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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  August 24, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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tonight at five: net migration to the uk falls by a quarter. the net number of people entering the uk was 246,000 in the year to march — the lowest level for three years. it follows a surge in eu nationals leaving the uk since the eu referendum. what we a seeing is a third quarter net reduction in the migration figures, but it shows we cannot and will not be complacent about working towards that long term aim and desire that we outlined to people across the country that we want to see net migration fall to sustainable levels. we'll hear from a polish businessman based in the uk and we'll get the latest analysis from westminster. the other main stories on bbc news at five: the number of students getting top gcse grades in maths and english has fallen slightly after the introduction of new tougher exams. a 25—year—old woman has been jailed
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for ten years for making a series of false accusations of rape and sexual assault. the husband of a woman knocked down and killed by a speeding cyclist calls for a change to the law to tackle irresponsible and reckless actions. i'm just asking that the law catches up, as it is with technology, as it is with social media, with all of these things, i'm just asking that the law catches up. and tian tian, the uk's only female giant panda, is believed to be pregnant! the due date could be as soon as... this friday. hello and good evening.
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welcome to the bbc news at five. there's been a sharp fall in the number of eu citizens migrating to the uk. net migration, the difference between those entering and leaving the uk, fell 81,000 to 246,000 in the year to march. the office for national statistics said the figures suggest migrants from eastern and central european countries, the so called eu eight nations, have been returning home. despite today's falling figures, the government remains well short of its target of bringing net migration below 100,000. adina campbell reports. could today's new numbers be the early signs of brexit? net migration, the difference between those entering and leaving the uk, fell to 246,000, in the year to march 2017. that's a drop of 81,000 in the previous year. much of that figure is down to net migration of eu citizens falling by 51,000. but despite today's falling figures,
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the government remains well short of its target of bringing net migration below 100,000. since the eu referendum, we've seen falls in net migration for eu citizens and in particular those for eastern european, and that's been driven by emigration of eastern european citizens who are returning for work. the office for national statistics figures show a sharp rise in people from the so—called eu8 countries leaving the uk. but migration experts say the overall net migration figure is still too high. the level is still 250,000 a year. that's a massive number for net migration and that's what's going to drive our population up by half a million every year for the indefinite future. and that means building a city the size of birmingham every two years. this cafe in west london serves
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scandinavian cuisine but advertising for new staff is proving increasingly expensive. it normally costs £200. but that shot up to more than £2,000 this summer. i might not choose london because of brexit and what will happen next year and the year after. they want some form of security and knowledge that they are allowed to stay and work in the country that they are choosing to go to. finding staff here may be difficult, but the government says it wants to get immigration even lower. labour warns, though, that could harm the economy. we want to be clear that we welcome people from around the world and people from all over europe, three million of whom are this country at the moment, contributing to our society, playing an important part in our economy. we need to continue to welcome people. we also need to be clear that when we leave the eu we will have more control of our borders. the nhs, particularly in parts of england, is facing problems of nurse recruitment partly because of
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the reduction in number of eu citizens coming. we have to have stability and migration based on the economic needs of the uk and that's what we're working on. as well as these new migration figures, new data from exit checks at ports and airports has also been released. the data revealed that when it comes to international students, one of the biggest groups of immigrants, the results weren't what some people previously thought. 97% of them left when they finished their courses, and therefore didn't abuse their visas. and to build a clearer picture of this, the government has now announced that it's going to start a new investigation, looking at the impact of international students on the uk's society and economy. the study is expected to be completed by september 2018. adina campbell, bbc news. 0ur political correspondent emma vardy is at westminster. in political terms... the key thing
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for the government, despite all this it is still off target? the target of getting net migration down to the crimes —— tens of thousands looks impossible. but of course, the way that the reduction of net migration is being interpreted, spun, if you like, it is in different ways. of course the government has said today that it welcomes this reduction in net migration. the office for national statistics has or some cotton, saying it is still too early to see if this is the beginning of a long—term trend, if this is the result of the brexit result. whether
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people feel less welcome? we can only really rely on anecdotal evidence. but the government is keeping that target, remaining committed to try to bring migration down to the tens of thousands. you would ask why have they can target that it to miss? continues it would be more difficult to back away from that and receive the criticism that would come from that rather than keep it as an objective, showing the public that it does want to bring immigration down. after brexit, being able to manage migration from the european union could become easier but we are going to learn more about the government's future proposals when it publishes those $0011. proposals when it publishes those soon. and a world about international students, this has been such a hot topic. interesting to read those statistics, when the bustard majority of international
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stu d e nts bustard majority of international students at the end of the study is either dead legitimate permission to remain, or go home. you would be forgiven for feeling sorry for the students, who have come in for criticism over the years. thank we have got all sorts of estimates of numbers of students overstating visas, abusing the sytem. those are the crimes. but these figures give us some concrete the crimes. but these figures give us some concrete evidence and it flies in the face of that. exit checks now. the government compares the number of students who have come here, and what it shows is that the vast majority, 95%, 97%, will return after visas are over. that takes away some of the political arguments that could have come from groups arguing that students abuse the
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system, arguing that it is some sort of problem here. it really takes the staying away from that. and it also means that the government and theresa may come under more pressure to ta ke theresa may come under more pressure to take foreign students out of the immigration figures. that argument has gone on for some time. an argument to say that foreign stu d e nts argument to say that foreign students bring a lot to the economy, the end to the easier and should not be included in totals. the figures today undoubtedly going to be made that argument, but more pressure on tulisa me to change the stands on foreign students. —— theresa may. and we will be talking more about this story, over the hour. what it all means for businesses up and down the country. the number of teenagers gaining the highest gcse grades has fallen slightly, after exam boards moved to a tougher system.
