like a bad showing but remember amongst democrat5 here is that a few percent and with independence he is now po5ed that a few percent and with independence he is now posed by a good 15% margin. so we need the 5trong good 15% margin. so we need the strong support of republicans and even some of them are getting turned off by his behaviour. that is interesting for viewers in this country because they watch this and they say well, members of the republican party congre55 who are republican, what are they thinking and doing about this, if they are di55atisfied, why do we not hear them talking about that little bit more? i'm glad you made a
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distinction between 5peaking more? i'm glad you made a distinction between speaking and doing. increasingly the republican leaders in congress are sending 5ignals directly or indirectly, that they are unhappy with the way that donald trump i5 they are unhappy with the way that donald trump is conducting his pre5idency. just today the new york time5 carried a major story which clearly had the republican majority leader in the us senate mitch mcconnell, and he said he‘s not sure donald trump can even salvage his presidency at this stage. now of cour5e presidency at this stage. now of course they have been warring on twitter and in speeches but the action5 speak louder than words as alway5. what are they doing, actually doing, to limit the damage from donald trump and the answer is, pretty much very little. they defeated the health care reform by a couple of votes. we will see what they do in the autumn but i think they do in the autumn but i think the marriage is rocky but they‘re not at the lawyer ‘5 office yet.
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always good to talk to you. thank you for now. there5a may has stripped the organisation that manages grenfell tower of its responsibility for the west london estate in which the high rise is located. the prime minister admitted there were flaws in the response to the fire, which killed more than 80 people. she attended a private meeting with residents last night to hear their concerns about how the aftermath of disaster is being handled. well a public meeting between residents and council leaders is due to get underway 5hortly — our correspondent sarah corker is there. i wonder if you have been able to talk to anyone who might be there in advance? this is the latest in a 5erie5 advance? this is the latest in a series of public meetings that have been held since the tragedy. while sometime may have passed since the fire, more than two months, there is
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5till fire, more than two months, there is still a sense of anger about what happened. it was last night when the prime minister met up to 70 re5ident5 prime minister met up to 70 residents in private to discuss their concerns about the handling of their concerns about the handling of the aftermath of this tragedy, they di5cussed support for bereaved re5ident5, housing, the public enquiry, the distribution of charitable fund5. and she acknowledged to them that the response from the counciljust had not been good enough. the tenant management organisation, the body responsible for the day—to—day running of the tower block, that has also come in for heavy criticism from the residents. and today during a tour of from the residents. and today during a tourofa from the residents. and today during a tour of a factory in guildford, the prime minister confirmed that that organisation will no longer be involved in the running of the e5tate. the tenant management organisation will no longer have responsibility for the lancaster west housing estate. people were pleased to hear that.
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what we were also able to do was to hear from specific issues that individuals had at that meeting. i have since spoken to the leader of the council to raise the issues with her that were raised with me at that meeting. because what i want to ensure is that grenfell united residents and others locally are given the support that they need following this terrible tragedy, which has so affected their lives. the council says it eventually will ta ke the council says it eventually will take over the running of all the housing stock in the borough. around 10,000 properties. but it will do so in stages. meanwhile earlier today new permanent homes for the re5ident5 new permanent homes for the residents were unveiled. 30 properties in chelsea that have been bought by the council, that is about three miles from grenfell tower. and since monday the residents have been able to go online and register their
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intere5t able to go online and register their interest in these properties. but so far only nine of 180 households have accepted permanent accommodation. 0ther5 accepted permanent accommodation. others are still in temporary housing and hotels. and the council has pledged to use re5erve5 housing and hotels. and the council has pledged to use reserves of up to £70 million to rehouse the residents and they have reiterated that it is and they have reiterated that it is a top priority. thank you very much. stay with us here on the bbc news channel. england striker wayne rooney has announced his retirement from international football even though he was asked to return to the team. we will have the latest reaction in the sports news inju5t we will have the latest reaction in the sports news in just a few minutes but before that look at weather pro5pect5. we have seen a gradual brightening up we have seen a gradual brightening up from the west moving through the day with this cloud pushing eastwards, 5ome
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day with this cloud pushing eastwards, some heavy bursts in there and localised flooding for pa rt5 of there and localised flooding for parts of northern england this afternoon. the rain will push north and east through the night but confined to the northern isles by the early hours. a few showers in northern ireland and western scotla nd northern ireland and western scotland and england and wales. temperatures down to 12—1ad, it will feel fresher than last night. the rain 5tays feel fresher than last night. the rain stays in the far northern i5les tomorrow, 5ome rain stays in the far northern i5les tomorrow, some heavy bur5ts. some heavy purse and showers, the majority further north and west. starting in western scotland and north west england and moving eastwards but for much of england and wales it will be dry and bright, temperatures a bit fresher than to date with a maximum of 22 in the south—east. good evening. this is bbc news at five. the headlines.
