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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  August 24, 2017 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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net migration to the uk falls by a quarter — it's at its lowest level for three years. new figures suggest migrants from eastern and central european countries have been returning home. we'll look at whether the shift is a consequence of brexit. also this lunchtime: the number of students getting top gcse grades in maths and english has fallen slightly — after the introduction of new tougher exams. the husband of the woman knocked down and killed by a speeding cyclist in london calls for a change in the law, to tackle irresponsible and reckless behaviour. i'm asking that the law catches up, as it is doing with technology, with social media, with all of these things. i'm just asking that the law catches up. the mobile phone group dixons carphone issues a profits warning — it says increasingly expensive handsets has led to a slump in people buying. and aged between a0 and 60? get out on regular brisk walks, says public health england —
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to prevent cancer, heart disease and poor mental health. and coming up in the sport on bbc news: efl holders man united have been drawn against burton in the third round of the cup. leicester, arsenal and west ham are also in the mix. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. there's been a sharp fall in the number of eu citizens migrating to the uk. net migration — the difference between those entering and leaving the uk — fell 81,000 to 246,000 in the year to march. the office for national statistics said the figures suggest migrants from eastern and central european countries, the so called eu8
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nations, have been returning home. despite today's falling figures, the government remains well short of its target of bringing net migration below 100,000. adina campbell reports. today's new numbers be the early signs of brexit. net migration, the difference between those entering and leaving the uk, fell, to 246,000, in the year to march 2000 and 17. that's a drop of 81,000 on the previous year. much of that figure is down to net migration of eu citizens falling, by 51,000. but despite today's falling figures, the government remains well short of its targets of bringing net migration below 100,000. since the eu referendum we've seen falls in net
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migration for eu citizens and in particular those for eastern european, and that's been driven by emigration of eastern european citizens who are returning for work. the office for national statistics figures show a sharp rise in people from the so—called eu8 countries leaving the uk. but migration experts say the overall net migration figure is still too high. a level is still two and £50,000 a year. that's a massive numberfour net migration and that's what's going to drive our population up by half a million every year for the indefinite future —— the level is still 250,000 a year. it means building a city the size of birmingham every two years. this cafe serves scandinavian cuisine but advertising for new staff is increasingly expensive. it normally costs £200. but that shot up to more
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than £2000 this summer. costs £200. but that shot up to more than £2000 this summerli costs £200. but that shot up to more than £2000 this summer. i might not choose london because of brexit and what will happen next year in the year after. they want some form of security and knowledge that they are allowed to stay and work in the country they are choosing to go to. finding stuff here may be difficult, but the government says it wants to get immigration even lower. labour warns that could harm the economy. we wa nt warns that could harm the economy. we want to be clear, we welcome people from around the world and people from around the world and people from around the world and people from all over europe, 3 million of whom are in this country at the moment contributing to our society, they play an important part in our economy. we need to continue to welcome people. we also need to be clear that when we leave the eu we will have more control of our borders. the nhs, particularly in england, is facing problems of nurse recruitment because of the number of eu citizens coming. we have to have stability and migration based on economic needs of the uk and that's what we're working on. as well as these new migration figures, new
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data from exit checks at ports and airports has also been released. the data revealed that when it comes to international students, one of the biggest groups of immigrants, the results weren't what some people previously thought. 97% of them left when they finished their courses and therefore didn't abuse their visas. and to build a clearer picture of this the government has now announced that it's going to start a new investigation looking at the impact of international students on the uk's society and economy. the study is expected to be completed by september 2018. adina campbell, bbc news. our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani is here. what is driving all of this change? 0f what is driving all of this change? of was going to think it's going to be the chilling effects of brexit. i think it's probably a little bit more complicate it than that but there's no doubt there's something in my going on. the ons, the