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for the first time, students in england have been graded from nine to one in english language, english literature and maths, with nine being the top mark. 0ur education correspondent gillian hargreaves reports from sheffield. you know the routine, thejourney, the waiting, the nerves. then the results. i've got into college so i'm all right. i passed everything. pretty good, i'm really proud of myself. in england, a new grading system for gcse english and maths but only a few will achieve grade nine. grade four is compared to an old—style grade c and considered a standard pass, however the government says the new grade five should be considered a strong pass. i've onlyjust passed maths, it's fine, i'm happy with it. in fact some maths papers
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were so challenging in england this year you only needed 18% to pass. the subject content is significantly harder, and some of the old a—level content is in there so some people will take confidence these results are world—class. which is why there have been all of these changes this year. the government wants students such as these to compete with the best the world. we want our young people to be well equipped, to do well in the world of work in a competitive, global economy so it has been necessary. the new grading system has been introduced to draw a distinction between the old gcse and these new, more demanding gcses. but the combination of new and old style exams has caused confusion and led headteachers‘ unions to say the pace of change has been too quick. i think we will look back and say this has been a very distracting process.
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the students we need to focus on are the middle and lower ability students who are easily neglected, and if we focus on the top end we neglect them even further. students here have spent two years getting used to these changes but the next big challenge will be explaining it to those employers who recruit 16—year—olds for apprenticeships. here they take on several 16—year—old apprentices each year but the owner isn't sure how he will be able to work out who has the best qualifications. i think i'm going to be confused. over a period of time obviously we will work it out. the standard pass, i think that would be our borderline. a four. definitely. it is notjust pupils in england who have been picking up results. welsh students have also been finding out how they fared in new, tougher exams.
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in northern ireland, where the system has remained the same, results have risen with one in ten entries being awarded a star. ministers are determined to make gcses harder to end what some see as dumbing down. this year's results are putting those ambitions to the test too. let's talk more about these changes to gcses with robert campbell, executive principal of impington village college. he's in cambridge. hello. good afternoon. what has the run up two best be like? assess the experience for students and staff? it has been a difficult couple of yea rs, it has been a difficult couple of years, especially for staff, getting
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to grips with these new qualifications and the new grading. the comparisons to the old system. teachers generally work best with some degree of certainty and when you have not got comparisons, examples, materials from over the yea rs examples, materials from over the years it can be disconcerting. and inevitably, that is potentially transmitted to the children, who also want to ask, does this work, four orfive? and also want to ask, does this work, four or five? and if also want to ask, does this work, four orfive? and if we do not have significant resources it can be challenging. it has been a difficult period for colleagues at maths and english, but they have done fantastic jobs. schools like english, but they have done fantasticjobs. schools like ours. it has been a real challenge for our collea g u es it has been a real challenge for our colleagues but they have been doing a fantasticjob colleagues but they have been doing a fantastic job under the colleagues but they have been doing a fantasticjob under the pressure of these reforms. just to remain people, the numeric sav only come in
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for three subjects. what is your observation about that? why didn't they change all? has that made any difference? i think it would have been more helpful if you have more change across the system. it would have meant that colleagues weren't working collaboratively —— were working collaboratively —— were working collaboratively, but you have got almost two currencies working. 0ld have got almost two currencies working. old and reformed. it is going to take three years. a lot of the subjects start next year, but still a handful in 2019. three year change programme. that is not good for anybody. you would not change the currency, the road system, why children's education? the currency, the road system, why child ren‘s education? that the currency, the road system, why children's education? that is beyond
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me. you say it is not good for anybody, in the long run you will know the department for education argument, getting british education to the world—class standard. competing with countries storming ahead on a lot of subjects. we have got to maintain the competitive edge? long—term, do you think we are going to have benefits? i appreciate it is difficult just going to have benefits? i appreciate it is difficultjust now, but longer term? any system that raises expectations and challenges is great. no head, school, academy... not going to say we want to raise expectations. staff have made changes. going through the long process of staff development and training. all that has had to place within existing budgets. we want to
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make the system world—class, but in this properly, invest in teaching and fundamentally, teachers. and the staff who support. that means, do not go about this cheaply, in a rushed and or disorganised fashion. everything not changing in one neat way. that is what i would say to anybody running the system, make these changes and we will support you but resource properly. thank you. it has been a busy day for you, iam sure. this is bbc news at five. the headlines: net migration to the uk falls by a quarter, to 246,000 a year. it's at its lowest level for three years. it follows a surge in eu nationals leaving the uk in the year to march.