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there5a may has insisted that the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice in the uk will come to an end with brexit. as the government publi5hed new details of its position, the pm said the uk would "take back control of our laws". a cycli5t accused of knocking over and killing a mother of two as she crossed the street, has been cleared of manslaughter. however, charlie alli5ton was found guilty of causing bodily harm by "wanton or furious driving". the pick tim‘5 hu5band paid tribute to her. for us to remember kim not through the lens of this trial but being the beautiful, fun loving woman who adored her children and who lived her life to the full. nadeem muhammad, a man who tried to smuggle a pipe bomb on to a plane at manchester airport, has been jailed for 18 years. prince harry has said he is "very
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glad" he joined the funeral cortege for his mother, princess diana. he and his brother have been talking about their sense of bewilderment at the grieving crowd5 following her death. sport now, here‘5 will perry. good evening. let‘s bring you more on the news that england‘s all time record goal—scorer, wayne rooney, has retired from international football with immediate effect. the everton striker was asked by england boss gareth southgate to be involved for the upcoming world cup qualifiers against malta and slovakia but says, "now is the time to bow out." rooney‘s been described as an icon by fa chairman greg clarke. earlier i wasjoined by a man who worked with rooney as first team coach at manchester united, rene meulensteen. fir5t first and foremost he always wanted
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to know what we were going to do, he would come up to me and mike phelan and say, what are we doing today, every day. he wanted and out what we we re every day. he wanted and out what we were doing and if you really explain him when there were specific aspects of training that related to him and other players, he would buy into it. hejust other players, he would buy into it. he just loved football so anything you wanted him to do even after training he would stay behind, no problem. liverpool will look to book their place in the knockout stages of the champions league this evening. they have a 2—1 lead over bundesliga side hoffenheim after the first leg. jurgen klopp‘5 side conceded a late goal to give tonight‘s visitors a glimmer of hope. klopp believes the team needs to improve on that performance in germany a week ago. a lot of people in england did not expect the quality of hoffenheim they saw. that is now clear. for me it is half—time and half—time you have to are just things. you have to change things in the right direction. —— adjust things. the first game was good enough to get a
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result. the second game needs to be better. there‘s also a big night of action ahead in the efl cup. there is a lancashire derby a5 blackburn welcome burnley to ewood park, and striker chris wood could make his debut for the premier league side. the club record 5igning is thought to have cost £15 million afterjoining from leeds, and his new manager says he‘s happy with his 5triking options. i think they are all different in different ways, the obvious thing is people look at sam vokes and think chris wood is a similar type. physically there are similarities but every 5trike physically there are similarities but every strike at their own weight about the pitch and he has his. he has a number of different ways of 5coring goal5 has a number of different ways of 5coring goals and he has shown that particularly lasted but through his career and i think he can be effective here. england‘s men have reached the semi—finals of the eurohockey championships in amsterdam. they beat ireland 2—1 to progress to the last four as runners—up in pool b behind germany. the men follow in the footsteps of england‘s women, who face the netherlands in their semifinal tomorrow. so many ways but probably our best
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performance of the group because of what was on it and how the game went. we dominated for long periods in the first quarter and ended up a goal down and to reflect on it, the p ressu re goal down and to reflect on it, the pressure built and to stick at it and some of the quality they played, they 5tuck and some of the quality they played, they stuck at it and right at the end it was a nailbiter. 0lympic bronze medalli5t5 marcu5 ellis and chris langridge are through to the third round of the world badminton championships in glasgow. the pair are seeded 1ath in the men‘s double5 had few alarms against the au5tria but they won by two games to nil. ab de villiers has announced he‘5 stepping down as south africa‘s one day international captain. de villiers has captained the side for six years, but now says it is "time for someone else to take the 0di side forward". he‘ll remain available for selection in test cricket, and for both 5horter formats of the game. that‘s all the sport for now. you can keep up to date with all those stories on the bbc sport website. that‘5 bbc.co.uk/5port, and i‘ll have more in sport5day at 6.30pm. let‘s get more on our top story,
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the publication of the government‘s proposals on resolving legal issues after brexit. the discussion paper says that the supremacy of eu judges would end, and the rights of eu citizens in the uk should be dealt with by british courts. in a moment we‘ll be speaking to the pro—brexit conservative mp peter bone. but first, how does the european court ofjustice work and what is its role? adam fleming has been to the court in luxembourg to find out more. welcome to the ecj, where justice is served, eu 5tyle. there are actually two courts here. the court ofjustice — that‘s where national courts can ask for eu laws to be clarified, and eu countries can get into trouble for breaking eu rules. and, the general court, where decisions made by the european institutions can be challenged by countries, companie5, and individuals.
