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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 24, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. it's gcse results day for more than half a million teenagers — there's a warning that big changes to the exam system in england will leave employers confused. students sat tougher tests in maths and english. the grades a—star to g have been replaced by the numbers 9 to 1. what impact have those changes had on pupils and staff? i am here at an academy in north london where staff are waiting to tell students how they've gotten on. good morning, it's thursday the 24th of august. also on the program, shocking levels of inactivity, it's revealed more than six million middle—aged people in england fail to go for a brisk
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walk even once a month. good morning. is the growth of car finance deals healthy for the motor industry? we built a lot more vehicles in july that last year, but there are big questions about what's fuelling the demand. i'll be taking a look. in sport, conor mcgregor and floyd mayweather declare a truce ahead of the big fight on saturday. and carol has the weather. rain over the northern isles for most of the day, but for most of the uk, some showers. especially in the south. feeling fresher than of late. all the details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. more than half a million teenagers in england, wales and northern ireland will get their gcse results this morning. there are some major changes for students in england coming into place for the first time. more difficult exams in english and maths will be graded using a numerical system, going from nine at the top to one at the bottom.
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other subjects will continue to be graded from a star to g. exams in wales have also been made harder, as our education correspondent gillian hargreaves explains. thousands of 16 —year—olds will find out if all their hard work has paid off. but there are new pressures this year in england and wales. maths, english and welsh have all been restructured. and in england, their‘s a new numerical grading system for the english and maths systems, running from grading 1—9, with nine being the highest score, identifying the best students in the country —— there's. great for is broadly being compared to a previous grade c, considered a standard pass. the government says the new grade five should be considered a strong past. the old alphabetic system is still in place for other gcse
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subjects until next year, head teachers are accusing the government of trying to reform too quickly and causing a muddle. the consequences for teachers are that they have had to start teaching new courses, partly at gcse, while other things have been changing in schools. it will lead to a sense of frustration that there hasn't been sufficient time to plan for it, there are not enough practice papers to work on. there is no doubt these changes to english and maths have been big changes for schools, but employers have to get their heads around it as well. i am slightly confused. i am sure in time we will work it out. a standard pass, that would be our borderline, i think. standard pass, that would be our borderline, ithink. a standard pass, that would be our borderline, i think. a four. the westminster government was determined to make gcse harder, two and what some see as a dumbing down. the first of the reformed exams will
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put these ambitions to the test —— gcse‘s put these ambitions to the test —— gcse's -- put these ambitions to the test —— gcse‘s —— to end. and we'll be discussing this with the labour shadow minister for education at ten to seven this morning. more than six million adults in england spend less than 10 minutes each month walking at a brisk pace, according to a new report. public health england is launching a campaign to encourage 10 minutes of brisk walking a day, particularly among the middle aged. it's claimed that it can help prevent cancer, heart disease and poor mental health. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports. in denton, in manchester, the first steps towards a healthier lifestyle. this walking group is starting slowly, but already some members are feeling the benefits of a regular stroll. i've lost about four stone. have you? four stone, wow. gone from 25 to 21. that is impressive. getting some exercise, and it's company as well, because i live my own, so that helps a lot. it's week two for me, i'm a newbie. and i decided when i retired that i wanted to do lots of different
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things, and i've done lots of things to keep the mind going, but not a lot to keep the body going. the beauty of walking is, of course, it is free. you don't need any special training, or indeed, any special kit. but health experts say doing at least ten minutes of brisk walking every day, well, that can have a really positive impact on your health. and it is brisk walking, around three miles an hour, that is the key. gp dr zoe williams practices what she preaches to her patients, but millions of adults are missing out. four out of ten adults between the ages of a0 and 60 are not managing to achieve ten minutes of brisk walking per month, which sounds unbelievable, and lots of those people will be walking, but they are not walking at a brisk pace. walking can help with weight loss, back pain, diabetes, and even reducing the risk of cancer. now, we are all being urged to get up and get moving. we'll be speaking to public health england
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after 7 this morning. there's to be a major investigation into the impact that international students have on the uk's economy. the government commissioned study will examine their effect on the labour market and education sector. new figures will be published this morning showing how many foreign students went on to leave britain after finishing their courses. dutch police are questioning the driver of a van about a possible terrorist attack on a concert venue in the city of rotterdam. police stopped the spanish—registered van, which was found to be carrying gas canisters, and called off the concert after a tip—off from spanish police. the husband of a woman who was knocked down and killed by a cyclist has called for new laws to tackle irresponsible and reckless actions. 20—year—old charlie alliston is facing a jail term when he is sentenced next month. he was riding a bike with no front brakes. andy moore reports. thejudge in this the judge in this case said she hadn't seen one iota of remorse from
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charlie alliston at any stage. he was cleared of manslaughter, but convicted of wanton or furious driving. he collided with kimberly briggs while driving in a legal bike that was not fitted with a front brake. police in london released a video to show the distance it can make to stopping distances —— difference. the first bike was fitted with both back and front brakes, which stops within a few meters. and then without, it takes much longer to stop, around 19 metres. the victim's husband is a cyclist in london, but he is calling for a change in the law. he wants to see a new offence of causing death 01’ see a new offence of causing death or serious injury by careless cycling. the same offence already exists for motorists. he said: charlie alliston will be sentenced
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next month. thejudge made it clear she was considering a jail term, the maximum for the offence is two yea rs. eight people have been killed and many are missing after typhoon hato hit the southern chinese territory of macau. a further four people were killed in mainland china, according to media there — with winds of more than 124 miles—per—hour being recorded. yesterday, the typhoon battered hong kong, uprooting trees, flooding streets and halting financial trading. a farmer has defended her decision to serve up as dinner the piglets, saved from a barn fire, to thank the firefighters who rescued them. the 18 piglets and two sows survived the fire in wiltshire in february, which saw 60 tonnes of hay catch fire. the firefighters initially said
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the sausages were fantastic, but have then apologised following complaints. farming is what we do here. it's not an animal sanctuary, you know, we don't keep animals just for the fun of it. we enjoy it having them being here and we are very sorry when they leave the farm and go on. i can appreciate and understand that there are some people who don't keep meat, but there are also people who do eat meat, and farming is our life. —— eat meat. the us powerball has seen 21 rollovers in a row, meaning the prize now stands at 700 million dollars — that's almost 550 million pounds. it's the world's richest lottery, with an average jackpot of $423 million. but while the prizes are big, the odds are slim — there's a 1 in 292 million chance of someone taking the cash home. 292 million... not much chance. how
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many wayne rooney's do you think you could buy for that money? not many, probably! he's all over the back pages this morning. every paper has their own tribute. it is quite a sensible thing for him to do at this point. back at everton, he could prolong his club career for another three orfour prolong his club career for another three or four years by not having to go and play for england, the extra hands and training he would have to do. when he played his first tournament for england, it was 13 yea rs tournament for england, it was 13 years ago now, he scored 53 goals
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for his country. he's turned down a recall to the squad and will concentrate on his club football at everton. liverpool will be in the draw for the champions league group stage later today after beating hoffenheim 11—2 last night. they won their qualifying playoff 6—3 overall. in the efl cup last night, west ham comprehensively beat league two side cheltenham. and ahead of one of the most lucrative fights in boxing history — floyd mayweather and conor mcgregor face off in an unexpectedly calm press conference in las vegas. i would even say civilised. i would even say civilisedlj i would even say civilised. i don't understand it, one minute they don't like each other, the next minute... how many more days of this? saturday night, sunday morning. they have
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used all of that kind of energy over the last few days and i think they've realised they have got to not waste any energy any more and concentrate what is —— on what is going to happen over the weekend. it has ground to a halt, it will ramp up has ground to a halt, it will ramp up again on saturday night and into sunday morning. we will talk more about that a bit later on. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. i don't like the umbrellas when they come out. some showers heavy, some thundery, but not all of us will see them. the driest conditions in the south and south—east. today we've got low pressure close by, mostly in
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scotla nd got low pressure close by, mostly in scotland and northern ireland. yesterday's weather front affecting the northern isles. in 0rkney and shetland, some rain. showers coming in across western scotland and northern ireland. away from that, a chilly start. some of us getting off toa chilly start. some of us getting off to a sunny start. moving across england and through wales, a lot of sunshine first thing this morning. fairweather cloud around. miss and fog should lift quite quickly. you can see across southern counties in east anglia and the midlands, off to a bright and sunny start. along the south coast, temperatures are in some places already at 70 degrees. through the day, some showers merging across southern scotland and northern ireland. the rain moving away from the northern isles. for the rest of us, hanging on to sunny intervals. fairweather cloud developing through the day. through
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the afternoon, hazy sunshine. pleasa nt the afternoon, hazy sunshine. pleasant in the south—east, 23— 2a degrees. pressure as we push further north, especially if you are in those showers. as we get into the evening and overnight, showery out wrecks of rain continuing across the north—west. some cloud, some breaks in that cloud. quite cool for some of us, especially in the countryside. some mist and fog patches forming overnight, clearing quite quickly as we head into tomorrow. showers moving from west tomorrow. showers moving from west to east overnight. first thing in the morning, you can see this cloud coming back into northern scotland. showers on and off through the course of the day. cloud as we move further south, temperatures in the west, looking at mid— high teens. pushing back down into the south—east, we will import some wind from the near continent. temperatures a little bit higher,
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22- 24. temperatures a little bit higher, 22— 24. from saturday into the weekend, high pressure in charge of the weather further south. however, we do have a set of fronts coming in from the atlantic. they are going to bring some rain with them. also rather breezy. that is largely going to be across the northern half of the country. rain moving from west to east courtesy of those weather fronts. away from that, back into some dry conditions with highs of two about 24 degrees. temperatures roughly where they should be at this stage of the year. it is about time! i like them a little bit higher. stage of the year. it is about time! i like them a little bit higherlj know, but it has been cold. i like them a little bit higherlj know, but it has been coldlj i like them a little bit higherlj know, but it has been cold. i agree with you. i like it higher. i am glad we are moving in the right direction. thank you. let's take a look at this morning's papers. we are all sitting comfortably. yes,
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thanks. shall i begin? we are all sitting comfortably. yes, thanks. shalli begin? yes. the daily mail, this is about inactivity. this is about how much you walk on a routine basis. this report shows a shocking lack of activity to do with the notion of how often you go for a brisk walk, and saying some people don't do ten minutes a month. and this is children on set on the itv news set, and you can see alistair stewart, who has had a little invader while on air. it has happened here if you dance. it is my favourite moment when that happens. they should always ta ke when that happens. they should always take over. some would say that we have. the sun is looking at the bbc being blasted last night a p pa re ntly the bbc being blasted last night apparently for giving 10% pay rises for almost 1800 staff, and saying it
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cost £8,000 each, and it will cost the licence payer £14 million. looking at students, how many foreign students will leave the uk when they finish their study, and the bbc scotland editor who will host sunday politics.|j the bbc scotland editor who will host sunday politics. i have two papers and one story. the front of the ft, the euro is at an eight year high against the pound, or at the pound, which is at an eight—year low. if you are looking to go abroad, you will look at this. low. if you are looking to go abroad, you will look at thism low. if you are looking to go abroad, you will look at this. it is effectively level. parity. if you look at how much it has changed since april, it was 0.85, now 92p, going to the daily mail, holidaymakers get just 0.87 euros,
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87 cents to the town at the airport. how many times have we said not to get currency at the airport? it is worth shopping around even more than normal because... you can get it at the airport if you book online and collect at the airport. yes, it is not like the people at the airport are not nice. they are lovely. you don't get the best deal.|j are not nice. they are lovely. you don't get the best deal. i love that. people at the airport are nice people. shall we look at the best moments wayne rooney has had in an england shirt? the guardian have five great moments of wayne rooney scoring for england. look at the scene, the right foot, one of the most important things in terms of his game. look at a shot. that is england... they lost in 2003. he was 18 at that point. he played excellently in the friendly against