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the number of students getting top gcse grades in maths and english has fallen slightly, after the introduction of new tougher exams. the husband of a woman who was knocked down and killed by a cyclist calls for a change to the law to tackle "irresponsible and reckless" actions. in sport... supporters have been treating wayne rooney disgracefully, thatis treating wayne rooney disgracefully, that is the verdict of former team—mate rio ferdinand. he thinks his former team—mate is correct to retire from international football. ibrahimovic will wear number ten for manchester united next season. he scored 28 times last season. and mo farah getting ready for the final farewell on the track in zurich this
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evening. soon he will be swapping the track for the roads instead. thank you. and we can talk more about the main story, the reduction in net migration and what the statistics have been showing us, it seems to be an outflux of people from eastern and central european countries. it is in that period, the yearup to march, countries. it is in that period, the year up to march, something of an exodus. we can go to salford. 0ne man who has lived here for many yea rs. man who has lived here for many years. but originally from poland. you have lived here for 12 years. you have lived here for 12 years. you have lived here for 12 years. you have your own business. the
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business networking club as well. when you hear these figures... an apparent surge in people leaving... does not reflect your personal experience? —— does that. does not reflect your personal experience? -- does that. a lot of polish people and immigrants leaving, even within my family and friends circles. people have decided to leave the united kingdom after many years of living and working. this is happening. various reasons. 0ne this is happening. various reasons. one is the value of the pound. also, the legal uncertainty regarding brexit. and many polish and other immigrants do not feel welcome any
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more. i think that this won't i have heard from people here in manchester and the united kingdom. when you say that people do not feel welcome, have they had actual negative, bad experiences? 0r have they had actual negative, bad experiences? or they have they had actual negative, bad experiences? 0r theyjust have they had actual negative, bad experiences? or they just feel something, somehow has changed in this country? many things. after the referendum, loads of polish and other migrants had comments from people who before were not mentioning anything. because of the referendum and brexit, they felt more encouraged to scrap political correctness, and seaport they had been thinking before. that immigration is a bad thing and migrants had been stealing jobs.
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this is what has changed. and also the legal uncertainty. that is a main reason. although the government has said that is a priority issue, and the european union has said it isa and the european union has said it is a priority issue, we do not know. if more and more people continue, why in fact... are you happy to stay? we hope you are. but what has made you want to continue?” stay? we hope you are. but what has made you want to continue? i am actually employed by a law firm. running a cross cultural network. my whole career and education has been in the united kingdom. i have never worked in poland! i would imagine i am going to be staying here, for
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sure. most of my friends and family are in the united kingdom. people like me who are settled ideas would stay. and many members of the business organisation, they are going to stay and carry on contributing to the british economy. i suspect that many people will leave because of the reasons i mentioned before. but the ones that are settled, contributing the most, they will stay and help the british economy to rise again after brexit. meeting that certainty, people could be from a variety of countries... people work, pay taxes... people like that have got to know where they stand ? like that have got to know where they stand? of course. if you want to plan for the future of your
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children, the financials, you need to know for sure what the status is going to be in the united kingdom. i think it is the most important thing, to get this across as soon as possible. just reassure the migrants that they are welcome, can stay, and can't keep on contributing. that they are welcome, can stay, and can't keep on contributingm that they are welcome, can stay, and can't keep on contributing. it has been good to talk to you. thank you for speaking to us. and more to come on that story, again, after half past. we will be talking to one of the leading campaigners for brexit. we will be getting his teeth on those figures. —— take. we can take a look at another main story. a woman who made a series of false allegations about rape and sexual assault has been sentenced to ten years in prison. 25—year—old jemma beale made accusations against 15 men over
