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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  August 24, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello, it's thursday, it's 9am, i'mjoanna gosling, welcome to the programme. more than 500,000 teenagers are getting their gcse results this morning, with pupils in english schools finding out how they did in the new, and harder, maths and english exams. iam here i am here at the outward academy city school in sheffield, where we know that handful of students have managed to reach the top grade of nine. there is some confusion about the new gcse system, but also some excitement. we'll be speaking to students and teachers and looking at the best options for sixth form. also... a teenager who has lived in the uk most of her life with her british mother said that her life has been turned upside down by brexit. we always said whatever the brexit result we will still be able to get me citizenship, but obviously that didn't work out. and we will have the extraordinary
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story of how a violinist who suffered a serious brain injury at the age of 19 is making music again, 29 years later. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11am this morning. and over 40% of middle—aged people don't manage one brisk walk a month. if you're one of them, tell us why you're so bad at exercising. we also want to hear from you if you've started walking to get fit. and we want to hear from you if you're an eu national living in the uk. are you worried about your right to stay after brexit? gcses as well of course. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag #victorialive. and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. 0ur our top story today... more than
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500,000 teenagers in england, wales and northern ireland are receiving their gcse results this morning. major changes. 0nce their gcse results this morning. major changes. once in england are coming into place for the first time. more difficult exams in english and maths are being graded using a numerical system going from 9-1. using a numerical system going from 9—1. exams in wales have also been made harder. thousands of 16—year—olds will find out if all that hard work three months ago has paid off. but there are new pressures this year in england and wales. maths, english and welsh have all been restructured. in order to stretch candidates. the new system has more grades... and in england, there's a new numerical grading system for the english and maths papers, running from grades 1—9, with nine being the highest score, identifying the best students in the country. under the new system, grade four is broadly being compared to an old—style grade c, considered a standard pass. the government says the new grade five should be considered a strong pass.
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the old alphabetic system is still in place for other gcse subjects until next year, head teachers are accusing the government of trying to reform too quickly and causing a muddle. the consequences for teachers are that they have had to start teaching new courses, partly post—16, partly at gcse, while other things have been changing in schools. and that will lead to a sense of frustration that there hasn't been sufficient time to plan for it, there are not enough practice papers for the youngsters to work on. there is no doubt these changes to english and maths have been big changes for england's schools, but employers have to get their heads around it as well. i think i'm going to be slightly confused. but i think over a period of time obviously we'll work it out. a standard pass, that would be our borderline, i think. a four. the westminster government was determined to make gcses harder, to end what some see
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as a dumbing down. this year's results, the first of the reformed exams, will put ministers‘ ambitions to the test. let's go to chi in stoke—on—trent with a group of students getting their results. how are they feeling? we are here at the outward academy city school in sheffield, with a group of students and some teaching staff who have been helping them through their new gcses. shannon, you did particularly well, didn't you? yes, i got an eight, which i was really proud about, and a seven in maths, and as in all of the science subjects. you want expecting to do as well as you did, where you? no, iwas to do as well as you did, where you? no, i was stressed about english in particular. liam, you managed to get a nine grade, how did that feel?
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yes, i've put in the hard work and it paid off. how long were you studying for and how hard was the actual exam? i think the longest was two hours and 15 minutes, the whole exam. i've been revising all year, basically. how did you manage to do? i got basically. how did you manage to do? igota basically. how did you manage to do? i got a seven in maths, a seven in english—language and an eight in english—language and an eight in english literature. how do you feel about your grades? i'm really proud of myself, yes to kill isabel, you did really well? i got a stars. how did really well? i got a stars. how did you feel? i felt really happy because i wasn't expecting to do as well as you did. and into do a—levels at six form. well as you did. and into do a-levels at six form. meyer, how did you do? i got an eight in maths, and in both english i got sevens. billy, you were one of the teaching staff that helped the students through. how was the stressful change for them? they actually held up really
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well. we had a few tears and pan drums. and a few cuddles and breathing techniques. but they got through it and i'm really proud of them today. andrew, you are the principal of the school. 0verall, how you feeling about how your school has done? immensely pleased with the students have performed in this school and across the trust as a whole, phenomenal. they really celebrate across the country with children like these. a handful managed to get the top grade of nine. how have your staff managed to corral them into that? it has been ha rd corral them into that? it has been hard work and dedication from students and staff as a whole, really working together as a team to make sure that this community is successful. that's what they have done. a handful of the students have managed to reach the top grade of nine. we'll be talking to some are then later on today. thank you very much chi at the outward academy in sheffield. we would love your thoughts as well of course. if
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you're getting your results, how you are feeling if you are a parent of somebody getting their results. how has your life turned out since compared to how you felt at the time was like we would love to get your thoughts this morning. meanwhile, anita is in the newsroom for a summary anita is in the newsroom for a summary of the rest of today's. good morning. dutch police are continuing their investigations into a possible terror threat which forced the cancellation of a concert in rotterdam last night. acting on a tip off from spain — they arrested the driver of a van found to be carrying gas canisters. in the last hour a second arrest has been made in the south of the netherlands. let's get more now with our correspondent anna holligan who's in the hague. tim allman reports. anna, watmore are the police saying at this point about the discovery of the van with those gas canisters in it, and the arrests? i'm actually outside the venue now in rotterdam, just behind me here is the rock concert venue. the band were scheduled to go on stage last night,
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aus scheduled to go on stage last night, a us band. police cordoned off the venue. they took everyone... inaudiable studio: apologies for the problems with the line to anna holligan in rotterdam. we will bring you more on that story throughout the morning. there's to be a major investigation into the impact that international stu d e nts into the impact that international students have on the uk's economy. the government commissioned study will examine their effect on the labour market and education sector. british universities are the second most popular destination in the world, after those in the united states. more than six million adults in england spend less than ten minutes each month walking at a brisk pace, according to a new report. public health england is launching a campaign to encourage ten minutes of brisk walking a day, particularly among the middle aged. it's claimed that it can help prevent cancer, heart disease and poor mental health. 0ur prevent cancer, heart disease and poor mental health. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports. in denton, in manchester, the first steps towards a healthier lifestyle.
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this walking group is starting slowly, but already some members are feeling the benefits of a regular stroll. i've lost about four stone. have you? four stone, wow. gone from 25 to 21. that is impressive. so, it does help. it's got me out. getting some exercise, and it's company as well, because i live my own, so that helps a lot. it's week two for me, i'm a newbie. and i decided when i retired that i wanted to do lots of different things, and i've done lots of things to keep the mind going, but not a lot to keep the body going. the beauty of walking is, of course, it is free. you don't need any special training, or indeed, any special kit. but health experts say doing at least ten minutes of brisk walking every day, well, that can have a really positive impact on your health. and it's brisk walking, around three mph, that is the key. gp dr zoe williams practices what she preaches to her patients, but millions of adults are missing out. four out of ten adults
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between the ages of a0 and 60 are not managing to achieve ten minutes of brisk walking per month, which sounds unbelievable, and lots of those people will be walking, but they are not walking at a brisk pace. walking can help with weight loss, back pain, diabetes, and even reducing the risk of cancer. now, we are all being urged to get up and get moving. dominic hughes, bbc news, denton. the clear—up is continuing in northern ireland after nearly two thirds of the average august rainfall fell in under nine hours. more than 100 people had to be rescued after being trapped by the water. at one point, the fire service received an emergency call every 45 seconds. the north west was worst affected, particularly londonderry, as well as other parts of the county and tyrone. a hospital in portsmouth has been given a formal warning notice by the health watchdog for putting vulnerable patients
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at risk of very poor care. inspectors said that hospital staff at the queen alexandra hospital said medication to patients by hiding it in their meals. inspectors also had to intervene to help a choking patient went two staff members failed to act. the hospital said it would be confident that it was able to improve. australia's top court has begun examining a constitutional crisis threatening to topple the country's conservative government. deputy prime minister barnabyjoyce is among at least five senior government figures under threat from an obscure law that bars dual citizens from sitting in parliament. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 9:30am. thanks, anita, see you later. let's get some sport with leah. the circus around floyd mayweather
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and conor mcgregor continues in las vegas? it is a fight that makes headlines around the world. conor mcgregor, the mixed martial artist, and floyd mayweather, the undefeated champion, are in las vegas. this is pa rt champion, are in las vegas. this is part of the build—up to the clash this weekend. this was the last press c0 nfe re nce this weekend. this was the last press conference before the fight, which will take place in the early hours of sunday morning. some are calling it a pantomime, others love it. it is set to be one of the most lucrative boxing matches in history, with both fighters set to earn millions of pounds, including a diamond encrusted belt. usually there wasn't the typical exchange of insults between the pair. have a listen. the best fighting the best. he's the best at what he do, i'm the best at what i do. when it's all said and done, conor mcgregor is like myself. he's undefeated standing up. he can do a lot of this, ican standing up. he can do a lot of this, i can do a lot of this, but it comes down to the skills, and it
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comes down to the skills, and it comes down to us fighting and competing and giving you guys what you want to see. when you face a manual about to fight, it's very ha rd to manual about to fight, it's very hard to keep everything in check at times, you make mistakes, you make errors, you slip up on the tongue, where only human. i think the whole lot of it, the whole spectacle, there's been many ups and many downs. it's nice to come full circle. i think the whole experience of it has been great for boxing, mixed martial arts and combat sport all over the world. we're two athletes at the end of the day, coming and risking at all, we should be respected for that. a bit of football for you now, later the —— draw for the group stages of the champions league will be taking place. liverpool lead hoffenheim 2—1 from the first leg. they scored three goals in the first 20 minutes ina 11—2 three goals in the first 20 minutes in a 11—2 win on the night. emre can scored twice. liverpool will be amongst the third seeds for the draw, that takes place in monaco.