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but remember, this is absolutely not the european court of human rights. that‘5 part of a separate organisation, that‘s not the eu. so it‘s not part of the brexit proce55. that is totally different, totally separate. so, why does the ecj matter? well, recent rulings which impact you and me included a decision that if you fall 5ick during annual leave from work, you‘re allowed more time off. plus, it was the ecj which decided anyone who wanted to access benefits in the uk had to prove they lived in the country. however, the ecj overruled british tax rules, forcing hmrc to refund 5ome taxes back to a number of businesses. this is every judgment from the 19505 to about 2010 in multiple languages. to supporters of this place, it‘s amazing. tran5nationalju5tice in action.
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to critic5, these are examples of foreign judges interfering in other countries. so, where do we think this place will feature in brexit negotiations? well, the eu wants a big future role for the ecj, particularly when it comes to the rights of eu citizens living in the uk. the british government isn‘t quite so sure. anyway, ca5e — definitely not — clo5ed. adam fleming, bbc news, at the european court ofjustice in luxembourg. joining me now from our westminster studio is the conservative mp peter bone, who backed the leave vote in the eu referendum. good evening. the ecj i5 good evening. the ecj is always going to have some sort of influence, isn‘t it? is that not inevitable post—brexit? influence, isn‘t it? is that not inevitable post-brexit? you couldn't possibly come out with that, say that having read the 12 page proposal. it is quite clear as the
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prime minister said that our supreme court will be the ultimate judge of our laws, we will make our laws in this country and they will be judged by what 0 own judges from our own courts and that is clearly what the paper says. there are some rules and regulations that are affected and impacted by the ecj. the european arrest warrant, the european air safety agency, the5e arrest warrant, the european air safety agency, these are things that are fundamental to the way we live? you would have seen in the paper that if there is a dispute with four example of the eu and the uk, there i5... example of the eu and the uk, there is... we have to find a neutral way of resolving it, not english law, not european law. the paper put5 of resolving it, not english law, not european law. the paper puts a number of different options down and the world trade organisation di5pute regime seem5 the world trade organisation di5pute regime seems to be the sensible way to go forward. this paper is about deciding di5pute5 to go forward. this paper is about deciding disputes between the european union and the united kingdom, not decisions made by our
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parliament which will be determined by the supreme court. when you say a neutral way of resolving things, doe5 neutral way of resolving things, does that mean the creation or establishment of new bodie5, new statutes ? establishment of new bodie5, new statutes? no, that is the point. the paper statutes? no, that is the point. the pa per clearly says statutes? no, that is the point. the paper clearly says if you take the world trade organisation, there is already a dispute mechani5m world trade organisation, there is already a dispute mechanism which is used between the eu and non—eu countries also first ball it says, let‘5 countries also first ball it says, let‘s talk and see if it can be re5olved let‘s talk and see if it can be resolved and if that fails there is a dispute body which setup an arbitration panel and they listen to the argument and make a decision and a rolling and there is also an appeal process. you don‘t have to create anything, it is already there —— and a ruling. that seems a reasonable way forward and it is already used by the eu in relation to countries that are not members. you don‘t have to create anything, it is already there also i spoke to
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lord falk and a while ago who knows a thing or two about the law and he 5aid a thing or two about the law and he said the only way to completely get the ect act of our hair, if you want to see it in those terms, it is not have any association at all —— the ecj. you don't have trade deals and things that you clearly want. that i5 things that you clearly want. that is clearly wrong. he is a qc! if you‘re a series of they would give you‘re a series of they would give you different opinions but that is blatant non5en5e. if you have trade deal, you have a way of determining di5pute5. by the nature of it, that has to be neutral, it cannot be determined by the uk and not by the european court. you will have a neutral way of doing it and the document talks of three or four different ways. i have talked about