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argentina. and the papers are split oi'i argentina. and the papers are split on whether or not he was given the chance to play before the world cup next year. some say he turned down an offer. some say that he decided oi'i an offer. some say that he decided on that because he wouldn't get a place that he would call time and ta ke place that he would call time and take it into his own hands. quickly, before i go, this very lucrative fight this weekend. the mail have a piece on, —— con at —— conor mcgregor and how much he has changed and the most significant change is the boxing gloves. who knows? although mayweather said that he has a gritty chin. gritty chin? as in he can takea a gritty chin. gritty chin? as in he can take a punch. absolutely. i love myjob. good. can take a punch. absolutely. i love
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my job. good. i mostly love my job. except when you say things like that. not really. apparently we hate ourjobs at 35. 0h, that. not really. apparently we hate ourjobs at 35. oh, gosh. and the reason being, when you start your firstjob you are happy, then when you get to 35, that is when you get more responsibility. you find it more responsibility. you find it more stressful. you are not in. you have probably been in work for 14 years since university —— nodding. so, happy zone? i keep refreshing. i am constantly happy. age-related happy. if 35 is when you stop being happy. if 35 is when you stop being happy in yourjob. i am overjoyed. are you asking for his age? happy in yourjob. i am overjoyed. are you asking for his age7m happy in yourjob. i am overjoyed. are you asking for his age? it is a little bit early for this time of mourning. i don't mind saying i have been unhappy for a long time. that isjust an been unhappy for a long time. that is just an average. some of us are always happy. how old are you? we
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will find out at the end of this morning. will we? i don't know. you can guess. 27. always say 27. it is a good one. it is again we are going to play, gas sean's age it isn't going to go away. —— guess. back to our main story now, hundreds of thousands of students across england, wales and northern ireland will be collecting their gcse results today. but for pupils in england this year there's a big difference, harder exams and a new grading system. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is with students at ark academy in north london for us this morning. many nervous students, i imagine. yes. good morning. welcome to ark academy in north london. students and parents and staff are gathering to find out the news — how they have gonein to find out the news — how they have gone in the gcses. big changes in
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three subjects, english language, literature and mathematics. it is the way they have been graded, 1—9, as opposed to a—e, or f or g. we will speak with some of the students later. we thought it would be interesting to speak with 316 —year—olds as they waited for their results to find out the pressures they have been under and what it is like to be 16 —— three 16. iam i am excited to see how i have done. i know i have tried my hardest. i am excited to see how i have done. i know i have tried my hardestlj i am excited to see how i have done. i know i have tried my hardest. i am quite nervous. i i know i have tried my hardest. i am quite nervous. lam i know i have tried my hardest. i am quite nervous. i am quite excited because it is a new stage. # i've been thinking about tomorrow. # i've been thinking about tomorrow. # instead of drowning in the past. this woman dreams of becoming an engineer. her college is right next to silverstone racetrack. issue passes her gcse is a highly coveted
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apprenticeship awaits. —— if she passes. aston martin, doing product development, which would be within manufacturing, working on their cars. i thought at first that i wouldn't get through because there are so many people my age that are more talented than me and have more experience. how much pressure do you feel under at the moment? there is a lot of pressure because there is a big change in life. you arejust coming into the adult world. if i fail anything i would have to retake them. dinkas crossed. -- fingers crossed. laurie's be love his cricket. i have been involved since an early age and i have always just loved playing. what do you hope to do when you get the results?|j loved playing. what do you hope to do when you get the results? i would like to do sports coaching, so i can do something i really like to do. a—levels give you a better prospect for the future. i am not really
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sure. # asi for the future. i am not really sure. # as i wake up this bright morning. i am excited, nervous, but ijust want morning. i am excited, nervous, but i just want to morning. i am excited, nervous, but ijust want to get the results so i can get into sixth form and i can possibly pursue a career in music. yash was born partially sighted. this trip to an indoor ski slope has been arranged for the royal society for blind children. growing up with partial site can be hard to come to terms with. now i use it as a strength, not a weakness. if i do get the grades i am hoping for five grades above b i will have my sixth form place and my needs will be catered for. what is the best thing about being 16? you really get to learn a lot around the world. there are so many options you can have. mum and dad pay for things like food and tv. what is the worst thing about being 16? nothing. # tell them
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iam no about being 16? nothing. # tell them i am no full. —— fool. very good luck to anyone receiving their results today. you just saw from the report, yash is here. how did you go? i got into sixth form. but i feel everyone could have done better and everyone can do better in future. for now this is what matters for me and at least i got into my sixth form. that was so important for you. congratulations. sixth form. that was so important foryou. congratulations. do you know what you will study?” foryou. congratulations. do you know what you will study? i wanted to study music. i got c so i can't study music. i have spoken with other people who say you won't do the modern music in a—level music. i think music will have to be just a hobby or self learning, whereas i got a seven in maths, which means i can do maths for a level and i got good grades in other subjects as
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well. you have done very well, yash. we will talk more later on. how have you gone? i did especially well in maths, i got nine, so i will plan to go on to maths in future. yourself? i have done really well, all as, so lam glad i have done really well, all as, so i am glad it is done. and a nine in maths, with the controversy around the grading systems, see you have done the best you can do. thank you. it was hard. i was stressing about getting the nine. i am it was hard. i was stressing about getting the nine. lam happy. it was hard. i was stressing about getting the nine. i am happy. how about you ? getting the nine. i am happy. how about you? i am happy that i got the majority as and bs so i got into my sixth form. congratulations. head teacher delia, how has this grading system being handled? it has had an enormous impact on the staff and school. we have had to work hard to write that work schemes and to prepare their children for no coursework in english, the students
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have had to memorise things they have had to memorise things they have never had to before. the exams are harder and there in maths are three exams when there was once two. thank you for having us this morning. a lot of and excitement. the big day has finally come. the results are here. thank you very much. lots of happy students. congratulations. good luck if you are waiting for your results. if you are waiting for your results. if you are worried or you know someone who is concerned about their results, there is an advice page. there is a bbc bitesize advice page at www. bbc.co.uk/education. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm claudia—liza armah.
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police say they're treating a huge fire at a poundland store in chingford as suspicious. at its height, around 100 firefighters were needed to tackle the blaze on old church road. crews were called just before 7pm last night, with homes evacuated nearby. no—one is thought to have been injured. a former industrial site in north london has become the first piece of land owned by the gla to be released for development that will consist of 100% affordable housing. 330 new homes for first time buyers will be built on at the former webbs industrial estate in waltham forest as part of the mayors move to deliver more land for housing. the draft london housing strategy which will set out more details about how the gla will deliver more homes will be published next month. the number of apprenticeships created by local authorities in london has grown for the sixth year in a row. according to london councils, the capital's local government association, 2,000 apprentices were hired by the boroughs last year, 11,000 since 2009. youngsters have been taking up training in a number of departments including human resources, adult social care and it.
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the weighing—scales are being brought out and and tape—measures unravelled at london zoo today as the animals prepare for their annual weigh in. home to more than 700 different species, zookeepers regularly record the heights and weights of all the creatures at the zoo as a way of monitoring their overall well being. let's have a look at the travel situation now. first up on the tube. there's no service on the district line from ealing broadway and richmond to earls court, due to signal failure at hammersmith. tickets being accepted on local buses. 0n the roads, northbound traffic on the blacklwall tunnel southern approach is slow from blackwall lane. in chingford, 0ld church road is closed between priory avenue and new road — that's because of that fire at poundland fire overnight. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth. good morning. today should be quite nice across the capital. there will be less cloud than we saw yesterday.
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more sunshine. a slightly fresh field of things. temperatures are lower this morning than they have beenin lower this morning than they have been in previous morning. early mist and fog. you shouldn't last long. it will lift and clear quickly. sunshine eventually emerging. the little cloud here and there. at a westerly breeze around. top temperatures very pleasant, 22— 23 degrees and we should stay dry. through this evening and overnight, quite nondescriptive. sunshine around, largely clear skies overnight. lows of around 12 degrees and early mist and fog tomorrow. tomorrow another nice day of whether with temperatures even higher, maybe up with temperatures even higher, maybe up to 24 degrees and sunny spells on offer. —— weather. this is what we think will happen over the bank holiday weekend. it won't be too bad. it will be dry or mostly dry. there will be some sunny spells around. still some uncertainty towards the end of the bank holiday weekend. possibly turning fresher by
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the time we get to monday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to naga and charlie. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it's 6:31am. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning... the wait is nearly over for those teenagers who get their gcse results today. we'll share the tension with pupils throughout the morning and find out why some are hoping for grade 9's instead of straight a's. far too many brits are so inactive they don't even manage ten minutes of brisk walking a month. we'll speak to a man who walked himself fit and lost over four stone in the process. and we'll look at one of the great royal romances with tom hughes, who plays prince albert in the hit itv drama victoria
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which returns this sunday. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. more than half a million teenagers in england, wales and northern ireland will get their gcse results this morning. there are some major changes for students in england with english and maths now graded using a numerical system, going from nine at the top to one at the bottom. exam regulator 0fqual says it will help distinguish between students of different abilities but some teachers say it has been introduced too quickly. the consequences for teachers are that they have had to start teaching new courses, partly post—16, partly charlie —— gcse, and there would be frustration that there has not been sufficient time to plan for those, not enough practice papers for those youngsters to work on. we'll be discussing that with the labour shadow minister for education at ten to seven, and nick gibb, the minister for education, at twenty to eight this morning. more than six million adults in england spend less than ten minutes each month
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walking at a brisk pace, putting their health at risk, according to a new report. public health england is launching a new campaign to encourage ten minutes of brisk walking a day, particularly among the middle aged, which it's claimed can help prevent cancer, heart disease and poor mental health. but doctors say people need to speed up their walking to boost their health. for in ten adults between the ages of 40 and 60 are not managing to achieve ten minutes of brisk walking per month, which sounds unbelievable. lots of those people will be walking, but they aren't walking at a brisk pace. it's important to walk with glee, because thatis important to walk with glee, because that is when you start to get the health benefits. dutch police are questioning the driver of a van about a possible terrorist threat on a concert venue in the city of rotterdam. the concert was called off at short—notice last night after a tip—off from spanish police. let's get more from our correspondent anna holligan. —— the husband of a woman who was knocked down and killed by a cyclist on a bike with no front brakes has called for new laws
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to tackle irresponsible and reckless actions. 20—year—old charlie alliston is facing a jail term after crashing into kim briggs in london last year. yesterday he was cleared of manslaughter but found guilty of causing bodily harm by "wanton orfurious driving". he will be sentenced next month. there's to be a major investigation into the impact that international students have on the uk's economy. the government commissioned study will examine their effect on the labour market and education sector. now, i wonder what postman pat would make of these. royal mail has unveiled its new electric delivery vans due to enter service later this year. nine of the futuristic looking vehicles, that come in various sizes and have a range of up to 100 miles
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are being trialled in london where they'll distribute post from the city's central depot. what was his cat called? jess! and how does the tune go? i think we can come back to that later. i remember being in the room when wayne rooney did his first interview, that makes me feel a bit old. but he has barely changed in terms of his manner, demeanour, how he speaks. all those yea rs demeanour, how he speaks. all those years and all that publicity, he is still very similar. that is unusual when you think about the kind of lifestyle he has led. he has announced his retirement now,
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however. that's after turning down a call—up from gareth southgate. rooney first impressed at the european championship 13 years ago and went on to score 53 goals for england. the everton forward says he regrets not being part of a successful england side but says playing for his country was a real privilege. the record speaks for itself. he's got so many caps, goals, he's a record goalscorer. tournament wise, it has never really happened for him, apartfrom it has never really happened for him, apart from when he burst onto the scene in portugal. he was so good. you have to remember that the vast majority of his career, he's only really been the one england world —class only really been the one england world—class player. there have been plenty of tributes to rooney on social media — this from michael owen, "brilliant timing — always great to go out on top. well done wayne rooney, an international career to be proud of." from harry kane, wayne rooney an amazing player and goalscorer for england, a three lions legend."