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it's not looking good for rafa benitez in newcastle after another defeat? not so good, i'm afraid. two premier league sides out of the afl, including newcastle. let's have a look at some goals. before the draw happened, west ham made it through to the second round. charlton had a bright start, diafra sakho put a stop to that, giving the hammers the control they needed before half—time. the match finished 2—0. newcastle united, the premier league clu b newcastle united, the premier league club knocked out by championship side nottingham forest. last year's finalists southampton also lost 2—0 to waltz. the chances are you lot was sleeping when the draw was made at about 4:15am as it took place in china. there are plenty of all premier league ties.
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the full list can be found on the bbc sport website. finally, a blow for england women's rugby world cup final? yes, fullback danielle waterman has been ruled out for the women's rugby world cup final against new zealand. that is taking place on saturday. she was taken off during tuesday's semifinal win over france. we're told she is suffering from concussion. afterfailing a head injury assessment, she won't have time to make that final. england do say that they have a number of other strong options available, so all is not lost. it's been a tense wait for gcse students, their parents and their teachers. but hopefully if someone in your house is getting their results this morning, it's good news. throughout the programme this morning we'll be hearing from students and teachers around the uk. we'll bring you this year's headline pass rate just as soon as we get it at 9:30am. we'll also look at some of the alternatives to a levels for students who want to take a more vocational path in sixth form.
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but much of the focus today is on the new grading system for maths and english gsces in england. here's how it works. it gives you more grades to strive for, makes you want to work harder. to get a higher grade you have to put a lot of work into it. it means you want to work harder because you don't know what online looks like. the new grades are going to be one to nine. what do you reckon is the top and what is the bottom? obviously it has to be one. it couldn't be anything else, could it? no, it's not one, it's nine. nine is the top. you're kidding? when i went for my interview at debenhams they were confused as to what the numerical grades meant so i had to spend time in my interview explaining to them exactly the impact
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that they would have and what they would all correlate to. i was speaking to my parents the other day and i was telling them in maths how i would at least get a seven and they were like, a seven, why don't you want an a or a*? i was like, wait, you guys don't understand, that is an a or a*. mums and dads get there because their children are talking about it all the time. i think the biggest challenge will be employers. what i don't want to happen is for somebody who has got a c grade last year versus somebody who has got a four or a five this year, i wouldn't want that four or five cv to be discarded just because the person who is looking at it did not understand the context of that grade. let's speak to now to dominic isles, who is a gcse english teacher. dallan campbell, who marked some of this year's english gcse papers. jacques szemalikowski, who is the headteacher for hampstead school in north london.
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and we also have some students from city learning trust in stoke sallanon trent, who got their gcse results this morning. thank you, all. welcome to you all. you have got your results. zoe, you are happy to open your results live on airfor us, is that are happy to open your results live on air for us, is that right? yes. go ahead. good luck! i'm happy. tell us what you got. i got a seven in maths, english language, five, english
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literature, eight. fabulous. well done. what about the rest? the rest, i got done. what about the rest? the rest, igota, done. what about the rest? the rest, i got a, apart from history, and i got a* for that. i got a, apart from history, and i got a" for that. the numbered system, that is the change. the others, tell us how you've done. system, that is the change. the others, tell us how you've donelj got seven in maths, seven in english language, and a six in english literature. and the rest of —— language, and a six in english literature. and the rest of -- and the result rest of them for you? literature. and the rest of -- and the result rest of them for you7m as. i got seven in maths, eight in english language, eight english literature. i got as in sciences, a in photography, history and music capital b. you have all done brilliantly. pretty queen sleep ——
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clea n swee p brilliantly. pretty queen sleep —— clean sweep of the top grades. sevens and eights are obviously as. how have you felt about this new system ? sally, how have you felt about this new system? sally, did you feel it was harder? it is obviously different from previous years. how did you feel about it? because there were more exams, it felt like exam after exam, and it was really draining and tiring compared to previous years, where you had an exam and then a bit ofa where you had an exam and then a bit of a break. i think that was the most difficult, having that stamina to carry on keeping high performances in your exams. zach, how did you find the experience?” found it quite hard, because this time we were thrown in at the deep end. the exams we did amounted to the final grade, so it was much harder than it would have been in
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previous years. and what about you, liv? it was hard to learn the sylla bus liv? it was hard to learn the syllabus because a lot of it was new stuff we hadn't learned in previous years, so stuff we hadn't learned in previous years, so stuff we had already learned was not really relevant to the new system. it was hard to get your head around certain aspects and the exam was more pressure. did you feel like guinea pigs? yes, to some extent. let's bring in the teachers. dallan, what do you think? you have marked some of the papers. to be honest, i feel really bad for our stu d e nts honest, i feel really bad for our students this year. i think guinea pigs is probably bill of rights —— probably the right word. many of them were not prepared well for the new system. who's fault is that? it can only be put down to the people
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up can only be put down to the people up above, responsible in the education department. when you say not fully prepared — give examples. the year 11s would only have been prepared for this new system over the past two years. as teachers, we've only been preparing ourselves in those last two years, so we have been trying to be one step ahead, trying to go to as many training sessions as possible with the exam board, trying to stay ahead and stay on top of things. but because the stu d e nts on top of things. but because the students at key stage three were prepared for a different set of exams, they have been finding it more difficult. dominic, how do you see, as a teacher? i agree. eventually, this system will become normal and it will be ok for the pupils as long as it doesn't change again. however, this cohort have had it quite hard this year, and i think
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they have been treated as guinea pigs. they have come up with a mixture of numbers and letters from the old system, which don't particularly link with each other. sixth form colleges are a bit confused about what level capital c is, whether it is a four moret five. as you saw in the video, employers might favour applicants with the old gcse grades as opposed to this new, more confusing system. the students we spoke to this morning, they got the as, and it sounds they have done as well as they would have last year. which is fantastic. this syste m year. which is fantastic. this system is good for the high achieving pupils. my concern is for achieving pupils. my concern is for a child who gets level three level two, andl a child who gets level three level two, and i think because the new for english has been so much more rigorous, i don't think some children have gained much from it. jack, you're a headteacher — do you
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feel that pupils have been disadvantaged this year? the challenge this year was the mixture of the old—style gcse and the new one. a good way of preparing his through past papers, and there have been none. sarita interrupted you, jack, but we are struggling to hear you. i think we might lose you for a moment and try to get a new connection, and hopefully we will get a better line and talk to you again. back to the students, in the end, do you feel you have done as well in english and maths as you would have done last year? do you feel like these grades reflect what would have happened had you at the exams last year? yes. but they took a lot more work than other years might have done. we are staying
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behind constantly to try and catch up behind constantly to try and catch up on work and make sure we understood the new system. liv, you got sevens in the papers you were telling us about. that would have been a straight a last year. would you prefer to have an a or the numbers, which allow people to see where you fall within the band?m is understood a lot more by people. if you tell people you had an a, they would understand. now, if you tell someone you have got seven, you have to explain it to them before they understand. zach and zoe, how do you feel about that?” they understand. zach and zoe, how do you feel about that? i agree. it is easier to say that you've got an a rather than explaining what a seven is. why can't you say a
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instead of seven? dallan, do you think this is a system that will be beneficial to kids in the end? the idea is to be able to differentiate people who have done particularly well at the top. dominic might agree on this, it's not really a system set up for on this, it's not really a system set upfora on this, it's not really a system set up for a lot of the children from the poorer areas in the country. it is a very difficult and rigorous system with an incredibly dynamic testing system. for example, at the minute, they have to do four english exams in a short period of time, and it is quite intensive. not being able to control any of that with any coursework i feel is just unrealistic. it might be ok in certain parts of the country where stu d e nts certain parts of the country where students are better prepared than literacy levels are higher, but some
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areas will find this exam system very difficult, and i really don't think in the long—run... very difficult, and i really don't think in the long-run. .. what will you be looking for in the breakdown when it through? we will be looking at seeing who fell short of the mark. we will have a much better idea when we see the boundaries. that has been a big issue — we had no information about the grade boundaries. we have been feeling our way in the dark. we may have said to the students, you may be a five or six, but we don't know. we haven't been given that information. we will look at that and we will look at what the exam boards want and how we can achieve that ourselves. we have jack back. can achieve that ourselves. we have jack back. can you hear me now? i think so. i hope so. what has it been like for the students this year? and can you compare the results kids are getting this year with what happened last year? i'll answer your second