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a period of four years. joining me now from southwark crown court is our correspondent, sarah corker. you have been following this case. explain more about what has been happening? the judge described jemma beale as an attention seeker, who enjoyed being seen as a victim. 0ne man went to prison for more than two yea rs man went to prison for more than two years because of these fake allegations, and the stories began backin allegations, and the stories began back in 2010. in total, false allegations against 15 men for rate and assault. she said she was a lesbian. and had no interest in sleeping with men. thejudge said
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that she was an extremely convincing liar, it had been an enormous waste of public time and money. i spoke to the lead police officer. of public time and money. i spoke to the lead police officerlj of public time and money. i spoke to the lead police officer. i think it is an appropriate sentence, considering the criminality that jemma beale has been involved with. she has destroyed several lives. cost the taxpayer a significant amount of money, through investigating these matters. and it has impacted on the criminaljustice system. people's faith in it. it actually cost the metropolitan police a quarter of £1 million, and more than 6000 man hours. thejudge said that this case was so serious, because it was a risk that it could deter victims in the future from coming forward. that guilty men could go free. he also said that
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those who had been accused byjemma beale would have to live with those allegations for the rest of their lives. he also asked whyjemma beale had made these allegations. he said thatjemma had made these allegations. he said that jemma beale was had made these allegations. he said thatjemma beale was rates as a child. that had played an important pa rt child. that had played an important part of our behaviour. she will serve half of the sentence before being released on licence. the widower of the woman who died after she was knocked over by a cyclist riding a bike without front brakes is launching a campaign to change the law. yesterday, 20—year—old charlie alliston was convicted of wanton and furious driving, an offence dating back to 1861, but was cleared of manslaughter, following the death of kim briggs. her husband, matthew, is calling for the creation of new offences such as death by dangerous cycling. he's been speaking to our correspondent, dan johnson. she had this mantra of make everyday count. enormous believer in filling life
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with experiences, with travel. she was always happy, always willing to help people, always willing to lend an ear. yeah, she was just fantastic. kim briggs, a wife and a mother who was hit by a bike. she suffered serious head injuries and died a week later. that bike should never have been on the road. it was designed for the velodrome. fixed gear and with no front brake. riding it was charlie alliston, in the middle. clea red yesterday of manslaughter, but convicted under a law from victorian times of causing bodily harm by wanton or furious driving. kim briggs‘ family welcomed the verdict but they are calling for the law to be changed. more and more people cycling which is a really good thing, but the law is outdated. it refers back to 1861 and i'm just asking that the law catches up,
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as it is doing with technology, with social media, with all of these things. i'm just asking that the law catches up. this case raises some broader issues about how cyclists and pedestrians share the same space but the key question is how much responsibility should cyclists have for safety on the road. should that responsibility be at the same level of car drivers? questions that have prompted plenty of debate, especially amongst cyclists. you regularly see bikes that are not fit for the road basically and shouldn't be out on the road, bikes with three wheels that have brakes that don't work, that are more dangerous than a fixed wheel without brakes. especially now pedestrians have a phone with them, on the head, they are looking up the phone, so they are really distracted. a responsility to travel on the roads someone's causing death by dangerous cycling, why should it be different from causing death by dangerous driving?
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cycling groups aren't opposed to a review, but there are calls for all traffic laws to be brought up to date. the problem we have got is there's a stack of offences in relation to the conduct of people on the roads, where we use careless, reckless, furious, wanton, dangerous, and there's a huge inconsistency of people's perception of what these are, what the consequence should be, and the whole issue needs to be looked at in a holistic review of all matters. i'm doing this to honour her. it's not an easy thing to do, to put myself out there when we've been quite a private family up until now, but it comes back to my earlier point that sometimes you have to just do the right thing and it occurs to me that this is the right thing to do and, yes, i'm doing it in kim's name, but i'm also doing it to ensure that just perhaps we can stop this happening again.
