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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 29, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. north korea's most provocative missile launch for years, as it fires a ballistic rocket over japan. siren. warning sirens were sounded injapan as people were told to take cover. at north korea's "reckless" actions. foreign secretary borisjohnson has expressed outrage at north korea's "reckless" actions. good morning. it's tuesday the 29th of august. also this morning: as texas deploys the entire national guard to deal with the worsening floods, 30,000 residents are left needing emergency shelter. it is probably 10—15 feet deep back there. your entire house is
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submerged? everybody's is. companies will be named and shamed if their investors rebel over bosses pay. that's one part of the government's plan to tackle boardroom excesses. but critics say the plans don't go far enough. i'll have the details. good morning. the sport. a huge upset at the us open as britain's world number seven johanna konta is knocked out in the first round. and carol has the weather. good morning. good morning. a s-way split. breezy, cloudy, patchy rain but in the south and south—east, sunny and once again very warm. more details and 15 minutes. thank you. first, our main story. the united nations security council is to hold an emergency meeting this afternoon, after north korea fired a ballistic missile over northern japan. the missile, which fell into the sea, triggered loudspeaker alerts warning people on the island of hokkaido to take cover. japan's prime minister said the launch represented a serious threat to his nation. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, said he was outraged. 0ur correspondent, yogita limaye,
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reports from the south korean capital of seoul. siren. japan being woken up by a siren on tuesday morning as a north korean missile through over the country. the rocket was launched from near pyongyang and flew over the island of hokkaido for splitting into three parts and landing in the sea to the ease. it is just the latest in a series of military missile test conducted by north korea this year, but more serious because it went overjapan. the last time that happened was nearly two decades ago. translation: the outrageous act of firing a missile over our country is a serious threat. that was prime minister shinzo abe. at a military base near tokyo, a military drill was conducted in response to the missile
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launch. across the sea in south korea, joint exercises are under way with american troops. they are held every august, and north korea usually responds with a show of strength. last year it conducted a nuclear test in retaliation. this year it has flown and missile which had the potential to cause serious harm. ——a missile. a strong message that despite international pressure, pyongyang has no desire to stop. bbc news. joining us from japan is our tokyo correspondent, rupert wingfield—hayes. good morning to you. what is the response there? we have heard from... audio issues. it seems... shinzo abe called at unprecedented. sorry, we lost you. could you start ain? sorry, we lost you. could you start again? absolutely. i think forjapan
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the fact the prime minister has called this unprecedented represents how they view this as something extraordinary that has not happened before. we have seen it from north korea before, but not a military ballistic missile going overjapan in this way before. it obviously makes japan feel extremely vulnerable. it also poses a major challenge now for japan vulnerable. it also poses a major challenge now forjapan and the united dates how to respond to this. there will be an emergency un meeting in new york. —— united states. there will be new sanctions announced that the there will be limited options. if there is no response, pyongyang may feel they have gotte n response, pyongyang may feel they have gotten away with it and will be encouraged to do this more, keep pushing the envelope, and doing more of these launches in the future. thank you so much. more for you later in the programme. and now to the next story.
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the "catastrophic" flooding in texas is expected to get much worse, with officials warning they expect nearly half—a—million people to seek assistance. with waters still rising, helicopters and hundreds of specialist vehicles have been deployed in the rescue effort. an emergency has also been declared in neighbouring louisiana, which is in storm harvey's path. nada tawfik reports from houston. waiting for help to arrive as the floods reached new heights. all day, emergency responders, neighbours, and even complete strangers, have a nswered and even complete strangers, have answered pleas for help from those trapped across euston. and still it has not been in our. —— houston. there is so much water. —— enough. resources have been overwhelmed by the epic scale of this disaster. 20 helicopters have been flying missions and the entire national
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guard of the state has been deployed to aid in the search and rescue. thousands have been saved, but many more have been desperate. from midnight until where we are today, 290 have been rescued. there are many other people out there in stressful situations and we intend to get to every one of them. they are struggling to stay a —— afloat. every major highway has been affected. the city's infrastructure is being strained. it has been based since it made landfall. but communities in texas are just now finding the impact. authorities fear that the worst is yet to come. president trump will travel to the state today. he has promised rapid federal aid. texas will need it. they face years of recovery in the wa ke they face years of recovery in the wake of this unprecedented storm. bbc news, texas.