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with what happened last year? i'll answer your second question first — absolutely not. we have no coursework and no modules, so some students who are perhaps not so good at examinations will have found this difficult, so it is incomparable with previous years. until we get a period of stability,... inaudible the line is not a huge lot better, i'm afraid. i think we got the gist of what you were saying. dominic, do you think you can compare what happened last year with this year? in the end, these kids will be putting in cvs forjob applications alongside the people who got their
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gcse results last year in the year before, so employers would necessarily make the distinction. and i don't think it's fair that students should have to explain to employers what the new system means. it is not theirjob to do that. it has been incredibly hard because it has been incredibly hard because it has all been closed book exams. students have had to learn hundreds of quotations, including old english from shakespeare. is it a good discipline? it is going back to the old—fashioned ways. discipline? it is going back to the old-fashioned ways. for high ability pupils, it is good discipline. you have to remember, there have always been learners who struggled with english. this new system will not help them at all. we encourage our pupils to grow up in a diverse society, and yet what we have in english is a curriculum which is narrow and rigid and only covers text from british writers, who tend to be quite, deceased establishment
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types. —— who tend to be white, deceased establishment types. silly, zach and liv, we will let you get back to celebrating. well done. let's go to our educations corresponding, gillian hargreaves, who is in sheffield and can give us the breakdown. the students are just about to come through the doors, so it may get quite noisy. the national overall picture shows that the pass rate has fallen slightly to 0.6%. the pass rate in english and maths in england has a numerical value now. instead ofa has a numerical value now. instead of a grade c, candidates are given a grade four, which is officially the pass rate for gcses in england in those subjects. the number of top grades, the new grade seven for
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english and maths, is down. throughout the uk, the number of top grades, a and above, has fallen by o.5%. although they sound very small figures, giving year on year there has been a lot of stability, and in previous years there has been quite a lot of growth in those top grades, it shows that this year students have found some of the papers a little more difficult. in england and wales, english, maths and welsh have been beefed up. new academic qualifications, and some teachers and students have argued that this year are the guinea pigs year, if you like, the first year to try them out. there may be some volatility, some turbulence in some candidates' results. so, what will be read into these results, gillian? well, when it comes to the top grades in english and maths, intriguingly, boys are doing better. more boys have got the very top grade, nine, for maths and —— in england. when it
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comes to english, girls have scored two thirds of the top grade nine. we have been told that in england, with these new specifications for english and maths, only about 2000 candidates have got the top grade nine in all three subjects. that's mathematics, english literature and english language. you can see this new top grade nine is very thin on the ground. very few candidates are going to get the top grade in all three subjects. of course, that plays into the theme of trying to stop what sometimes government ministers have called the race to the bottom, that it's been easy to get that top grade. it looks like it's much harder now. certainly when it's much harder now. certainly when it comes to all three subjects, very few candidates have achieved that. gillian, thank you very much. we will be talking much more about the gcse results throughout the show and we would love to hear your thoughts on the results. hashtag victoria mize. also, coming up... herfather
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is british —— father is french and her mother is british. she has not been granted permanent residency because of health insurance. we will find out more, shortly. i knew she was a musician. i knew she would understand. how one woman's dream of composing and playing music again after a devastating brain injury 29 years ago were made possible. here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. thanks joanne, good morning thanksjoanne, good morning again. the portion of teenagers receiving top grades at gcse has fallen to its lowest level since 2007. more than 500,000 teenagers in england, wales and northern ireland are receiving their gcse results today. the proportion of those receiving grade aor proportion of those receiving grade a orabove, or proportion of those receiving grade a or above, or seven or above in england, has fallen to 20%. down
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half a percentage point on last year. there are major changes for stu d e nts year. there are major changes for students in england coming into place, with a new numerical grading system and tough exams. a second man has been arrested in connection with the cancellation of a rock concert in rotterdam last night following a terrorism related tip—off from the spanish authorities. a van containing gas canisters was discovered near the venue several hours later. the driver of the spanish registered van was detained. authorities in egypt say they have broken up a ring of criminals involved in the trafficking of human organs. police have shut down a medical centre in cairo that specialised in kidney transplants, and arrested doctors and members of staff. they are suspected of removing the kidneys of poor people, including some refugees, for the use of wealthy foreign patients. more than six million adults in england spend less than ten minutes each month walking
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at a brisk pace — putting their health at risk, according to a new report. public health england is launching a new campaign to encourage ten minutes of brisk walking a day, particularly among the middle—aged, which it's claimed can help prevent cancer, heart disease and poor mental health. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10am. thanks, annita, see you later. let's get some sport with leah. thank you, joanne. conor mcgregor says he wants a career in both boxing and martial arts after this fight. it was their final press conference before the record—breaking fight in las vegas. liverpool are through to the champions league group stages. jurgen klopp's side beat hoffenheim 4-2 at jurgen klopp's side beat hoffenheim 11—2 at anfield to win their play—off match 6—3 overall. there will be six british sides in the draw, made later today. west ham beat cheltenham 2—0 last night to reach the second round of the efl cup. the draw was made for the second round
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this morning in china. all of the results or on the bbc sport website. england will be without danielle waterman for saturday's women's rugby world cup final against new zealand in belfast. the full—back is suffering from concussion. i'll have more in the next half—hour. in the next half-hour. banks, leah. some breaking news on migration to the united kingdom. the latest migration figures have just been published. the official estimates show that net long—term international migration to the uk was 246,000 in the year ending march 2017. that is the lowest level for three years. the number was down 81,000 to 246,000 over the past year, which is the lowest level for three years. and the office for national statistics are saying that that fall in eu net
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migration to britain was driven by an increase in emigration for eu citizens. so, eu citizens leaving this country. we are going to be talking a bit more about that shortly. do let us know your thoughts on that. a teenager who's lived in the uk most of her life with her british mother says her life has been turned upside down by brexit. estelle dragan, who has a french father, has lived here since she was six. after brexit, she applied to become a permanent resident in the uk, but her application was rejected. her story will be familiar to many eu nationals who are worried about their status, despite assurances by the british government that most will be allowed to stay. celestina 0lulode reports. this is me and my sister at primary school. that was my first day at high school. you look very grown-up. my high school prom.” high school. you look very grown-up. my high school prom. i kind of felt safe in a way because i thought i
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would be able to become a citizen. we always said, you know, whatever the brexit results are, you know, we will still be able to get me citizenship. but obviously that didn't work out. this is home for estelle. the 19—year—old student was born in france to a french father, but when her parents divorced, she left for the uk with her younger sister and british mother. for the past 13 years, she's lived here is an eu national. but when brexit was announced, she felt she needed to begin the process to become a british citizen. the first step was to become a permanent resident. but her application was rejected. this is the refusal letter. it says that my application has been rejected. it actually says on the notice, it also explains whether and when you are required to leave the united kingdom, which obviously was really scary to read. here are the reasons for my refusal. you have not provided evidence of preferences
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insurance cover whilst studying in the uk is required by the immigration... i think are —— the uk is required by the immigration... ithink are —— i cried, rising to remember. students who want to become permanent residents have to have comprehensive sickness insurance, a form of private medical cover. but because of the nhs, many never thought they needed it. had estelle bean and 18, things would have been different. it's horrible, because i feel responsible. had i gone for british citizenship for her before she turned 18, she would have had it. but at the time, brexit wasn't on the cards. there was no need for it, because she had the same rights as anybody else living here.” because she had the same rights as anybody else living here. i feel, like, ina anybody else living here. i feel, like, in a way, my life has been put on hold. because i don't know what is going to happen. i don't think anybody does, really, know what is going to happen. while this isn't a new law, brexit has sharpened the
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focused on what has become significant role for some eu nationals. justin howard is an immigration lawyer who has dealt with numerous cases involving csi. what's your reaction to the current situation around permanent residents and cs1? situation around permanent residents and c51? i keep hearing, i didn't ever expect to consult a lawyer. what's comprehensive sickness insurance? i just didn't what's comprehensive sickness insurance? ijust didn't know that i was supposed to have private medical insurance to study. and my response is always to the last comment is, nobody knew. what has made things more upsetting for estelle is that her younger sister, more upsetting for estelle is that heryoungersister, clara, more upsetting for estelle is that her younger sister, clara, was able to become a british citizens. that's because she is under 18, so a different set of requirements apply. how did you feel when your passport came through? i felt quite guilty in a way. because i'd got it all quite easily. whereas i know my sister is going through quite a hard time to try and get her citizenship.