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0ur streets are getting busier, with the potential for more conflict. it's a not easily solved. we will pause to catch up for the weather. we are looking at another similar day tomorrow. we have an area of low pressure in the north west, bringing outbreaks of rain as we move through the next few days. and a dry spell of whether further south thanks to high pressure that has when sitting there. as we go through tonight, more showers and consistent training to scotland and the far north—west of england. for wealth and central and southern england, clearer skies and it will stay largely dry, and some mist and
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fog over night, loads of 12—14d. tomorrow, a bright start to the day with some sunshine berthing, cloud tending to bubble up in central england and wales. 0utbreaks tending to bubble up in central england and wales. outbreaks of rain in northern ireland and scotland, persistent at times, edging towards the south—east and into the north of england. 0ne the south—east and into the north of england. one or two showers, temperatures reaching maximum of 25 degrees in the south east, it will feel warm in the sunshine. this is bbc news at 5pm — the headlines. net migration to the uk falls by a quarter — to 246,000 a year —the lowest level for three years. it follows a surge in eu nationals leaving the uk since the brexit vote. what we a seeing is a third quarter net reduction in the migration figures but it also highlights how
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we cannot and will not be complacent about working towards that long term aim and desire that we outlined to people across the country that we want to see migration fall to sustainable levels. the number of students getting top gcse grades in maths and english has fallen slightly, after the introduction of new tougher exams. a 25—year—old woman has been jailed for ten years for making a series of false accusations of rape and sexual assault. the husband of a woman who was knocked down and killed by a cyclist calls for a change to the law to tackle "irresponsible and reckless" behaviour. we will talk more about migration among other things but first let's catch up with the sports news. good
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afternoon. one of wayne rooney's former international and club team—mates — rio ferdinand — has criticised those fans who don't think the striker should go down as one of the all—time great england players. rooney retired from international football yesterday, bowing out as the three lions‘ leading goal—scorer, although england manager gareth southgate was looking to call rooney up for the world cup qualifiers. i travelled around with him all over the world with england and manchester united and he was adored wherever we went, wherever we touched down, they loved him. come back to england, though like this, it‘s a joke, it happens too often, he will be appreciated more in a few yea rs he will be appreciated more in a few years when he retired from bubble, whenever that may be.|j years when he retired from bubble, whenever that may be. i was thinking about including him in the squad. his form has been excellent. i thought there was a role for him in the squad, but by the same token we understand his rationale, and it is a good moment to recognise
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what an outstanding player he has been for england. i have seen some debate about whether he is a legend or not. if you are the most capped outfield player and the record goal—scorer, i'm not sure what else you have to do to be a legend, so he has been somebody who has served england brilliantly. well, in his squad southgate has given a first call—up to leicester city‘s harry maguire, whojoined from hull for £17 million in the summer. there‘s a recall for arsenal‘s danny wellbeck, but adam lallana misses out through injury. also getting his first chance at the senior level is watford‘s nathaniel chalobah who moved from chelsea in this transfer window. there‘s good news for manchester united fans this afternoon. zlatan ibrahimovic says he‘s "back to finish what he started." the swede has signed a new one year deal to stay at old trafford having scored 28 times in 46 appearances in his first season with the club. he‘s unlikely to return until the turn of the year, following the serious knee injury that saw him miss the club‘s europa league win back in may. will alexis sanchez be signing
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a new deal with arsenal? that question still lingers. buy he could make a comeback this sunday when they face liverpool at anfield. manager arsene wenger says last season‘s top scorer is available after injury at the end of last season... he works very hard, very focused, and gives absolutely everything, it‘s difficult to stop him. he looks ready. he has not played for a long time, so i will have to decide what i do with him, but he‘s ready to play. another man back in action is team sky‘s geraint thomas — he‘ll return to cycling for the tour of britain next month, with team—mate 0wain doole also set to compete. thomas was sitting second overall in the tour de france when he broke his collarbone in a fall at last month‘s race. the tour of britain starts in edinburgh in september and will finish in his home city of cardiff.
