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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 25, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello. this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. convoys of lorries controlled by a single driver will be tested on roads in england up to three trucks linked by wifi will be tried out next year. major travel disruptions on the railways. passengers are warned to expect delays of services on much of the network, which have been cancelled or restricted. good morning. it's friday the 25th of august. also this morning: convoys of lorries controlled by a single driver will be tested on roads in england. the planning controversy that's getting alan titchmarsh worried. this and magnolias, they will all go. we're live at these historic gardens, where proposals for a safer motorway junction could mean the removal of hundreds of trees.
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good morning from the future, or at least, the home of the future. i am looking at how top tech could be changing the way we look at our lives. mo farah wins the final track race of his career. britain's most successful athlete sprinted to victory in the 5,000 metres in zurich, bringing to an end his incredible track career. and matt's by the seaside with the forecast. good morning. good morning. iam in whitby all morning. bank holiday weekend. the sun is up. heavy rain today in northern ireland and western scotland. i have the full bank holiday weekend forecast coming up. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. major travel disruption is expected over the weekend as millions prepare for the bank holiday getaway amid engineering works on some of the country's busiest rail routes. 0perators have warned passengers to expect delays, as services between london,
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the north—west and scotland are cancelled and five of london's biggest stations face disruption. keith doyle is at london euston station, which will close for two days tomorrow. how will travellers be affected this weekend? what kind of disruption will we have? good morning. it will be a busy day. but tomorrow and sunday, this station will be completely closed, meaning no west coast services from scotland, birmingham, into london, or out again. there is lots of disruption and other key stations in london and across the uk. network rail is using this holiday period to carry out significant work on major rail projects. 70,000 engineering staff will be working on the railways over this holiday weekend. they say it will be good for passengers in the end, but for many wanting to travel
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this weekend, well, it could be very difficult indeed. travelling by train this bank holiday weekend will be difficult for many, and some journeys will be impossible. engineering work is taking place at five of london's main stations. they will have greatly reduced services. euston will be close completely on saturday and sunday at the work on hs2 means no trains from scotland and the north of england to london on the west coast mainline on saturday and sunday. services from the midlands will only go as far south as rockhampton. great western services out of paddington to wales will be disrupted until next month with no services between newport and cardiff this weekend. king's cross station in london is expected to be very busy, and it won'tjust be the stations. road traffic is expected to be 20% greater compared to last
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yea r‘s to be 20% greater compared to last year's summer bank holiday. 5 million people will go to the roads on monday alone. nearly a quarter of the million passengers will use heathrow today, and over 300,000 will use gatwick over the weekend. so whether it is planes, trains, or automobiles, it will be a busy few days. i mentioned some of the main closures and disruptions. but so many things are happening that you should check out the advice and perhaps don't travel. the nottingham carnival is on this weekend. the rugby league final with the warriors. many premier league games that usually have supporters using
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those routes. the company says this is essential and will transform train travel for years to come up be they say it is the best time to carry out this work. people are asking why it has to take place over the same weekend. i am sorry to say the same weekend. i am sorry to say the roads will be busy as well. 18 million journeys expected this weekend. some of the major roadworks have been cleared the eu is congestion, but there will still be a problem. —— to ease. i am sorry, not much good news. thank you. south wales police missed a number of opportunities to bring convicted paedophile, ian watkins, tojustice sooner, an investigation by the police watchdog has found. the independent police complaints commission says that from 2008, the force failed to act on allegations made by seven people about the then lead singer of the "lost prophets." radical action is needed to help integrate immigrants into society, according to a group of mps.
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in a new report, the all—party—parliamentary group on "social integration" warns that the immigration debate has become polarised. it's renewing calls for the government to make english lessons compulsory. the home office says it already funds community cohesion projects, including some focused on language. we will be speaking to the chair of the group, chuka umunna, atabout 7:10. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has told libyan politicians that they should learn from theresa may's mistake and avoid holding elections before they are ready. during a two—day visit to libya, mrjohnson urged all sides to compromise, in an attempt to unite their divided country. the uk has pledged £9 million to help tackle people trafficking and terrorism in the country. we have been encouraging them and telling them about politics, telling them about what it takes to fight an election, warning them about some of the pitfalls of calling elections
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too soon for instance, one of the risks they face here because they have not got their ducks lined up properly. but i am encouraged genuinely by what i have seen over the last 48 hours. there is the chance for a political deal that could lead to a successful election. texas is bracing itself for hurricane harvey, which could be the worst storm to hit the us mainland in 12 years. the category 3 storm is expected to make landfall along the state's central coast tonight. there are concerns that torrential rain could bring life—threatening flooding to some parts. plans to test convoys of lorries, controlled byjust one driver, are to be carried out on major british roads by the end of next year as part of a plan to cut emissions and reduce congestion. the department of transport says up to three wirelessly connected hgvs will travel together, with drivers in each to steer and the speed controlled
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by the lead vehicle. but the aa says it has major safety concerns about the idea as our correspondent, andy gill, reports. they call it platooning trucks, driven by wi—fi with much less space between them than normal. this dutch project uses two vehicles. the trial announced here will use three. project uses two vehicles. the trial announced here will use threem will take up less space on the network and improve efficiency and pass on the savings to the consumer. each lorry has a driver, but the main cab has control. to think about how three could travel down a road ina row, how three could travel down a road in a row, imagine the lead truck is a giant wi—fi hub, sending out signals of the distances and speeds the other two need to travel at. the wi—fi on the trailing two trucks can
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react much more quickly to signals than a react much more quickly to signals thana human react much more quickly to signals than a human being can. the funding announcement was made at a lancashire truck factory. they said vehicles in platoon irony chuggers slipstream so fuel consumption falls. but one road using body is sceptical. uk motorways are the most congested in europe. we have more entrances and exits. having a platoon of trucks will be difficult to see the road signs and exit. there will be rigourous safety checks before any are allowed on the road. then they will compare real delivery journeys made road. then they will compare real deliveryjourneys made by platoon trucks with ones made in the traditional way. bbc news, lancashire. us officials say that the number of american embassy staff affected
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by hearing loss while working in cuba has risen to at least sixteen, after what they believe were a series deliberate covert attacks. the state department is probing several incidents dating back to september last year in which diplomats are thought to have been hit with a mystery sonic weapon. cuba has denied any involvement. it's a figure too big to comprehend. $758] million. it is too big to say as well. but one 53—year—old healthcare worker from massachusetts has beaten all the odds to win the biggest single jackpot in american history in the us powerball. mavis won—zik, a mum of two from chicopee, came forward yesterday to collect her lottery prize, telling reporters that she had already quit herjob. her chances of winning were just one in 292 million. firstly, i want to just sit back and relax. i had a pipedream. it came true. wanted to retire. it came
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early. where do you were? a medical centre. i was there for 22 years. do yourfamily know? centre. i was there for 22 years. do your family know? well, i have called my boss and told them i am not going back. not going back. that is amazing. she should change her name to wons it. i liked it. how are you? talking about people who have won things. he could change his name as well. she can do whatever she wants, because she has the money. as well. she can do whatever she wants, because she has the moneylj am sorry, wants, because she has the moneylj am sorry, i am distracting you. a familiar celebration. we will not see it any more, especially on the track. it has been a long by which
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we saw at the world championships. the final race on british soil. the final one is in zurich. i don't mind stretching out that goodbye. he deserves it. mo farah's final race on the track finishes with victory, but only just. he won the 5,000 metres in the diamond league byjust four hundredths of a second. have a look at that. a very tight one. he beat the man who beat him in the same event at the world championship. getting his own back. this is how you justify a four to £5 million pricetag. —— £115 million. everton are through to the europa league group stage thanks to this amazing goal from new signing gylfi sigurdsson. they beat hadjuk split 3—1 overall in their playoff. and don't the fans enjoy that one. tottenham will face the champions league holders real madrid in the group stage of this season's competition.
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spurs were drawn in the same group as the spanish champions while chelsea are alongside atletico madrid and roma. and it's a big day forjoe root. the england captain will lead the side out for the second test against west indies at headingley, his home ground. that is the stuff of boyhood dreams. iam sure that is the stuff of boyhood dreams. i am sure he wants to follow that up on home ground. would you like to see a lovely sunrise? yes. well, the weather. matt's beside the seaside in whitby this morning with the weather. why don't you step aside, we can watch that? we were talking about that, leave the camera on that all morning, we will go home and have a coffee. glorious start in whitby this morning, beautiful sunrise. nice and dry. bolellli count, we will be here all morning, but they
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make their deckchairs on the big side. 0ut more about that through the programme andi 0ut more about that through the programme and i will try to get myself up there as well at some point. let's crack on with the forecast, a few in the deckchairs this weekend. bank holiday for many and there is some sunshine in the forecast and quite a bit of dry weather but this morning while we have sunshine for many parts, there is some rain to come, especially in scotla nd is some rain to come, especially in scotland and northern ireland. starting in scotland, a scattering of showers this morning with the odd heavy one and they will get heavier through the day and more widespread but not everyone seeing them this morning, some staying dry. a dry start in northern england with broken cloud, like here in whitby, sunny spells and the cloud will thicken up later but further south to the midlands, east anglia and
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southern england, light winds with a cool start and mist and fog patches and temperatures in single figures but soon warming up under the light winds and sunshine overhead. that sunshine extends across much of central, southern england and through a good part of wales too. cloud in northern ireland. a lot of rain in northern ireland this week and there's the risk of minor flooding here through the day because still some heavy bursts of rain at times. longer spells of rain possible and that will affect western parts of scotland through the day. i don't think anyone plays will be wet all day long. you should get to see some drier and brighter moments but these are the areas that will see some of the wettest conditions and heavy and thundery conditions and heavy and thundery conditions in scotland, especially the north and east later. temperatures in the breeze in the mid—to—high teens at best in the north, further south, mid 20s, pleasa nt north, further south, mid 20s, pleasant day in store. this evening and overnight we will see showers to end the day in northern england as the cloud thickens, they will come
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and go through the night. still outbreaks of rain in scotland and northern ireland, easing from the west gradually but some stay wet in the morning. temperatures holding up more than last night given the fact there will be slightly more breeze and a bit more cloud, especially further south. into the bank holiday weekend. saturday, a story of sunshine and a few showers. eder today for northern ireland and western scotland and heavy downpours in eastern scotland —— a dry day. most of you will avoid the showers altogether on saturday and feeling warm in the sunshine that further south you are. as we go into sunday, we continue with the largely dry story. almost uk wide. most places will be dry. cloud amounts will vary quite a bit from one place to the next and through the day but still sunshine breaking through in many areas and feeling warm in the sunshine. 0n the bank holiday, england and wales will see sunshine and increasing warmth, especially in
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the south, could hit 27 or 28. scotla nd the south, could hit 27 or 28. scotland and northern ireland starting bright, dry, wet and windy from the west later with gales in the far west of scotland. for a bank holiday weekend, can't complain, dry and sunny for many and particularly warm in southern areas. more updates through the morning from whitby. i'll see you in half an hour. can you indulge us, you and your camera team, to push the camera away from you so team, to push the camera away from you so we can see team, to push the camera away from you so we can see the sun rise again. go on then. it has gone behind the cloud. there we go, it has not quite the image we were looking for but that looks nice, doesn't. .. looking for but that looks nice, doesn't... more through the morning anyway. there's a lovely view. another view from whitby. wonderful. is it coming and going? no. we have had ourfill, is it coming and going? no. we have had our fill, we've is it coming and going? no. we have had ourfill, we've had enough. let's look at the papers. has it put
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you in the mood for the bank all day weekend? if we get weather like that then we will all be happy! the front pages. facebook is publishing a list of people smugglers and slave trading gangs using facebook to broadcast the abuse and torture of migrants to extort ransom money from theirfamilies. traffickers migrants to extort ransom money from their families. traffickers using videos. an investigation by the times. the picture isjudi dench, at 82 she is saying she loves life but she reveals she has failing eyesight so she reveals she has failing eyesight so she can't read a book any more. sir david attenborough, 91, suggests he is more optimistic now about the future of the planet than ever before, which is nice to think if he is optimistic. the problems on the rail networks over the weekend are dominating our coverage this morning but on the front page of the daily telegraph, the roads, driverless lorries with wi—fi helping them. they have worked