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0bviously try and get her citizenship. obviously i was happy for my sister, but it was upsetting at first. 0bviously, but it was upsetting at first. obviously, you we're sisters, we've grown up together and we do everything together and we now have different nationalities. it feels very strange, actually, and very unfair, it kind of intensifies how ridiculous this whole thing is. we approached the home office for a response but they told us they would not comment on an individual case. they told us that people like as dell do not need british citizenship to stay in the uk. —— people like estelle. in a statement, they told us... and it is this new proposal of a settled status which would give eu national right to stay here in definitely. if it is approved, people could stay without needing private medical insurance. weigl well, i think it's not the law yet, it's a suggestion. there isn't a lot
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of guidance on what this new settled status proposal is, what the requirements are for it. i think it's hard to say to my clients, oh, don't do anything. at the moment there will be this new settled status. at the moment i don't know enough about it. the proposal is to narrow. it is the starting point, the reassurance i need just feel kind of welcome in this country, at least. but to be honest, it's not really enough terms of fairness. because, you know, i should be able to become a citizen, you know, because i'm part british. let's speak now to emma brooksbank, who is an immigration lawyer and is in leeds. nicolas hatton, who is co—chair of the3millon, a campaign group that works to defends the rights of eu citizens, who joins us from bristol. and here with us in the studio we have andrew rosindell, conservative mp for romford. welcome, all of you. how do you see
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this, andrew? the sisters see it is ridiculous and unfair. being a british citizen is not a right. you have to earn that right. whoever you are and whatever direction you come from. so everyone goes through a process if they want to apply to be a british citizen. there are anomalies with the system, of course. if in this particular case is still feels aggrieved, of course she can appeal and reapply. the fact of the matter is, nobody is going to ask her to leave the united kingdom. she is a french citizen. that means that as an use it as an she will have the right to stay in the uk. my advice to her is to appeal or to reapply. i'm certain that there will bea reapply. i'm certain that there will be a solution to her individual issue. you say that nobody has a right, you have to earn that right. but how do you think they feel, as sisters, where one has been told, you don't have the right, and the other is told, you do? well, we are all individuals and there are different statuses. the other sister
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is and 18, so there is a different role. 0ne is and 18, so there is a different role. one of that age compared to somebody who is over 18. these things can all be resolved. it is not a political issue, it's not about brexit. it's about actually going through the process and attaining the status that you require. it is all coming to light they because of brexit, people are feeling vulnerable and wanting to get their status assured. and that is why they went down the path that they went down. the government says that there will be a new settled status that will give eu nationals the right to stay in the uk indefinitely. but clearly people aren't reassured, which is why they aren't reassured, which is why they are going down the path of trying to get security. can you understand that? well, i do understand it, but i also understand the importance of britain controlling the numbers of people coming into our country. and other countries similar systems. the eu obviously has been a different situation because we have had free movement. that is going to end in
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2019. the government is quite tense of liberty in a new mechanism which means that every single eu citizens thatis means that every single eu citizens that is legally here at the moment can actually say. nobody is going to be asked to leave provided they are here legally and law—abiding and provided that they have gone through the process of applying for settled status. so i don't think that anybody needs to worry. after we leave the eu, new people that want to come in, of course there is going to come in, of course there is going to bea to come in, of course there is going to be a new situation with that. and therefore i think those who are currently here, so long as they are here legally, of course, have nothing to fear and they will be welcome to stay. nicholas, are you reassured by what you hear from andrew? i think that is del's case shows that there are monty python type rules when it comes to eu citizens. too many of us have been receiving letters asking us to leave in error,
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and the rules are too complicated. the rules are changing. a lot of us, when we came to this country, if we required csi, we were not told at the time that we needed it, and then we get caught in the system. ultimately, the letters you referred to were described by theresa may as u nfortu nate, to were described by theresa may as unfortunate, sent out in error, so those who were told they have to leave are not in that position. the overall position of the home office and the government is that there will be a settled status that means that eu nationals living here do have the right to stay indefinitely. can you close your ears to the noise and just sort of sit comfortably and trust that everything will be all right in the end? we need to work on a solution that will work for the 3
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million eu citizens that came here in good faith, made the uk their home and want to stay. at the moment, i think we are not really there. there is a negotiation, the brexit negotiation, and the settled status isjust a proposal, not our policy, and we're working quite closely as an organisation to propose solutions that will work for everybody. we want something parent practical, and i think andrew will agree that it has to be fairer and practical for the people living here. andrew, respond to that. it is a good point, isn't it? the settled status is a aspiration, a proposal, which is why people are trying to settle the state is now before everything gets nailed down. the negotiations are taking place now. what is bad is that the eu have ignored the british offer. theresa may made an offer a year ago that
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all eu citizens living in the uk would be welcome, provided it is reciprocal. unfortunately, the eu have not come back and agree to that. they are playing politics.“ the uk is prepared to offer, why not give people the assurance?m the uk is prepared to offer, why not give people the assurance? it has to be reciprocal. we have large numbers of citizens living in eu countries and we can't abandon them. if the eu keeps playing politics with people's lives like this, we have to put the interests of british citizens first. we want eu citizens who are here legally to stay here, and they are welcome. there are 3.2 million eu citizens here, all of whom are welcome to stay. we will give them settled status. the matter will be resolved, and people should not fear. they should be telling brussels to stop playing politics
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with people's lives and agree to a reciprocal arrangement. what is the best advice to give people now? the message from the government seems to be, sit tight, you don't need to scramble now to sort yourself out. andrew is perhaps overstating the case in terms of the security that eu nationals can feel in response to this announcement. as nicola says, it is simply a proposal. it is contingent upon a reciprocal arrangement being put in place for british nationals overseas. it is not at all certain, and we can't have any guarantees at this stage that this will be put into policy. we are advising our clients that they may want to apply for permanent residence now because we don't know what the future will hold. at the same time, by applying for permanent residence now, you may have to go through an own risk of a difficult application process now and again in the future in order to be able to
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secure settled status. for some clients, it will be right for them to sit tight and see how it pans out and what happens in the future. how many people are coming through to you on this? we have had a huge surge in enquiries, 70% of those coming from eu nationals relating to permanent residence. a significant number of those have issues with comprehensive sickness insurance. andrew, the office for national statistics figures are just out on net migration, down dramatically, and the 0ns says that that big fall is driven by an increase in emigration for eu citizens. it sounds like they are leaving because they don't feel welcome.” sounds like they are leaving because they don't feel welcome. i don't think so. i think it is good news. i think so. i think it is good news. i think the british people have wanted to see a reduction in immigration.
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it has been government policy for a long time. we have the highest numberof long time. we have the highest number of people in employment at the same time, so that may indicate that actually some people are leaving the uk but it's not necessarily affecting the job market, in that sense. i think most people in this country will be pleased that at last we are seeing a reduction in the numbers of people coming into this country. we do have to limit the immigration numbers, andl to limit the immigration numbers, and i think the british people have said that in the referendum, in general elections, and if this is now happening, i think it will be welcomed by most people across the country. thank you very much. we will talk more about those figures. thank you forjoining us. let us know your thoughts. a brain—damaged violinist has performed in concert with her best friend 29 years after a devastating
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accident left her unable to play. rosemaryjohnson was wired up to a computer using specialist software, allowing her to compose and play music again. this month, for the first time, she was able to perform with her friend from first time, she was able to perform with herfriend from her days first time, she was able to perform with her friend from her days with the welsh national opera orchestra. we will talk to allison in a moment, but first, let's see the project in action. i had this thought — imagine if it would be possible to read information from the brain to compose music. music plays ‘s music plays 's is that somebody can no longer move their body or play an instrument. imagine if you could design something to reconnect this person with music. when i met rosie,
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there was something that clicked. i knew that she was a musician. i knew that she would understand. the system is reading rosie's brainwaves. she makes a selection, and the violin player plays those phrases. that moment was magical. the idea of playing with rosie again after so many years was something i had never imagined would be possible. music plays
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well, i am very pleased to say we can now speak to the violinist, alison balfour, who performed at that concert. it is incredibly moving and beautifully put together — how did you feel doing that? moving and beautifully put together - how did you feel doing that? well, it was a privilege. i felt honoured to be playing with rosy after all this time. it was extraordinary to see her reaction, to see what was
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possible, not just for see her reaction, to see what was possible, notjust for rosy but for possibly many other people. tell us more about her before the accident, and yourfriendship. more about her before the accident, and your friendship. we weren't best friends. she was a bit younger than me. but we were all together in the orchestra, and we were all violinists together. when she had this accident, we all felt utterly broken, and it took a long time to get over that. people will know, of course, that listening to music can be transformational for your feelings. how much do you think it has meant to her to do this? well, i hope it has meant quite a lot to her. her reaction when we were doing the recording was wonderful to see. she looked so happy. she was smiling, and she had a look of total
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exhilaration, i have to say. and what do you take away from it? the wonder of what can happen with technology. it is extraordinary. are you hoping that you will be able to do more with her, going forward?” would like to. who knows? just sort of being there, in it, describe, because we are seeing pictures of the reconstruction, somebody who looks like her before the accident cut with you and her now. it is an extraordinary thing that technology can do this, as you say. when you we re can do this, as you say. when you were in the moment, realising that it was her brainwaves driving what was happening, what was going through your head?” was happening, what was going through your head? i wasjust hoping
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to reproduce for she was selecting off her screen in terms of musical excerpts for me to perform as they came onto my screen. so, it was a collaboration. it was very exciting. we appreciate yourjoining us. thank you very much indeed, alison, for talking to us. it is a beautiful thing you have done there. let's catch up with the weather. we have seen some beautiful sunrises across the uk today. this one was sent in. there has been a fair amount of cloud, much of it high, fairweather cloud, except in the north of scotland, where thick cloud is producing rain. this morning, a fair bit of cloud here and there, producing one or to make showers.
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the showers are heaviest across northern ireland and western scotland, so we will see a feud dotted around the country. —— we will see a few showers across the country. showers across the southern uplands, and slow—moving showers across the north—east of scotland, one or two of them thundery. showers in western scotland and northern ireland. in between, there will be bright spells and sunny spells. wales can't rule out a shower this afternoon. sunny intervals across the south west, with one or two make showers. driest and brightest in the south—east and east anglia. we can't rule out a shower across the midlands. it will be a chilly night with clear skies. some mist and fog
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patches, nothing too dense. the showers will be with us first thing in the morning, but if anything, they will build up again, giving heavier showers. some prolonged rain across northern ireland and western scotland, drifting to the east. cloud will start to build. a fine day with hazy sunshine, the top temperatures in the south—east, 25 celsius. cooler under this band of rain in the north—west. at the weekend, a north — south split. low pressure in the north will produce showers. across england and wales, high pressure. in the north, showers moving from west to east. further south, brighter skies, sunshine, hazy at times. an action replay on
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sunday. hello, it's thursday, it's 10am, i'm joanna gosling, welcome to the programme. the proportion of gcse students getting top grades has dropped slightly following the introduction of tough exams. stu d e nts introduction of tough exams. students in english is that new exams in england and maths. we had no coursework, so we were exams in england and maths. we had no coursework, so we were thrown in at the deep end. it was much harder than what it would have been in previous years. we will speak to stu d e nts previous years. we will speak to students and teachers and looking at the best options for how you have done. four in ten middle—aged people in england don't do any exercise at all. the government wants to change that. health experts are telling us that. health experts are telling us that everyone, particularly middle—aged people like me, need to do ten minutes of brisk walking every day for the good of our house.