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well one of great britain‘s most well respected athletes, sir mo farah, is getting ready for his farewell on the track in zurich tonight. his incredible career has seen him win total of ten world championship and olympic gold medals. but this won‘t be the last we see of him, as he switches his focus to marathon running instead. no matter who you are, you‘ve got to fight for it. and yeah, medals that i‘ve won doesn‘t take me to the line. i got go in there fresh, there‘s going to be new guys and they run a lot faster than me. so it‘s about starting slowly, how i get to them, what do i need to learn from them, what does it take? happening right now is the champions league draw, six british clubs finding out where they will play. details about at 6:30pm. you can
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follow all of our sports alloys on our website. —— sports stories. the battle for raqqa has entered its final stage. amnesty says hundreds have been killed sincejune alone when the offensive began to reca ptu re when the offensive began to recapture raqqa, the stronghold of so—called islamic state. 0ur correspondent is in harm. the report is heartbreaking. and also chilling. it is set in the context in what is believed to be the last of the final battles to destroy the so—called caliphate of the islamic islamic state in syria. raqqa was their capital. as the raw intensifies into raqqa, into a habit leads to
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limerick are heavily populated neighbourhoods, civilians are cats —— civilians are trapped. is does not want the civilians to leave but wedding does manage to escape, is coming underfire wedding does manage to escape, is coming under fire from the wedding does manage to escape, is coming underfire from the us led air stroke which has killed hundreds of civilians. the amnesty report is a cry for protection. even in war there are rules, and those rules are being absolutely shattered day in, day out, here. tell us more about the situation in harm ‘s you are? viewers may remember homs from the early years of berlocq rising in syria, it was called the capital of their revolution. it was the centre of the first peaceful process against bashar al—assad‘s rule and saw some of the worst fighting. but now it is a quiet city, there are
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corners where you could be forgiven for thinking there was no war. swimming pools full of children in summer swimming pools full of children in summer breaks, families sitting in the parks, but look behind me, you may not see the details that this is the skyline of a city which has been absolutely torn apart. there are neighbourhoods in homs were not a single building has been that standing. the saab scenes of the first or second world war. it is calm but still a city with deep wounds. both will take a very long time to heal. a few other stories making the news here tonight. eight people are missing following a landslide that forced the evacuation of dozens of villages in south—eastern switzerland. roads were blocked and many buildings were damaged. rescue work is continuing to try to find the missing people. danish prosecutors investigating the death of a swedish journalist, kim wall, who disappeared
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during a submarine trip, say they will seek a murder charge against the vessel‘s owner and creator, peter madsen. kim wall‘s headless body was found off the danish coast earlier this week. dutch police have arrested a man after a rock concert in rotterdam had to be cancelled because of a terror alert. the man was detained in the early hours of the morning after a tip—off from spanish police. it‘s not clear whether there is any link to the attacks in catalonia last week that killed 15 people. more now on our top story this evening — the sharp fall in the number of eu citizens moving to the uk. net migration — the difference between those entering and leaving the uk — fell 81,000 to 246,000 in the year to march. it‘s thought the fall is largely driven by a drop in the number of arrivals from central and eastern europe.
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let‘s talk to our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani. he has been looking through all the figures. people arriving or leaving. what we are trying to get to the bottom of, is the reasons behind all of that? what are the figures telling us? these figures are fascinating because we have this real insight into what is happening with the life journeys, these migrant earnings, people from eastern and central europe. i will spare you some statistics, this is gcse maths there but we don‘t want to go third, the key thing is the bigjump in the to go third, the key thing is the big jump in the number of eastern european is leaving the uk. although some are still coming, that has been a significant increase in those that wa nt to a significant increase in those that want to leave as well. 46,000 in a year till march of this year. that isa year till march of this year. that is a quite significantjump. within that, one of the biggest components will be polish workers, there are about 1 will be polish workers, there are about1 million will be polish workers, there are about 1 million polish will be polish workers, there are about1 million polish citizens
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living in the uk, they are the largest group. it also seven nations within that. and departures by romanians, bulgarians as well. why they are going, this is quite an interesting figure. those lots of speculation of a brexit chilling effects, people uncertain about their features. people say it is also a financial decision. the pound has fallen and weakened. be polish worker sending a pound backhand could buy six polish zlotys on the youth of the referendum. now it is 4.6. for many workers, it isn‘t worth it any more. dominic, thank you. talking about the key elements of this today. john mills is the founder and chairman oijl, a consumer goods company. he is also chairman of labour leave, and has been a strong voice in support of the uk leaving the eu. good evening. what goes through your
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mind when you hear those figures, what do you make of it? 240,000 people coming here is still quite a big number. 0bviously people coming here is still quite a big number. obviously it has gone down from here and 30,000 last year so there is a full. —— but this is a good thing. one problem with the british economy is we have had so many people from eastern europe who are prepared to work hard, and well, for relatively low wages has been a real discouragement for british industry. investment levels are terribly low. to some extent, having a reduction in people coming from eastern europe will be a help to the economy. the cbi eastern europe will be a help to the economy. the (b! said this is worrying, the figures showed a loss of vital skills, a manufacturer organisation save manufacturers are struggling like never before to recruit and retain the workers they need. business say we are not happy