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with convoys on the road and this story is about people using their phones as sat navs, saying drivers risk being banned from the roads according to police chiefs. that's on the front page of the daily mail, the driverless lorries. 0n the front page of the mirror, lots of stations, euston station closed, others too, lots of works across the bank holiday weekend. my attention is drawn to that curious image you have. on the back of the sun, if you're into boxing or not, there's an interesting fight between conor mcgregor and floyd mayweather, some saying it's not a genuine sporting event. it's not a very fair matchup looking at those two pictures! here's his son, to add to the circus thatis here's his son, to add to the circus that is the fight this weekend, his son is wearing a rather snappy suit and some shades. conor mcgregor
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junior. he will grow out of that so quickly! in the way that those big fights do, it has thrown up some bizarre things along the way. and money. floyd mayweather is all about money, he calls himself the money tea m money, he calls himself the money team and by a stepping out into the ring, sponsorship on his shorts will be $25 million alone. we saw the belt yesterday, did you see it, with the diamonds and alligator skin. very vegas. yes it is. where else would you hold it? we will be talking later on. it's one of the busiest motorway junctions in the country with more accidents than any other in england. but plans to improve the m25 atjunction 10 and the a3 wisley interchange could threaten a number of rare trees and plants. highways england says the upgrade will make the both roads safer but campaigners including alan titchmarsh are calling for british gardeners to take a stand. tim muffett is in wisley for us this morning. a glorious location, tim, but there
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is some tension around the place. good morning. good morning. what a fabulous spot this is, the royal horticultural society's garden at wisley in surrey. a beautiful sight but you might be able to hear traffic behind me, that is the a three and it's a very busy road and as you say it is close to a junction with the emperor and the. —— a road three. —— m25 —— a3. here's an explainer about the situation and why some people aren't happy. it's been considered a centre of horticultural excellence for more than a century, but wisley lies close to where the m2 meets the a3. thejunction close to where the m2 meets the a3. the junction is close to where the m2 meets the a3. thejunction is often congested. at peak times it's used... according to highways england it has one of the highest collision rates in the
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country and needs improving. the royal horticultural society says one plan being considered would see the a3 widen. 500 trees would be cut down —— widened. a prospect that has angered some. this is a giant redwood. you've heard of these, massive. 0ver redwood. you've heard of these, massive. over 100 redwood. you've heard of these, massive. 0ver100 years old. 0ne redwood. you've heard of these, massive. 0ver100 years old. one of several down this great strip. this along with rhododendrons, magnolias, comedians would all go. the rhs once highways england to choose another option, one that would have less impact on these historic gardens. let's have a chat with the curator at rhs wisley. how bad would this be potentially in your view? this is a devastating landscape change for wisley and it's part of the surrey countryside, we're talking about a strip of trees that have been here
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for 100 years, they are big redwoods, a huge bank of trees. the trees we see behind me, from their further down all the way along here and down to there would potentially go if the decision doesn't go your way? that's right. three garden areas, our main arboretum, a garden and that alston hill, one of the famous parts of wisley. clearly road expansion is needed, thejunction is dangerous, congested and changes need to be made. changes have an impact, do you accept that? we do and it's important to say the rhs supports the improvement of this road. i tried supports the improvement of this road. itried it supports the improvement of this road. i tried it myself every day, it isn't perfect by any stretch of the imagination —— i drive it. there's an option to widen the m3 that doesn't involve a land grab of this heritage garden. do you think the options available, under consideration by highways england at the moment, do you feel they are working with you as well as they
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should be? they say they are. we discussed an option which was one of their earliest options which was to expand the land to the east of the a3 which doesn't involve the land grab. we don't have the assurances we wa nt grab. we don't have the assurances we want and we need to know this heritage site enjoyed by over1 million people a year will be safe and protected. thanks very much, matthew. later we will talk to a motoring journalist who believes we should take other things into account when making these decisions. highways england have given us a statement, they say they care about the environment and protecting the habitat around wisley isa protecting the habitat around wisley is a priority as it develops proposals for the junction. they say they are working closely with the rhs and they have a proud track record of delivering road improvements that protects and is an times in hance is the environment. two sides of the argument but there is concern here that if the a3 —— and in harnesses the environment. an announcement is due in the next few
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weeks. we will keep an eye on that and you will keep us updated through the morning. big brands are always looking for new ways to try and influence what we buy and ben's getting a glimpse of how this might change all our homes in the future. good morning. welcome to what is the home of the future. it mightjust looked like any ordinary home but i'm having a great time this morning because i get to do all sorts of cool stuff like this, turn on kitchen lights... magic. they turn on, they are voice actor and. let me give you a sense of how these things change what we do in the future. it looks like an ordinary kitchen but the fridge knows what you have ordered online because you have ordered online because you have ordered it online and it is in there. cameras in future will be able to tell if the stuff you have in the fridge is going off and you need to use it. using the internet it will be able to suggest recipes you might want to cook with the food about to go off. if you're like me
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and you aren't very good at cooking, it will tell the other and when to switch on, how hot, and you can even control that by sound, you can speak to your other as well. in the house of the future you don't just use to your other as well. in the house of the future you don'tjust use any old way of making coffee, you do it on an ipad or a tablet. this controls the coffee maker. decided i wa nt controls the coffee maker. decided i want a cappuccino and i want it to be strong and let's see how that gets on. while that is making my coffee this morning, it's worth remembering that brands want to get involved in this because as advertising and the market gets crowded, fewer and fewer of us are paying attention to the adverts, perhaps on tv or newspapers or online, and this could be one way they get to control what we do. let's keep an eye on how my coffee's getting on this morning. well, yeah, it's a good start to the day, the coffee's working. but before that, let's get the news,
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travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armargh. police are on the hunt for a group of men involved in the robbery of nearly £2 million worth ofjewellery from a store in forest gate. it happened last month when the men smashed through a wall ofjoya—lukkas in green street using a sledgehammer. they were able to crawl through in what detectivies described as an audacious raid'. eight men, thought to be in their mid—30s, are believed to have been involved. police want anyone with information to get in touch. scotland yard says it's spent at least a £250,000 investigating the false allegations of a woman from bedfont who claimed she'd been sexually assaulted or raped by fifteen different men. jemma beale, who's 25, has beenjailed for ten years for perjury. one of the men she accused was given a seven—year prison sentence, which was later quashed. 0n the fifth anniversary of the london 2012 paralympic games
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there are claims it left no positive legacy for disabled people. research from the disability charity scope shows despite the success of the games themselves, there's been little change in the way disabled people feel they're treated by society and supported by the government. let's have a look at the travel situation now. a the travel situation now. good service on the tube as we've been hearing, south—western railway at waterloo severely reduced service due to ongoing engineering work. 0n the roads, the a12 by the bow underpass is closed southbound... that's because of an accident. it means queues are building on approach. in chelsea a lane is blocked on the embankment eastbound before albert bridge, that's also because of an accident. in norbiton, queen's road
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is closed northbound between kingston hill and alexandra road because of a burst water main. and on the m25 clockwise, one lane is closed beforejunction 6 because of a broken down vehicle. let's have a check on the weather now. get set for a lovely day today across the capital, lots of sunshine around, it's going to stay dry and it will feel a couple of degrees warmer than yesterday. we do have some early mist patches around this morning, there lived in clear nicely through the morning really very quickly. lots of blue sky and sunshine around and fairweather cloud developing into the afternoon. the winds are like this morning so pleasa ntly warm the winds are like this morning so pleasantly warm in the sunshine, highs of 2a or 25 and there will be some late sunshine around this evening as well. 0vernight tonight we will see a little bit more cloud just pushing in from the west at times, maybe a few light showers as we head into the first part of tomorrow morning out to northern home counties as well. a mild start to the weekend, on around 15 degrees. the bank holiday weekend looks very promising indeed. it does looks very promising indeed. it does look like it's going to stay dry or
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mostly dry. just the small chance of one or two heavy showers developing one or two heavy showers developing on sunday but for the vast majority, dry, good spells of sunshine and feeling pleasantly warm with temperatures generally up into the mid—20s on saturday, sunday and monday. we did think that monday was going to be a bit cloudy but now we think the sunshine is set to stay but it will turn more changeable from tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. also on breakfast this morning: with major engineering works planned for several railway lines this bank holiday weekend, we'll get the latest from network rail about the disruption. five years on from the hugely successful london 2012 paralympics, we'll ask if there has been any long lasting change in the way disabled people feel they are treated. #you raise me up so i can stand on
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mountains#. just one of the 1a number ones shane filan had with westlife. shane's been solo since 2013 and will be here on the sofa to tell us about his latest album. all that still to come. but now, a summary of this morning's main news. major travel disruption is expected over the weekend as millions prepare for the bank holiday getaway amid engineering works on some of the country's busiest rail routes. 0perators have warned passengers to expect delays, as services between london, the north—west and scotland are cancelled and five of london's biggest stations face disruption. road users have also been advised to expect longerjourneys with more traffic predicted over the course of the weekend. travelling by train this bank holiday weekend will be difficult for many, and some journeys will be impossible. engineering work is taking place at five of london's main stations: waterloo, london bridge, liverpool street, and paddington,
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will have greatly reduced services. euston will be close completely on saturday and sunday, and the work on hs2 means no trains from scotland and the north of england to london on the west coast mainline on saturday and sunday. services from the midlands will only run as far south as southampton. great western services out of paddington to wales will be disrupted until next month with no services between newport and cardiff this weekend. king's cross station in london is expected to be very busy, and it won'tjust be the stations. road traffic is expected to be 20% greater compared to last year's summer bank holiday. 5 million people are predicted to take to the roads on monday alone. abda says nearly a quarter of the million passengers will use heathrow today, and over 300,000 will use gatwick over the weekend. so, whether it is planes, trains, or automobiles, it will be a busy few days. wifi controlled convoys of trucks
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could be on major british roads by the end of next year as part of a plan to cut emissions and reduce congestion. the department of transport says up to three wirelessly connected hgvs will travel together, with drivers in each to steer but the speed controlled by the lead vehicle. the aa says it has major safety concerns about the idea. south wales police missed a number of opportunities to bring convicted paedophile, ian watkins, tojustice sooner, an investigation by the police watchdog has found. the independent police complaints commission says that from 2008, the force failed to act on allegations made by seven people about the then lead singer of the "lost prophets." 0ur reporter, mark hutchings, has the details. radical action is needed to help integrate immigrants into society, according to a group of mps. in a new report, the all—party—parliamentary group on "social integration" warns that the immigration debate has become polarised. it's renewing calls for the government to make
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english lessons compulsory. the home office says it already funds community cohesion projects, including some focused on language. us officials say that the number of american embassy staff affected by hearing loss while working in cuba has risen to at least 16, after what they believe were a series deliberate covert attacks. the state department is probing several incidents dating back to september last year in which diplomats are thought to have been hit with a mystery sonic weapon. cuba has denied any involvement. four out of five businesses have seen the cost of employing staff rise over the last year according to the british chambers of commerce. the companies say the increases are because of changes to employment legislation which is aimed at boosting prospects for workers, things like the apprenticeship levy, pensions auto—enrolment, and the new higher minimum wage. this is the question of the morning.
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if you get it right, i don't even know... how do you find out the length a lion? you don't! you use a bag of meat suspended from a tree. these are penguins... gosh, they are all being measured. here's a lion. this is one being measured at london zoo as part of its annual weigh—in. the sizes and weights of the creatures are recorded by the keepers so they can monitor the creatures' health and well—being. there are currently more than 20 thousand animals and 698 different species at the zoo. you don't want to use anaesthetics on one. there's a gorilla. that is quite a big task of measuring. given the choice to measure a line, gorilla, or a penguin,
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the choice to measure a line, gorilla, ora penguin, what do the choice to measure a line, gorilla, or a penguin, what do you choose? —— lion. 0k, just the first two then. gorilla. lions are too fierce! what amazes me is your amazement at easing the gorilla over amazement at easing the gorilla over a lion. i would rather measure a lion. gorillas are terrifying. you have talked me around. you are both correct, i think. we won't dwell on it. in the final track race of his career, mo farah emerged victorious in the men's 5,000 metre event in zurich. he finished with a win! brilliant. he finished with a win! brilliant. he is such a proud man. you forget
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sometimes... are you going to show the win? yeah. fully deserved. have a look at this. exceptionally close. just managing to hang on. he beat the man who beat him at the world championships earlier this month. it may well go down as one of farah's most tense races. the four time olympic champion just managed to hang on at the line, ahead of the man that beat him in the same final at the london world championships earlier this month, muktar edris. farah will now move onto road racing. it is amazing to win. i have enjoyed my career. it has been a long journey. i will miss the track and the people. it is time to start a new chapter in my life, going on to the road to see what i can do. cj ujah claimed the best win of his young career beating the world championjustin gatlin in the 100m with a season's best of 9.97 seconds. the american gatlin finished back in fourth. get ready for two great goals.