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we will speak to the experts leading the campaign and three people it is aimed at. europe's biggest street party, the notting hill carnival, is taking place in london this weekend. the route goes close to grenfell, and the organisers have arranged some special tributes. we'll find out what they are just before 11am. let's go straight to annita in the bbc newsroom for the latest summary. thanks, joanne. the latest immigration statistics show a massive decrease in eu migration to the uk since the brexit folk. net long—term international migration to the united kingdom was 246,000 in the united kingdom was 246,000 in the year ending march 2017. it is the year ending march 2017. it is the lowest level for three years, according to official estimates. there has been a small drop—off in english and maths grade following the introduction of new, tougher exams. 500,000 teenagers in england and wales are receiving their gcse
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results today. the proportion of those receiving grade a or above, or seven or above in england, has fallen 20%, down to 0.5% on last year. for the first time this year there are some major changes for stu d e nts there are some major changes for students in england coming into place, with a new numerical grading system and tough exams. a second man has been arrested in connection with the cancellation of a rock concert in rotterdam last night, following a terror related tip—off from the spanish authorities. a van containing gas canisters was discovered near the venue several hours later. a man was arrested in connection with drunk driving, no relation to the terror threat. there is to be an investigation into the impact that international students have on the uk's economy. the government commissioned study will examine the effects on the labour market and the education sector. both universities and political
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parties received... more than half of the money went to the conservative party, which took over £25 million from donors in the three months from april— june. compared to £9.5 million for labour. the clear—up is continuing in northern ireland after nearly two thirds of the average august rainfall fell in under nine hours. more than 100 people had to be rescued after being trapped by the water. at one point, the fire service received an emergency call every 45 seconds. the north west was worst affected, particularly londonderry, as well as other parts of the county and tyrone. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10:30am. thanks, annita, see you later. let's get some sport with leah. it's the fight that keeps making headlines around the world. conor mcgregor and floyd mayweather, the undefeated champion, are in las
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vegas in the build—up to their clash this weekend. there was a press conference last night, the last one before the fight takes place in the early hours of sunday morning. some are calling it a pantomime, others love it. it is set to be one of the most lucrative boxing matches in the history of the sport, with both fighters set to earn millions of pounds, including a diamond encrusted belt. there wasn't the typical exchange of insults between the pair. it's about the best fighting the best. he's the best at what he do, i'm the best at what i do, but when it's all said and done, conor mcgregor is like myself. he's undefeated standing up. he can do a lot of this, i can do a lot of this, but it comes down to the skills and it comes down to us fighting and competing and giving you guys what you want to see. when you face the man you're about to fight, it's hard to keep everything in check at times, you make errors, you make
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mistakes, used pup in the time, there have been many ups many downs. it's nice to come. cool, but the overall experience of it has been great for boxing, mixed martial arts and combat sport all over the world. we are and combat sport all over the world. we a re two and combat sport all over the world. we are two athletes coming and risking it all, we should be respected for that. liverpool have made the group stages of the champions league after beating german side hoffenheim 4—0 at anfield to win their qualifying play—offs 6—3 overall. there are six british sides in the qualifying which will take place later today. jurgen klopp is upbeat. it is so exciting to be part of it. for me personally, i don't know exactly, two or three years ago, or three yea rs two or three years ago, or three years ago, i loved it always, and i still love it, the players loved it, the crowds love it. we have a few fantastic anfield makes, european nights at anfield. it's all good at
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the moment. whilst most people were sleeping, the draw for the third round of the efl cup placing china. leicester city will play liverpool in the pick of that is. there are four all premier league ties in total, with crystal palace hosting huddersfield and bright in travelling to bournemouth. manchester united will host burton, whilst arsenalface league manchester united will host burton, whilst arsenal face league 1 side doncaster. england full—back danielle waterman has been ruled out from the england world cup final, against new zealand in belfast on saturday. the 2014 world cup winner left the field in england's first half final victory over france. britain's chris froome has extended his lead at the vuelta is by no. the fifth stage was one by the kaza khsta n fifth stage was one by the kazakhstan athlete. chris froome is aiming to become the third man to win the vuelta and the tour de france in the same year. that's all
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from us. more in half an hour. thanks, see you later. the latest migration figures have just been published — they show a fall in net migration, partly driven by an increase in the numbers of eu citizens leaving the country. let's get all the details from our home affa i rs get all the details from our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani. a really big drop in the figures, dominic. tell us more? yes, joanne, this is a statistical 0mg in some respects. that brief bit of science. net migration is the difference between the number of people coming in as immigrants and the number of people who leave, emigrate. that gives us effectively a net figure every year of how many people it adds to the population. it is way above the goverment‘s self—imposed target. it has missed that six years in a row now. net migration in the year to march, 246,000 people. that is down 81,000 on last year, and two thirds of that fall, this is the key thing, two thirds of that for is down to
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eastern and central european citizens. what that basically means is fewer people from eastern and central europe are coming into the uk, and more of them are leaving at the same time. we are nine months in in data terms from the referendum results. but that is starting to look like a bit of a trend in terms of people's responses to the referendum and looking at their long—term options. it is really, really interesting. within that, the ons really interesting. within that, the 0ns says we have to be careful about whether or not this is definitely a trend. but the trend is definitely that net migration is currently going down. and a great deal of that is down to eastern and central european workers. another piece of really, really interesting data has come out today, about what happens to international students. this has been a huge row going on, very politically tense, about what to do about international students over the next couple of years. universities are desperate to get more of them into the uk, they say that they add to the brainpower of britain, they are economically
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valuable, and the project soft power of britain back out into the world. but people who want to control immigration say that they want to cut international students, that they are of estelles who abuse the system. the data today says that these students don't abuse the system. the migration data counting those who actually leave the that 97 the scent of students from outside of the eu leave at the end of the course either leave or transferred toa course either leave or transferred to a different reason. we're not sure what happens to them, some of them may have other reasons to stay. that is effectively good news for the universities, who say there is a strong case for encouraging more stu d e nts to strong case for encouraging more students to come to the uk. really interesting statistics, thank you, dominic. let us know what you think about that big drop in net migration. i spoke to a conservative mp earlier he says it is a good thing and people will welcome it. we are going to be speaking to people in industries who rely on eu workers
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and the impact on their businesses asa and the impact on their businesses as a result of a decrease in the number coming here. let us know what your view is. the usual ways of getting in touch. hashtag victoria mize. breaking news from switzerland. eight people are missing after a landslide that forced the evacuation of several small villages of south eastern switzerland. it —— eight people at the time of the landslide have not been found. the local police said the missing include a german, austrian, and swiss citizens. we will keep you updated if we hear any more on that. gcses passes have dropped slightly across the range of subjects, with some bigger changes in new, tougher exams sat for the first time in england. teenagers across england, wales and northern ireland have been collecting their gcse results this morning — and those in england have been the first to sit the new, more rigorous exams. instead of the traditional a* to u grades, english and maths students now have a numbered grading system. 0verall now have a numbered grading system. overall in england, wales and northern ireland, passes (grades c/4 and above) dropped 0.6 percentage
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points to 66.3%.in england, the english literature pass—rate fell 2.5 percentage points to 72%, but in maths it rose from 61.5% to 68.9%. both are the new, tougher exams. let's speak now to our reporter chi chi izundu who is at a school in sheffield. we are here at the outward academy city school in sheffield. as you can see behind me, there is a lot of excitement with stu d e nts there is a lot of excitement with students opening their gcses. 181 stu d e nts students opening their gcses. 181 students sat the exam this year. the things you need to know about the reform changes is that the content, what the children actually have to study in the exam, has been beefed up study in the exam, has been beefed up and made harder. when it comes to the grading system, it is no longer a- the grading system, it is no longer a— g. the grading system, it is no longer a- g. it the grading system, it is no longer a— g. it is now1—9, with the grading system, it is no longer a— g. it is now 1—9, with nine being the top grade. this year, the subject affected our maths, english literature and english language. let's talk to one student who managed to get a grade nine in her gcse. this is morgan. morgan, congratulations on your gcses. what weigl results? i got an eight in maths, a grade nine in english language and nine in english literature. and how did you feel when you got your results? so relieved, i didn't expect the grace that i got, but i did work really
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ha rd that i got, but i did work really hard all year so that i got, but i did work really hard all yearso i'm that i got, but i did work really hard all year so i'm proud of myself. mum and dad, you initially didn't even want morgan to come to this school? not originally, because it had a bad reputation. but the grade or outstanding. i am so proud. you didn't expect morgan to do as well as she did do today, did you? no, they have changed it all around. morgan's results are outstanding, i'm so proud of her. congratulations. what do you plan to do? i'm going to do a-levels in english literature, history and biology. fantastic. let's talk to martin 0liver, the ceo of the academy's trust in this area. you have 17 secondary school that you look after. what is the overall picture for those was blog fantastic, i'm so proud of all of our students and staff across the whole trust. it is a great
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celebration. when you look at the grade nine, we have got 63 students across our 70 academies have a grade nine in maths. 93 have a grade nine in english. 18 students have a grade nine in both england and maths —— english and maths. how hard was it to prepare the students for this change. the criticism has been that it has come in quick as block all change is difficult, but when you put effort into professional development and you are supporting staff in your schools, i have a great team in my schools and across the whole trust, the professional element and the preparedness to work together, it makes us a stronger unit. that is one of the benefits of being a multiple academy trust. liem is the last student we will talk to just now. lee, you havejust opened during some results, how did you do? i'm really happy with what i got. i got quite row a styles, two as, one
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a. this is this year's results. where you are selecting to get those results ? where you are selecting to get those results? no, not at all, especially science, i got two a styles. what do you plan to do next? i plan to do a mighty apprenticeship doing programming and networks and things like that. why did you want to go down that route? i think the experience is important. the college is going higher and experience is important. the college is going higherand higher, i can afford the debt at university and get work experience, that's what i'm thinking. fantastic. how did you do, sam? i did phenomenally, yes. are you very happy? over the moon. what you very happy? over the moon. what you plan to do next? i found to do a—levels, physics, maths and computing. there is a lot of excitement here. we have quite a
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number of students that have managed to get the new grade nine in either maths, english literature or english—language. as we said, overall the grades are down this year. thank you very much, chi. there are going to be lots of kids out there thinking about what they will do next. we're joined we'rejoined by we're joined by matthew, we'rejoined by matthew, who we're joined by matthew, who did we'rejoined by matthew, who did not do very well in his gcses but now ru ns do very well in his gcses but now runs a gardening company. annie, how many calls are you expecting to the helpline today?” couldn't tell you exactly how many. we have had thousands of calls since we opened on a results day. we are very busy now. and what is the sort
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of general flavour of calls that you might expect? we're having literally a whole range of calls this morning. people who have not done as well as they were hoping, but also students who have done much better than they we re who have done much better than they were hoping and it opens up a whole range of options for them. our were hoping and it opens up a whole range of options for them. 0urjob is to support them, whatever their questions. let's talk about some of those options. i mentioned, matthew, that you didn't do very well in your gcsess, which is obviously subjective, but what happened when your results came through?m subjective, but what happened when your results came through? it was a strange experience. it is the first time you get something which is could define your life. i got them, realised they were average, and just thought, well what will i do next? that is when the planning started. what did you decide to do next?”