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about today‘s figures provided if you have pretty full employment like we‘ve got you will always have some problems getting people. part of this is a weight problem, the wages are relatively low and he would get british people applying. —— a weight problem. the problem with getting large number of people coming in from eastern europe it has made it difficult to recruit british—born people. we are looking at pictures now of fruit picking, agricultural work, that is a key sector that brings in people every summer in particular from other countries? but how many times have we heard from farmers safe they cannot get indigenous in this people to apply for thejob ‘s? indigenous in this people to apply for the job ‘s? i indigenous in this people to apply for thejob ‘s? i have heard cou ntless for thejob ‘s? i have heard countless agricultural sector people say that that they can‘t get the application. the wages are low, the
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work as hard and is not attractive for british people who have alternatives, a social security that pays better. how will farmers put those wages up? i think they should. it will make it more expensive. is that what we‘re talking about? at if strawberries cost more, it‘s a reasonable price for getting the work done. we will not get real wages up unless we get productivity up wages up unless we get productivity up and we might get productivity up u nless we up and we might get productivity up unless we invest more in labour—saving machinery. that is not the conversation we are having in this country at the moment. the agricultural side is one thing, you are saying labour—saving machinery. when eee f say manufacturers cannot find the right people, is your contention that once britain has finally completely left the eu, things. to change, that these companies will invest?” things. to change, that these companies will invest? i hope they will do. it is partly a question of
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what wages are paid and a question of training. another romp in this country is we don‘t train people adequately forjobs country is we don‘t train people adequately for jobs available —— another problem in this country. it is but this do with rotational training but we don‘t do it. if we don‘t get people trained, we might get productivity up and we won‘t get real wage increases. do you think the government gets that? that training has to start now, doesn‘t it, to filter through? i think it does. you talk about numbers, there are3 does. you talk about numbers, there are 3 million people coming from the eu living in this company leg you are not talking about a massive number. but you are right. we need to start doing more training and better vocational training in particular now. just a final thought because i interviewed a gentleman
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from poland earlier in the hour that has run business here and business networking groups for a long time in this country, he says anecdotally he knows people who are leaving now since lastjune, because almost from an emotional perspective, they do not feel welcome any more, they think this country doesn‘t want. it is sometimes the reason for leaving, does that concern lukas lacko if it was true, and a bigger scale, it wouldn‘t, but i don‘t is think so. why are two one of the big success of this country particularly in london, is to have integration better than has been accomplished in other places in europe and we should be proud of that. john mills, thank you. the headlines: net migration
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to the uk falls by a quarter — to 246,000 a year. it‘s at its lowest level for three years. it follows a surge in eu nationals leaving the uk since lastjune‘s brexit vote. the number of students getting top gcse grades in maths and english has fallen slightly — after the introduction of new tougher exams. and the husband of a woman who was knocked down and killed by a cyclist called for a change in the law to tackle irresponsible and reckless behaviour. an update on the market numbers for you — here‘s how london‘s and frankfurt ended the day. and in the the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. this more than six million adults in england fail to have a brisk ten minute walk even once a month. that‘s a finding from public health england which has launched a campaign to encourage the practice, particularly among people who are middle aged — the public health body says walking can help prevent cancer, heart disease and poor mental health. our health correspondent
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dominic hughes has more. in denton, in manchester, the first steps towards a healthier lifestyle. this walking group is starting slowly, but already some members are feeling the benefits of a regular stroll. i‘ve lost about four stone. have you? yeah. four stone, wow. gone down from virtually 25 to 21. that‘s impressive. so it does help. it's got me out, it's got me getting some exercise. and it's company as well, because i live on my own so that helps a lot. this is week two for me, i'm a newbie. and i decided when i retired that i wanted to do lots of different things. and i've done lots of things to keep the mind going, but not a lot to keep the body going. the beauty of walking is, of course, it‘s free. you don‘t need any special training or indeed any special kit. but health experts say doing just ten minutes of brisk walking every day, well, that can have a really positive impact on your health.
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0ur lifestyles have changed. compared to the 1960s, we are now 20% less active. and each year we walk 15 miles less than we did just two decades ago. physical inactivity amongst adults contributes to one in six deaths in the uk. it is estimated to cost the nhs nearly £1 billion a year. but a brisk walk ofjust ten minutes each day can reduce the risk of early death by 15%. gp doctor, zoe williams, advises her patients that it‘s walking at a good pace, around three miles an hour, that is the key. practising what she preaches, she uses a smartphone app to measure her own progress. but according to a public health england survey of our exercise habits, millions of adults are missing out. four in ten adults between the ages of 40 and 60 are not managing to achieve ten minutes of brisk walking per month. which sounds unbelievable.