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and tributes not just from the world of football. golferjustin rose says, "what an amazing england international career. all the best, mate." liverpool will be in today's champions league group stage draw after they won their playoff against hoffenheim four—two, 6—3 on aggregate. liverpool came flying out from the start at anfield. emre can put them ahead in the first ten minutes. they went two up when summer signing mo salah tapped in this rebound, and it was three when a superb move was finished by can. roberto firmino scored a fourth in between two hoffenheim goals. we wa nted we wanted to be part of it with all we have, and ifought the boys played a few pieces of outstanding football. how it is in a game like this, especially against a team like hoffenheim, we'll all it had some problems, the's how it is. but we
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are problems, the's how it is. but we a re really problems, the's how it is. but we are really happy, we deserve qualification. two premier league scalps were claimed last night in the efl cup as newcastle were beaten at home by nottingham forest and southampton lost to wolves. west ham made no mistake against league two side cheltenham, goals from diafra sakho and andre ayew ensured a 2—0 win. burnley cruised past blackburn in a lancashire derby. it finished 2—0, thanks to this goal from jack cork — who joined from swansea in the summer, and robbie brady. ahead of the much anticipated fight between conor mcgregor and floyd mayweather this weekend, they were unexpectedly civilised and relaxed. the fighters declared a truce after weeks of vicious verbal attacks, mayweather in particular praising mcgregor saying it wouldn't be an easy fight.
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i will go out and perform. i'm not going to look to implement anything. iam going going to look to implement anything. i am going to outbox this man at his own game, that is how much of a different level i am to him. lam taking i am taking this extremely seriously, but the thing is this. when it's all said and done, one thing i can do, i can fight. i can give it and i can take it. for me to be 49 and zero, it's obvious. i'm not receiving it, i'm it. —— i'm giving it. they both quite like a tailored suit, don't they? england full—back danielle waterman has been ruled out of the women's rugby world cup final with concussion. defending champions england face new zealand in belfast on sunday. the 32—year—old, a world cup winner in 2014, left the field in the first half of england's 20—3 semi—final victory over france. as we've been hearing this morning, the husband of a woman killed
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by a cyclist riding an illegal bike has called for new laws to tackle irresponsible and reckless cyclists. 20 year—old charlie alliston knocked down and killed kim briggs in london last year. yesterday he was cleared of manslaughter but convicted of causing bodily harm by wanton or furious driving, a charge which dates back to 1861. let's talk to duncan dollimore, head of road safety and legal campaigns at cycling uk. thank you forjoining us. this bike that was used, it was a fixed wheel bike with no brakes, is that legal? it isa bike with no brakes, is that legal? it is a legal bike in terms of the bike itself, but to go on the road, it has to have a front brake. this is the sort of like you would see on track, a velodrome. if you are riding on the road, you have to have a front brake. this rider didn't have one. i think there has been a
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perception that someone like myself will come on the radio and defend the actions of this young man, but what he did was absolutely stupid. riding a fixed gear bike on the road with no brakes endangers yourself and other people. it is entirely right that he was prosecuted. talking about the charges before the attitudes to cyclists and the campaigns for cycling. the event dates back to legislation in 1861. it does seem that these are quite archaic laws that need to be brought up—to—date, considering how many more cyclists there are on the road at the moment? we have been campaigning fora at the moment? we have been campaigning for a review of all the laws for a number of years. the government promised a review of those penalties, but that has sat in the inbox of four successive justice secretary. it would be churlish of
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me to suggest that we should not have a review of similar offences which date back to 1861. as soon as you talk about what the words wanton and furious mean, it is properly an indication that we need to talk about this. there are irresponsible people on the road, whether they are cyclists or cards, the truth of the matter is, there is great confusion about what the words mean, what the standards are. a holistic review is required of all offences when people behave irresponsibly on the roads —— cars. dangerous is pretty clear? no, it isn't. we used to have a charge of games —— death by dangerous driving, but it was confused. it was
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suddenly reclassified as careless. there is huge depth and discrepancy about what one person's view of careless is, and what a view of dangerous is. is it possible to have the same convictions for cyclists? shouldn't they be treated equally as drivers? anyone who behaves irresponsibly should be dealt with by the law. we have to look at where the risk is. these cases cause huge controversy, this one has got a massive amount of attention. in the last year, over 400 pedestrians were killed on the roads. 99.5% of them we re killed on the roads. 99.5% of them were killed by people in motor vehicles. 0ne were killed by people in motor vehicles. one of the reasons this case has got such publicity is that it is astonishingly rare. but that is no consolation for the family of
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kim briggs. it is right that this young man has been prosecuted and convicted. we need to look at where the great risk comes from for those on our roads, it is from people in vehicles. it is not actually from those who are cycling. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. the next couple of daysis good morning. the next couple of days is similar. we have sunshine and showers. dry conditions are in the south. some will miss showers altogether. some will be heavy and thundery. low pressure is dominating the weather. not much of a breeze. it isa the weather. not much of a breeze. it is a fresh start to the day. having said that, parts of the south coast are 70 degrees already. yesterday's rain is over the northern isles —— 17 degrees. we have clear skies in the east. across
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north—west england, more cloud with one or two showers. the east has a sunny start. showers for northern ireland and some sunshine. showers across wales and some cloud. and bits of pieces of cloud in the south—west. equally, some sunshine. for southern counties into east anglia and the south—east, a lot of dry weather to start the day. any mist orfog will dry weather to start the day. any mist or fog will lift quite readily. through the day further showers develop across england and were. southern areas will be mostly dry. showers will be heavy across northern ireland and western scotla nd northern ireland and western scotland —— across england and wales. in the sunshine further south, 22, maybe 23. that will feel quite pleasant. 0vernight, we hang on to the showers. in the north—west, rain coming in across northern ireland and western scotla nd northern ireland and western scotland with the cloud. further south, under clear skies, it
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scotland with the cloud. further south, under clearskies, it will scotland with the cloud. further south, under clear skies, it will be a cool night in the countryside. some isolated mist and fog forming, which will clear quite readily tomorrow. tomorrow, for england and wales, we will get off to a beautiful start with sunshine around and fair weather cloud developing through the course of the day. the rain gathering across northern ireland and western scotland. some of this could be quite heavy. it is quite cool under the rain with top temperatures 17 or 18. once again, in the sunshine, especially in the south—east, we have 23 or 24. for the weekend, we have low pressure trying to get in from the atlantic introducing weather fronts. trying to get in from the atlantic introducing weatherfronts. further south, bright conditions. saturday's forecast — it is a fine day for most of england and wales. it is going to stay dry. however, with the weather moving across, it will bring showers
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and some of them could be heavy with the odd rumble of thunder. 0n sunday, as the rain moves west to east, some of that could be heavy, and you will hear the odd rumble of thunder. away from that, we are into dry conditions. so, basically, there are showers around. equally, there is dry weather too. is there a gcse in whether? there must be something to do with meteorology or it would be covered in geography weather.- you remember your gcse results? we have this conversation last week. it was 100 bc. it was a little different. it was a nerve racking time. absolutely. i wish everyone good luck. thank you. i imagine many have had quite a tense night. it's been a long and nervous night for teenagers across england, wales and northern ireland waiting to get their gcse results this morning. this year sees the start of major changes to the results system for students in england.
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they've sat harder tests in maths and english and instead of getting alphabetic grades, from a star to g, they're being marked from nine to one. let's discuss this with labour's shadow minister for education, mike kane. how is it gonna work? what do you think of this change? congratulations, firstly, to everyone receiving their results on a red letter day around the country. in terms of the change, it has been an illogical and ill thought out. there is confusion about what a great four means, what a great five means. “— great four means, what a great five means. —— grade. employers and universities have been told that grade four is a pass and schools will be judged on how many pupils got grade five. there is confusion. there was confusion when the a star was introduced. the a star was
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introduced around grade inflation. government thought it didn't work. they are trying to do that again. they are trying to do that again. the proof of the pudding will be how many pupils come out with a grade nine and whether the grade inflation is going to be a problem moving forward with the system. is going to be a problem moving forward with the systemm is going to be a problem moving forward with the system. if a labour government comes into power, would you get rid of the system? schools have seen enough changes. as the head teacher said, they are under enormous pressure. schools have seen huge budget cuts, 4 billion over the next three years, a massive problem with teacher recruitment. 0ne quarter of teachers who have trained have left the profession. i would be careful about introducing a whole new system. we will have to see how it pans out. that is a no, isn't it? i would like to hear back. the other thing we don't know is how many children will appeal. we have more
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grades in the system. there will be more problems with appeals going forward and people wanting to try to get their graves on through the appeal system. we don't know how the syste m appeal system. we don't know how the system will pan out over the next couple of hours. for a lot of people, lots of parents will know the system, can i make it clear about what he said about a nine — you say it that will be the test as to whether it works? it will be one of the test. the reason the government introduced this is because of great inflation. so many students under the previous system we re students under the previous system were getting a star. i would like to complement everyone who got the a star who got the top results. they are trying to get to a system where less students gets the nine to differentiate the bright from the brightest. if there are a lot of
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nines, can you give us a sense of what you're looking for? if there are a lot of nines, the system won't worked and they will have spent tens of millions of pounds introducing the system and half £1 million trying to explain what the new syste m trying to explain what the new system is. would it mean there are a lot of excellent kids who were not previously recognised ? lot of excellent kids who were not previously recognised? they were being recognised. that is why they change from the a star. so many children were getting that. they we re children were getting that. they were being recognised. they will have spent millions of pounds on a syste m have spent millions of pounds on a system if everyone comes out with anae nine that won't have done what they wanted it to do. —— with a nine. it has nine, eight and seven, equivalent with a star and a. there isn't more differentiation to make it easierfor employers isn't more differentiation to make it easier for employers to look at these kids. the cbi
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it easier for employers to look at these kids. the ce! is a time pressured hr consultants won't know what the four or five degrees. is a nine the a star? the government hasn't made it clear. it is harder to differentiate the new system and what it means. thank you for your time. we'll be discussing this with education minister nick gibb ataround 7:40am. do you remember your results?” do you remember your results? i do indeed. i went to school in my constituency. it was 1985. i am indeed. i went to school in my constituency. it was 1985. lam not sure i want to share all of the results. why? i did the 0 level syste m results. why? i did the 0 level system and i got five passes at the time. iwas system and i got five passes at the time. i was pleased. system and i got five passes at the time. iwas pleased. i system and i got five passes at the time. i was pleased. i exceeded expectations. that is the most important thing. thank you. how did
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you do? not terribly well. to be honest, it was even longer a go. it has turned into a blur. suffice to say it was an unhappy day in the stayt household. you did well. we wish everyone luck. don't worry. it is not the end of the world if it doesn't go to plan. we are talking about car sales and the means by which we purchase them. ifi the means by which we purchase them. if i could get you to guess what percentage of car sales are done with a finance deal, what would you say? 9096. ask mike. charlie isn't far off. i think he has read it. good morning. 0n the surface these figures out today are very good news for the car industry. what have we got? well, the number of cars built last month in factories around the uk was up by near 8% onjuly last year. the number of cars made to be sold here in the uk was up nearly 20%, that after we've had seven months
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in a row of decline. got to remember we've got the new registrations coming in september, so production is often ramped up injuly. why does this matter how the industry does? well, it employs around 170,000 people directly, plus thousands more across the whole supply chain. let's have a chat with mike hawes, who is chief executive of the society of motor manufacturers and traders. good morning. let's focus onjuly. it seems like a big figure. 8% increase on the before. why was there this increase? absolutely. there has been a lot of investment in uk manufacturing. it takes four or five years to come three in the new models. you see cars like jaguar
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land rover bringing models to the market. injuly land rover bringing models to the market. in july a land rover bringing models to the market. injuly a couple were at full production. that has ramped up production. the other issue, always injuly and production. the other issue, always in july and august production. the other issue, always injuly and august you production. the other issue, always in july and august you increase production ahead of the september numberplate change. added to that of course is the fact that things can change. july and august can change a lot depending on the summer shutdown. what is the general trend? we have seen falling production and sales as well. it has been an erratic year with production. the last three or four months have been in decline. that would reflect reducing demand at home. if we look at new car sales, they have been on the decline going into the second quarter. when sales are on the decline, dealerships and manufacturers will be looking to find ways of getting customers to buy cars. it is a good time to buy a
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car. you see the deals everywhere, and the bank of england said 85% of sales are car finance deals. is there a worry that many people rely on loans to buy these cars? the guidance and the restrictions, the regulations around the selling of finance are very strict. there are affordability tests and credit checks. and you have to make sure that the consumer understands their responsibility. our members doing more checks, are they doublechecking more? there has always been the checking in place because if you buy a new vehicle you have to know what the mileage will be, and people have to make sure they keep to the mileage. for many people it is an opportunity to purchase a car which they wouldn't otherwise be able to afford. thank you. 8596 was the answer. within the margins. thank
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you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm claudia—liza armah. police say they're treating a huge fire at a poundland store in chingford as suspicious. at its height, around 100 firefighters were needed to tackle the blaze on old church road. crews were called just before 7pm last night, with homes evacuated nearby. no—one is thought to have been injured. a former industrial site in north london has become the first piece of land owned by the gla to be released for development that will consist of 100% affordable housing. 330 new homes for first time buyers will be built on at the former webbs industrial estate in waltham forest as part of the mayors move to deliver more land for housing. the draft london housing strategy which will set out more details about how the gla will deliver more homes will be published next month. the number of apprenticeships created by local authorities
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in london has grown for the sixth year in a row. according to london councils, the capital's local government association, 2,000 apprentices were hired by the boroughs last year, 11,000 since 2009. youngsters have been taking up training in a number of departments including human resources, adult social care and it. the weighing—scales are being brought out and and tape—measures unravelled at london zoo today as the animals prepare for their annual weigh in. home to more than 700 different species, zookeepers regularly record the heights and weights of all the creatures at the zoo as a way of monitoring their overall well being. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the trains, additional engineering works at waterloo station means that platforms 1—14 are closed today and tomorrow which means a 75% reduction in services. 0n the roads, traffic is building on the a13 westbound heading out of dagenham into barking. northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow
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from blackwall lane. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth. hello, good morning. today should be a pretty nice day of weather across the capital. there will be less cloud than we saw yesterday. more in the way of sunshine. but a slightly fresh field of things. and temperatures are already lower this morning than they have been in previous morning. we've already got some early mist and fog around. you shouldn't last long. it will lift and clear quickly. sunshine eventually emerging. the little cloud here and there. at a westerly breeze around. top temperatures very pleasant, 22—23 degrees and we should stay dry. through this evening and overnight, pretty nondescript, really. sunshine around, largely clear skies overnight. lows of around 12—13 degrees and some early mist
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and fog tomorrow. tomorrow another nice day of weather with temperatures even higher, maybe up to 24 degrees and sunny spells on offer. this is what we think will happen over the bank holiday weekend. it's not going to be too bad. it will be dry or mostly dry. there will be some sunny spells around. still quite a lot of uncertainty towards the end of the bank holiday weekend. but possibly turning fresher by the time we get to monday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it's gcse results day for more than half a million teenagers — but there's a warning that big changes to the exam system in england will leave employers confused. students sat tougher tests in maths and english. the grades a—star to g have been replaced by the numbers 9 to 1. what impact have those changes had?