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statisticians, they are cautioning, saying hang on a minute before we make any real assumptions about brexit. but the figures do speak for themselves. the number, the net migration from eastern europe alone has halved since the vote took place. now anecdotally you pick up stories. i've been out talking to migrants over the past year, i didn't work —— i did a lot of work around the general election where people said they were scared. the pound is significantly dropped so if you are polish worker, the number of zloty you could buy back home has really decreased. it starts to really decreased. it starts to really is the question whether its worth come to the uk anymore. —— it sta rts worth come to the uk anymore. —— it starts to raise the question. some of the european countries are starting to grow faster than the uk, poland being example. that's a key driver. one other thought, poland being example. that's a key driver. one otherthought, ministers will be buoyed because they had this target they want to hit but the figure from the rest of the world is still 180,000, figure from the rest of the world is still 180 , 000, that's figure from the rest of the world is still 180,000, that's well above the target habit something they have to
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try to get to grips with. dominic casciani, thank you. let's talk about the politics of it, our political correspondent leila nathoo is at westminster. that's politically the key point, isn't it, that the overall figure is still not where the government wants it to be? that's right, i think there are a number of issues thrown up by these figures. first is this target that dominic was mentioning, the government has a long—standing but never achieved as of yet target of getting net migration down to the tens of thousands. when you think it currently stands at almost 250,000 come you can see how far away that is. i think that labour are talking about this being a shambles, and arbitrary target, and calling for the government to abandon it. the government is insisting it's not complacent and it is still committed to getting it down to a sustainable level but there's a second issue that has been thrown up and that's theissue that has been thrown up and that's the issue of eu citizens. people will read this as eu citizens fleeing the country after the brexit
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referendum and although the ons says it's too early to say whether this isa it's too early to say whether this is a long—term trend, the liberal democrats for example are seizing on this, calling it a brexodous. ministers would say they've made a fair offer to eu citizens of settled status and i think the government says we will see more of its immigration policy a bit further down the line and finally, on this issue of foreign students here, and the idea that exit checks data reveals that most foreign students are not overstaying their visas, the idea that exit checks are not currently used to calculate the currently used to calculate the current net migration figures will i think reopen the debate about the methodology such a politically sensitive figure. thanks, leila nathoo at westminster. the number of teenagers gaining the highest gcse grades has fallen slightly, after exam boards moved to a tougher system. for the first time, students in england have been graded from nine to one in english language, english literature
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and maths, with nine being the top mark. our education correspondent gillian hargreaves is at outwood academy in sheffield. yes, across england, wales and northern ireland, thousands of stu d e nts northern ireland, thousands of students will have received their gcse results by now. i spent the morning with pupils at this school, as they opened those fateful envelopes. you know the routine. thejourney... the weight... the nerves... then the results. college. i've got in, i'm all right. i passed everything! pretty good, i'm really proud of myself. in england and new grading system for gcse english and maths, but only a few will achieve the top grade nine. great four is broadly
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being impaired to an old—style grade cand is being impaired to an old—style grade c and is considered a standard part. however, the government says the new grade five should be considered what they call a strong pass. i've only just passed maths, by a little bit. yeah, i'm happy with it. in fact, some maths papers were so challenging in england this year you only needed 18% to pass. the subject content is significantly harder and in the higher maths paper, some of the old a—level content is in there so the old a—level content is in there so people will take confidence that these results are going to be world —class. these results are going to be world-class. which is why they've all this —— which is why there have been all these changes this year. the government wants students such as these to compete with the best in the world. we want our young people to be equipped to do well in the world of work, in a competitive global economy and so it has been necessary. the new grading system has been introduced to draw a
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distinction between the old gcse and these new more demanding gcses. but these new more demanding gcses. but the combination of new and old style exams has caused confusion and lead head teachers' unions to say the pace of change has been too quick. we will look back and think this has been a very distracting process. the most important thing is to let teachers get on and teach and the stu d e nts we teachers get on and teach and the students we need to focus on in particular those middle —— middle ability and lower ability students who are easily neglected and by focusing on the top end we neglect them either further. students have spent two years getting used to the changes but the next big challenges explaining it to employers who recruit 16—year—olds for apprenticeships. at this hairdresser they'd take on several 16—year—old apprentices each year but the owner isn't sure how he'll be up to work out who has the best qualifications. i'm going to be slightly confused, but over a period of time we'll work it out. a standard pass, i think