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the world trade organisation which seems the easiest way. for lord faulkner to say that will not happen i5, faulkner to say that will not happen is, to be blunt, rubbish. thank you. more now on one of our main stories. a cycli5t accused of knocking over and killing a woman in london has been found not guilty of manslaughter by a jury at the old bailey. charlie alli5ton was found guilty of ‘wanton and furious driving‘. alli5ton crashed into aa—year—old kim briggs as she crossed the road. her husband matt made this statement outside the old bailey. thi5 this has been an intensely gruelling ten days for me, my family and our many friends. 0bviously ten days for me, my family and our many friends. obviously i am
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relieved that this trial is finally over and i would like to thank the jury over and i would like to thank the jury for their verdict. i would like to thank my friends for their amazing support. i would like to thank duncan penney qc, the cps, the metropolitan police and in particular dc darren ca5e, metropolitan police and in particular dc darren case, for their diligence and support and also keith barrett. i would also like to thank the media for the respect they have 5hown the media for the respect they have shown me, my family and friends. i will make further statements in due cour5e will make further statements in due course but for now i would like to a5k course but for now i would like to ask the media to continue to respect my privacy and for us to remember kim not through the lens of this trial, but for being the beautiful, fun loving woman who adored her
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children and who lived her life to the full and by the mantra, make everyday count. thank you. that was matt briggs who5e that was matt briggs whose wife died last year as she was cro55ing that was matt briggs whose wife died last year as she was crossing the road in london. charlie alli5ton wa5 found guilty of wanton and furious driving. the transport secretary, chris grayling, says politicians in the north of england should find the solutions to its regional transport problems, not central government. his comments come as northern leaders are meeting in leeds, calling for more money and a commitment from central government to help improve transport links in the region. 0ur correspondent dan whitworth is in leeds. a5 as you said there has been a big meeting of dozens of political leaders and business leaders and
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they have been talking about places like this, leed5 station, a real transport hub in the north of england and the reason tho5e leaders have come together is because they wa nt to have come together is because they want to create a sense of unity, to speak to the government with one voice. when they ask or demand, depending on how you look at it, more commitment and more money from the government to help improve existing public transport networks in the north, and to create new ones. this comes in the wake of an article written by the transport secretary this morning for the yorkshire post, with the headline saying it all. i must say, that has left a bit of a sour taste in the mouth5 left a bit of a sour taste in the mouths of some of the delegates at the meeting who are keen to make sure it was not a political meeting, not about bashing london or the government. chris grayling for his pa rt government. chris grayling for his part 5aid government. chris grayling for his part said the government is already spending £13 billion this parliament, a record for a government, on improving public transport network systems in the
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north and why is this important and why does it matter? there are 15 million people in the north of england, it it was its own country it would have the tenth largest economy in the eu so no doubt we will hear more on this story in the coming weeks and months and even years ahead. thank you. prince5 william and harry have described their bewilderment when they encountered grieving crowd5 on the day of their mother‘s funeral. speaking in a bbc documentary marking 20 years since the death of diana, princess of wales, they say walking behind her coffin was a family decision. 0ur royal correspondent, nicholas witchell, reports. it was the week when a nation mourned, and the monarchy faced sharp criticism. at its heart were two boys, william and harry, then aged 15 and 12. grieving for the loss of their mother, but required by their royal position to appear in public and help assuage the public sense of loss.