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iamat what impact have those changes had? iam atan what impact have those changes had? i am at an academy in north london where staff, parents and pupils are gathering to find out the results. good morning, it's thursday the 24th of august. also this morning, shocking levels of inactivity as it's revealed more than six million middle—aged people in england fail to go for a brisk walk even once a month. more bad news for holiday makers as the pound has fallen to an 8—year low against the euro. but some experts are predicting it could go even lower. i'll be talking to a currency expert in about an hour. in sport, conor mcgregor and floyd mayweather declare a truce as they square up in a rather subdued final press conference ahead of saturday's fight. there is now a diamond encrusted dealt at stake. —— belt. and carol has the weather. rain ensconced across most of the
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northern isles, looking at sunshine and showers. the driest conditions in the south, feeling fresher than it did yesterday. more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. more than half a million teenagers in england, wales and northern ireland will get their gcse results this morning. there are some major changes for students in england coming into place for the first time. more difficult exams in english and maths will be graded using a numerical system, going from nine at the top to one at the bottom. exams in wales have also been made harder, as our education correspondent gillian hargreaves explains. thousands of 16—year—olds will find out if all that hard work three months ago has paid off. but there are new pressures this year in england and wales. maths, english and welsh have all been restructured. and in england, there's a new numerical grading system for the english and maths
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systems, running from grades 1—9, with nine being the highest score, identifying the best students in the country. grade 4 is broadly being compared to a previous grade c, considered a standard pass. the government says the new grade five should be considered a strong pasw. the old alphabetic system is still in place for other gcse subjects until next year, head teachers are accusing the government of trying to reform too quickly and causing a muddle. the consequences for teachers are that they have had to start teaching new courses, partly post—16, partly at gcse, while other things have been changing in schools. it will lead to a sense of frustration that there hasn't been sufficient time to plan for it, there are not enough practice papers for youngsters to work on. there is no doubt these changes to english and maths have been big
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changes for schools, but employers have to get their heads around it as well. i think i'm going to be slightly confused. i am sure in time we will work it out. a standard pass, that would be our borderline, i think. a four. the westminster government was determined to make gcse‘s harder, to end what some see as a dumbing down. the first of the reformed exams will put minister's ambitions to the test. we'll speak to the schools minister nick gibb at around twenty to eight. more than six million adults in england spend less than ten minutes each month walking at a brisk pace — putting their health at risk, according to a new report. public health england is launching a new campaign to encourage ten minutes of brisk walking a day, particularly among the middle aged, which it's claimed can help prevent cancer, heart disease and poor mental health. we'll be speaking to public health england at ten past
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seven. there's to be a major investigation into the impact that international students have on the uk's economy. the government commissioned study will examine their effect on the labour market and education sector. new figures will be published this morning showing how many foreign students went on to leave britain after finishing their courses. dutch police are questioning the driver of a van about a possible terrorist attack on a concert venue in the city of rotterdam. police stopped the spanish—registered van, which was found to be carrying gas canisters, and called off the concert after a tip—off from spanish police. the husband of a woman who was knocked down and killed by a cyclist has called for new laws to tackle irresponsible and reckless actions. 20—year—old charlie alliston is facing a jail term when he is sentenced next month. he was riding a bike with no front brakes. andy moore reports. the judge in this case said she hadn't seen one iota of remorse from charlie alliston at any stage. he was cleared of manslaughter, but convicted of wanton or furious driving. he collided with kim briggs
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while driving in a legal bike that was not fitted with a front brake. police in london released a video to show the difference it can make to stopping distances. the first bike was fitted with both back and front brakes, which stops within a few meters. and then without, it takes much longer to stop, around 19 metres. the victim's husband is a cyclist in london, but he is calling for a change in the law. he wants to see a new offence of causing death or serious injury by dangerous or careless cycling. the same offence already exists for motorists. he said: charlie alliston will be sentenced next month. thejudge made it clear she was considering a jail term, the maximum for the offence is two years. a holidaymaker from west sussex
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arrested in turkey is facing three yea rs arrested in turkey is facing three years in prison for trying to take home page and coins he found while onafamily home page and coins he found while on a family holiday. toby robyns is believed to have said his children found the coins while they were swimming. he is being detained in prison on suspicion of smuggling historical a rtefa cts . eight people have been killed and many are missing after typhoon hato hit the southern chinese territory of macau. a further four people were killed in mainland china, according to media there — with winds of more than 124 miles—per—hour being recorded. yesterday, the typhoon battered hong kong, uprooting trees, flooding streets and halting financial trading. a farmer has defended her decision to thank fire crews by giving them
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sausages made from the meat of piglets they'd saved from a blaze. the 18 piglets and two sows survived the fire in wiltshire in february, which saw 60 tonnes of hay catch fire. the firefighters initially said the sausages were fantastic, but have then apologised following complaints. farming is what we do here. it's not an animal sanctuary, you know, we don't keep animals just for the fun of it. we enjoy having them being here and we are very sorry when they leave the farm and go on. i can appreciate and understand that there are some people who don't eat meat, but there are also people who do eat meat, and farming is our life. the us powerball has seen 21 rollovers in a row, meaning the prize now stands at 700 million dollars — that's almost 550 million pounds. it's the world's richest lottery, with an average jackpot of $423 million. but while the prizes are big, the odds are slim — there's a 1 in 292 million chance of someone taking the cash home. but a huge chance, really, is it? ——
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not. inactivity amongst the middle aged is on the rise and is costing the nhs almost a billion pounds each year, according to public health england. its research found that six million adults don't managejust 10 minutes of brisk walking in a month. we'rejoined now by graham ward, who took up regular walking after he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and doctorjenny harries, deputy medical director at public health england. can you first of all take us through what you're saying to people? ten minutes of brisk walking, can you explain... it is quite a shock that
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6 million are not doing ten minutes of brisk walking each month. i have to admit! of brisk walking each month. i have to admit i didn't believe it, i downloaded our app, and i wasn't either. it is about three mph and equates to moderate activity. but if people just go out and get their hearts pumping, that is the right level. people might be a bit confused by that and think, i walked from the bus to work, i walk around. you're separating out that kind of walking from something more strenuous? yes, we are saying we wa nt strenuous? yes, we are saying we want people to up the speed, the duration and intensity of what is important. just ten steps is important. just ten steps is important. it keeps you moving. but it is not the same as ten minutes of continuous risk exercise. getting your heart pumping a little bit, being a little bit rate. your heart pumping, the easiest way is to
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download a free app which will tell you how many minutes have been brisk. and graham, you have converted to walking? what got you into it and why? i was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and i was told i needed to make some changes in my life. i enrolled in a local course where they talked about life changes. we are seeing a picture of you before? that is a pretty good image, that's how you looked when you saw the nurse? absolutely. i did a local course and they said, you need to try and do 10,000 steps per day, it is difficult but you need to try. ijoined a local walking group. it was absolutely tremendous. i had a pedometer to count the steps. the changes that made, using the
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pedometer, gradually walking further and faster, the weight started to fall. i was amazed. tell us about before and after. before, why won't you doing more exercise? what was going on in your life? like most people, i was busy, working, going on in your life? like most people, iwas busy, working, a sedentaryjob. i people, iwas busy, working, a sedentary job. i was people, iwas busy, working, a sedentaryjob. i was telling myself, i would never fitted in. sedentaryjob. i was telling myself, iwould never fitted in. now sedentaryjob. i was telling myself, i would never fitted in. now i know that i could. the opportunity was there, but you didn't take it? at lunchtime, go for a rate brisk walk, cleared the head —— go for a —— clear. it has been a massive difference, just going out there and walking. a lot of people have been in touch, inspired by your story. susan has said, she walks about six
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miles per day, averaging 15,000 steps. their‘s no need to walk briskly as long as you are as active as you can be? my guess is, if she is doing 15,000 steps and she's a keen walker, she would probably be walking quite briskly anyway. the evidence we have used is very much about the intensity. moderate activity, going back to graham's story, it's a fabulous example of how you can fit walking into your daily life. a lot of people think they can't fit it in, 10,000 steps isa they can't fit it in, 10,000 steps is a huge ambition if you haven't been walking before. gram, your story, you needed a shock to get you to do this. you're doing it a nice way, launching a lovely campaign. clearly people had probably said this to you before, you had to have
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a shock to make a change? like most people, i think i am indestructible. get to it. when you get a shot, you think, it is going to affect my wife, my grandchildren. thank god i did think about that. people don't look at... the campaign is to highlight to people what they aren't doing at the moment and how dangerous it is to their long—term health. it allows them to get into walking in an easy and accessible way. just walk more quickly when you are taking the kids to school and that sort of thing. use the stayers. park in the underground at the supermarket. i am guilty, i go to the closest point i can. i'll spend extra time just to get close. it is amazing how quickly you can go from
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2000 the -- amazing how quickly you can go from 2000 the —— steps per day to 10,000. thank you very much for all of your comments. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: teenagers across england, wales and northern ireland get their gcse results this morning with a new grading system in english and maths for pupils in england. there's a warning many middle—aged people in england are putting their health at risk by falling far short of the recommended guidelines for walking. so, we were talking about gcses today. we wish you luck. we were reminiscing getting our results. it doesn't matter. you tend to think people are doing well. inevitably some don't get what they want. anything can happen. just don't panic. there is always help to help
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move forward. good luck. sean was talking about the year he took his gcses. what year? the pound was about... it was before the euro... we were talking about exams, age, and sean refuses to say how old he is. which is perfectly fair. i am thinking of the future line of presenters who have to tell their age. iam presenters who have to tell their age. i am laying down the law. good for you. how did you do? all right, yes, quite happy. they were gcses? yes. we will get there in the end. who was number one?” yes. we will get there in the end. who was number one? i have no idea. carry on. talk about the euro. yes. have you got a trip around europe planned ? the pound has hit an eight year low aganst the euro. so on the official exchanges you it
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costs you 92p to buy a euro but of course when your getting your holiday money, it's not far off £1 a euro, and even more in some places. i'll have more on that in about half an hour. about half an hour ago i was talking about cars, because there's been a big increase in the number of cars built in the uk. we built about 8% more injuly than the same time last year, that's according to the body that represents car makers. many carmakers increase production injuly ahead of new models going on sale in september and summer shutdowns. however, the number of cars made in the uk in the first seven months of the year fell 1.6% to about one million. almost four out of five cars that roll off british production lines are exported. and there are issues about phasing out that £1 coin. businesses have been reminded to collect the old and new ones separately. half of the queens returned to sorting centres are the new queen. the government is
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telling cashier is and shopkeepers to make sure they don't give the old queen back to shoppers. 0ctober to make sure they don't give the old queen back to shoppers. october 15 is the deadline. —— the old coin. really? it feels like we have talked about it for ages and you can kill swa p about it for ages and you can kill swap them after, though it will become a pain. —— you can still swap them. you are still getting them backin them. you are still getting them back in changing places.” them. you are still getting them back in changing places. i am surprised when i see anyone in my purse. really? yes, i expect to see the old one. millions of them around. i mustn't have enough. thank you, sean. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. this morning we have a fine start for many. it is cooler than yesterday for most of the uk. for the next couple of days the forecast is similar with sunshine and showers, some of them merging to get heavy spells of rain across northern ireland and scotland with the driest conditions in the south.