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everton are through to the europa league group stage, helped by a stunning goal from gylfi sigurdsson against hajduk split. everton led 2—0 from the first leg but split scored their own wonder goal late in the first half. any nerves were eased seconds after the break thanks to sigurdsson's amazing strike, his first for everton. a jordan pickford penalty save ensured it finished 3—1 on aggregate. tottenham have been given one of the toughest possible draws in their champions league group for this season. they're up against defending champions, real madrid. also in the group is borussia dortmund and apoel nicosia, the cypriot team. spurs will play their home matches at wembley this season, while their new stadium is built. they'll come up against former tottenham players gareth bale and luka modric. here is how it looks for the other british sides in the draw. manchester united are in group a alongside former winners benfica. celtic are in another tough group with bayern munich and paris st germain. chelsea match up against atletico. meanwhile, liverpool will be pleased. they face spartak moscow, maribor and sevilla. manchester city too will be
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happy with their draw, although they face a long trip to ukraine to take on shakhtar donetsk. england men's manager, gareth southgate, has defended mark sampson, the head coach of the women's team, amid allegations of "bullying and discrimination." striker eniola aluko made the claims against sampson, but he's been cleared of wrongdoing by both an fa investigation and a separate independent inquiry. sampson and the fa deny the allegations and southgate has praised the character of his fellow coach. my my feeling is that the culture is very good here. so i cannot talk about the specific meetings, age groups, i have got involved with, but i sense that we are heading in a good direction at saint georges parkhead. the summer was a good example of that. now, a legitimate contest or a farce ? well, the floyd mayweather and conor mcgregor fight this weekend is splitting opinion
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and there's no denying it's a talking point. now former boxer ricky hatton has revealed his thoughts "pure showbiz." however hatton doesn't blame the fighters for taking the money, and he's hoping there's a victory for mcgregor. iama i am a little bit disappointed in how boxing has gone a little bit lately. it wasn't so long ago when people were complaining they were too many belts and weight divisions in boxing now. i don't blame connor or floyd, but it shows you how boxing has gone these days, doesn't it? it does indeed. england can seal the series against west indies with victory in the second test which starts later at headingley. the last test finished inside three days and england are big favourites ahead of this match too. it's one of two tests to take place before this winter's ashes and will seejoe root lead england out at his home ground.
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iam i am lost for words it is a bit. i can't describe it. it is a great opportunity to do it here at headingley. i have played a lot of cricket here. to become captain here is very exciting and a very proud day for me. that is the stuff of dreams. the west indies, not the tea m dreams. the west indies, not the team they once were. a huge win for england last time. you anticipate it again. you never know, he could have again. you never know, he could have a dream entrance. we are talking about gsce results. amazing stories in among those results. this is the sister of one of the manchester bombing victims. amongst those receiving their gcse results yesterday was 16—year—old, ines alves. the teenager lived on the 13th floor of grenfell tower, and just hours after escaping from the fire, she went to school and sat her chemistry exam dressed in the same clothes that she'd fled the fire in.
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she was revising for physics while he was missing. respect for doing that in those circumstances. her mother spoke to us on breakfast and told us how proud she is. ines alves. the teenager lived on the 13th floor of grenfell tower, and just hours after escaping from the fire, she went to school and sat her chemistry exam dressed in the same clothes that she'd fled the fire in. 0ur correspondent, adina campell, reports. the gloomy grey shell of what is left of grenfell tower has been home to ines alves for the past 16 years.
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but today, she is celebrating her gsce results. how was it opening that envelope after what you have gone through? mixed emotions. i was disappointed in some subjects that mostly disappointed in some subjects that m ostly gla d disappointed in some subjects that mostly glad and excited. she and her family had a lucky escape. butjust hours later, ines alves decided to sit her chemistry exam. hours later, ines alves decided to sit her chemistry examlj hours later, ines alves decided to sit her chemistry exam. i got an a in that exam. idea that the morning of the fire. how much of the fire did you see? my father burst into the room and told me to get changed. he said there was a fire in the building. we left immediately and went downstairs. at first i was kind of annoyed because it was such a small fire. but then we realised how big it was getting when it started to reach six floors above it and
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kept on going up and up and then there was no turning back. since the disaster, herfamily there was no turning back. since the disaster, her family have there was no turning back. since the disaster, herfamily have been living in a hotel, and are still waiting to be permanently rehoused. after everything you had seen and heard in that fire, you were at school the next morning taking an exam. many people are going to be wondering why you had the courage to go. i had been revising the night before. that was on the top of my mind. when before. that was on the top of my mind. when! before. that was on the top of my mind. when i woke up, my father barged into the room. my chemistry notes were right next to me. they we re notes were right next to me. they were the first thing i grabbed. while i thought they would want to put the fire out, i was like, why not waste this time and revised instead. i did not think about it. it was a good exam. after her
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success today, ines alves now plans to carry on studying, and says nothing will hold her back. today, of course, is a day to celebrate. you have done so well with everything you have gone through. are you positive about the future? yeah. i feel like if are you positive about the future? yeah. ifeel like if i could get through this, i can get through anything, really. a fantastic young woman. ines alves talking to us. we're blessed this morning by seeing the seaside. look at that rather glorious image with matt as the sun comes up. isn't that stunning. good morning, matt. good morning. what a glorious morning in whitby. it is a stunning town on the yorkshire coast. first signs of it being settled in 656.
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built upon the river esk. it's an important ancient port and fishing village and on the headlamp we have st mary's church and the whitby abbey which is the inspiration behind bram stoker's dracula. —— headlamp. we will have more from here this morning and from the bbc brea kfast here this morning and from the bbc breakfast deckchair. we've been travelling up and down the country finding out what you love about the seaside and certainly today who couldn't love this? dry and sunny at the moment, a bit cool but what about the rest of the country for today and the rest of the bank holiday weekend? today most places will see at least some sunshine, much of england and wales will stay dry but in scotland and northern ireland it's a different story. a bit of rain, heavy at times, and that rain is already developing in western scotland at the moment. showers will creep to eastern scotla nd showers will creep to eastern scotland during the day and they could become heavy. in england and wales, much cloud in northern
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england, like whitby at the moment, but further south, clearer skies overnight and that's led to a chilly start, single figures this morning. some mist and fog patches around but they will clear now the sun is up. winds are like as well so it will warm up quickly with the strong sunshine overhead —— light. same in much of wales but in the north wales they'll be a bit more cloud certainly later in the day and in northern ireland, a different story altogether with a bit of rain. —— there will be. some flooding this week and more heavy rain coming today. this has been one of the wettest spots, along with the west of scotland. there will be drier moments but lengthy bursts of rain in scotland. we could have some thunder as well. some showers into northern england later but much of england and wales will stay dry, the sunniest in the south were temperatures will get to 2425 with temperatures will get to 2425 with temperatures in the mid—to—high teens in the northern half of the uk
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—— 24 or25. teens in the northern half of the uk —— 24 or 25. rain for a time in scotla nd —— 24 or 25. rain for a time in scotland and all the nile at the right. showers continuing in eastern scotla nd right. showers continuing in eastern scotland through the night and into the morning —— and northern ireland tonight. temperatures not as low tonight, given a bit more cloud and breeze. 0n the bank holiday weekend there will be a lot of dry and sunny weather. not clear blue skies on saturday by any means but sunshine breaking through the cloud here and there, a few more showers in england and wales, most places avoiding them. still heavy showers in eastern scotla nd them. still heavy showers in eastern scotland but western scotland and northern ireland will improve compared to today and a touch warmer, further south temperatures reaching their midtwenties. sunday largely dry, variable cloud with sunny spells. rain into the north—west highlands later on but most will have a fine day on sunday. warm in the sunshine again and in the south it could be warmer still as we go into bank or the day monday
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with temperatures around 27 or 28. much of england and wales will stay dry with sunny spells, scotland and northern ireland will stay fine rain and stronger winds will push in later. that's how your bank holiday weekend is looking. fine for many of us. weekend is looking. fine for many of us. one of the reasons we are in whitby this morning, you can probably hear, just building up behind me, the lovely sound of the sheffield maurice men. it's the last day of the festival today. they have been performing all week. if you are in the whitby area then come down and see them and the other 600 acts performing at the festival. come and see them and i'm sure before the programme is out charlie will have me taking part. absolutely, that is exactly what we would like to see, matt. we have that beautiful aerial view of whitby. lots coming up. more beautiful sites from whitby and matt morris dancing. i would be happy if
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he just walks down the middle while they are doing the stick thing. i want to see him with the stick! big brands influence what we buy through clever advertising on billboards, tv and social media. but in an increasingly crowded world how are they going to connect with consumers in the future? ben's in a house that might have the answer. you look like you're in one of those murder mystery things and you're about to go through a tiny little door. yeah, all sorts of wonders lie beyond the store. we are with a company that has set up this thing and it might not look like much from the outside and inside it is a fully fledged house and they have packed it through with the latest tech, some stuff from the high street and other stuff that is brand—new, and they have decided to find out what it means for brands. signing is a
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futurist. thanks for letting us in. looking around it looks like a normal house but it is jampacked with technology. why do you have this? it is. the connected home where all these devices are connected to a main line will be the next most powerful advertising ca nvas next most powerful advertising ca nva s we next most powerful advertising canvas we have ever seen next most powerful advertising canvas we have ever seen and we have built this so we can study how brands can communicate messages in the home in the right way. when you say ai, artificial intelligence, it learns our behaviour and does things for us. earlier you turned on the lights and the music came on and the tv came on because you came home and it knew but there are practical applications for this as well? absolutely, your ai can control the home, lights and other things, but using spotify, it suggests songs based on our listening, it can suggest new music and it can suggest new recipes. we will be able to stop cooking the same stuff and do new recipes like we discover new bands.