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in the bbc documentary, william and harry speak about the numbness and confusion they felt when they were told that their mother was dead. and, in harry‘5 case, it‘s clear that there still anger towards the french photographers who were pur5uing diana‘s speeding car in the crash in the alma tunnel in paris. i think one of the hardest things to come to terms with is the fact that the people that chased her into the tunnel where the same people that were taking photographs of her while she was still dying on the back—seat of car. and william and i know that, we‘ve been told that numerous times by people that know that was the case. she‘d had quite a severe head injury but she was still very much alive on the back—seat. and those people that caused the accident, instead of helping, were taking photographs of her dying on the back—seat. and then those photographs made their way back to news desk5. william and harry were at balmoral when they heard the news from paris.
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they speak up in support of their grandmother for her efforts to shield them. and of their father — he tried to do his best for us, says harry. applause. william... bless you. bless you, william. when they moved from balmoral to london, they encountered grieving crowds. and it‘s clear that they found the experience bewildering. with so many people sobbing and wanting to touch them. of the decision to walk behind their mother‘s coffin, both say it was a collective, family decision and both say they felt a strong sense of duty, even then. when you have something so traumatic as the death of your mother when you're 15, as very sadly many people have experienced, and no one wants to experience, it leaves you... you know, it will either make or break you. and i wouldn't let it break me. i wanted it to make me. i wanted her to be proud of the person i would become.
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i didn't want her worried or her legacy to be that, you know, william and or harry were completely and utterly devastated by it and that all the hard work and all the love and all the energy that she put into us when we were younger, would go to waste. they were children, coping with their own grief and the attention of a grieving nation, and who kept going to honour their mother‘s memory. nicholas witchell, bbc news. and you can see that documentary, ‘diana, seven days‘ on bbc one on sunday at 7.30pm. some of the other stories making bbc news at 5. police in denmark have confirmed that the torso found washed up on a 5hore near copenhagen is that of the missing swedi5h journali5t kim wall. she disappeared earlier this month during a submarine trip with an inventor, peter mad5en. he‘s been charged with negligent manslaughter. the us navy has confirmed
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the 5acking of a fleet commander after two serious colli5ion5 in asia in two months. vice admiraljo5eph aucoin of the seventh fleet, was relieved of his duties after ten sailors went missing after a destroyer collided with an oil tanker near singapore. a british man has been arrested at an airport in turkey as he reportedly tried to fly home with several coin5 he‘d found while 5norkelling in the sea near bodrum. toby robyn5, an ambulance driver from west sussex, is believed to have found the coins by accident and considered them to be 5ouvenir5. police in birmingham have obtained what they‘re calling landmark court injunctions against suspected members of two criminal gangs thought to be involved in gun and drugs offences. 17 people have been served with a legal order, banning them from entering large parts of the city and from mixing
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with one another. from birmingham, sima kotecha sent this report. early morning and police in birmingham are getting ready to issue several men with gang injunctions. we are on our way to serve a final gang injunction on a man by the name ofjeromejone5. for the next two years the men won‘t be able to go to certain parts of the city, they won‘t be able to meet one another, and they won‘t be allowed to post material online. well, we are driving through handsworth, one of the areas where the men will no longer be able to go to. and it is in what is called the exclusion zone and that area stretches from the centre of the city to its out5kirt5. here are the 18 men, 12 of whom are already in prison. they‘re all suspected of having links with two prominent birmingham gangs. the burger bar boy5 and thejohnson crew. house number one, and he is not home. my name is pc evan5. we are afterjerome. at the next addre55, nobody answer5.