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that would be our borderline, a four, definitely. it's notjust pupils in england who's been picking up pupils in england who's been picking up results. welsh students have also been finding out how they fared in new tougher exams. ministers are determined to make gcses harder, to end what some see as dumbing down. this year's results, the first of the reformed exams, are putting those ambitions to the test as well. just to illustrate how hard is to get that top grade nine, we've been told, bearing in mind 600,016 —year—olds sit these exams each year, we've been told only 2000 of them have got that top grade nine in english language, english literature and mathematics, the three reformed examines in england —— bearing in mind 600,00016—year—olds it
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examines in england —— bearing in mind 600,000 16—year—olds it these exams. it shows how difficult it is to get that top grade, to distinguish the ultra—right from the very bright. gillian hargreaves. the widower of the woman who was killed by a cyclist using a fixed gear bike, without front brakes, is launching a campaign to change the law. yesterday 20—year—old charlie alliston was convicted of wanton and furious driving, an offence dating back to 1861, but was cleared of manslaughter, following the death of kim briggs. her husband, matthew, is calling for the creation of new offences, such as death by dangerous cycling. he's been speaking to our correspondent, dan johnson. she had this mantra of make everyday count. enormous believer in filling life with experiences, with travel. she was always happy, always willing to help people, always willing to lend an ear. yeah, she wasjust
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fantastic. kim riggs, a wife and a mother who was hit by a bike. —— kim briggs. she suffered serious head injuries and died a week later. that bike should never have been on the road. it was designed for the velodrome. fixed gear and with no front brake. riding it was charlie alliston, in the middle. cleared yesterday of manslaughter, but convicted under a law from victorian times of causing bodily harm by wa nton times of causing bodily harm by wanton orfurious times of causing bodily harm by wanton or furious driving. times of causing bodily harm by wanton orfurious driving. kim briggs' family welcomed the verdict but they are calling for the law to be changed. more and more people cycling which is a really good thing, but the law is outdated. it refers back to 1861 and i'm just asking that the law catches up, as it is doing with technology, with social media, with all of these things. i'm just asking that the law catches up. this case raises some broader issues about how cyclists and pedestrians share the same space but the key question is how much
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responsibility should cyclists have for safety on the road. should that responsibility be at the same level of car drivers rush to mark questions that have prompted plenty of debate. especially amongst cyclists. you regularly see bikes that are not fit for the road basically and shouldn't be out on the road, bikes with three wheels that have brakes that don't work, that have brakes that don't work, that are more dangerous than a fixed wheel without brakes. especially now pedestrians have a phone with them, on the head, they are looking up the phone, so they are really distracted. a response ability to travel on the roads someone's causing date —— death by dangerous cycling, why should it be different from causing death by dangerous driving? cycling groups aren't opposed to a review but there are calls for all traffic laws to be brought up to date. the problem we have got is there's a stack of offences in relation to the conduct
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offences in relation to the conduct of people on the roads, where we use careless, reckless, furious, wanton, dangerous, and there's a huge inconsistency of peoples perception of what these are, what the consequence should be, and the whole issue needs to be looked at in a holistic review of all matters. i'm doing this to honour her. it's not an easy thing to do, to put myself out there when we've been quite a private family up until now, but it comes back to my earlier point that sometimes you have to just do the right thing and it occurs to me that this is the right thing to do and yes, i'm doing it in kim's name, but i'm also doing it to ensure that just perhaps we can stop this happening again. our streets are getting busier, with the potential for more conflict. it's a not easily solved. dan johnson, bbc for more conflict. it's a not easily solved. danjohnson, bbc news, london. dutch police have made a second arrest, after a rock concert
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in rotterdam was cancelled because of an alert from spanish police. the arrest follows the detention of a spanish man who was found with gas canisters in his van in rotterdam. the authorities had been warned about a potential risk — though it's not clear whether there is any link to the attacks in catalonia last week that killed 15 people. anna holligan is in rotterdam. the focus of the police investigation has now shifted from this concert venue in rotterdam to a house in a region close to the belgian border. early this morning they detained a 22—year—old man and searched his home. he is now being questioned on suspicion of having links to this tip—off received from the spanish police that the gig performed by the american rock group allah—las may be the target of a terror attack. we have been speaking to the police here in rotterdam. they said they cleared of any
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immediately as a precaution. we asked whether the public was ever in any danger, they said it was too soon to say. that was not the subject of the investigation. the allah—las are an american rock group. they have talked in the past about receiving messages of concern from muslims who don't like the use of the word allah, the arabic word for god, in the title of the band. as far as the spanish van driver who was detained close to the venue last night, he is now being questioned on suspicion of drunk driving. he is not suspected of having any links to the possible terror attack at the music venue on the banks of the river in rotterdam. the police have said that the fact that he acted so swiftly is because they were not prepared to take any chances. anna holiday inn in rotterdam. the time is 1.18pm. our top story this lunchtime. net migration to the uk for spot a