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we saw the kitchen earlier, this is the lounge with all the technology. looking at the bathroom and looking at the mirror, that gives us a sense of how long we have been brushing our teeth. what else does it show? the mirror is almost like an assistant, saying you had better leave early because there's traffic on the m1 or whatever and it will be hands—free so you can look at tutorial videos, do your make up, you won't be juggling your phone and your make up any more. take selfies and send them to your friends and all that kind of stuff. simon, thanks, we will catch up later. in the bedroom there are all sorts of devices to help you sleep. as we said at the start it is all about brands, brands want to get in on this game because it makes it easier to sell stuff to us when we might be a bit blase about the adverts we ignore. natalie, nice to see you. we are looking around here and this mirror will tell us what time it is and what the weather is doing and
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what we should wear for the day but there are big applications for businesses here as well? absolutely. technology is changing the way we shop and we have to ask ourselves, what is shopping? shopping used to be going to a physical store and looking at products on the shelf and paying and going home whereas today you can be in your kitchen pressing a button on your fridge or asking the computer to add it to your shopping list and that is shopping as well. the creation of these new touch points is creating a new level of convenience and complexity for retailers. do those retailers know how to play that game? we are looking at the clothes in here, it will know i bought a white shirt last week and for example it will suggest a pair of trousers to go with it. is it intrusive or clever marketing? there's a fine line between this technology being helpful and creepy. it is the same in—store, retailers are using facial recognition technology so store
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employees can identify the shopper when they walk in the door so that can be helpful in terms of personalising the offer and tailoring the offer. some shoppers might not want that much tech, though. natalie, thanks very much. we will be here all morning and i show you around some of these cool inventions later. so much to show you, i will try and fit inasmuch as ican.| you, i will try and fit inasmuch as i can. ijust have one little question, can you actually see yourself in the era? do you have a mirror you can see into without being... yeah. a normal mirror? exactly. the one in the bathroom will do lots of things, you can watch breakfast while you are brushing your teeth. some of the exa m ples brushing your teeth. some of the examples here, internet, it will tell you the time. if you want to getan tell you the time. if you want to get an old—fashioned mirror then it will do that too. it's just a case of turning it off! back with you later on. a remarkable attempt now to get the
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two to everyone. at its best, theatre has the power to transport an audience to another time or place. the combination of dialogue, music, sets and costumes can be magical. but what can it offer to people who can't see or hear? 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson went along to a preview. samuel taylor coleridge's kubla khan adapted into a 15 minute musical show for children who are deaf, blind. but how exactly do you create a production for young people who can't see or hear? if we can't relate to them by those senses, what other senses are there? there is scent, taste, touch, the sense of movement you have, the kinaesthetic sense so we often use movable seating. and the cast of kubla khan aim to create a pleasure dome by interacting with the children using water, sand and pebbles. it'sjust beautiful. i mean, it'sjust an
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honour to kind of do it and get to have this communication with these kids really. you almost looked like you're getting emotional?” kids really. you almost looked like you're getting emotional? i am. i'm about to do it in 20 minutes and i can't wait, it's going to be great. and music also has a crucial role to play. people don't just hear play. people don'tjust hear with their ears, some people say as much as 60% of what you hear you pick up through your body. 0ther of what you hear you pick up through your body. other people say it's 40%. the vibrations are the essential part and then how you play with those textures so you can actually feel them, so that you can sort of almost swim through them. afterwards it was clear what an impact of the show had made both on the children and their parents. what did james particularly like then? i think he liked the moving
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water. definitely the moving water. he loves bath time, for instance, so he can relate to that sort of thing. and again, music, loves his music. it's not very often that she enjoys something that she was part of and she was really part of, so it was a lovely time for both of us. there's nothing wrong with crying. emily has thoroughly enjoyed herself? she really did, she really enjoyed herself. she really did enjoy herself. tomorrow this groundbreaking production will have its official premiere in canterbury. colin paterson, bbc news. you can see the impact it's happening, can't you ? time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armargh. police are on the hunt for a group of men involved in the robbery
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of nearly £2 million worth ofjewellery from a store in forest gate. it happened last month when the men smashed through a wall ofjoyalukkas in green street using a sledgehammer. they were able to crawl through in what detectivies described as an audacious raid. eight men, thought to be in their mid—30s, are believed to have been involved. police want anyone with information to get in touch. a woman who made a string of false rape claims and sexual assault allegations cost police more than £250,000. 25—year—old jemma beale from bedfont has beenjailed for ten years for perjury. she claimed she'd been sexually assaulted or raped by 15 different men. one of the men she accused was given a seven—year prison sentence, which was later quashed. 0n the fifth anniversary of the london 2012 paralympic games there are claims it left no positive legacy for disabled people. research from the disability charity scope shows despite the success of the games themselves, there's been little change in the way disabled people feel they're treated by society and supported by the government. let's have a look at
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the travel situation now. a good service on the tube so far. 0n the trains, as we've been hearing lots of issues because of engineering work including at waterloo, where services are significantly reduced. do check before you travel. 0n the roads, the a12 by the bow underpass is closed southbound because of an accident. it means queues are building on approach. in chelsea, a lane is blocked on the embankment eastbound before albert bridge, that's also because of an accident. in bean, a lane is closed on a2 westbound between the bean interchange and m25 junction 2 because of an accident. and in tooting, church lane closed between chertsey street and cowick road due to burst water main. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. get set for a lovely day today across the capital, lots of sunshine around, it's going to stay dry and it will feel a couple of degrees warmer than it did yesterday too.
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we do have some early mist patches around this morning, they'll lift and clear nicely through the morning really very quickly. lots of blue sky and sunshine around and a little bit more fairweather cloud developing into the afternoon. the winds are light this morning so pleasantly warm in the sunshine, highs of 24 or 25 and there'll be some late sunshine around this evening too. 0vernight tonight we'll see a little bit more cloud just pushing in from the west at times. maybe a few light showers as we head into the first part of tomorrow morning up to northern home counties as well. a mild start to the weekend on around 15 degrees. so, the bank holiday weekend looks very promising indeed. it does look like it's going to stay dry or mostly dry. just the small chance of one or two heavy showers developing on sunday but for the vast majority, dry, good spells of sunshine and feeling pleasantly warm with temperatures generally up into the mid—20s on saturday, sunday and monday. we did think that monday was going to be a bit cloudier but now we think the sunshine is set to stay. it will turn more changeable,
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though, from tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. major travel disruption on the railways, as bank holiday engineering work is carried out on some of the country's busiest routes. passengers are warned to expect delays, as services on much of the network are cancelled or restricted. this is london's euston station this morning and it's going to be closed for two days over the weekend. good morning, it's friday 25th august. also this morning: wifi—controlled convoys of truck could be tested on roads in england by the end of next year. we're live at these historic gardens, where proposals for a safer
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motorwayjunction are getting some people worries, among them alan titchmarsh. this, along with rhododendrons, magnolias, camellias, would all go. good morning from the future, or at least the home of the future. i'm looking at how top tech could change the way we live our lives. in sport, britain's most successful athlete mo farah wins the final track race of his career, sprinting to victory in a tight finish in the 5,000 metres diamiond league meeting, in zurich. and we are taking you to the seaside this morning for the weather. good morning. i will be here all morning. a glorious start to the day. the sun is up. lots of sunshine drew this
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bank holiday weekend, but there is a bit of rain, especially in northern ireland and western scotland. the full details coming up in 15 minutes. first, our main story. major travel disruption is expected over the weekend as millions prepare for the bank holiday getaway amid engineering works on some of the country's busiest rail routes. 0perators have warned passengers to expect delays, as services between london, the north—west and scotland are cancelled and five of london's biggest stations face disruption. keith doyle is at london euston station, which will close for two days tomorrow. this is going to cause quite a bit of disruption, to say the least. good morning. absolutely. yes, good morning. it's just starting to get easy at euston station. today will be very busy ahead of the closures tomorrow and sunday. that means there will be no west coast services from scotland, manchester, birmingham, in the london and out again. it's notjust
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the station. another five london and out again. it's notjust the station. anotherfive key stations around london will have disrupted services over the weekend, as will many key routes around the country. this is because of work on major rail projects. 17,000 engineering staff will be working on those works over this weekend. now, network rail says this will be good for passengers in the end, but for many passengers travelling this weekend it will be very difficult indeed. travelling by train this bank holiday weekend will be difficult for many, and some journeys will be impossible. engineering work is taking place at five of london's main stations. waterloo, london bridge, liverpool street, and paddington, will have greatly reduced services. euston will be closed completely on saturday and sunday, and the work on hs2 means no trains from scotland and the north of england to london on the west coast mainline on saturday and sunday. services from the midlands will only run as far south as southampton. —— northampton.
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great western services out of paddington to wales will be disrupted until next month, with no services between newport and cardiff this weekend. king's cross station in london is expected to be very busy, and it won'tjust be the stations. road traffic is expected to be 20% greater compared to last year's summer bank holiday. 5 million people are predicted to take to the roads on monday alone. travel trade organisation abda says nearly a quarter of a million passengers will use heathrow today, and over 300,000 will use gatwick over the weekend. so, whether it's planes, trains or automobiles, it's going to be a busy few days. rail operators are saying to check before you go on yourjourney, or indeed heed advice and don't travel at all. but there are lots of things to travel for this weekend. the notting hill carnival. numerous
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premier league matches, where supporters would be travelling on those routes that are disrupted and there's the edinburgh festival as well. network rail is saying that this is essential work that will transform journeys in months and yea rs transform journeys in months and years to come and, despite this being a holiday weekend, they say this is the best time to do it throughout the whole year. but many people here this morning say, why does so much work have to be done at the same time? but it's notjust the railways, the roads are also going to be incredibly busy today, as our airports, the overall it's not great news on the travel front for this weekend. thanks very much. wifi controlled convoys of trucks could be on major british roads by the end of next year as part of a plan to cut emissions and reduce congestion. the department for transport says up to three wirelessly connected hgvs will travel together, with drivers in each to steer but the speed controlled by the lead vehicle. the aa says it has major safety
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concerns about the idea as our correspondent andy gill reports. they call it "platooning trucks", travelling in wi—fi connected convoy, with much less space between them than normal. this dutch project uses two vehicles. the trial announced here will be with three. it will be more efficient, take up less space on the network and improve efficiency and hopefully pass on the savings to the consumer. each lorry has a driver, but the lead cab has control. to think about how three trucks can travel down a road in a platoon, imagine that the lead truck is a giant wi—fi hub, sending out signals on the precise distances and speeds the other two need to travel at.
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and the wi—fi on the trailing two trucks can react much more quickly to signals than a human being can. the funding announcement was made at a lancashire truck factory. they say because vehicles in platoon are in each other‘s slipstream, fuel consumption and pollution falls. but one road using body is sceptical. uk motorways are the most congested in europe. we have more entrances and exits. and if you have a platoon of trucks, it will be difficult to see the road signs and exit. there will be rigourous safety checks before any platoons are allowed on the road. then they will compare real delivery journeys made by platoon trucks with ones made in the traditional way. south wales police missed a number of opportunities to bring convicted paedophile ian watkins to justice sooner. the independent police complaints commission says that,
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from 2008, the force failed to act on allegations made by seven people about the then lead singer of lostprophets. us officials say the number of american embassy staff affected by hearing loss while working in cuba has risen to at least 60 after they what —— after what they believe were a series of covert attacks. there are several incidents dating back to september last year, when diplomats we re september last year, when diplomats were supposedly kit with a mystery weapon. cuba has denied any involvement. four out of five businesses have seen four out of five businesses have seen the cost of employment rise. the company say the increases are because of changes to employment legislation aimed at boosting prospects for workers, things like the apprenticeship levy, pensions, auto—enrolment and the new higher minimum wage. 0ne minimum wage. one other story. the women who won the biggest single lotteryjackpot in american history has already told her bosses she wont be returning to work. mavis, a 53—year old mum of two
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from massachusettes, beat all the odds to scoop the $758.7 million prize in the powerball. her chances of winning were just one in 292 million. first thing i want to do, just sit back and relax. i had a pipedream and that's finally come true. i wanted to retire early. it came true. where do you work? mercy medical centre. i was there for 22 years. does your workplace know you won? well, i have called my boss and told them i will not be going back. not surprising. that's quite reasonable $700 million in the bank. would you? go back to work? of course! would you not? of course! would you not?
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of course. we will have the weather a little bit later. looking beautiful this morning. the sport as well. that is all coming upa morning. the sport as well. that is all coming up a little bit later. the immigration debate dominated last year's eu referendum campaign and continues to drive discussion. notjust about how many people can come to the country, but also how to integrate them into society when they arrive. a group of mps is renewing demands for compulsory english lessons for those who are not fluent and wants a loans system to pay for the classes. the chair of the group and labour mp chukka umunna joins us now from westminster. good to see you. thanks for your time. good morning. good to be with you. let's talk about this. how is this going to be paid for? how are you going to pay for people to learn english, with the idea of integrating them into our society?