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that holds true today with low pressure driving the weather once again. and the closer you are to the low pressure the more showers you are likely to see. further south it is dry and bright and we lose mist and fog patches. you can see rain across the northern isles, that is the remnants of yesterday. showers for western scotland. the rest of scotla nd for western scotland. the rest of scotland has a dry and bright start with sunshine. 0ne scotland has a dry and bright start with sunshine. one or two showers for cumbria and lancashire. some of them getting into the pennines. north—east of england is dry. northern ireland has one or two showers. bright spells and sunshine, the same for wales and south—west england. as we move east we are looking at a lot of dry weather and any mistand looking at a lot of dry weather and any mist and fog patches lifting quite readily. through the day we will see showers develop. some across wales into the midlands, the further south you are the further it is likely to stay. we continue with
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showers across the highlands into aberdeenshire and they might be quite heavy. in between, there will be sunshine with a temperature range of 13 in the north to 22 or 23 further south. this evening and overnight the showers turned heavy. we will see more rain coming in across northern ireland. there will bea across northern ireland. there will be a lot of dry weather and around and some clear skies. in the countryside it will be nippy. some local mist and fog patches. they will move off through the morning and for the bulk of england and wales it will be another fine day. like today with fair weather cloud developing. for northern ireland and scotla nd developing. for northern ireland and scotland there is more rain moving slowly eastwards through the course of the day. 14— 17. as we look south east we are looking at 22— 24. friday into saturday we have low
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pressure close to us. it is bringing weather fronts moving west to east. further south high—pressure is dominating the weather. we are looking at settled conditions. to put some pictures on that you can see what i mean. here is the rain moving west to east across scotland, northern ireland, showers across northern england later, a lot of dry weather into the south and it is still quite all is well. thank you very much. we will see you later on. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is with students at ark academy in north london for us this morning. good morning. the wait is overfor 600,016 -- 600,00016 good morning. the wait is overfor 600,016 —— 600,00016 —year—olds. pa rents 600,016 —— 600,00016 —year—olds. parents and teachers are waiting to find out their results. we thought
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it would be interesting to see how some students have gone in the lead up some students have gone in the lead up to the results and the pressure they have been under and what it is like to be 16 years old. i'm excited to see how i have done. i know i've tried my hardest, whatever results i get. i'm quite nervous. but i'm quite excited because it's a new stage. # i've been thinking about tomorrow. # instead of drowning in the past.# chenise dreams of becoming an engineer. her college is right next to silverstone racetrack. if she passes all her gcses, a highly coveted apprenticeship awaits. aston martin, doing product development, which would be within manufacturing, working on their cars. i thought at first that i wouldn't get through because there are so many people my age that are more talented than me
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and have more experience. how much pressure do you feel under at the moment? well, obviously, there is a lot of pressure because it is a big like change in life. you arejust coming into the adult world. if i fail anything i would have to retake them. fingers crossed. # tell them i'm no fool. laurie's big love is cricket. i've been involved since an early age and i have just always just loved playing. what do you hope to do when you get the results? i quite like the idea of doing a sports coaching apprenticeship, so i can do something i really like to do. a—levels give you a better prospect for the future. i am not really sure. # as i wake up this bright morning. i'm excited, nervous, but ijust want to get the results so i can get into my sixth form and i can possibly pursue a career in music.
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yash was born partially sighted. this trip to an indoor ski slope has been arranged by the royal society for blind children. growing up with partial sight can be hard to come to terms with. now i use it as a strength, but not a weakness. if i do get the grades, i'm hoping for five grades above b, i will have my sixth form place and my needs will be catered for. what is the best thing about being 16? you really get to learn a lot about the world. being 16, there's so many options you can have. mum and dad pay for things like food and tv and things like that. what's the worst thing about being 16? um...nothing. # tell them i'm no fool.# and best wishes to everyone receiving their results and we will speak with shanice and laurie later on. yash is here this morning. how did you go? mostly bs. the most
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important thing is i got into the sixth form, the most important part for me. congratulations. thank you very much. delia is head teacher here at ark academy. how are you feeling about the results? thrills. students and teachers have worked so hard at the exams, incredibly hard —— thrilled. we have improved grades, so, well done. the three subjects, english and maths, there is a grading system 9-1, and maths, there is a grading system 9—1, so how have you gone, if you can compare it? the government has said for this year in this transition that anything that was a a star would be seven and above and that would stay roughly the same, so we are thrilled that in maths, which we are thrilled that in maths, which we specialise in, we have 32% of
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seven and above, and it was 30% last year, so we have maintained on a much harder exam, much harder. most importantly, seven students got grade nine, which is a completely new great. how has it been handled, will confuse employers? in the first couple of years it will be confusing. we will be looking at comparisons, like metric, the old and new money. in a year or two's time, we won't be talking about the old grades, we will understand. just to know that nine, eight and seven are the top grades and anything above four is a past. congratulations. thank you. cannot interrupt you, how did you go? really well. i got a nine in maths. iam really well. i got a nine in maths. i am really happy. and yourself? i did well as well. eight in english literature, which i am really happy about. the grading system has been
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more complicated, do you think? we had a lot of challenges. thanks to the teachers we covered everything. we prepared for the worst. and you did well? i did well. i got all as andi did well? i did well. i got all as and i got an eight in maths, which is great. congratulations and thank you for everyone for sharing their results with us. a lot of excitement. indeed. thank you. we will be back with him later on picking up on the results. and we will speak with the minister for education shortly. and if you or anyone you know is worried about results, there is a bbc bitesize advice page at www. bbc.co.uk/education. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm claudia—liza armah. police say they're treating a huge fire at a poundland store in chingford as suspicious.
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at its height, around 100 firefighters were needed to tackle the blaze on old church road. crews were called just before 7pm last night, with homes evacuated nearby. no—one is thought to have been injured. a former industrial site in north london has become the first piece of land owned by the gla to be released for development that will consist of 100% affordable housing. 330 new homes for first time buyers will be built on at the former webbs industrial estate in waltham forest as part of the mayors move to deliver more land for housing. the draft london housing strategy which will set out more details about how the gla will deliver more homes will be published next month. the number of apprenticeships created by local authorities in london has grown for the sixth year in a row. according to london councils, the capital's local government association, 2,000 apprentices were hired by the boroughs last year, 11,000 since 2009. youngsters have been taking up training in a number of departments including human resources, adult social care and it. the weighing—scales are being brought out and and tape—measures unravelled at london zoo today
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as the animals prepare for their annual weigh in. home to more than 700 different species, zookeepers regularly record the heights and weights of all the creatures at the zoo as a way of monitoring their overall well being. let's have a look at the travel situation now. first up on the tube: there are minor delays between barking and upminster and from ealing broadway and richmond to earl's court. good service on the rest of the line. 0n the trains: additional engineering works at waterloo station means that platforms 1—14 are closed today and tomorrow, which means a 75% reduction in services. 0n the roads: northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. in chingford, 0ld church road is closed between priory avenue and new road — that's because of that fire at poundland overnight. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth. hello, good morning. today should be a pretty nice day of weather across the capital. there will be less cloud than we saw yesterday. more in the way of sunshine.
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but a slightly fresher feel to things. and temperatures are already lower this morning than they have been in previous morning. we've also got some early mist and fog around. that shouldn't last too long. it will lift and clear fairly quickly. sunshine eventually emerging. the little cloud here and there. and a westerly breeze around, as well. top temperatures very pleasant, 22—23 degrees and we should stay dry. now, through this evening and overnight, pretty nondescript, really. there will be some late sunshine around, largely clear skies overnight. lows of around 12—13 degrees and some early mist and fog again tomorrow. but tomorrow another nice day of weather, in fact, temperatures even higher, maybe up to 24 degrees and sunny spells on offer. this is what we think will happen over the bank holiday weekend. it's not going to be too bad. we think it will be dry or mostly dry. there will be some sunny spells around. still quite a lot of uncertainty with the forecast towards the end
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of the bank holiday weekend. but possibly turning a bit fresher by the time we get to monday. the district line has now cleared up, soa the district line has now cleared up, so a good service on all lines on the tube. more in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it's 7:31am. the main story this morning: more than half a million teenagers in england, wales and northern ireland will get their gcse results this morning. there are some major changes for students in england, with english and maths now graded using a numerical system, going from nine at the top to one at the bottom. exam regulator 0fqual says it will help identify students of different abilities — but some teachers believe it has been introduced too quickly. we'll talk to the schools minister nick gibb in about ten minutes from now. more than six million adults in england spend less than ten minutes each month walking at a brisk pace, putting their health at risk, according to a new report.
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public health england is launching a new campaign to encourage ten minutes of brisk walking a day, particularly among the middle aged, which it's claimed can help prevent cancer, heart disease and poor mental health. four in ten adults between the ages of 40 and 60 are not managing to achieve ten minutes of brisk walking per month, which sounds unbelievable. lots of those people will be walking, but they aren't walking at a brisk pace. it's important to walk briskly, because that is when you start to get the health benefits. dutch police are questioning the driver of a van about a possible terrorist attack on a concert venue in the city of rotterdam. police stopped the spanish—registered van, which was found to be carrying gas canisters, and called off the concert after a tip—off from spanish police there's to be a major investigation into the impact that international students have on the uk's economy.