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quarter to its lowest level for three years as migrants from european and central european countries have been returning home. and still to come. he's the boxer of his generation facing the mixed martial arts champion. we're in las vegas for the big contest this weeekend. in sport, after breaking his collarbone at last month's tour de france, team sky's geraint thomas is back. he'll be taking on the tour of britain in september, which starts in edinburgh and finishes in cardiff. six million adults in england fail to have a brisk 10 minute walk even once a month. that's a finding from public health england which has launched a campaign to encourage the practice, particularly among people who are middle aged — the public health body says walking can help prevent cancer, heart disease and poor mental health. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports. in denton, in manchester, the first
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steps towards a healthier lifestyle. this walking group is starting slowly but already some members are feeling the benefits of a regular stroll. i've lost about four stone. have you? yeah. four stone, wow. gone down from virtually 25 to 21. that's impressive. so it does help. it's got me out, it's got me getting some exercise. and it's company as well because i live on my own so that helps a lot. this is week two for me, i'm a newbie. and i decided when i retired that i wanted to do lots of different things. and i've done lots of things to keep the mind going but not a lot to keep the body going. the beauty of walking is, of course, it's free. you don't need any special training or indeed any special kit. but health experts say doing just
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ten minutes of brisk walking every day, well, that can have a really positive impact on your health. our lifestyles have changed. compared to the 1960s, we are now 20% less active. and each year we walk 15 miles less than we did just two decades ago. physical inactivity amongst adults contributes to one in six deaths in the uk. it is estimated to cost the nhs nearly £1 billion a year. but a brisk walk of just ten minutes each day can reduce the risk of early death by 15%. gp doctor zoe williams advises her patients that it's walking at a good pace, around three miles an hour that is the key. practising what she preaches, she uses a smartphone app to measure her own progress. but according to a public health england survey of our exercise habits, millions of adults are missing out. four in ten adults between the ages of 40 and 60 are not managing to achieve ten minutes of brisk walking per month. which sounds unbelievable. lots of those people will be
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walking, but they are not walking at a brisk pace. and it's important to walk briskly because that's when you start to get the health benefits. but for many of us it's finding the time in an already busy day. i drive to work and it is timing really, trying to find the time. generally i would rather drive than walk because i need to get there in a hurry. so generally not, no. not every day, we probably do about one and a half miles twice a day and about one mile in the middle of that. you can always make time. one less cake, one more walk! walking can help with weight loss, back pain, long—term conditions like diabetes, and even reducing the risk of cancer. now we are all being urged to get up and get moving. dominic hughes, bbc news. shares in dixons carphone have slumped by almost a quarter, after the company issued a profits warning. it says sales of mobile handsets have fallen —
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partly because of the fall in the pound since the eu referendum, making devices more expensive. it says lower eu roaming charges will also affect its profits. our technology correspondent rory cellanjones is here. a couple of reasons given there, what is the overall picture, what is really going on, rory? what is really going on, rory? what is really concerning dixons carphone and the rest of the mobile market is we seeing a change in consumer behaviour. the chief executive said to me today, the concern is that instead of changing phones every two yea rs instead of changing phones every two years people may change the firms every two and a half years and believe it or not that leaves a big gap in profits. here's the problem, all these funds look incredibly similarso all these funds look incredibly similar so people look at them and say they are all very good, they all
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do the same, and they all incredibly expensive. maybe i will hold off a bit longer. we saw a phone from samsung this week that costs £869 as a starting price. so people are being more cautious. a lot of hope is being pinned on the new apple iphone which we are expecting in late september. there are rumours that could cost up to £1000. people are saying, yes, we love our phones and need them but do we need to upgrade so often when they already dojust about upgrade so often when they already do just about everything we want them to? goodness, that's quite a sum. rory catherine jones, them to? goodness, that's quite a sum. rory catherinejones, thank you. dot—mac rory catherinejones thank you. thousands of civilians in the syrian city of raqqa are coming under fire from all sides, as the battle for control of the city enters its final stage. amnesty international says hundreds of people have been killed or injured since june, when the offensive began to recapture raqqa, which is the stronghold of so—called islamic state. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet is in the syrian town of homs. lyse, let's talk first about raqqa