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lots of those people will be walking, but they are not walking at a brisk pace. and it‘s important to walk briskly because that‘s when you start to get the health benefits. but for many of us it‘s finding the time in an already busy day. i drive to work and it is timing really, trying to find the time. generally i would rather drive than walk because i need to get there in a hurry. so generally not, no. not every day, we probably do about one and a half miles twice a day and about one mile in the middle of that. you can always make time. is 0ne less cake, one more walk! walking can help with weight loss, back pain, long—term conditions like diabetes, and even reducing the risk of cancer. now we are all being urged to get up and get moving. dominic hughes, bbc news. an as—yet unnamed woman has
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become america‘s biggest ever lottery winner, scooping a prize of more scooping a prize of more than $758 million. the powerball draw took place last night, with the jackpot going to a middle—aged customer who bought the ticket at a petrol station in the town of chicopee, massachusetts. officials say she‘ll be named in the next few minutes. that as much as i can tell you, i‘m afraid, that‘s an awful lot of money for one person to win. let‘s had to edinburgh. edinburgh zoo has announced that tian tian, the uk‘s only female giant panda,
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is believed to be pregnant. a spokesperson for the zoo said it was hard to predict a specific date for any cub, but that the breeding season can last until late september. her keepers say she is being closely monitored. tian tian has been pregnant several times before , but has never given birth to a live cub. 0ur correspondentjames shaw is in edinburgh this is difficult to predict what‘s going on? the difficulty is they tend not to know for sure if a female panda is pregnant. artificial insemination has happened and there are other signs to suggest there is are other signs to suggest there is a viable pregnancy at the moment. co nsulta nt a viable pregnancy at the moment. consultant records, we have covered this story many times in the path back to 2011 when the pandas arrived in edinburgh. i think she has been pregnant for times in the past and has not given birth to a live cup. of course, they have two be hopeful at the zoo, and the fans of the
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panda have to be hopeful as well. but there are no guarantees. my knowledge of pandas is limited apart from the images here, but one imagines given the delicacies you outlined there, she is being watched night and a? i think that is true. in the past, we have found out she has been pregnant early on and that has been pregnant early on and that has led to speculation and covered by the media. but the zoo preferred to keep things quiet. she is kept away from the public and distractions, the chances of a live birth is enquiries. it was surprising to discover that tian tian is possibly pregnant. but as you say, it could take some time to find out if it is successful or if it is aborted. if it is possible to be absorbed their own yarn during
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pregnancy, so no one could predict what is going to happen. it may be days or weeks before we find that actually whether there is this chance of a first life panda berth in the uk. 0k, chance of a first life panda berth in the uk. ok, so you and i may be talking in the weeks to come, quite a few weeks possibly, thank you for now. keep an eye on that story. more coming up on all today‘s news from 6pm, we will leave you with a look at the weather. hello. we have seen some good spells of sunshine, the further south and east you are, but further north and west is an area of low pressure which is bringing outbreaks are framed in the next few days. slowly edging eastwards and it will mean that the rest of the brightness is further south and east. we have seen showers in northern ireland, this
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photo sent in by a watcher in antrim. this photo was sent in from twickenham. some brightness there. we have seen more in the way of brightness, particularly further south and east you are. some showers in northern england and scotland, the majority of those outbreaks have beenin the majority of those outbreaks have been in northern ireland. as he moved through tonight, will see outbreaks of rain, quite persistent in scotland and west england, the clearer skies in rest of england and wales, and patches of mist and fog with overnight layers of 12—4dc. a bright start tomorrow in the south—east, a similar setup to today. it will look fairly similar, some showery outbreaks, with persistent rain pushing into northern ireland, scotland and the far north of england. some brightness around first thing in the south—east but we will tend to receive cloud bubbling up, largely
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dry for wales and central southern england. here we are at four o‘clock, we have more persistent outbreaks of rain further west, tempered in scotland a maximum of 17-18d. in the tempered in scotland a maximum of 17—18d. in the north, one or two showers, becoming drierfurther south, more cloud across wales and south west but brighter. further south—east are some good spells of sunshine. a touch warmer today with temperatures up to 24—25d. into saturday, the area of low pressure edging eastwards, some showers to look in the north, a fairly cloudy start, we will see some bright intervals in the south. for sunday, we will see a few showers again. they could edge into the midlands but staying largely dry further south, their next area of low pressure is coming in, the isobars are squeezing. at the beginning of next week, it will be a fairly
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breezy day. a bank holiday for some of us, with some outbreaks of rain, particularly further north, but looks largely dry in the south. looking out for the best of the brightness in the far south—east in the next few days. tonight at six, new migration figures set off a debate about the effects of the brexit vote. net migration to the uk falls to the lowest level for three years. and there‘s a surge in the number of eu nationals leaving — many feel they‘re no longer earning enough in pounds. sterling is going down, you know? we want to go there because we can find good jobs for the same money. we‘ll have a close look at what‘s driving these migration changes. also tonight... a slight fall in gcse pass rates. in england these were the first students to take new, tougher exams. kim briggs died after she was hit by a cyclist — now her husband calls for new laws to tackle reckless riders.
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i‘m doing it in kim‘s name, but i‘m also doing it to ensure that, just perhaps, we can stop this happening again.

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