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the government commissioned study will examine their effect on the labour market and education sector. british universities are the second most popular destination in the world, after those in the united states. now, i wonder what postman pat would make of these. it looks like a toy, doesn't it? royal mail has unveiled its new electric delivery vans due to enter service later this year. nine of the futuristic looking vehicles, that come in various sizes and have a range of up to 100 miles are being trialled in london where they'll distribute post from the city's central depot. you know what we need? we need to have a split screen where we can see postman pat's car at the top, and this one... be careful what you wish for, because here, what you ask for,
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you will receive —— postman pat. coming up on the programme, carol will have the weather for you. i remember being in the room when wayne rooney did his first interview, that makes me feel a bit old. in terms of his goals, he is prolific. the thing that will let him down is a lack of tournament success. you can't beat those players from 1966, ever. let's have a look at him now. he is playing for england, that fantastic right foot. people say, he hasn't won anything,
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how can you compare them? this is what one important man had to say. the record speaks for itself. he's got so many caps, goals, he's a record goalscorer. tournament wise, it has never really happened for him, apart from when he burst onto the scene in portugal. he was so good. you have to remember that the vast majority of his career, he's only really been the one england world—class player. liverpool will be in today's champions league group stage draw after they won their playoff against hoffenheim 4—2, 6—3 on aggregate. liverpool came flying out from the start at anfield. emre can put them ahead in the first ten minutes. they went two up when summer signing mo salah tapped in this rebound, and it was three when a superb move was finished by can. roberto firmino scored a fourth in between two hoffenheim goals. we wanted to be part of it with all we have, and i thought the boys played a few
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pieces of outstanding football. how it is in a game like this, especially against a team like hoffenheim, we also had some problems, the's how it is. but we are really happy, we really deserved qualification. two premier league scalps were claimed last night in the efl cup as newcastle were beaten at home by nottingham forest and southampton lost to wolves. west ham made no mistake against league two side cheltenham, goals from diafra sakho and andre ayew ensured a 2—0 win. burnley cruised past blackburn in a lancashire derby. it finished 2—0, thanks to this goal from jack cork — who joined from swansea in the summer, and robbie brady. while most of us were sleeping, the
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draw for the next round was picked. leicester will play liverpool in probably the pick of the ties. holders manchester united will host burton albion. west brom have drawn manchester city at home and arsenal face league one side doncaster. were exactly is burton albion? that is not even the question i thought you were going to ask. i thought you we re you were going to ask. i thought you were going to ask, why china? they we re were going to ask, why china? they were sponsored by a chinese energy drink but! were sponsored by a chinese energy drink but i don't think it had a big effect. most people who wanted to see the draw will probably be waking up see the draw will probably be waking up to the news now.
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england full—back danielle waterman has been ruled out of the women's rugby world cup final with concussion. defending champions england face new zealand in belfast on sunday. the 32—year—old, a world cup winner in 2014, left the field in the first half of england's 20—3 semi—final victory over france. britain's chris froome has extended his lead at the tour of spain. the fifth stage was won by alexy lut—sen—ko, after he broke clear on the uphill finish. froome's aiming to become the third man to win the a vuelta and the tour de france in the same year. he now has a 10—second advantage over his nearest rival. england's men have reached the semi—finals of the eurohockey championships in amsterdam. they beat ireland 2—1 to progress as runners—up, behind germany and follow in the footsteps of england's women, who face the netherlands
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in their semi—final today. ahead of the much anticipated fight between conor mcgregor and floyd mayweather in las vegas both were unexpectedly relaxed as they saw each other for the final time before friday's weigh—in. the fighters declared a truce after weeks of vicious verbal attacks, mayweather in particular praising mcgregor saying it wouldn't be an easy fight. i will go out and i will perform. i'm not going to look to implement anything. i am going to outbox this man at his own game, that is how skilled and how much of a different level i am to him. i am taking this extremely seriously, but the thing is this. when it's all said and done, one thing i can do, i can fight. i can give it and i can take it. for me to be 49 and zero, it's obvious. i'm not receiving it, i'm giving it. all you need to know is that it is going to be the richest fight in
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history. hundreds of millions of dollars involved. we are still trying to track down a picture of the belt for you. it is made from alligator and is covered in thousands of diamonds. not my favourite look ever. not a huge fan. it's been a long and nervous night for hundreds of thousands of teenagers waiting to get their gcse results this morning. for pupils in england there's the added drama of big changes to the way maths and english are assessed. instead of getting alphabetic grades — from a star to g — they're being marked from 9 to1 to indicate a more challenging, harder set of exams. but, labour's shadow ministerfor education, mike kane, says the changes are causing confusion. in terms of the change, i think it
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has been illogical and ill thought out. there is confusion about what a grade four orfive out. there is confusion about what a grade four or five means today. i wish to take nothing away from those pupils receiving their results, but employers and universities are being told that great for is a pass, whereas schools will be judged on how many pupils got raid five going forward. there is still confusion. so why have these changes been made? schools minister, nick gibb, is here to discuss this with us. it isa it is a nervous day for those opening their letters this morning? very nervous, and they deserve all our congratulations, hundreds of thousands of students. they have worked in credit we had to get to this point. also to say thank you to all of the teachers who have responded well to what is a more
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demanding curriculum. there are other subjects that have also been reformed and we will see those results next year. we have spoken to some students this morning, i might ——i understand correctly, we don't have figures yet, that we have wrought in these changes, you are presumably looking for something, but what for? we are looking for stability in results. we have been determined to eliminate grade inflation from the system. we want consistency and stability across the system. these are more demanding exams. we have been determined from 2010 to raise academic standards in our schools. it started with a better way of teaching children to read in primary school, we see the dramatic improvement in six —year—olds's reading ability, we reformed the primary curriculum so that maths is more challenging and children are better prepared for the
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demanding curriculum at secondary school. now we are seeing the reformed gcses which are more demanding. they are on a par with the best qualifications around the country. this is a reform process thatis country. this is a reform process that is very important. we need to ensure that our education system is enabling every child to fulfil their potential and that they are equipped and ready to enter a more demanding global economy and jobs market in the future. it is really helpful when people can compare themselves to someone else. if you are a student in england, we have spoken to some this morning who have done remarkably well and have gotten grade nine in maths. if you get a nine in maths in england, but and a—star in wales, who is the better student? it is difficult to compare
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them, the welsh have not reformed their system in the way we have —— an. to get that dark does require considerable effort. at the gcses in england are formed and they are more demanding and on par with international qualifications of a similar age group. so, you can't compare these incompatible things? employers and universities to make comparisons. people from wales will apply for the same courses as people from england, so there will be asking those questions. yes, we have asking those questions. yes, we have a communications plan that is quite extensive in place. since 2014 when these new grading systems were announced. 90% of secondary head teachers are aware of the new grading system. 80% of parents of children in secondary schools understand the system and 70% of businesses. it is straightforward,
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minus the top grade reserved for exceptional performance, down to number one. you exceptional performance, down to number one. you are exceptional performance, down to number one. you are saying you are trying to get rid of grading, sorry, grade inflation, are you expecting more students to fail in those english and maths groups? your proud boast is that exams have gotten harder, that is a good thing. are you expecting more students to fail? no, we want consistency from year—to—year. we don't want any student to be disadvantaged simply because we have introduced a new and more demanding set of gcses. roughly the same proportions should be achieving the grades as previously. doesn't that make the idea a bit nonsense? there is more content in the maths
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gcse. they are better prepared for technical education when they leave school at 16. that is the purpose. what are they learning, how well educated are they? the reason for thatis educated are they? the reason for that is to draw the distinction between the demanding gcses and the old gcse. that is why we have got the distinct numeric system. the concern about employee is not understanding the grading system, the notion of the five and four in line with the b and c, are you concerned about that? the survey shows business understands to the same level as they understand the existing system. four is equal to the c. we said we want schools to do even better than that. that is why the performance tables will record the performance tables will record the levels of proportions at shiva ina the levels of proportions at shiva in a five so that schools can do
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better in the years ahead. -- at schools achieving five. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. is it my imagination, i am thinking back, we had a period of hot weather, i think, back, we had a period of hot weather, ithink, in back, we had a period of hot weather, i think, in summer that happened, didn't it? it did. will it happened, didn't it? it did. will it happen again? at the end ofjune we had a fabulous spell over the wimbledon fortnight as well we had a fabulous time. it was sunny and hot. summer is in just fabulous time. it was sunny and hot. summer is injust over. as we go through the next few days temperatures rise. what we have is a mixture of sunshine and showers. some of the showers will merge to give long spells of rain. dry conditions and high temperatures in the south and the south—east. today low pressure is driving the weather and areas close to the low pressure in northern ireland and western scotla nd in northern ireland and western scotland will see prolific showers not just this scotland will see prolific showers notjust this morning but into the
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afternoon as well and some of them will be slow—moving. away from those areas and we have right conditions through the day, high cloud, fair weather cloud, so the sunshine will be hazy in places with more showers across wales and the midlands. showers will be around in northern ireland this afternoon. some of them merging. and also north—east scotla nd merging. and also north—east scotland into aberdeenshire some will be heavy with the odd of thunder. away from those we are looking at some bright skies with sunshine. 0ne looking at some bright skies with sunshine. one or two showers across northern england and parts of wales. as you can see, many of us will miss them and have a dry day. that holds true across southern counties. a fair bit of sunshine. you might see the odd shower in south—west england. you probably will across wales with cloud building through the day. it is turning the sunshine a bit hazy. through the evening and overnight if anything to showers
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will merge and turning to showery outbreaks of rain as they push across northern ireland and western scotland. 0ne across northern ireland and western scotland. one or two getting into northern england. away from that a lot of dry weather with clear skies, chilly in the countryside and there will be local mist and fog forming. that means it won't be everywhere and it will clear quickly tomorrow morning. tomorrow for england and wales if you like it's only you are infora wales if you like it's only you are in for a treat because that is how it is going to start. the sunshine is turning hazy. across northern ireland scotland we have rain coming in through the day. it will move from the west heading in the direction of the east. what about the weekend? we still have low pressure close to the north—west with the attendant fronts. it will bring rain west to east. a little ridge of high pressure further south keeps things fairly settled. saturday has the rain coming in across the north—west scotland. we could see some of that across northern ireland. showers getting in across northern england. it won't be
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raining all the time. away from that we have dry and bright weather. lots of festivals on. in southern areas there is the chance it will be dry. 0n there is the chance it will be dry. on sunday there is more of the same. we have rain moving west to east. some of that will be heavy and thundery. further south we have dry and warm conditions. all in all it is not too bad. it could be better. it is not too bad. we would like it a little bit better, wouldn't we? well, we do because we like son. and if you are looking for the sunshine, maybe you are going to the south —— sun. sean says you will be in for a nasty shock when you spend your pounds and euros. especially if you don't have your currency already. good morning. we all know that the pound has been falling in value againts the euro since the vote to leave the eu. before the vote to leave the eu, at the start ofjune last year, a pound would get you about 1.30 euros. with the growing uncertainty
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over brexit, it's been falling ever since. today you'll get closer to 1.08 euros. that's the lowest level since october 2009 and some experts are predicting that by the end of this year you'll get a one—for—one exchange. that's clearly going to be bad news for holidaymakers, though it's better news for toursists heading to the uk. let's talk to jeremy cook, who's chief economist at currency experts world first. morning. morning. we have the initialfall morning. morning. we have the initial fall after brexit part in the recent days and weeks there is been another drop. why is that? the initialfall been another drop. why is that? the initial fall was about the sterling wea kness initial fall was about the sterling weakness and the uncertainty of brexit and possible hits to the uk economy. the recent one has been about european strength. we ended the year worried about the political atmosphere in europe. the dutch and french and german elections which ta ke french and german elections which take place next month have dissipated a little bit and also the economic data coming out of europe has been particularly strong, stronger than it has been, growing at twice the rate we are in the uk.