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first of all, the overall argument we are making is integration is absolutely key and the poisonous nature of the debate around immigration is actually hindering integration. it putting off newcomers to our communities from actually getting involved in the life of the communities and that involves better leadership, amongst a host of other things, from politicians. in relation to this specific question, there are two things. first of all the government has to provide other funding. secondly, you can do that in a way perhaps that doesn't break the bank and is perhaps not as costly as it could be, by introducing a contingent loan, a bit like the student loan system, to help newcomers in our community is help fund their own english language learning. this is a real issue and the latest figures, which are bit dated, but the most recent ones, show that over 800,000 immigrants in
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a country can't actually speak english properly and that's a huge impediment to them being able to access all of the opportunities and everything that britain can offer. we've got to be clear on this, that the overwhelming majority of newcomers to our communities want to learn english, but there is often those obstacles, notjust costs, but in some communities, louise casey identified this in her report, in some communities there are impediment is where people are actively discouraged from learning english. so that's one of the number of recommendations that we make in this report today. let's talk about this report today. let's talk about this income contingent loan. you say they are similar to student loans. when you look at student loans at the moment there's a problem with the moment there's a problem with the level of payback, and how why you going to guarantee that the taxpayer's money, which you spend as a loan, is going to be returned? in
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the end if it's a contingent there is no complete guarantee that all of the money will be paid back. as i said at the top, there's no getting away from the fact that the government will have to put money into this. but let's not forget, if you look at the economic benefits immigration has brought to our country, and by the way in this report we don't deny that this has also brought challenges in terms of the pressure put on public services and some areas that have gone to be democratic change in a short period, we don't deny it can impose challenges but it need not be that way. we derive a huge economic and that from actually having immigrants come our country. not just economically, if you look at public services, the nhs as well. i personally and most members of the all—party parliamentary group on social integration that produced this report, we believe this is a price worth paying given the benefits we get. but there would be a cost. i can't give you a precise
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number, that would be up to government. kay, let's talk about the proposal that immigrants are spread across the country into various economic regions. how will that work and what happens if they are employed by a company, by a firm, which needs them to move around the country? this proposal arises looking at the things that they do in canada and australia, where they have devolved immigration policy to the provinces and regions in those countries. what they do there is they have employers help with the issue of region specific visas which require a person to work for two or three yea rs person to work for two or three years ina person to work for two or three years in a particular region before they're years in a particular region before they‘ re allowed to years in a particular region before they're allowed to move years in a particular region before they‘ re allowed to move across years in a particular region before they're allowed to move across the rest of the country. what we're trying to do here is actually give localities and regions much more power over the way our immigration
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system works to increase the confidence in it so people feel they've got more control over what's happening in their communities. we know different parts of the country feel different about this. look at london, the london chambers of commerce has been arguing for this, they want a london visa. if you look in scotland, the scottish garden that has been asking for more control over immigration policy. so we said devolved the power, look at the regions and their specific needs and economies and businesses that scottish government. and then you can determine how many people come to the ridge —— scottish government. how do you make sure they stay in that region? of course the employers have to check the status of people they are signing up to work for them —— come to the region. they need your address when you sign up. the model is what they do in australia and canada where it works very well
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and canada where it works very well and both our countries where they have a much healthier, less toxic debate around immigration, which is just such a problem. you mentioned at the top of your package how often the focus is on the number of immigrants coming here and of course they were the latest immigration stats that came out yesterday but we think too little about what happens when people come to our country and settle here and too often we have immigrants who are not properly integrated into their communities and that is bad for them because it stands in the way of them accessing the opportunities there are and it's bad for the overall community because there's a lack of trust there and when there's a lack of and a vacuum that's when the peddlers of hate and division come in, and u nfortu nately we saw hate and division come in, and unfortunately we saw that too much in the eu referendum and frankly frontline politicians, who should have known better, should have been far more responsible in the way they we re far more responsible in the way they were discussing these issues. thanks
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for your time this morning. thank you. it's a bank holiday weekend this weekend. we know there are problems on the trains, if you're travelling across the weekend, but when you get there maybe you will see a site like this. this is whitby this morning. a bit of cloud in the sky. matt has a forecast for anyone out and about over the weekend. good morning, matt. good morning, charlie. we are in whitby this morning, what a glorious view. beautiful seaside town on the north yorkshire coast. 0n the banks of the river esk. here is where shipping and fishing became a big thing. beautiful sight behind me, lovely start to the day, and also now it's the home of the bbc brea kfast also now it's the home of the bbc breakfast big deckchair. a huge beast, even i struggled to get up on that. the reason that's here is to give you a preview to see what's
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coming up. we're doing a series on coastal britain to see what you love about the coast and seaside. the deckchair has been travelling up and down the country to find out what you enjoy and how you feel about your issues with the seaside. we will give you a few more previews of what's been going on later in the programme. at the moment it is bathed in sunshine. a mixed reaction to the british seaside, particularly this summer, but the bank holiday weekend forecast is actually looking reasonable. a bit of rain today, many will see the sun, the wettest weather probably today in parts of northern ireland and scotland. heavy bursts and lengthy bursts developing. much of eastern scotland dry at the moment but we could see thunderstorms later and northern england dry, like whitby, variable cloud with sunshine coming through and a small breeze. the breeze lighter the further south we go and that's why we have mist and fog
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patches now clearing with the sun being up, temperatures down in single figures overnight. but with the sunshine overhead we will get strong sunshine for much of the day. further north into north wales, we will see more cloud and northern ireland, this is where we will have some of the wettest conditions. we don't need the rain at the moment, it's been a thoroughly wet week. the risk of minorflooding it's been a thoroughly wet week. the risk of minor flooding later as the rain continues. i'm optimistic there will be drier moments but lengthier bursts of heavy rain to come, the same in western scotland. showers in eastern scotland and in northern england, starting dry but one or two showers. the further south you are, dry with sunshine and temperatures in the midtwenties. into the night and the showers will continue in the northern half with one or two developing further south in england. the odd heavy one to the east but most the odd heavy one to the east but m ost pla ces the odd heavy one to the east but most places will be dry with a bit more of a breeze, more cloud, not as chilly as last night but some mist and fog patches could form in the
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southern half of the country in particular. into the bank holiday weekend and there will be a lot of dry weather around. a few showers on saturday in mainly eastern scotland and northern england, the midlands and northern england, the midlands and eastern england but not too many. most will avoid them and staying dry. pleasant in the sunshine, temperatures in the midtwenties in the south and a better day for western scotland and northern ireland tomorrow compare the two today so feeling warmer here. largely dry again sunday. —— compare the two today. the sunshine will break through every now and again —— compared to today. staying dry and sunny. a few spots of rain to the far north—west of scotland. warmer in the south of the country. warmer in the south of the country. warmer still as we head into bank holiday monday. some in southern parts of england could hit 27 or 28. england and wales dry with sunny spells through the day, bright enough start for scotland and northern ireland but turning wetter
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and windierfrom northern ireland but turning wetter and windier from the north—west and some of that rain could reach north—west england by monday ‘s end. but considering the summer we have had so far it gets a big thumbs up from me. thanks, matt, and thank you for that gorgeous view of whitby. we will make the most of that through the morning and pop in and out. it's one of the busiest motorway junctions in the country with more accidents than any other in england. but plans to improve the m25 at junction 10 at wisley could threaten a number of rare trees and plants. highways england says the upgrade will the road safer but campaigners including alan titchmarsh are calling for british gardeners to take a stand against the plans. tim muffett is in wisley for us this morning. it's a beautiful day, tim, isn't it crazy but there's a real issue, a beautiful place next to a very big road. -- isn't it? good morning. a row is taking root in these historic
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gardens it's fair to say. the royal royal horticultural society in wisley in surrey. —— royal horticultural society. look at these trees, they are at the centre of this row at the moment. as you say, proposals are being considered to expand the a3 and m25, you might be able to hear the traffic behind me as we speak because we are right next to that main roads. before we carry on, here's a little explain as to the geography of where we are and what this argument all about. it's been considered a centre of horticultural excellence for more than a century, but wisley lies close to where the m25 meets the a3. the junction's often congested. at peak times it's use by 7,000 vehicles an hour. according to highways england it has one of the highest collision rates in the country and needs improving. the royal horticultural society fears one plan being considered would see the a3 widened with the loss of 2.5 acres of woodland from the 240—acre site.
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500 trees would be cut down, a prospect that has angered some. this is a giant redwood. you've heard of these, massive. 0ver100 years old. one of several down this great strip. this, along with rhododendrons, magnolias, camellias, would all go. the rhs wants highways england to choose another option, one that would have less impact on these historic gardens. matthew paul tge is a curator for rhs wisley. how worried are you that these trees will go? -- pottage. a real worry. they are significant to the landscape and the garden, they've been here for hundreds of yea rs they've been here for hundreds of years and they will go on for hundreds more for future generations. it's under consideration at the moment so it
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won't definitely happen, roads need to be expanded, you can hear the traffic here where we are now, something has to happen? we are supportive of the road, it needs to be improved, it isn't perfect and we're not saying that but we want assurances on their fact there is another option which involves widening the a3 which doesn't involve a land grab from wisley gardens and that's what's so important for us. do you think it would be spoiled, would it not be what it was? indeed. we are talking about a large bag of trees but all the garden beyond that would be spoiled and ruined and you can't have a tranquil garden space with a motorway roaring past —— bank of greece. it's taken 100 years to build up so stripping this away isn't an option —— bank of trees. you are a moto journalist from the auto express. as far as you're concerned, how important is it that this road is expanded? -- motor. it
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is important roads and railways and other transport modes are expanded but it is where you expand them and it's the way you do it. i don't think you can just it's the way you do it. i don't think you canjust come at it's the way you do it. i don't think you can just come at this, whether it is highways england, the government, department for transport, surrey county council, to come and say we are going to plough a road wherever we want. improvements need to be made but they need to be done in the right way. isn't it inevitable sometimes that when expansion happens there are negative consequences and more and more people are using the roads, aren't they? people need the roads to get to wisley gardens, the staff need to get here, but it needs to be donein need to get here, but it needs to be done in an appropriate way. we can't plough through buildings and ancient woodland to improve junctions, for railways, roads or any other mode of transport. improvements need to be made but made in the right way and i think if you add an opinion poll and ask whether the right way is to knock down hundreds of thousands of
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trees, the public and anyone else in their right mind would say it's not their right mind would say it's not the way to go —— if you had. highways england gave us a statement, they said they care about the environment and protecting special habitats around wisley is a priority as they develop plans for thejunction. an priority as they develop plans for the junction. an announcement is expected in the next few weeks. we are being spoiled this morning with some wonderful vistas, aren't we? whitley, wisley, the ws are giving it to us today. we will be in both of those locations throughout the morning. but time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armargh. police are on the hunt for a group of men involved in the robbery of nearly £2 million worth ofjewellery from a store in forest gate. it happened last month when the men smashed through a wall ofjoyalukkas in green street using a sledgehammer. they were able to crawl through in what detectivies described as an audacious raid. eight men, thought to be in their mid—30s, are believed
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to have been involved. police want anyone with information to get in touch. councillors in kensington and chelsea have agreed a £76 million package to help people who lost their homes in the grenfell tower fire. £40 million will go towards buying homes from private social housing providers and money is being set aside to compensate people who owned flats in the building. a woman who made a string of false rape claims and sexual assault allegations cost police more than £250,000. 25—year—old jemma beale from bedfont has beenjailed for ten years for perjury. she claimed she'd been sexually assaulted or raped by 15 different men. one of the men she accused was given a seven—year prison sentence, which was later quashed. 0n the fifth anniversary of the london 2012 paralympic games there are claims it left no positive legacy for disabled people. research from the disability charity scope shows despite the success of the games themselves, there's been little change in the way disabled people feel they're treated by society and supported by the government.
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let's have a look at the travel situation now. a good service on the tube so far. 0n the trains, as we've been hearing lots of issues because of engineering work including at waterloo, where services are significantly reduced. do check before you travel. 0n the roads, the a12 by the bow underpass is closed southbound because of an accident. it means queues are building on approach. and on the m1 southbound, three lanes are closed because of an accident atjunction 7. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. get set for a lovely day today across the capital, lots of sunshine around, it's going to stay dry and it will feel a couple of degrees warmer than it did yesterday too. we do have some early mist patches around this morning, they'll lift and clear nicely through the morning really very quickly. lots of blue sky and sunshine around and a little bit more fairweather cloud developing into the afternoon.
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the winds are light this morning so pleasantly warm in the sunshine, highs of 24 or 25 and there'll be some late sunshine around this evening too. 0vernight tonight we'll see a little bit more cloud just pushing in from the west at times. maybe a few light showers as we head into the first part of tomorrow morning up to northern home counties as well. a mild start to the weekend on around 15 degrees. so, the bank holiday weekend looks very promising indeed. it does look like it's going to stay dry or mostly dry. just the small chance of one or two heavy showers developing on sunday but for the vast majority, dry, good spells of sunshine and feeling pleasantly warm with temperatures generally up into the mid—20s on saturday, sunday and monday. we did think that monday was going to be a bit cloudier but now we think the sunshine is set to stay. it will turn more changeable, though, from tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty
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and charlie stayt. the main news: major travel disruption is expected over the weekend, as millions prepare for the bank holiday getaway amid engineering works on some of the country's busiest rail routes. 0perators have warned passengers to expect delays, as euston station is closed entirely for two days and services between london, the north—west and scotland are cancelled. road users have also been advised to expect longerjourneys, with more traffic predicted over the course of the weekend. wifi controlled convoys of trucks could be on major british roads by the end of next year as part of a plan to cut emissions and reduce congestion. the department for transport says that up to three wirelessly connected hgvs will travel together. there'll be drivers in each to steer but the speed controlled by the lead vehicle. the aa says it has major safety concerns about the idea. south wales police missed a number
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of opportunities to bring convicted paedophile ian watkins to justice sooner. the independent police complaints commission says that from 2008 the force failed to act on allegations made by seven people about the then lead singer of lostprophets. radical action is needed to help integrate immigrants into society, according to a group of mps. in a new report, the all—party—parliamentary group on social integration warns that the immigration debate has become polarised. it's renewing calls for the government to make english lessons compulsory. the home office says it already funds community cohesion projects, including some focused on language. four out of five businesses have seen the cost of employing staff rise over the last year, according to the british chambers of commerce. the companies say the increases are because of changes to employment legislation, which is aimed at boosting prospects for workers, things like the apprenticeship levy, pensions auto—enrolment and the new higher minimum wage. texas is bracing itself
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for hurricane harvey, which could be the worst storm to hit the us mainland in 12 years. the category 3 storm is expected to make landfall along the state's central coast tonight. there are concerns that torrential rain could bring life—threatening flooding to some parts. the women who won the biggest single lotteryjackpot in american history has already told her bosses she will not be returning to work. mavis wanczyk, a 53—year old mum of two, from massachusettes, beat the odds to scoop the $758.7 million prize in the powerball. that's about £500 million. her chances of winning were just one in 292 million. coming up in the programme later, we will be out with the weather this
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morning. we saw the most beautiful sunrise as we came on air this morning. and it still looks glorious. this was glorious, john. mo farah has brought down the career on “— mo farah has brought down the career on —— the curtain on his track career. it has been an incredible career. it has been an incredible career. it has been a long goodbye, starting with the championships. which we don't mind doing. if anyone deserves a good send off its him. he won his last race on british soil in birmingham. now he will concentrate on the road races. it was exceptionally close. it may well go down as one of farah's most tense races. the four—time olympic champion just managed to hang on at the line, ahead of the man that beat him in the same final at the london world championships earlier this month, muktar edris. farah will now move onto road racing. it feels amazing to win.