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and a deeply disturbing picture for any civilians caught up there. this amnesty report is heartbreaking and chilling. it is set in the context of the last, what is believed to be the final months, the final battles to destroy the so—called caliphate of the islamic state here in syria. in raqqa, the city you just mentioned in northern syria, it was their self—declared capital. mentioned in northern syria, it was their self—decla red capital. and mentioned in northern syria, it was their self—declared capital. and as their self—declared capital. and as the war intensifies right into the centre of raqqa into heavily populated neighbourhoods civilians are trapped into what amnesty calls this deadly labyrinth. every direction they turn come under fire, whether snipers and booby traps from isis which doesn't want civilians to leave or when they do escape they are coming under fire leave or when they do escape they are coming underfire from us led coalition air strikes which have killed hundreds of civilians in recent months. so this amnesty report is a cry for compassion but also for protection, even in wartime
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there are rules, and the rules of war are there are rules, and the rules of warare being there are rules, and the rules of war are being absolutely shattered, day in, day out, here. tell us more about the situation in homs where you are. viewers may remember homs from the early years of the uprising in syria the city the capital of their revolution. homs saw some of their revolution. homs saw some of the first peaceful protests against the first peaceful protests against the rule of president bashir al—assad and also saw some of the worst of the fighting. now homs is a quiet city. there are corners where you could be forgiven for thinking that there is no war. swimming pools full of children on summer break, splashing in the water. cafes are full. families going out, sitting and parks. but behind me, you may not see the details but this is a skyline of a city that has been torn apart. there are neighbourhoods in homs where not a single building has been left standing. these are like
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scenes from the first and second world wars. although homs is, it is still a city which has deep, deep wounds which will take a very long time to heal. dot—mac although homs is calm. lyse, thank you. least is set — lyse doucet in homs. it's one of the most highly anticipated boxing contests of recent times but one of the fighters hasn't boxed professionally before. this weekend in las vegas the irish mixed martial arts champion, conor mcgregor, will face floyd mayweather, who is undefeated in 49 fights, and is seen by many as the boxer of his generation. our sports news correspondent richard conway was at their last press conference before the fight. it's set to be the richest ever contest in boxing history. fight night is fast approaching, but the sport's purists are not hailing the prospects of this match—up. despite that, in a city
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that is full of stars, floyd mayweather and conor mcgregor are the biggest names on the famous las vegas strip this week. after a controversial build up, there was a surprising lack of fear and loathing during the bout‘s final press conference. conor mcgregor has had a hell of a career, still got a hell of a career, he is a hell of a fighter. a hell of a fighter. he is a stand—up guy, he is a tough competitor, it's not going to be an easy fight — it's going to be blood, sweat and tears saturday. that's is what we're here to give the fans and that's what what people want all around the world. last month's publicity tour which culminated in london, was a very different affair — with homophobic slurs, accusations of racism and childish antics. of course there have been slip—ups, we are only human and when you face a man you're about to fight, it is very hard to keep everything in check, you make mistakes, you slip up on the tongue. but i think the overall experience of it has been great for boxing,
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for mixed martial arts and for combat sport all over the world. few experts give conor mcgregor any chance of victory, but he insists he is ready to shock the world and one former champion shares his optimism. if indeed mcgregor boxes him and tries to be clever in there, then there is only one winner. to me, mayweather cannot lose the fight. but if he brings that celtic warrior, that spirit which is irrepressible, and brings this into a fight, if he makes a fight, an ugly fight of this, everything and anything could happen. this contest is unashamedly money—motivated, with sporting reasons somewhat in the shade. given that, the reputations of both men and that of boxing are all on the line. richard hughes, bbc news, las vegas. time for a look at the weather. here's lucy martin.
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we have the north west south east is red, low pressure in the west, it will stay there for the next few days, greater chance of showers and more persistent rain, the further north and west you are, the further south and east, drier, brighter weather, we've seen blue skies, this photo was sent in by one weather watcher in hampshire. further north we have seen more in the way of cloud. a fairly grey scenes sent in from cumbria. we've seen a few showers this morning pushing into wales and the south—west. they should tend to ease, the best of the brightness that the south—east and weaves in the majority of those showers for northern ireland. as we move through the rest of the day—to—day will continue to see showers northern ireland. some sunny spells in the mix and outbreaks of rain across shetland but for eastern scotla nd rain across shetland but for eastern scotland the best of the

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