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investors look at the euro and say it isa investors look at the euro and say it is a better bet than the pound. they look at it that way — what are the consequences for the uk it investors look at europe that way so --? if the pound continues to fall, we have heard about inflation this year, rising at 3%, above the bank of england target, people talking about interest—rate rises, and it means that can't ignore pocket is worth less, it is buying less imports coming from abroad, so how can businesses fund themselves? can they protect themselves against the rises and make sure they can sell their products at a margin, which keeps them viable? as an exporter you would be looking and thinking, great, my products look more valuable. it depends on how sterling trade is doing over the course of the next couple of days but we could be at the worst level ever since records began. we haven't seen a pickup in exports without. we have seen some changes with exporters happy but the production isn't as
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good as it should be. while it might come on soon, exporters still have a lot of slack to pick up. if we look at the holiday aspect of it, the story in the mail today, holidaymakers getting 87 euros per pound. if there is one thing you do it is watch how much £1 is worth. when you see airports offering that kind of price, are they making a lot of money out of it? it is a captive audience in the departure board. you have to go to one place and that is the only place you can get it. if you think ahead, much like a business, if you plan your expenditure moving forward and you say, i need to buy some heroes for the holiday in spain or italy, then i know how much i will need and i can buy it forward, i can buy it ahead, then lock it in your pocket, it is just ahead, then lock it in your pocket, it isjust like... are their consequences for european countries that lots of brits like to go on holiday to, do they not want a
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stronger euro and a weaker pound, because it feels like people might not spend as much as they did? we have heard from the european central bank over the past couple of weeks they are worried about the strength of the euro for multiple reasons. spain, italy, cyprus, greece, which in summer depend on tourist coming from within europe and also from abroad coming in and spending their money. it has been tough, anyway, for a couple of years. and they will turn into the black injune, july, august, september as people spent two weeks by the beach. thank you very much. yes, so, lowest level in eight years. even when you go abroad, all other countries are competing against each other for your euro, for your pound. you may still be able to get some decent deals when you are out there. plan ahead, that is the trick, i think. in the next hour we'll be talking about the husband calling
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for a change in the law for prosecuting cyclists, following the death of his wife who was knocked down and died from head injuries. many of you have been in touch. thanks very much. ian says it is about time all cyclists were registered and have an annual test and insurance. he says his car was hit by a cyclist who laughed and rode off leaving him with a £200 repair bill. that has been picked up bya repair bill. that has been picked up by a couple of people. richard has beenin by a couple of people. richard has been in touch. he is a cyclist. he thinks we need some sort of licence. there should be more education in schools to make people aware of the danger. people talking about how cyclists are punished. simon says if it was a driver of a car they would have been calling for ten years behind bars. it is time idiots on bikes have the same punishment. and then there is the infrastructure issue. sue lives near a main road with a cycle path and she says cyclists use it as a racetrack. woe betide if you are in their way. and
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a key issue in this case was the bike that was in question, which was a specialist bike, it shouldn't have been on the road in the first place. still to come this morning: we'll find out the secrets of a good investment with the two new multi—millionaires who've taken up seats in the dragons den. tej lalvani and jenny campbell will be with us at around 8:40am. and i think we will need to establish on the gcse day how they did in school, because it is always fascinating to hear people's stories when they have done so well and in this case made so much money, you think what it was like when they we re think what it was like when they were 16 getting those results. often those entrepreneurs did not do brilliantly academically but they do well in life. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm claudia—liza armah. police say they're treating a huge fire at a poundland store in chingford as suspicious.
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at its height, around 100 firefighters were needed to tackle the blaze on old church road. crews were called just before 7pm last night, with homes evacuated nearby. no—one is thought to have been injured. a former industrial site in north london has become the first piece of land owned by the gla to be released for development that will consist of 100% affordable housing. 330 new homes for first time buyers will be built on at the former webbs industrial estate in waltham forest as part of the mayors move to deliver more land for housing. the draft london housing strategy which will set out more details about how the gla will deliver more homes will be published next month. the number of apprenticeships created by local authorities in london has grown for the sixth year in a row. according to london councils, the capital's local government association, 2,000 apprentices were hired by the boroughs last year, 11,000 since 2009. youngsters have been taking up training in a number of departments including human resources, adult social care and it. the weighing—scales are being brought out and and tape—measures
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unravelled at london zoo today as the animals prepare for their annual weigh in. home to more than 700 different species, zookeepers regularly record the heights and weights of all the creatures at the zoo as a way of monitoring their overall well being. let's have a look at the travel situation now. first up on the tube, there are minor delays between barking and upminster and from ealing broadway and richmond to earl's court. good service on the rest of the line. 0n the trains, additional engineering works at waterloo station means that platforms 1—14 are closed today and tomorrow, which means a 75% reduction in services. in central london, marylebone road is down to two lanes, that's westbound by great portland street station because of a broken down truck. it's causing congestion all the way back to king's cross. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth. hello, good morning. today should be a pretty nice day of weather across the capital. there will be less cloud than we saw yesterday. more in the way of sunshine. but a slightly fresher feel to things. and temperatures are already lower
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this morning than they have been in previous morning. we've also got some early mist and fog around. that shouldn't last too long. it will lift and clear fairly quickly. sunshine eventually emerging. the little cloud here and there. and a westerly breeze around, as well. top temperatures very pleasant, 22—23 degrees and we should stay dry. now, through this evening and overnight, pretty nondescript, really. there will be some late sunshine around, largely clear skies overnight. lows of around 12—13 degrees and some early mist and fog again tomorrow. but tomorrow another nice day of weather, in fact, temperatures even higher, maybe up to 24 degrees and more sunny spells on offer. this is what we think will happen over the bank holiday weekend. it's not going to be too bad. we think it will be dry or mostly dry. small chance of showers in southern areas. there will be some sunny spells around. still quite a lot of uncertainty with the forecast towards the end
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of the bank holiday weekend. but possibly turning a bit fresher by the time we get to monday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it's gcse results day for more than 500,000 teenagers, but there's a warning that big changes to the exam system in england will leave employers confused. students sat tougher tests in maths and english. the grades a* to g have been replaced by the numbers nine to one. so what impact have those changes had? i will be talking to staff and pupils at the art academy in north london as they receive their results. good morning, it's thursday the 24th of august. also this morning... we'll be discussing calls for new laws to tackle irresponsible cycling, following the death
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of kim briggs, who was knocked down and killed while crossing the road. good morning. shopkeepers and caches are being reminded not to give out the old pound coin in change to help the transition to us all using the new one. i'll have more on that, shortly. in sport, conor mcgregor and floyd mayweather square up for the last time before saturday's fight. there's now a diamond encrusted belt at stake in what's expected to be the most lucrative bout in history. do you not think perhaps i should sleep in my own quarters tonight? hopefully by the morning, you will have recovered your reason. victoria returns to our tvs this sunday evening, and actor tom hughes will bejoining us to discuss the fiery relationship between prince albert and his queen. and carol has the weather. good morning. we've got rain across the northern isles today, but for most of the uk it is a day of sunshine and showers, the heaviest across scotland and northern
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ireland, the driest conditions in the south of england. i'll have more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. more than 500,000 teenagers in england, wales and northern ireland will get their gcse results this morning. there are some major changes for students in england coming into place for the first time. more difficult exams in english and maths will be graded using a numerical system, going from nine at the top to one at the bottom. exams in wales have also been made harder, as our education correspondent, gillian hargreaves, explains. thousands of 16—year—olds will find out if all that hard work three months ago has paid off. but there are new pressures this year in england and wales. maths, english and welsh have all been restructured. in order to stretch candidates. the new system has more grades... and in england, there's a new numerical grading system for the english and maths papers, running from grades 1—9, with nine being the highest score, identifying the best students in the country. under the new system,
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grade four is broadly being compared to an old—style grade c, considered a standard pass. the government says the new grade five should be considered a strong pass. the old alphabetic system is still in place for other gcse subjects until next year, head teachers are accusing the government of trying to reform too quickly and causing a muddle. the consequences for teachers are that they have had to start teaching new courses, partly post—16, partly at gcse, while other things have been changing in schools. and that will lead to a sense of frustration that there hasn't been sufficient time to plan for it, there are not enough practice papers for the youngsters to work on. there is no doubt these changes to english and maths have been big changes for england's schools, but employers have to get their heads around it as well. i think i'm going to be slightly confused. but i think over a period of time
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obviously we'll work it out. a standard pass, that would be our borderline, i think. a four. the westminster government was determined to make gcses harder, to end what some see as a dumbing down. this year's results, the first of the reformed exams, will put ministers' ambitions to the test. more than six million adults in england spend less than ten minutes each month walking at a brisk pace — putting their health at risk, according to a new report. public health england is launching a new campaign to encourage ten minutes of brisk walking a day, particularly among the middle—aged, which it's claimed can help prevent cancer, heart disease and poor mental health. our health correspondent, dominic hughes, reports. in denton, in manchester, the first steps towards a healthier lifestyle. this walking group is starting slowly, but already some members are feeling the benefits of a regular stroll. i've lost about four stone. have you? four stone, wow.
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gone from 25 to 21. that is impressive. so, it does help. it's got me out. getting some exercise, and it's company as well, because i live my own, so that helps a lot. it's week two for me, i'm a newbie. and i decided when i retired that i wanted to do lots of different things, and i've done lots of things to keep the mind going, but not a lot to keep the body going. the beauty of walking is, of course, it is free. you don't need any special training, or indeed, any special kit. but health experts say doing at least ten minutes of brisk walking every day, well, that can have a really positive impact on your health. and it's brisk walking, around three mph, that is the key. gp dr zoe williams practices what she preaches to her patients, but millions of adults are missing out. four out of ten adults between the ages of 40 and 60 are not managing to achieve ten minutes of brisk walking per month, which sounds unbelievable, and lots of those people will be walking, but they are not walking at a brisk pace.
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walking can help with weight loss, back pain, diabetes, and even reducing the risk of cancer. now, we are all being urged to get up and get moving. dominic hughes, bbc news, denton. there's to be a major investigation into the impact that international students have on the uk's economy. the government—commissioned study will examine their effect on the labour market and education sector. british universities are the second most popular destination in the world, after those in the united states. the husband of a woman who was knocked down and killed by a cyclist on a bike with no front brakes has called for new laws to tackle "irresponsible and reckless" actions. 20—year—old charlie alliston is facing a jail term after crashing into kim briggs in london last year. yesterday, he was cleared of manslaughter but found guilty of causing bodily harm by "wanton orfurious driving". he will be sentenced next month. we'll discuss this issue in more detail in a couple of minutes.
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dutch police are questioning the driver of a van about a possible terrorist attack on a concert venue in the city of rotterdam. police stopped the spanish—registered van, which was found to be carrying gas canisters, and called off the concert after a tip—off from spanish police. in the past few minutes we can bring you news coming through that there are reports that police have arrested a second suspect. we will keep you updated with that. eight people have been killed and many are missing after typhoon hato hit the southern chinese territory of macau. a further four people were killed in mainland china according to media there, with winds of more than 124 mph being recorded. yesterday, the typhoon battered hong kong, uprooting trees, flooding streets and halting financial trading. a farmer has defended her decision to thank fire crews by giving them sausages made from the meat of piglets they'd saved from a blaze. 18 piglets and two sows survived the fire in wiltshire in february, and firefighters initially said the sausages were "fantastic", but have since apologised following complaints. farming is what we do here.