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i've really enjoyed my career. it's been a long journey, but i've enjoyed it. i will miss the track and the people. but it's time to start a new chapter in my life, going on to the road to see what i can do. cj ujah claimed the best win of his young career beating the world championjustin gatlin in the 100m, with a season's best of 9.97 seconds. the american gatlin finished back in fourth. get ready for two great goals, one of them a 50 yard effort from everton's new signing gylfi sigurdson. hadjuk split‘s opener in their europa league qualifier was pretty impresssive, only to be outdone by this strike from the new £45 million signing. what a great effort. that was his first goalfor the club. everton won the tie 3—1 to reach the group stages of the europa league. tottenham have been given one of the toughest possible draws in their champions league group this season. they're up against the defending
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champions, real madrid. also in the group is borussia dortmund. spurs will play their home matches at wembley this season, while their new stadium is built and will also come up against former player gareth bale. here is how it looks for the other british sides in the draw. manchester united are in group a alongside former winners benfica. celtic are in another tough group with bayern munich and paris st germain. chelsea match up against atletico. meanwhile, liverpool will be pleased. they face spartak moscow, maribor and sevilla. manchester city too will be happy with their draw, although they face a long trip to ukraine to take on shakhtar donetsk. england men's manager, gareth southgate, has defended mark sampson, the head coach of the women's team, amid allegations of "bullying and discrimination". striker eniola aluko made the claims against sampson, but he's been cleared of any wrongdoing by both an fa investigation and a separate independent inquiry. sampson and the fa deny the allegations and southgate has praised the character of his fellow coach. my feeling is that the culture
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is very good here. so i can't talk about the specific meetings, age groups, but i sense that we are heading in a good direction at saint georges parkhead. the summer was a good example of that. whether you think it's a legitimate contest or a farce, the floyd mayweather and conor mcgregor fight is certainly splitting opinion. the former boxer ricky hatton has labelled it "pure showbiz". mcgregor himself though challenges anyone who doubts it's a genuine contest. theses two men swinging blows to the temple, you know what i mean? people can say what they want. we are going to fight. it's disrespectful from my opinion and i witnessed it from
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pundits and analysts all over, as well as the media, so, look, whatever, they'll see two men go at it and risk it all on saturday night. england can seal the series against west indies with victory in the second test which starts later at headingley. the last test finished inside three days and england are big favourites ahead of this match too. it's one of two tests to take place before this winter's ashes and will seejoe root lead england out at his home ground. and staying with cricket, the test match special 60th anniversary match took place yesterday, with former players and celebrities all involved. here's a bit of action. radio 0ne's greg james dropping this catch, perhaps unsurprsingly because he was broadcasting live on his phone at the time. he made up for it by scoring some runs though to help team boycott to victory. he wasn't the only one getting involved, was he? there you are in a huddle. already prepared, with my cricket shoes. but
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we didn't find any pictures of you batting. i wonder why that is? the team was very kind to me. i had never held a cricket bat before. i was put outlast to bat and it was a20 format andi outlast to bat and it was a20 format and i was number 12. outlast to bat and it was a20 format and i was number12. —— outlast to bat and it was a20 format and i was number 12. —— twenty20. there is no shame in being 12th! i wasn't ashamed. when we got near the and i was looking at the school and we were nearly out of overs, so i thought, well, and we were nearly out of overs, so ithought, well, i and we were nearly out of overs, so i thought, well, i will nip over to the wine tent. i was having a chat with one of the commentators and he said, my dear, i think you might be needed. so i walked out and i missed my spot. the moment i was going to go out, they got out, so we were done. auntie meant to enjoy a drink once you're done? —— aren't you.
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the way to watch cricket is in a relaxed atmosphere, to enjoy the game and converts between shots. i didn't say i was drinking in the tent! just doing research... i missed my bit, but i did do a lot of fielding. great footwear. it was very inappropriate... big brands are always looking for new ways to try and influence and get into our heads. they are trying to do that by getting into our homes. ben's getting a glimpse of how this might change all of our homes in the future. what have you found so far? we had a coffee machine that you operate from a laptop, your ipad or whatever. what else have you found? we've been looking at all. stuff this morning. things that could really make a difference to how we
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live at home. i've maybe gone a little bit low—tech now because these look like ordinary playing cards. they are cards like kids might use, but they are really high tech. nothing special to them, but ifi tech. nothing special to them, but if i pick up the tab key will be able to see that they are special. —— tablet. they come to light. this is clearly a zebra. you can interact with them. there is a monkey. i can put that over here and maybe the zebra put that over here and maybe the ze bra wa nts put that over here and maybe the zebra wants to come here. you get a real sense of what this can be used for. this looks like a bit of fun, maybe education for kids, i'd imagine if it a cereal packet or a magazine and it adds extra value. for advertising, great news. all of this is the brainchild of simon. good morning. you have the amazing title of futurist here. why have you got this setup? with had a look around. it looks like a normal house, jampacked full of technology. why? i've always been into future,
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forward—looking advertising. we see where all of the appliance a two an ai and there will be opportunities and risks for brands to share their stories with consumers in their homes. we want to look at what's happening. does that mean so you can talk to it and get it to talk back? yes, and the sale rates are going at the speed of iphone. there's the opportunity for to advertise at home and we want to look at the right way for brands to communicate with people in their homes and we are studying it by building this experience. thanks very much. come with me and i will introduce you to maisie. good morning. we heard from simon about brands using this. they can sell these things and advertise to us. is it bad news for us? we
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wa nt to to us. is it bad news for us? we want to be sold things like that? the way this will affect our brand advertising has probably been ghastly exaggerated in the short term but it will have a huge impact. traditional advertising still forms the main part of brands' communication. they have got to make sure that the way they use it's a way that people are comfortable with, otherwise it won't work for them. they will have a lot of information as well. they will know when we have run out of things, they will know what in our diary, so therefore what clothes we might need. some might say that's really intrusive, but it such a huge opportunity for brands, isn't it? intrusive, but it such a huge opportunity for brands, isn't mm really change how they work. what it won't work for the brands if people find it uncomfortable. they've got to be sure that people understand how they are using their data and are comfortable. you've also got to add value. so if amazon suggest a song or e—book, that's useful and
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that's the way it works. if you are just shouting at people to buy a new t—shirt, they won't appreciate that. thanks very much. let's talk later. let's come into the kitchen, in this amazing future house. good morning, natalie. we heard about brands being able to use it and that's all too apparent in kitchen, because when we run out of stuff it will get ordered automatically. absolutely. ithink in the future shoppers will spend less time buying the necessities because technology is making a life so convenient and in the future when we run out of things like toilet paper or nappies or cleaning products, it'll just be automatically replenished, which provides shoppers with a huge amount of convenience, but actually it's a huge headache for retailers, high—street retailers, who wonder, if you don't need to go into a store, how do we get shoppers through the doors? the big challenge. thanks for now. so that's a taste of what this place does and
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how it might represent how we shop and do things in the future. but you will notice that maybe we've done away with supermarkets altogether because this is the indoor farm growing some edible stuff, some of it not, but nonetheless a glimpse of perhaps how we might be living over the next 5— 15, 20 years. herbs grown under item pilot light? —— ultraviolet light. yes, but some of them are not in soil. it's like hydroponics. they sit in water that is full of nutrients and those nutrients can be replenished and the plants keep on growing. so it does away with some of the mess and waste of soil. thanks. this morning is all about people getting involved with things. matt is going to get involved with something now i think. he's at the
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seaside in whitby telling us about the weather for the weekend. bank holiday for many people, not in scotland, but looks lovely there? certainly is. very nice morning in whitby, glorious scenes as you can see. dry start, bit of cloud but we are in whitby all morning, part of the lead up to the bank holiday weekend and also to give you a quick heads up on what's coming your way 0n breakfast in a couple of weeks. peter already making use of our giant deckchair, it's been travelling around the country recently, people have been telling us recently, people have been telling us what they love about the seaside and the coastline. let's look at what they have to say. why do i like the british coast? i love those three! aren't they brilliant? it's part of our
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coastline britons series coming our way on the fourth of september, a few more brief blitzes through the morning —— britain. if you're heading to the coast you want it try. —— glimpses. good news, lots of dry weather this weekend —— dry. there is some wet weather to come today, northern ireland and scotland in particular. this morning already showers developing widely across western scotland in particular, some developing to eastern areas later even with the odd rumble of thunder. northern england dry with a variable amount of cloud this morning, sunshine breaking through with a bit ofa sunshine breaking through with a bit of a breeze but further south the breeze is very light, leading to single figures overnight, a few missed all fog patches. clearing with the sunup and that sun will be strong today —— mist and fog patches. —— the sun up. southern areas seeing the best sunshine this morning and through the day, a bit
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more cloud at times through in the north and in northern ireland we have the wettest weather. northern ireland, west of scotland, heaviest rain through the day, not great news, we have seen rain through the day, not great news, we have seen minorflooding there this week. still some drier moments but still some lengthier bursts to come and the odd rumble of thunder in eastern scotland and in northern england, expect more cloud. 0ne northern england, expect more cloud. one or two will see showers later in the day, maybe from mid afternoon onwards. further south it stays dry, sunny and warm with temperatures in the mid—20s compared to the mid—to—high teens in scotland and northern ireland. tonight we will see showers across northern ireland quickly clear, they will last into the night in scotland. some in northern england and the midlands too but many will be dry, the lightest winds in the south with mist patches forming. tonight given a bit more cloud and slightly more breeze for a time, it would be quite as chilly. that takes us into bank holiday weekend, saturday is looking
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fine for many with a few more showers around across england compared to what we have seen today but many will avoid them and lots of showers to begin with in western scotland, gradually easing. western scotla nd scotland, gradually easing. western scotland and northern ireland feeling warmer with a better day and in england and wales, strong sunshine, feeling pleasant with temperatures in the 20s, especially the further south you are. sunday looking bright for most, showers limited to the far north—west of scotland. i'm not going to promise blue skies through the bank holiday weekend, quite a bit of cloud at times and when the sun comes through feeling nice, temperatures in the 20s for some and it could get higher on monday. 0n 20s for some and it could get higher on monday. on monday we could see temperatures get to 28 in southern parts. lots of sunshine to begin with, lasting all day long just about for england and wales, but wet and windy weather arrives into scotla nd and windy weather arrives into scotland and northern ireland. all in all it is a bankroll a day weekend forecast that you can't really complain about. i've mentioned peter —— bank holiday
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weekend. here is the whitby folk week group, the final day of it, joining me are the sheffield morris men, 600 performers through the week, they've been entertaining me all morning. before charlie asks, if you can't beat them... you might as welljoin them. laughter in flip—flops! can we stay on those pictures? i'm not in time, and my? please, let's go not in time, and my? please, let's 9° -- not in time, and my? please, let's go —— am i? it's not everyday you see morris dancing like that! this is one of the highlights of this broadcasting career as a