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sat at a levels. schools don't push apprenticeships as much as they possibly should, so i fell into the a—level group and went down that route. you are here to say that if you don't do as well as you were hoping, you can go on and make a success. i took a year out of education, because i was undecided what to do. there was a fair amount of pressure to go to university but which, coming from... i went down the apprenticeship route, where i did a level two is in icp. the apprenticeship route, where i did a leveltwo is in icp. robin, you are a lecturer at a college for 16-18 you are a lecturer at a college for 16—18 —year—olds. it was interesting hearing matthew saying that schools don't push kids down alternative
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routes. what is your experience of kids who make their way to the couege kids who make their way to the college where you are right lecturer? is if children aren't achieving academically highly, they aren't given lots of options in terms of going down a vocational route orjob specific qualifications, they are encouraged to do general things because they have more options. a lot of people wa nt have more options. a lot of people want to go straight into learning the skills they will be doing in their job the skills they will be doing in theirjob every day. if they are really passionate about something like games design, they can start learning those skills straight after gcses. learning those skills straight after gcses. what kids might be attracted to the course that you teach? we have a whole range of students applying, some from crate of backgrounds, some of them really passionate about music or games, but the nice thing about games development is that you have all
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skill sets, so you could be a producer, if you're good at design and layout, you could be a level designer, right through to working in pr and marketing, and these are all things that we cover on the course to give a good overview of the industry. you did really well in your gcses, didn't you? do you need to have done really well to make the switch? i think it is more being really willing to work hard for what you want to do. i loved school and studying lots of different subjects, which led me into games design. you got all a*s and is as. which led me into games design. you got all a‘s and is as. that was a lot of missing parties and focusing on my studies. annie, what is the best advice to someone who has not got what they were hoping for today?
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really important is, don't panic. we have been hearing that there are loads of options available. we have dozens loads of options available. we have d oze ns of loads of options available. we have dozens of careers advisers who can give advice. give us a call. we are on facebook and twitter as well, so please do get in touch if there are any concerns that you have. allen says: i did terribly because i wasn't interested. i always wanted to bea wasn't interested. i always wanted to be a forklift truck driver, and as soon as to be a forklift truck driver, and as soon as i was old enough, i got my license. i have been driving them for 20 years and still love it. gcses aren't everything. mike says: i worked with students through many exa m i worked with students through many exam changes, and never once did i consider myself for the students to be guinea pigs. i talked to the best of my skill and for the benefit of the students. these changes are nothing new, you have to get on with
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it. anna says: i am concerned about the grading. scotland's standards are numbered 1—7, with one being the best. it is completely counterintuitive for nine to be seen as better than one. it is important to understand that the colleges and universities are well aware of that. there are different qualifications and different levels in different parts of the uk, so i think employers, colleges and universities are aware of this. as long it is clear on your cv or your application form. people should maybe put in brackets a*, a whatever the
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equivalent is? employers and universities know where you are at. there is no direct equivalence. i would go with the grade you have got, because it can be understood within the marketplace. thank you, all of you, forjoining us. do keep your comments coming in. still to come: notting hill carnival this taking place in the streets of london this weekend, but with its route going through north kensington, what is being done to mark what happened at grenfell tallaght? we will have some of the tributes performed live in the studiojust tributes performed live in the studio just before tributes performed live in the studiojust before 11am. where often hearing we need to exercise more to stay fit and healthy, but a new study this morning reveals what it calls shocking levels of inactivity amongst adults. many adults do not even manage a brisk ten minute walk once a month. the benefits include
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increased fitness, mood, a healthy weight and a reduction in the risk of dying prematurely. 0n weight and a reduction in the risk of dying prematurely. on average, we are 20% less active than we were in the 1960s. walking 15 miles less a year than we the 1960s. walking 15 miles less a yearthan we did the 1960s. walking 15 miles less a year than we did to make decades ago. we will talk to a couple whose lives have been transformed through exercise. first, dominic hughes gives us five top tips to stay healthy. health experts are telling us... lets talk to doctorjenny harries from public health england, and sarah, who has been using the application. why did you start to useit? application. why did you start to use it? i had a knee operation, and i had been walking and doing
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exercise prior to that to increase my fitness level before the operation, and i was aware that after the operation i was quite slow walking, so i used the application to tell me how many active minutes i was having, and it helped me enhance the speed of my walking to make sure i was walking briskly for ten minutes a day. what impact has it had on you? i recovered from the operation within four weeks, which previously would have taken a couple of months, and ifeel much healthier and better in myself. i've lost 1.5 stone in weight in the last year. just from ten minutes of brisk walking everyday? is not ten minutes. how much have you done? on a sunday, i woke with a club for about an hour, and then another hour on my own. lets talk to jenny harris
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from public health england. sarah's story is a clear impact that walking can have. why does walking have such a powerful impact? obviously, sarah has done well, and she's a great exemplar of how you can go from a short amount of walking to something much more substantial. we have looked at the evidence which leads to the chief medical officer's guidance that 150 minutes of moderate activity a week will really have an impact on your health, reducing your risk of diabetes by 40%, affects cardiovascular risk, although sort of things. we know that that puts a lot of people off because they don't see it as attainable. we have looked at that first bit, the dose response for every minute of exercise you do, what the health benefit is. we have found that, for ten minutes of continuous, vigorous walking each
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day, you can get most of those health benefits. let's bring in paul and alex, who say their life has been transformed through exercise. they are with their trainer, brian page. thank you forjoining us. wide eu your life has been changed walking? because we used to not do any exercise, we were overweight and and unfit. we were asked to try out the application, which got us into walking briskly for ten minutes a day. and that was the start of the journey. you say you used to not do any exercise at all. we have pictures of how you used to be. the audience can't see, but i can see that you are grimacing at the pictures. how did you feel then? com pletely
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pictures. how did you feel then? completely unfit. we never wanted to go out. we were always making excuses not to go anywhere or do anything. wejust excuses not to go anywhere or do anything. we just sat around doing nothing, really. and paul? it has absolutely changed my life. brisk walking now, ten minutes a day, it led me on to a lot of running, which i thoroughly enjoyed. i would encourage everyone that ten minutes of brisk walking is fantastic, helped in every way, from breathing just a motivation, and keeps you moving for the rest of the day. could you have imagined then that you would be running? how much running do you do now? how have you changed? massively. i have always liked sport, but running was never something i like. i average a minimum offive
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something i like. i average a minimum of five kilometres every day, which is a long distance, and i can do that continuously without having to stop, just an unbelievable change of life, starting from just brisk walking and moving on to what iam capable brisk walking and moving on to what i am capable of now, which is a total life changer. could you pass the microphone to brian, the trainer? there will be people at home watching who are thinking, five kilometres every day or every week — i couldn't possibly get to that. how do you persuade someone who feels like they really couldn't do it that they can? we like to introduce our runners to people like alex and paul, people who are live hayes case histories. there are applications that you can use to get going. they guide people on how to build up from nothing to five kilometres over an
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8-10 nothing to five kilometres over an 8—10 week period. it is difficult not to find anything. it is all over social media, what people can and are doing. if anybody took up the ten minutes of brisk walking per day, what impact could it have on the nation's health and the cost to the nation's health and the cost to the nhs? is about £0.9 billion is going out in expenses on the nhs just are, so there is a clear financial impact. i think the well—being element is important for this. i had the pleasure to meet paul and alex yesterday, and the important thing for the viewers is, they are doing fantastic things now, but many people won't be able to picture themselves running five kilometres. if they download the application, they will be able to see how fast they are moving when they are walking, and it will give them positive messages to show when they have intensity which is helpful to help. all they need to do was put on a
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pair of trainers orflat all they need to do was put on a pair of trainers or flat shoes, build that into their daily lives, ta ke build that into their daily lives, take the kids to school a bit faster, walk a bit faster, whatever it is, and it can really contribute toa it is, and it can really contribute to a reduction in the risk of diseases, benefit their mental health and strength in their muscles and bones. a brilliant thing to do. great to talk to you all. thank you very much. still to come... fewer people are arriving from the former eastern bloc countries. what does it mean for certain sectors? we'll have the details of the special tributes to grenfell arranged by the organisers of the notting hill carnival, which is taking place in london this weekend. let's joint let'sjoint annita for let's joint annita for the latest news summary. let's joint annita for the latest news summary. thank you, joanne, good morning again. the latest immigration statistics show a large decrease in eu migration to the uk
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since the brexit vote. more eu citizens are also leaving the country. net long—term international migration to the united kingdom was 246,000 in the year ending march 2017. it's the lowest level for three years according to official estimates. there has been a small drop—off in top grades in english and maths gcses in england following the introduction of new, tougher exams. 500,000 teenagers in england, wales and northern ireland have been receiving their gcse results today. the proportion of those receiving grade a the proportion of those receiving gradea warabove, the proportion of those receiving grade a war above, seven or above in england, has fallen to 20%, town 0.5% on last year. a new numerical grading system and tougher exams have been introduced. dutch police have arrested a 22—year—old man in connection with the cancellation of a rock concert
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in rotterdam last night following a terrorism related tip—off from the spanish authorities. police say the driver of a van containing gas canisters was arrested on suspicion of drunk driving, with no apparent connection to the terror threat. there's to be a major investigation into the impact that international students have on the uk's economy. the government—commissioned study will examine their effect on the labour market and education sector. british universities are the second most popular destination in the world, after those in the united states. the clear—up is continuing in northern ireland after nearly two thirds of the average august rainfall fell in under nine hours. more than 100 people had to be rescued after being trapped by the water. at one point, the fire service received an emergency call every 45 seconds. the north west was worst affected, particularly londonderry, as well as other parts of the county and tyrone. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 11am on bbc newsroom live. thanks, annita, see you later. let's get some sport with leah.