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and it's not an animal sanctuary, you know, we don't keep animals just for the fun of it. we enjoy them being here, and we are very sorry when they leave the farm and go on. i can appreciate and understand that there are some people who don't eat meat, but there are also people who do eat meat, and farming is our life. there will be plenty of people hoping for some luck in the us tonight, as the country's second—largest lottery jackpot in history is up for grabs. and it is a big one. it's huge. the us powerball has seen 21 rollovers in a row, meaning the prize now stands at $700 million — that's almost £550 million. but while the prizes are big, the odds are slim — there's a one—in—292 million chance of someone taking the cash home. huge sums of money. we have the
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sport and the weather with carol coming upa sport and the weather with carol coming up a bit later on. more now on the calls for new cycling laws from the husband of a woman who died after being hit by a cyclist riding an illegal bike. 20—year—old charlie alliston knocked down and killed kim briggs in london last year. yesterday, he was cleared of manslaughter but found guilty of causing bodily harm by "wanton orfurious driving", a charge that dates back to 1861. so, does the law need updating? lots of issues surrounding this case. jeanette miller, president of the association of motor 0ffence lawyers, is here with us, as is rob hayles, former track and road race cyclist. good morning to you both. let's start with that question, this law from 1861, many people say it is quite archaic. wanton and reckless... quite archaic. wanton and reckless. . . wanton quite archaic. wanton and reckless... wanton and furious driving. we have a bike, this is an
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example of the kind of bike that was being ridden. we will get the details of that in a moment. first, that law, is it applicable, is it right to have that law now?m that law, is it applicable, is it right to have that law now? it is reserved for very raza constanta is. tha nkfully reserved for very raza constanta is. thankfully the number of fatalities caused by pet all cyclists is rare —— very caused by pet all cyclists is rare —— very rare circumstances. caused by pet all cyclists is rare —— very rare circumstances. this particular piece of legislation, dating back to the 18 hundredths, is reserved purely for circumstances where the road traffic act would not apply, either because the offender is using a vehicle that is not a mechanical vehicle such as a car, or, where the incident occurs not on a public road or place. so, my view is that the law does not need updating, because the circumstances are so rare, and, you know, there isn't a need to introduce new legislation. there is of course legislation. there is of course legislation that was introduced to
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apprehend people from dangerous cycling and careless cycling. but that doesn't go far enough, i think, for the prosecution's intentions in this case, because the penalties for those offences of fine only. ok, rob, talk us through the bike in question here. a lot of the evidence was around this style of bike, that it was on the road in the first place, and it should never have been? no, unfortunately not. this is a track bike, a fixed wheel bikes, hence the name fixed. this was one of my spare bikes when i used to race on the velodrome. as you can see, there are no brakes on it. there is one deer, and it is a fixed gear. if you pedal backwards, the back wheel goes backwards. it is legal on the road if they are fitted with a front brake. 0n legal on the road if they are fitted with a front brake. on this bike, there is a hole on the front of the
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floor to actually be able to attach the front brake to it. then it would be legal, because you basically essentially have a front brake, plus the ability to slow down on the real wheel byjust applying pressure. if you ride it on the road like that, it's basically like driving a car with only using your handbrake, which is not safe. the only way of making its tough without the break is to stop paddling? -- making it stop. you still continue to peddle because the wheel is fixed to the pedals, you can't freewheel, you just apply pressure. obviously on the velodrome, you don't need to stop, so you just see the riders when they come off the inside of the track, theyjust gradually slow down. so in a practical sense, how long does it take to stop it bike like this? it is going to take the 10-15 like this? it is going to take the 10—15 times the amount of time but it would if you write with breaks.
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why would you write this on the road? i have no idea, it is a cultural thing, a lot of it comes from new york, it is a fashion thing. i have written fixed wheels on the road but at least with a front brake or ideally two breaks. why anybody would want to go out there and ride on the open road purely with a fixed bike with no brakes is beyond me. some of the issues around the law, kim briggs' husband saying after the court case yesterday, it's time for the legal system to adjust. you reference this moment ago. what are the avenues that could be explored? at the moment, there is no offence that is imprisonable that would apply the situation of the van the manslaughter charge, that was u nsuccessful, manslaughter charge, that was unsuccessful, it didn't secure a conviction, or this wanton and furious cycling chad. the wanton and furious cycling chad. the wanton and furious cycling, the world itself sounds ancient and archaic, and it is. but it is fit for purpose to some extent because it allows an
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avenue for prosecution to at least in these extremely raza adams a nswe rs. in these extremely raza adams answers. i'm not sure there is a need for an overhaul in legislation —— extremely rare circumstances. need for an overhaul in legislation -- extremely rare circumstances. but more and more people are cycling, i'm not criticising cyclists who cycle fast, but recklessly. if that trend is happening, surely the law needs to be updated. there are regulations that specify how a bike needs to be put together and the needs to be put together and the need for front and back brakes, etc. u nfortu nately, need for front and back brakes, etc. unfortunately, this particular cyclists claimed to be unaware of the need for a front brake, he did know that the cycle was actually illegal. the laws have been recently considered, because dangers and careless cycling were introduced relatively recently. i think in this situation, the penalties for those offences, for whatever reason, the legislators did not consider there to bea legislators did not consider there to be a need for anything beyond a fine. just a thought, rob, it is interesting to hear people's
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reaction today. a lot of cyclists and non—cyclist, the issue of a licence of some kind or some kind of registration system. it won't stop us “— registration system. it won't stop us —— it will not stop desperately reckless people, but where do you sit on that issue? when i used to train on the open road, when i was a professional, i would actually have liked to have had some kind of license, because at least it would have ta ken away license, because at least it would have taken away a lot of the angst and aggression from car drivers. because they think that you are... you are not licensed, you're not in short, but i was ensured because i was a british cycling member. i didn't pay road tax or anything, which has got nothing to do with driving a car, there were no legal acquirement is, but i would have liked that. but how do you implement that? i have a son and a daughter and an eight—year—old and an
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ii—year—old, do they need a licence to ride to school? good luck with that one! i think there is a strained relationship between motorists and cycles, and obviously i wasn't involved in this particular case and haven't been in the courtroom to hear the evidence, but this case was heard by a jury, hear the evidence, but this case was heard byajury, and hear the evidence, but this case was heard by a jury, and how much that strained relationship may have featured in the decision made, i don't know. but there is a preconceived notion in some insta nces preconceived notion in some instances of cyclists being reckless. i find they are very mindful of the laws of the road, so i don't know how far the law needs to go beyond where it is now. thank you forjoining us. and thanks for bringing in the bike! you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: teenagers across england, wales and northern ireland get their gcse results this morning.
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with a new grading system in english and maths for pupils in england. there's a warning many middle—aged people in england are putting their health at risk by falling far short of the recommended guidelines for walking. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. for many of us, it is going to be a pleasa nt for many of us, it is going to be a pleasant day. the next few days, a mixture of sunshine and showers, some of the shower was heavy, possibly thundery at times will stop we won't all see them. the driest conditions are likely to be in the south. low pressure drives the weather today, so you're likely to see showers close to that. the most prolific ones will be across northern ireland and scotland. this is the scene at the moment. the thickest cloud in the north of scotla nd thickest cloud in the north of scotland is yesterday's rain, producing rain over the northern isles. however, many of us start on
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a sunny note. a few showers throughout the day. northern england, wales and into the midlands will see showers. in between, a fair bit of sunshine. in northern ireland this afternoon, bright spells, sunny intervals and some showers. showers across western scotland, slow—moving showers across the north—east of scotland, some of them thundery, and also a lot of dry weather. a few showers in northern england. many of us missing them all together. a few showers could crop up in the midlands. the sunshine will become hazy as the cloud builds through the day, but still pleasantly warm in the south—east. one or two showers in the south—west. they are the exception rather than the rule. in wales, the odd shower through the afternoon. this evening and
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overnight, the showers in northern ireland and scotland get heavier. it will be cooler overnight in the countryside. a little mist and fog forming. that won't last long tomorrow in the sunshine. through the day, a little more fair weather cloud will appear. we hang on the rain in northern ireland and scotland, drifting from the west, heading towards the east. temperatures of 19—25dc. friday into saturday, we still have low pressure moving to the east, but we also have high pressure a pet —— affecting parts of the south. things will be a
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lot drier and brighter with sunshine. cani can i ask, no such thing as bad weather, just the wrong clothing? spot—on, charlie! weather, just the wrong clothing? spot-on, charlie! that's what they say. they're not right! they do say that in scotland. then why are they saying that you? because you are wearing t—shirts and shorts in december. what have you come to talk to us about? all kinds of business news. the car industry, manufacturers, the number of cars we made in the uk injuly is up 8% on last year, which is good news. it is a snapshot. the comparisons
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year—on—year can be a bit volatile because of the new registration coming in. the general trend is that we're not making as many cars as we work, and sales are down. we were also talking about car finance deals. we have heard from the bank of england that 85% of new car sales in the uk have a finance deal behind them. quite a big change over the last few years. it is increased competition as well, i suppose. exactly. next, the pound. firstly against the euro. that's grim. if you're going abroad, it's not great. helen got in touch saying that she got1 euro for the pound. it pushed up got1 euro for the pound. it pushed up the cost of her holiday by 15% on last year. a big change. pete says,
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the current value of the pound encourages us to buy made in britain. we have talked about imports and exports, with a weaker pound being good for exporters because it makes goods cheaper than they were before. but if we forget about that, here in the uk, we not pigs -- about that, here in the uk, we not pigs —— exposed to that. someone else says, what idiot changes money at airports? i have done that. no, we can't be mean to people in the airport. if you book in advance, you can getjust airport. if you book in advance, you can get just as airport. if you book in advance, you can getjust as good a rate and collected at the airport. if you turn up with your suitcases under your arms, it's not an ideal time. we have been reminiscing about
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gcses. i did take gcses. i used to love the old pound coin. another little story, businesses are being told by the government to make sure they bag up the old pound coin and they bag up the old pound coin and the new pound coin separately. shopkeepers and cashier ‘s... the new pound coin separately. shopkeepers and cashier 's. .. are you listening? it is interesting. you're upset with sean. we were talking about gcses, i thought you might want to share with everyone your memory of the day. it is a nerve—racking day. i was one of the lucky ones — it went very well for me. did you pick it up from the school on a piece of paper?m me. did you pick it up from the school on a piece of paper? it was all the envelope is a yes. how long
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are you? a good few years ago! charlie has been trying to find out sean's age all morning. back to our main story now — hundreds of thousands of students across england, wales and northern ireland will be collecting their gcse results today. but for pupils in england this year there's a big difference, harder exams and a new grading system. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is with students at ark academy in north london for us this morning. lots of happy gcse takers. yes, thousands of students taking their gcses and getting their results. how did you get on? ok. how did you fair? i think it added to the challenge, but the school prepared us for the worst. i think
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generally, the school did really well. how work your grades? i got as and —— a&s. well. how work your grades? i got as and -- a&s. how had the students been coping with this new grading system ? been coping with this new grading system? we have done a lot of work, stu d e nts system? we have done a lot of work, students and teachers, preparing everything from scratch. we now have an extra grade, 1—9, where there we re an extra grade, 1—9, where there were only eight in the past. everyone has been a little unsure, the has—been trepidation, but overall, we are pleased with the results. how hard has it been to implement this change? there has been a lot of time that teachers have had to spend together. we have also met with other teachers from other schools, going, what do we think a seven is, what an eight is?
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everyone is searching around. by cooperating with other schools across the network, we have been able to establish fairly good predictions. how was it, compared to last year? the department has said that everybody last year 's a* would get seven and above, and it has held to that. is great, thank you very much indeed. we're going to speak to a maths teacher. what is it like teaching maths with this new system in place? it has been challenging to have a curriculum change, the exam structure, and a new grading system, so we tried to plan very closely as a department so that students are offered a very rigorous curriculum that prepares them for the new exams
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and they feel reassured, even though they don't have a bank of past papers to refer to. well done for dealing with those. a big day for so many 16—year—olds across the country, waiting for those results. here is the news, weather and travel where you are. high—pressure building from the south, but we have low—pressure lingering across the north west and the next couple of days, bringing showers and longer spells of rain. that is where we are this morning, lots of showers further north and west, brisk winds. head further south, the sunshine is breaking through the cloud and feeling pleasa nt through the cloud and feeling pleasant as we head into the
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afternoon, certainly across the south east as we have the best of the dryer, warm and bright conditions. further west, the dryer, warm and bright conditions. furtherwest, more cloud around with the sunshine breaking through. the risk of isolated channels across wales and the midlands. in between, there will be sunshine to enjoy as well. western parts of scotland seeing a few showers and longer spells of rain coming in later. northern ireland, a day of sunshine and showers, around 17 celsius. through tonight, the band of rain across northern ireland will gradually bush into scotland. further south, a quiet night, starry skies. temperatures not dropping too much, in 11—14dc. then we do it all again tomorrow, low—pressure in charge of the north—west, showers and longer spells of rain. further south and east, a lovely day. we can look forward to some sunshine, and temperatures getting up to about 24 celsius. the winds are right further
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south as well. into the weekend, high—pressure across us. low— pressure high—pressure across us. low—pressure to the north and west bringing heavy showers with it. at least there will be some sunshine in between is well—stocked —— as well. hello, this is business live from the bbc with jimmy robertson hello, this is business live from the bbc withjimmy robertson and ben thompson. top talks or hot air? the world central bankers gather in wyoming for their annual meeting, will the talks deliver any insight into the global economy. that is our top story on thursday, the 24th of august. will today's talks deliver any real progress in boosting the global economy? we will have the details on
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