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this is often a problem that we get, we can come as early as we like, but we won‘t necessarily catch them in. and unfortunately we do not have the power of entry to serve the injunctions on them. you just went round the back, tell me what you found. there were lights on and windows open, which would suggest to me that there are people in. but we can‘t force them to answer the door, can we? the injunctions have been issued to try and disrupt gang violence between the men. they come after a spate of gun and knife attacks in the city. it enables police officers, who know them, to undertake to challenge them if they are in particular areas where they are not allowed to be in the exclusion zones. if they are in company with people they are not allowed to be, it enables them to be challenged and taken back to court. it actually di5rupts their life5tyle and that is the one thing they do not want to happen. but former gang members have told us they do not work. some lawyer5 believe they‘re just a cosmetic gesture to show something is being done about gangs. if the injunctions are breached,
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the men could face time in jail. sima kotecha, bbc news, birmingham. let‘5 finish on wayne rooney‘s announcement that he is to retire from international football. the everton striker i5 england‘s all—time leading scorer with 53 goals in 119 appearances. some high—profile footballer5 have been tweeting about the news, including wayne rooney himself. rooney‘s tweet said... his fellow former england player michael owen paid tribute, tweeting. .. and england player harry kane said... in the last few minutes gary lineker
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has been talking to us. i'm not entirely 5urprised wayne has called ita entirely 5urprised wayne has called it a day internationally. i think it i5a it a day internationally. i think it is a sensible po5ition. there is or wa5 is a sensible po5ition. there is or was a lot of regulation whether he should be in or not, then the it in the squad, if he is the captain, if he plays or not. when you get to your 305 as all footballer5 know, the powers wayne a little bit without meaning to make the pun! i think it is a good position at the right time, a lot of good young player5 coming through and wayne has had a fabulous international career. does the timing seemed odd after such a great start to the season with everton? such a great start to the season with eve rton? it such a great start to the season with everton? it seemed like he could play his way back into the england setup and it seemed gareth southgate was considering it. we don‘t know what conversations have gone on between them, gareth southgate might have said he was con5idering other players, perhap5 giving him the opportunity to do it himself but is always nice to do rather than being pushed out. that
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remains to be seen, the announcement has been made by wayne himself which i5 has been made by wayne himself which is the way most of us like to go. i think overall, it is the decision he has made and he can concentrate now on his club football with everton where he started particularly well. gary lineker talking to john where he started particularly well. gary lineker talking tojohn watson. the six o‘clock new5 gary lineker talking tojohn watson. the six o‘clock news is it up, let‘5 have a look at the weather now with lucy martin. we have seen some heavy rainfall in a short amount of time in northern ireland last night and in parts of northern england to with some localised flooding here in scarborough. some bright interval5 around, this was sent in from staffordshire. we have seen this band of cloud and rain further north moving eastwards through the day, brightening up from the west behind it and introducing 5ome brightening up from the west behind it and introducing some fresh air. through the night, the rain will become confined to the far
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north—east in the northern ireland with some heavy burst in the early hours. a few showers coming into northern ireland and the west of scotla nd northern ireland and the west of scotland and northern england and wale5. temperature i5 scotland and northern england and wale5. temperature is a bit fresher than last night, overnight lows of 12-1ad. than last night, overnight lows of 12—1ad. tomorrow we are looking at sunny spell5 12—1ad. tomorrow we are looking at sunny spells and showers, the rain in the northern isles for much of the day. some showers first thing in western scotland and northern ireland, some bright intervals further east in scotland with a few showers in northern england first thing. further south, showers in northern england first thing. furthersouth, more in showers in northern england first thing. further south, more in the way of brightness with the odd shower in parts of wales and the south west but further south—east, more in the wake of brightness and good spells of sunshine first thing. moving through the day, those showers will move eastwards, a lot of dry wales in england and wales. further north be showers edged across northern ireland into scotla nd across northern ireland into scotland and northern england, moving east through the day.
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temperatures tomorrow a bit fresher than today, a maximum of around 22 celsius in the south—east. a5 than today, a maximum of around 22 celsius in the south—east. as we move into friday we will see the rain clearing from the far northern isles, still this rain in the north—west and brighter conditions in the south—east, some showers pushing into northern ireland and northern england through friday and into the weekend, some heavy showers for scotland first thing on this front could bring some heavy showers into the south—east but some uncertainty so keep an eye on the forecast. for saturday and sunday it could be a few showers in the north, some warm sunshine around, particularly the further south you are but some uncertainty as to whether it will last into monday. tonight at six, british law and british courts for british citizens.
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theresa may‘s promise for life after brexit. under new proposals the european court ofjustice will not have a direct say over our affairs. when we leave the european union we will be leaving the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice. but what happens if there‘s a dispute with the eu after brexit? who decides what‘s right or wrong? also tonight: cleared of manslaughter, the cyclist who knocked down a mother of two who died of her injuries. a nation had lost its princess. they‘d lost a mother, harry and william speak about diana‘s death. it will either make or break you and i wouldn‘t let it break me and i wanted it to make me, and i wanted her to be proud. and rooney retires — wayne calls time on his international career with england after 1a years.

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