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meteorologist. he's a natural, isn't he? an absolute natural. can you go now? we are still on new. just a little bit longer. get into the rhythm! —— we are still on new.” wa nt to rhythm! —— we are still on new.” want to see him do it with longer sticks —— on you. we have the sport for you later on. let's deal with a sporting theme, shall we? five years on from the hugely successful london 2012 paralympics the disability charity scope says there has been very little improvement in the way disabled people feel they are treated. the charity says despite the success of the games themselves, a quarter of disabled people feel they didn't deliver a positive legacy. let's discuss this with james taylor from scope and blogger chloe tear. good morning. chloe, tell us about your experience. what have you seen, what changes or what have you not seen what changes or what have you not seen happening that you want to happen? i think the blogging
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community is obviously helping in certain lights. i think my blog has been read more than by the general public since the olympics —— more by. what is it about? it is about cerebral palsy. my experiences with it and anything i go through i will write about it. i think more people may be interested in the topic, so i think over time obviously we're going to get the awareness and the understanding but i don't think we're quite there yet. james, what do you think would have been done more? scope has done is research into this. our research out today shows around a third of the sable people say despite the huge success of the paralympics and paralympic gb, that hasn't translated quite into positive attitude change over the past five years so as chloe
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says, there's more to do to challenge attitudes towards disability and disabled people. what are the attitudes you are most concerned about changing? were concerned about changing? were concerned about changing? were concerned about lots of things, that is discrimination in the workplace or bullying in schools and discrimination to disabled people still happens to frequently today and we need to see more visibility of disability, not just the two weeks where the paralympics run every four years but all the time. chloe, do people separate things out, they look at the paralympics and they see the sporting achievements and the individuals many now know and they separate that out from the people they see on a day—to—day basis and the problems people have? definitely. ithink it will allow us to gain more understanding and by showing the paralympics they understanding and by showing the pa ralympics they can understanding and by showing the paralympics they can see we are able to achieve things, which is important. but then there's the danger that you're going to be
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separating them and, you know, people might say that people with disabilities are inspirational if they do everyday things. yet we are capable of doing that. were sure that be seen? should it be seen... when people are exposed to the paralympics, like you say, great access and inspirational —— where should that be seen? as you say, people with disabilities lead ordinary lives and they aren't necessarily inspirational, they're just doing their thing. should that be seen on soap opera is and on the bbc breakfast soper —— soap opera is sofer —— soap operas. we should be more integrated but not having a elaborate storylines which are all about the disability. so it's not so
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special? we are just like everyone else. the continuity of messages rather than a moment in time is key. absolutely and chloe is right, it's about constant visibility. there are 13 million disabled people in britain but many people say they've never interacted with a disabled person and when many disabled people push hard to getjobs but they person and when many disabled people push hard to get jobs but they are still seen as risky hires, we need to do more in the media and the workplace to ensure disabled people get access. thanks for your time this morning. we will be back with you at the top of the hour. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armargh. police are on the hunt for a group of men involved in the robbery of nearly £2 million worth ofjewellery from a store in forest gate. it happened last month when the men smashed through a wall ofjoyalukkas in green street using a sledgehammer. they were able to crawl through in what detectivies
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described as an audacious raid. eight men, thought to be in their mid—30s, are believed to have been involved. police want anyone with information to get in touch. councillors in kensington and chelsea have agreed a £76 million package to help people who lost their homes in the grenfell tower fire. £40 million will go towards buying homes from private social housing providers and money is being set aside to compensate people who owned flats in the building. a woman who made a string of false rape claims and sexual assault allegations cost police more than £250,000. 25—year—old jemma beale from bedfont has beenjailed for ten years for perjury. she claimed she'd been sexually assaulted or raped by 15 different men. one of the men she accused was given a seven—year prison sentence, which was later quashed. let's have a look at the travel situation now. a good service on the tube so far. 0n the trains, as we've been hearing lots of issues because of engineering work including at waterloo,
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where services are significantly reduced. do check before you travel. 0n the roads, the a12 by the bow underpass is closed southbound because of an accident. in because of an accident. colders green, colders gre is in colders green, colders green road is closed between armitage road and hartford road because of an accident. in deptford, blackford heath road southbound is partially blocked because of an accident. and on the m1 southbound, three lanes are closed because of an accident atjunction 7. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. get set for a lovely day today across the capital, lots of sunshine around, it's going to stay dry and it will feel a couple of degrees warmer than it did yesterday too. we do have some early mist patches around this morning, they'll lift and clear nicely through the morning really very quickly. lots of blue sky and sunshine around and a little bit more fairweather cloud developing into the afternoon.
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the winds are light this morning so pleasantly warm in the sunshine, highs of 24 or 25 and there'll be some late sunshine around this evening too. 0vernight tonight we'll see a little bit more cloud just pushing in from the west at times. maybe a few light showers as we head into the first part of tomorrow morning up to northern home counties as well. a mild start to the weekend on around 15 degrees. so, the bank holiday weekend looks very promising indeed. it does look like it's going to stay dry or mostly dry. just the small chance of one or two heavy showers developing on sunday but for the vast majority, dry, good spells of sunshine and feeling pleasantly warm with temperatures generally up into the mid—20s on saturday, sunday and monday. we did think that monday was going to be a bit cloudier but now we think the sunshine is set to stay. it will turn more changeable, though, from tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with
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naga munchetty and charlie stayt. major travel disruption on the railways as bank holiday engineering work is carried out on some of the country's busiest routes. passengers are warned to expect delays, as services on much of the network are cancelled or restricted. this is london's euston station which will be closed for two days. good morning, it's friday 25th august. also this morning... wi—fi controlled convoys of truck could be tested on roads in england by the end of next year. we're at these historic gardens where proposals for a safer motorway junction are getting some people worried — among them,
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alan titchmarsh. this, along with rhododendrons, magnolias, camellias, would all go. good morning from the house of the future. i'm finding out how top tech like this can change the way we live our lives. in sport, britain's most successful athlete, mo farah, wins the final track race of his career sprinting to victory in a tight finish in the 5,000 metres diamond league meeting in zurich. and matt's by the seaside with the forecast. good morning. i'm here in whitby all morning with the bbc breakfast deckchair ahead of bank holding weekend, and it's a weekend that contains unbelievably quite a lot of dry weather. but today we have some rain, especially for parts of northern ireland and western scotland. full details of that in the forecast in 15 minutes. first, our main story.
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major travel disruption is expected over the weekend as millions prepare for the bank holiday getaway amid engineering works on some of the country's busiest rail routes. 0perators have warned passengers to expect delays, as services between london, the north west and scotland are cancelled and five of london's biggest stations face disruption. 0ne one of the stations being disrupted is london euston, closed completely for the weekend. keith doyle is at london euston station, which will close for two days tomorrow. busy and bustling now. are people trying to get away today instead of over the weekend? good morning from euston station where it will be an incredibly busy day today ahead of the complete shutdown tomorrow and sunday. there will also be disruption right across the networks. no west coast service from scotland, manchester, birmingham into london and out again. 0ther birmingham into london and out again. other key stations in london facing disruption because of
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engineering work and some major routes around the country. network rail says this is because of significant work on major rail projects. they say 17,000 rail engineers will be working on the network this weekend. they say in the end it would be good for passengers but in the meantime passengers but in the meantime passengers travelling this weekend, many of them will find it difficult. travelling by train this bank holiday weekend will be difficult for many, and somejourneys will be impossible. engineering work is taking place at five of london's main stations. waterloo, london bridge, liverpool street and paddington will have greatly reduced services. euston will be closed completely on saturday and sunday. work on hs2 means there will be no trains from scotland and the north of england to london on the west coast main line on saturday and sunday. services from the midlands will only run as far south as northampton. great western services out of paddington to wales will be disrupted until next month with no
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services between newport and cardiff this weekend. king's cross station in london is expected to be very busy. and it won'tjust be the stations. road traffic is expected to be 20% greater compared to last year's summer bank holiday. 5 million people are predicted to take to the roads on monday alone. travel trade organisation abta says nearly a quarter of a million passengers will use heathrow today, and over 300,000 will use gatwick over the weekend. so whether it's planes, trains or automobiles, it's going to be a busy few days. the advice is to check before you leave for your journey, or take the advice is to check before you leave for yourjourney, or take the advice of the rail companies who are saying don't travel unless it's absolutely essential. but there are lots of things to travel for this weekend and lots of things will be affected. there is the rugby league final at wembley, the notting hill
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carnival, many premier league matches that would normally involve supporters using some of those very busy routes that are now disrupted. and there is the edinburgh festival. national rail are saying this is essential work that will transform journeys in months and years to come. they say despite the fact it's a holiday weekend, this is the best time to carry out this important work. some people you're talking to hear this morning say, why does all the work have to be carried out at exactly the same time? it's notjust the railways, with roads and airports also very busy this weekend. not the best travel news to give you this morning. it certainly isn't the best news, but it's news that needs to be delivered. thank you. we'll be speaking to network rail later in the programme. wi—fi controlled convoys of trucks could be on major british roads by the end of next year as part of a plan to cut emissions and reduce congestion. the department for transport says up to three wirelessly connected hgvs will travel together,
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with drivers in each to steer but the speed controlled by the lead vehicle. the aa says it has major safety concerns about the idea — our correspondent andy gill reports. they call it platooning, trucks travelling in wi—fi connected convoy with much less space between them than normal. this dutch project is with two vehicles. a trial just announced here will be with three. it would be more efficient, take up less space on the network, improve fuel efficiency and hopefully help improve costs and savings to the consumer. each lorry has a driver, but the lead cab has control. to think about how three trucks can travel down a road in a platoon, imagine that the lead truck is a giant wi—fi hub, sending out signals on the precise distances and speeds the two
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need to travel at. and the wi—fi on the trailing two trucks can react much more quickly to signals than a human being can. the funding announcement was made at a lancashire truck factory. researchers say because vehicles in platoon are in each othe'rs slipstream, fuel consumption and pollution fall. but one road user's body is sceptical. uk motorways are the most congested in europe. we have more entrances and exits. and if you have a platoon of driverless lorries, it's very difficult to see road signs. it will be difficult to exit the motorway. there will be rigorous safety checks before any platoons are allowed on the road. they will compare real delivery journeys made by platoon trucks with ones made in the traditional way. andy gill, bbc news, lancashire. south wales police missed a number of opportunities to bring convicted paedophile ian watkins to justice sooner.