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thank you, joanna. conor mcgregor says he wants a career in both boxing and mixed martial arts after his fight with mayweather. it was their final press conference before the record—breaking fight in las vegas. liverpool are through to the champions league group stages. jurgen klopp's side beat hoffenheim 4—2 at anfield to win their play—off match 6—3 overall. there will be six british sides in the draw, made later today. west ham beat cheltenham 2—0 last night to reach the second round of the efl cup. the draw was made for the next round at 4am this morning in china. all of the results or on the bbc sport website. fewer people are arriving in the uk from the eight former eastern bloc countries that include poland, latvia, lithuania and hungary. that's according to the latest figures from the office for national statistics. and more nationals from these countries are leaving the uk.
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it means net migration has fallen to its lowest amount from these countries since theyjoined the eu in 2004. so why is it happening, and what does it mean for the sectors that rely on eu nationals? let's speak now to nigel howard, who works for mps crane 0perators, a company that supplies crane operators to building sites around the uk. he says they have seen a drop in eu national workers, but the uk nationals are keeping up with supply. he is in liverpool. john hardman runs hops labour solutions, an agency which supplies farm workers and relies on eu workers. he says there is a shortage of workers, and crops will be left rotting in the future if it continues. he is in lincoln. aiste lukociute is from lithuania and has been in the uk for nine years. she works for poskitts, a farming business which supplies vegetables to supermarkets, and has seen lots of lithuanians leave the uk in recent months. and she is in goole in yorkshire. thank you all very much forjoining
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us. nigel, tell us more about the picture that you have seen in terms of the drop in eu national workers? well, the company that i work for has been involved notjust in deploying crane operators all over the world for the last 30 years, but also employing the operators from all over the world. and, yes, we have seen a marked decline in the number of people wanting to come and work in the uk is crane operators. this could be for several reasons, i couldn't really pinpoint one in particular. it's just happened. couldn't really pinpoint one in particular. it'sjust happened. and over the last six months, i haven't had any body contact me, you know, with a request for training and a change of certification to work over in the uk. i mentioned that you said that uk nationals have been making up that uk nationals have been making up the shortfall. so, has it
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mattered for your business? not really, no. ithink mattered for your business? not really, no. i think there has been an increase in there i say it, uk people taking up an interest in crane operating —— there i say it. because, at the end of the day, it's quite a well—paid job and it's relatively easy to get into because you don't have to do any lengthy apprenticeships. you can go on a two—week course, and within two weeks you are virtually qualified to go and work on a construction site. rightly or wrongly, but that's the it is. it's the way that the training is structured at the moment —— that is the way it is. training is structured at the moment -- that is the way it is. john, what has your experience been? for this season, we have had one of the worst shortfalls we have seen in many years. since the brexiter vote, we have had devaluation of the pound, which has had the biggest impact of white goods. 0ur which has had the biggest impact of white goods. our country is sometimes —— impact on workers. 0ur country is sometimes viewed as
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xenophobic. nigel says that in his area, the shortfall in eu workers has been made up by uk nationals. you are saying there is a shortage of workers and crops will be left rotting in the future if it continues. uk workers not stepping in? with the benefit system as it is run at the moment, there isn't really any incentive for uk workers to come off benefits and come and work in agriculture. quite often, where we have large populations of eu workers is not where we have hotspots of uk unemployment. if we look in bradford or hull, it is very difficult to commute those people down into herefordshire or kent. aiste, you are from lithuania. you said you have seen lots of lithuanians leaving the uk in recent months, why do you think that is? well, after all of the conversation with friends we have who suggest the
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people that left, yes, it is the unclear situation in the uk after the brexiter vote. for unclear situation in the uk after the brexitervote. forthe unclear situation in the uk after the brexiter vote. for the new arrivals, they are not sure where they stand, if they are welcome to they stand, if they are welcome to the uk and if they will try to find work or create their life. as well as, already somebody mentioned that the pound has dropped. that happened recently. and all of the friends and people i know, for one or another reason, come here to work and find may be more savings to send back to help the relatives in their own countries. and when the pound drops significantly, it is now hard to say, you know, just a the point of this dane piedt —— to see the point of staying here when you can go back to our own country. would you definitely stay or would you think about returning? i don't think about returning to lithuania at the
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moment, but it really depends. because this is an clearness after brexit really bothers me as well. i try not to think about it at the moment and just do my own daily routine. and we'll see what's happened, and then we'll make decisions as well. as well as other people like friends choose more welcoming countries like scandinavia, like norway and sweden, germany. places where they can earn and be more welcome, maybe. it is taking that hard decision to leave their own country, you don't want to feel unwelcome in the country you choose. so that's what probably drops the uk at the moment, with all of the brexit, onto the bottom list. briefly, john, i spoke to a tory mp only about the net migration figures and the fact that there has been a dramatic fall, down eight to 1000 to 246,000 over the course of the past
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year. he said people will welcome it and it is a good thing. how do you see those stats was blog certainly if that has come from a tory mp, the tories promised the net migration into tens of thousands for many years and never achieved it. brexit vote has certainly turned the tide, and that is why they are seeing a drop in net migration. i would like to ask that tory mp who is going to pick our fruit and vegetables in the future. thank you all very much indeed forjoining us. the widower ofa indeed forjoining us. the widower of a woman who was killed by a cyclist with no front brake is launching a campaign to change the law. yesterday, 19—year—old charlie alliston was convicted of wanton and furious driving, an offence dating back to 1861, in relation to the death of kim briggs. he was cleared of manslaughter. tim's husband matthew is calling for laws of death by dangerous cycling. she was out on her lunch break on february the 12th last year. she left for work, a very
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normal morning. and she didn't come back. your world falls apart. but you have to get up. you're a father. so many times... so many times in this sort of modern world we are told, you know, you don't have to do this, you don't have to do that. actually, when that happens, you're the dad, you're the person left. so you get up every single morning, you do the normal things. you make brea kfast, do the normal things. you make breakfast, you look after your kids. and you do your duty. and in doing that, slowly, sometimes painfully, you rebuild your family over that period. and that's what i've tried to do. tim's case was quite specific, that there was an agreed illegal act —— kim. specific, that there was an agreed illegalact —— kim. riding
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specific, that there was an agreed illegal act —— kim. riding an illegal act —— kim. riding an illegal bike, a bike without front brakes. after much consideration, andi brakes. after much consideration, and i believe it was an awful lot of consideration on behalf of the cps, it was felt that the charge of manslaughter could be brought. but the vast majority of cases, manslaughter would not be applicable, and the cps would have to fall back on a victorian law. and what do you think about that's weiyuan lu easy about that brazil are uneasy about the charge —— were you uneasy about that? uneasy about the charge? i have an enormous respect for the justice system, and that respect has actually grown. i have huge respect for the police and the cps. and i was in their hands. and i think they have done the right thing. in doing this. but it's shown that the law is inadequate. people sort of keep saying, you're calling for new laws. i'm actually not falling for a new law, i'm calling for a change to the law to cooperate
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cycling. we have dangerous driving and reckless driving and causing death... and calling for cycling to be included in that for the law to catch up. i haven't yet met anybody, be they a politician or anybody else, he says that that doesn't make sense or can't be done. from where i sat, it seems to me very. let's get this done, so that the next, you know, it will happen again, u nfortu nately, know, it will happen again, unfortunately, and the next person who is that he hasn't had to go through this. tim was an intensely private person —— kim to be with, she was so much fun. she had a wicked sense of humour. great fun, a great friend. she lived for her family, she lived for her kids. so i'm doing this to one her. it's not an easy thing to do, to put myself out there, when we've been quite a private family up until now. but it
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comes back to my earlier point, sometimes you just have to do the right thing. and it occurs to me that, you know, this is the right thing to do. and, yes, i'm doing it in kim's name. but i'm also doing it to ensure that, you know, just perhaps we can stop this happening again. it's 10:45am. europe's biggest street party, the notting hill carnival, will bring calipso and colour to the streets of london this weekend, but its route takes it into the shadow of the remains of g re nfell tower. the fire injune claimed the lives of at least 80 people, and has left many more homeless. there have been calls for the carnival not to happen this year. but instead of cancelling it, organisers have arranged a number of events to pay respect to those caught up in the tragedy, as well as asking revelers to not go through the estate around the tower. let's talk to toby laurent—belson, who is an organizer of the green for grenfell campaign, and who lost a friend in the fire. socrates, who is a calypso performer,
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who will be performing his song about the tragedy at the carnival. and will wiles from the kids on the green project, who has organised a float for children caught up in the fire. and chelsea dann who will be on the float, who is here with mum caz. welcome, all of you, and thank you for joining welcome, all of you, and thank you forjoining us in bringing some colour to the studio with bits from the floats. toby, i mentioned that there were calls for the carnival not to go ahead — how are you feeling about it? the response to those calls was swift, immediate and very clear, that the community is carnival, and carnival is the community, so there was never any question of carnival being moved, postponed in any way. we are all feeling is slightly nervous, of course, because we are still a grieving community, however, we feel that carnival is a celebration of