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the independent police complaints commission says that from 2008, the force failed to act on allegations made by seven people about the then lead singer of lostprophets. radical action is needed to help integrate immigrants into society, according to a group of mps. in a new report, the all party parliamentary group on social integration warns that the immigration debate has become polarised. it's renewing calls for the government to make english lessons compulsory. the home office says it already funds community cohesion projects, including some focused on language. us officials say that the number of american embassy staff affected by hearing loss while working in cuba, has risen to at least 16, after what they believe was a series of deliberate covert attacks. the state department is probing several incidents dating back to september last year in which diplomats are thought to have been hit with a mystery sonic weapon. cuba has denied any involvement. four out of five businesses have seen the cost of employing staff
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rise over the last year according to the british chambers of commerce. the companies say the increases are because of changes to employment legislation which is aimed at boosting prospects for workers — things like the apprenticeship levy, pensions auto—enrolment and the new higher minimum wage. the woman who won the biggest single lotteryjackpot in american history has already told her bosses she won't be returning to work. perhaps not the most surprising part of this story. mavis wanczyk, a 53—year—old mum of two from massachusettes beat all the odds to scoop the $758.7 million prize in the powerball. the weekly wage all of a sudden becomes a bit irrelevant. the first thing i want to do is i just want sit back and relax. i had a pipe dream, and my pipe
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dream has finally come true. i wanted to retire in 12, and it came early. what do you do for work? i work currently at mercy medical center, and i was there for 32 years. are you still there or are you...? i've called them and told them i will not be coming back! laughter that is such a huge sum of money. her odds were won in 292 million. a lucky lady. who needs money when you have a view like this. this is the scene in whitby this morning. we thought we would tempt you. a bank holiday weekend for many, not in scotland, but england, wales and northern ireland. if you have plans this weekend, perhaps heading off to the coast, somewhere glorious like this, if you are then matt will have the weather in a few minutes. also to bear in mind, there will be
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transport problems. it's a good news and bad news. the weather will be nice but if you are trying to get anywhere, particularly on the rail network, major engineering work will be taking place on some of the busiest networks. we're joined now by ross easton from national rail, who is at london euston this morning. euston station busy as normal, it's friday, perhaps busier than normal, because that station will be com pletely because that station will be completely shut for two days, having a big impact. this starts first thing tomorrow morning. that's right. euston station behind me, that will be closed for two days for workaround hs2. we have other work going on around the country this bank holiday weekend, investing £133 million and 17,000 engineers out there to deliver better services for passengers in the future. looking at
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houston, that's the link to so much of the northwest, scotland and other places. —— looking at euston. of the northwest, scotland and other places. -- looking at euston. we have been out communicating the station will be closed and there are alternative travel arrangements in place to make sure passengers are as informed as possible. we will continue to do that today as well. lots of events on across the country, as you mention, and our advice is to check before you travel. in practicalterms, why does the whole station at euston have to do close for the whole two days? what's the work going on that means you can't keep some platforms and operation running? bank holidays when people tend to travel much less. the rail network is much quieter around bank holiday periods, so quieter around bank holiday periods, so it makes it an ideal time to carry out much larger engineering projects. we carry out about 15,000
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railway projects across the country delivering better services for passengers. at bank holiday we can deliver some of the megaprojects. at waterloo we will be delivering a 30% increase in capacity. passenger numbers in last 20 years have doubled. that's why this engineering work is essential, to deliver better ra i lwa ys work is essential, to deliver better railways for passengers in the future. anyone travelling this weekend, what's your advice to them? i'm sorry, ijust missed that question. i think you asked about advice for passengers travelling this week in, and the advice to passengers is to check before you travel. visit the national rail website, where you can find out the latest travel information. you said this is part of a major programme. people understand that work needs to be done. are they going to be many more of these weekends where for
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some people the rail system is effectively grinding to a halt? it's important we carry out these railway upgrades. we need to deliver better services for passengers in the future. we do make service announcements and make sure people are well aware of what's happening in advance. we try to minimise the work done during the day as far as possible. a lot of projects take place overnight. 15,000 projects, the majority of which taking place at night when the train service is not running. 0ver at night when the train service is not running. over a at night when the train service is not running. 0vera bank at night when the train service is not running. over a bank holiday weekend when fewer people travel, we can get in to carry out these megaprojects to deliver better services for passengers. ross houston, thank you for your time, ithink ross houston, thank you for your time, i think a lot of people will not be travelling, if they have that choice. the advice is only travel if you absolutely need to. you might want to be travelling to whitby, where
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matt is this morning. glorious morning there, you have had some fun, you have been dancing, you were in your shorts, flip—flops, you have seen a in your shorts, flip—flops, you have seen a beautiful sunrise, a lovely morning! it certainly has been, getting into the mood for a bank holiday weekend for many. beautiful seaside town of whitby on the coast of north yorkshire, on the mouth of the river, and i have brought the bbc brea kfast river, and i have brought the bbc breakfast deckchair, this will be backin breakfast deckchair, this will be back in full force in a couple of weeks' time for our series on coastal britain. it has been travelling around the uk, finding out what you'll be about the seaside and the coast, and what sort of issues are being phased around the coast. —— faced around the coast. the weather on the coast is a hot topic among many, and you will notice that some were sitting under
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grey skies, but what about the bank holiday weekend? for today, some sunshine for most of you, but there will be some rain too, particularly across parts of northern ireland and western scotland. they have already got the rain in scotland, and it will develop more widely through the day, but some brightness expected between the downpours. a dry start for northern england, a bit more of a breeze today, cloud amounts varying, but the sun is poking through, starting to warm things up a touch. further south, we had clear skies through the night, and we started with temperatures in single figures, but it has warmed up nicely now, the morning mist has cleared. a cracking start to the bank holiday weekend for many, and if you are on holiday at the moment, there can be very few complaints with light winds and strong sunshine. wales will see the best of the sunshine in the south and east, to the north and west some sunshine, but more cloud developing later in the day. in
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northern ireland, we already have outbreaks of rain, not what we needed after the minor flooding this week. i do not think any spot of rain in northern ireland or western scotland, but a few thunderstorms possible to the north—east of scotland, but a bit of sunshine at times for eastern scotland, a few showers. temperatures generally into the teens, maybe mid 20s depending on where you are. a few showers overnight, and that were continuing to scotland, but driving out for the west. —— that will continue into scotland. the vast majority of towns and cities will be in the teens. that takes us into your bank holiday weekend, where you are celebrating it, saturday not looking too bad, there will be a few showers across england and scotland, but very few across england, the vast majority
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will be dry. northern ireland, western scotland, after today, a vastly improved day, feeling warmer. further south, temperatures into the 20s. sunday looking largely dry, i am not promising anywhere clear blue skies, there will be cloud at times, but where sunshine breaks through, strong august sunshine, it will feel warm with most places having a dry day, temperatures into the mid 20s further south. it could get higher still into bank holiday monday, highs of 28 degrees across southern england, much of england and wales dry and sunny. northern ireland sta rts dry and sunny. northern ireland starts fine, but wet and windy weather pushing in through the day, reaching north—west england, northwest wales by the evening, but through much of the day and much of the coming weekend, there will be a lot of dry weather and a reasonable amount of sunshine. if you are heading somewhere like the glorious scenes here at whitby throughout this bank holiday weekend, i hope
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you enjoy. back to you. you know what i have noticed, charlie? again, that gorgeous view of whitby, did you see matt against the really big deckchair, the sizes did not match. if we go to ben in the modern house, he is on a bed, but it looks like a really small bed for really big ben. would you fit in there? your feet would for really big ben. would you fit in there? yourfeet would hang over the end! shall we find out? this is the story of my life, guys, welcome to my world! make longer beds, please! but thatis world! make longer beds, please! but that is not why we are here, we are talking about the house of the future, and this looks like a normal bedroom, apart from the tiny bed, but it is jam—packed full of technology. like in the bathroom, this hi—tech mirror will tell you the date and time, what your shares are doing, if you want to know that sort of stuff. it links with your
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diary, so it knows that if you have got a big meeting at lunchtime and it will rain, you have to take your raincoat to make sure that you have got everything you need. let me introduce you to simon, the chief futurist here, good morning. you have been showing us all sorts of technology? shall we buy a chair in augmented reality? looking at this device, i have casted onto the screen though the viewers can see it, we know where the floor is, touch the bottom right corner, we will choose a chair, and with millimetre accuracy, we can bring a chair into the room. and this is the right size and shape, so you know if it will fit. i can rotate it, i can walk up to it, we can explore it and ca ptu re walk up to it, we can explore it and capture it with the camera. i can share that photograph on my social networks, ask my friends, should i buy blue or red? it looks like a lot offun, buy blue or red? it looks like a lot of fun, but for brands, it is big
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money for them, it gets us to buy stuff where advertising may be losing its power. brands have to find ways to win the hearts and minds of consumers, 0k? find ways to win the hearts and minds of consumers, ok? you have to entertain them, find new ways of telling stories, and augmented reality, virtual reality, mixed reality, virtual reality, mixed reality, these are always for brands to share stuff in exciting ways. let me introduce you to maisie, good morning, we heard from simon about how brands are using this, and we have seen a decline in sort of traditional advertising, maybe we are getting more smart about being sold to — is this the way they could do it in future? you could argue that, in this world, brands are even more important, getting people to actually remember what your brand is is more important, because you need to make sure that when people are ordering batteries or razors, they are not going for the generic term, in which case google or amazon would be able to pick. this is the point,
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i suppose, where the companies know so i suppose, where the companies know so much about us, they know when we need a new razor, when we need new cornfla kes, and they need a new razor, when we need new cornflakes, and they are able to do that automatically, and that is a huge power, knowing that we needed and they can provide it. indeed, but you need to make sure that people are ordering your stuff, which could mean that traditional broadcast, reaching a lot of people at the same time, not necessarilyjust to be, thatis time, not necessarilyjust to be, that is more important, because you need people to be thinking of your brand when they ran out of beer or margarine. thanks very much. natalie is from planet retail, it is so funny, when we look at stuff like this, a connected home, it all looks very familiar, super hi—tech, and thatis very familiar, super hi—tech, and that is a lot of opportunities for brands. technology is fundamentally changing the way that we shop. in the future, we will spend less time buying the necessities, so toilet
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paper, washing powder, you know, these functional purchases willjust be automatically sent when we run low, so this has huge implications on the retail sector, because retailers are struggling to get shoppers into their doors. but amazing convenience for consumers. amazing convenience, some people may find it a little terrifying that companies would know so much about what we need, where we shop, or that sort of thing. do they have a point? yeah, they do, and there is a fine line between technology being helpful and it being creepy, and it depends on personal preferences, but the upside to all this technology is not just convenience but the upside to all this technology is notjust convenience but the ability to offer a much more targeted and personalised offer for consumers. natalie, thanks very much indeed. a taste of what this place can do, but asi taste of what this place can do, but as i showed you earlier, fascinating to see the television talk to the fridge, to the oven, switching it on and off so you don't burn your
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dinner. more from me later. interesting, isn't it? all these different things that could change our lives — if we want to change them. in an attempt to make theatre accessible for all, one company has created a production especially for children who are both deaf and blind. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson was invited to a preview performance to find out how it works. samuel taylor coleridge's kubla khan, adapted into a 50—minute musical show for children who are deaf—blind. but how exactly do you create a production for young people who can't see or hear? well, if we can't relate to them by those senses, what other senses are there? there's scent, there's taste, there's touch, there's a sense of movement you have, the kinaesthetic sense, so we often use movable seating. and the cast of kubla khan aim to create a stately pleasure dome by interacting with the children using water, sand and pebbles.
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it'sjust beautiful. i mean, it'sjust an honour to kind of do it, and to get to have this communication with these kids, really. you almost look like you're getting emotional. i am, i am, it's probably because i'm going to do it in 20 minutes and i can't wait, it's going to be great. and music also has a crucial role to play. people don't just hear with their ears. some people say as much as 60% of what you hear you pick up through your body. other people say it's 40%. the vibrations are the essential part, and then how you play with those textures so you can actually feel them, so that you can sort of almost swim through them. afterwards, it was clear what an impact the show had made both on the children and their parents.
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what bit did james particularly like, then? i think he liked the moving water, definitely the moving water, because he loves bath time, for instance, so he can relate to that sort of thing. and again, music, loves his music. it's not very often that she enjoys something that she's part of, and she was really part of this, so it was a lovely time for both of us. you're beaming. yeah, maybe, nearly crying. there's nothing wrong with crying. and emily's thoroughly enjoyed herself? she really did, she really enjoyed herself. she was clapping earlier on. and yes, she really did enjoy herself. tomorrow, this ground—breaking production will have its official premiere in canterbury. colin paterson, bbc news. having a great effect on those kids. it certainly works. time to get the
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news, travel and weather where you are. the bank holiday forecast looking pretty promising, looking forward to sunshine and warm. high pressure building from the south with low pressure to the north—west bringing a weather front which brings rain to northern ireland and that frontal track eastward to western scotland. the further south you are, the drier, but showers in western scotland, with some showers heavy and thundery. the potentialfor localised flooding across northern ireland. as we head into the
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northern part of england, showers moving in. further south it is drier with quite a bit of cloud around. limited brightness coming through across wales, devon and cornwall, but the best of the sunshine the further south and east you are with temperatures up to 23 or maybe 24 celsius. a slight improvement for eve ryo ne celsius. a slight improvement for everyone tomorrow, just a few showers across scotland, but also sunshine as well. a much better day in northern ireland with limited brightness. yet again, the best of the conditions, the further south and east you are tomorrow. feeling fresh across the north with temperatures of 17—19. further south—east, perhaps getting up to 25 or 26 celsius. sunday, another largely fine day to look forward to, staying dry with a few showers coming into western scotland. for the bulk of the country, dry and bright and looking good as we head into monday. a dry start with
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high—pressure hanging on. it's weather front will bring rain across north and western parts for monday. the further south and east you are, a little dry and bright weather to look forward to. it will be windy around the rain band with highs of 26 celsius. this is business live from bbc news with ben bland and jamie robertson. samsung scion jailed. the de facto boss of the south korean giant faces five years in jail for crimes ranging from bribery to perjury. live from london, that's our top story on friday the 25th of august. as a court in south korea finds samsung heirjay y lee guilty of paying bribes, we ask what it means for the future of the company. plus, the flying kangaroo bounces ahead of its rivals. qantas has posted blockbuster
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results today, despite cut—throat competition. this is how the european markets look at the start
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