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life, of the cycle of life, and we are all looking forward to creating are all looking forward to creating a wonderful time for our community is in our process of healing. and thinking of the residents, there will be quiet areas, and there has been a request for the estate where the grenfell tower is so that —— g re nfell tower the grenfell tower is so that —— grenfell tower is only to be open to residents. i grew up walking through that the state, next to shepherd's bush roundabout, five minutes away. so every year, i would make that walk down saint hans road and come through the estate. a lot of people come from shepherd's bush through latimer road. things that work is clearly requested from the families,
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the protection of the estate, silences on both days, sunday and monday, at 3pm, and of course, is our wonderful green for grenfell campaign to bring solidarity and peace to the carnival. will, you are involved in a float for the carnival that will have kids from grenfell? all three of us have been participating in a project called kids on the green, which was set up in response to the grenfell fire. the fire affected a radius around the site of the tower. all the residents who live nearby witnessed some really horrible things on the night. residents have lost teachers and friends, and when that happens to people all in one place, you can no longer say that the people affected were only the ones living
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in the tower. a lot of people who lived in the tower are finding it ha rd lived in the tower are finding it hard to get back to the neighbourhood because of where they have been relocated. the carnival has been set up as a healing process for the whole area, the whole latimer road area, and i understand that people are quite fixated on g re nfell tower that people are quite fixated on grenfell tower and that people are quite fixated on gre nfell tower and its that people are quite fixated on grenfell tower and its people, who experienced the worst tragedy, but we are also trying to deal with moving on for a whole area. how do you see it? you live ten minutes away from the tower, but you're obviously part of a wider community thatis obviously part of a wider community that is affected. it has affected everybody. it's not just that is affected. it has affected everybody. it's notjust affected the people that were close to grenfell. it the people that were close to gre nfell. it has the people that were close to grenfell. it has affected all around the area. we're trying tojust get people to take their minds off it and try to look forward to carnival. kids on the green have made some
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lovely artwork which will be on the float. and chelsea, you will be on the float — what will you be doing? i will be blowing up balloons and letting them off, 1000 balloons for eve ryo ne letting them off, 1000 balloons for everyone in grenfell. i will also be minding children, and doing some stewa rd i ng minding children, and doing some stewarding as well. kids on the green is a nice project, open to anyone who was affected by the fire. and for people who don't know, what is the aim of it? is the aim is to ta ke is the aim of it? is the aim is to take everybody's is the aim of it? is the aim is to take eve rybody's mind is the aim of it? is the aim is to take everybody's mind off, even if it is not about the tower, you can come and reflect, sit down and talk to people about anything, notjust that. children can come, they can make bracelets, do anything they like. there is a part. there are
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mass irishs, hairdressers will stop it is lovely, but it has taken something like this for a community to build and get together. what would you say has been the impact of the project? and how important is what is happening this weekend as pa rt what is happening this weekend as part of that? chelsea just said it really well. in terms of what has been set up, i'm an entertainer by trade, and i was asked to come and do some workshops with the kids. when i arrived, the thing i thought was amazing was that all the families were connected with therapists, well— being families were connected with therapists, well—being in general. so it was providing for the immediate relief efforts weren't. they were focused on the material aspect, but what is happening is an emotional story for a lot of people. there are people dealing with loss, so there are people dealing with loss, so it is picking up where the more
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systemic response doesn't go. is carnival is very much about that too. the project is is running a float for... lots of tragedies like g re nfell float for... lots of tragedies like grenfell happen to people who live in favelas in brazil as well. it sounds funny to say it, but the celebration is not simplyjust about being happy as any skate, it is also about that moment where you release grief is and you let go of the bad thing that has happened is. and sometimes even make an effort to be with your community and have joy.
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so, really, that's one of the reasons why they have given us a float. it is a big honour. do you think it will be that moment for the community, seeing it as a time to release grief and let go? yes, to a degree. medicine is something that we have in our community, medicine men, community leaders who always seek to do that. it is within us as a culture in ladbroke grove and in that part of west london. so i do believe bringing all of these people together — and we are still looking for volunteers over the next three days to support our efforts to turn the streets green — and we will be collecting at various points. to go through these things that will absolutely help us to actually heal and come together. socrates, you
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will be performing at the carnival, and you are going to perform the song that you have written for us in a few moments. tell us about it.” ama a few moments. tell us about it.” am a singer songwriter from the caribbean. 0ver am a singer songwriter from the caribbean. over the past five years, i have come to london to be part of the notting hill celebration. iwas here about a week when i saw the fire, and it really impacted me. is injuly, i wrote the song. i had to ta ke injuly, i wrote the song. i had to take in the solemnity of the holy event. i wrote the song is, and some of the guys from the committee asked me to perform it. i was asked to perform the song here today, and on saturday. and what is the message of the song? it speaks about healing,
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healing after a tragedy. the refrain is, may their souls rest in peace. for the loved ones who sadly perished, may their souls rest in peace. it is about the healing process. do you think the mood of the carnival will be different?” think everyone will be there, thinking of what has happened and just try to keep the spirit going for them, really. toby, you were talking about green for grenfell, the idea that people will wear green to show that they are thinking about the people affected by it. are you expecting that many people will go to the carnival wearing green?” think so. it has been a massive push amongst the community. as has been mentioned, we are such a close community. people always come to
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ladbroke grove, around shepherd's bush, holland park, notting hill, and a mention, this is like the old days. is there a palpable sense that things have changed? is there are people who talk about before g re nfell people who talk about before grenfell and after grenfell, and there are a lot of people who are already working towards change since before grenfell, and it is sad that we did not get that change to prevent grenfell happening, but after g re nfell, prevent grenfell happening, but after grenfell, definitely we are moving. socrates, we would love to hear your song now, if you would be happy to perform it for us. thank you very much. socrates is going to play us out of the programme. thank you very much for your company today. #in # in horrified shock we watched a
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raging fire #it raging fire # it climbed up the grenfell tower in the dead of night # when most were asleep, we saw a big like and we are still left to grieve # still in mourning for those who did not survive # while counting our blessings for who made it out alive # five in the name of our cherished loved ones # survivors demand justice # survivors demand justice # for those who are perished, may they rest in peace # may their soul rest in peace # may their soul rest in peace # may their souls rest in peace # may their souls rest in peace # 0ur heart goes out to the survivors who from the council demand answers # for their loved ones who sadly perished, may they rest in peace # the anger, the grief, the loss and
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the pain is #we the pain is # we pray they never happen again # we pray they never happen again #it # we pray they never happen again # it was glad to see of the community is ready to show its humanity #in humanity # in this tragedy is most reg retta ble # evidently quite preventable # evidently quite preventable # and they are still looking for victims # and the numbers, they increase # and the numbers, they increase # waiting for healing, may they rest in peace sing with me # may they rest in peace, may their souls rest in peace... #. looking at the satellite, we can see the best of the brightness in the south—east. eastern parts of
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scotla nd south—east. eastern parts of scotland doing not too bad, but shah was continuing to rolling across northern ireland and western parts of scotland. further south, staying dry with good sunny spells developing. temperatures will be between 13 and 22 celsius today. a few showers coming in overnight in northern ireland and scotland. further south, staying dry with clear skies into the early hours of friday morning. temperatures remain in double figures for all of us. tomorrow, we do it all again, the southern part of the country staying dry, further north, cloud increasing, rain across northern ireland spreading into western parts of scotland. it will be rather blustery. that's the latest forecast. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11am.
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a slight fall in the gcse pass—rate as half a million students receive their results this morning. new, tougher exams were sat for the first time in a number of subjects — by pupils in england, wales and northern ireland. net migration is at its lowest level for three years, after a surge in eu nationals leaving uk since last june's brexit vote. dutch police make a second arrest after a possible terror threat forced the cancellation of a concert in rotterdam last night. the husband of a woman who was knocked down and killed by a cyclist calls for new laws to tackle "irresponsible and reckless" actions. i'm just asking that the law catches up — as it has done with technology,
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with social media and all of these things, i'm just asking that the law catches up.

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