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amazing pictures. we will talk to people caught up in it later, in about 20 minutes. brexit negotiations are continuing in brussels after the eu told the uk it needed to get serious about the withdrawal talks. the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, has expressed concern about the lack of progress made so far and accused britain of ambiguity on key issues like its exit bill. the uk brexit secretary david davis said both sides had to show "flexibility and imagination." britain's busiest railway station is open for business as usual this morning after nearly a month of disruption, but some minor delays are expected due to signalling issues. almost half of the platforms at waterloo station have been closed since the 5th of august as engineers made changes to accommodate longer trains. network rail says it's working hard to minimise delays to passengers. hundreds of the uk's biggest companies will be made to reveal how much more their chief executives are paid compared to their average employee under government measures
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due to be announced later today. the plans are designed to increase boardroom transparency in publicly listed companies. firms who face significant shareholder opposition to executive pay deals will also be named and shamed on a new register. more than half of us mis—sold payment protection insurance, or ppi, may not yet have claimed compensation. the regulator, the financial conduct authority, is launching a campaign later today encouraging people to claim before a deadline runs out in two years' time. so far, £27 billion has been paid out in compensation with major banks, having set aside more than £37 billion. the number of uninsured drivers on british roads may be increasing for the first time in more than a decade according to new data obtained by the bbc. the motor insurance bureau, which processes claims by victims of uninsured drivers, say there was an increase of 10% tojuly of this year. that rise could suggest that there are more uninsured people driving on uk roads,
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but increases in the overall number of drivers and the effect of claims management companies may also be a factor. my my children have been asking me for the last six weeks when does strictly come dancing start? the wait is nearly over. strictly come dancing's class of 2017 lined up at a glitzy red carpet event last night to mark the show‘s first launch since the death of sir bruce forsyth. judge bruno tonioli paid tribute to the show‘s former host on a night when the sequins and sparkles were out in force. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba mingled with the stars and sent us this report. glitterballs and glamour, the new celebrities. they gathered for their launch show. the first to be
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broadcast since the death of sir bruce forsyth. there will of course bea bruce forsyth. there will of course be a special tribute. he will always be a special tribute. he will always be with us. he is part of the show, oui’ be with us. he is part of the show, our lives, the country. he is with us. our lives, the country. he is with us. as in previous series, the programme will be aiming to deliver entertainment, and perhaps even the odd surprise. richard, we saw you coming down the red carpet. you have got some moves. i have. i don't know if they will be good for anyone. but they are bubbling like a volcano. you have watched strictly come dancing as if you are. as a co ntesta nt ? dancing as if you are. as a contestant? i will make sure i enjoyed it. —— as a viewer. i hope i don't get too nervous. have you got any advice? she is so excited about me doing this. i have not got advice yet. but she will give me many tips.
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you are the first contestant to be in the show with a disability. how do you feel being a trailblazer?m shows the way that life in the show is going in general. the country is becoming more inclusive. as well as new contestants, there is also a new head judge. taking over from new contestants, there is also a new head judge. taking overfrom len goodman. i don't feel much pressure. i have a good amount of experience. we will see on the night. next month's launch show will give the public their first chance to see the new contestants in action. it will also be an opportunity for the programme and the viewers to remember sir bruce, a man who made strictly come dancing one of the most popular shows on tv. bbc news. they have a few weeks to
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loosen up. let's get an update on the flooding situation in texas, which has dominated headlines all over the weekend. there's also been a declaration of a state of emergency in neighbouring louisiana. cbs news correspondent, meg oliver, is in houston for us now. tell us, what is the latest situation? it hasn't even stopped raining! the rainjust won't situation? it hasn't even stopped raining! the rain just won't quit. it pounded houston for a fourth consecutive day. it just it pounded houston for a fourth consecutive day. itjust picked up. it has gotten a0 inches of rain. by tomorrow morning, we could have another foot. nothing is tomorrow morning, we could have anotherfoot. nothing is getting in the way of search and rescue cruise. there have been rescue operations
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all day. they have asked people to put flags on their roofs so they can be located. it has been an overwhelming job for the first responders. they have been asking for volunteers and the volunteers have responded. all day long we have seen have responded. all day long we have seen dozens and dozens of people driving into houston trying to navigate the flood ravaged highways. they were telling fishing boats behind them. some people have come all the way from louisiana. one person came from the new york police department who drove all the way down. they are here to help. they are willing to stay as long as it ta kes to are willing to stay as long as it takes to rescue the remaining people still trapped. while we are talking to you we are seeing pictures of people being rescued. overnight i read desperate messages of people on social media reporting they are on roofs and needing help. what is
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going on? social media has really played an important role in all of this. there was one picture, a very moving picture, of senior citizens that were in waist high water. that was as soon as hurricane harvey hit. the owners of the care home could not get to them. they put it on social media. quickly, the rescue teams were able to rescue them. that is the kind of thing that has been going on over and over again. if you cannot get there, at least you know people are being heard, cries for help are being heard. 75,000 people have called the 911 system. on an average day they get 8000. thank you very much indeed. and now someone else in the us. the us open. not good news for the finest of britain.
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we expected so much from johanna konta after wimbledon. playing on a surface that is not her favourite. you would expect she would do better at the us open. it hasn't gone well. the world number seven was among the favourites for the title. she could have ended the tournament as world number one. the world number 78 crawled back to pull off one of her biggest victory is. juana contests said she simply played better. kyle edmund is through to the next round. the british youngster outside the top 200 has also made it through. england will look to bowl out the west indies today to secure
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victory in the second test at headingley. england built a lead of over 300 runs yesterday, before declaring in the final session. and alex oxlade chamberlain is on the brink ofjoining chelsea from rivals arsenal. the england midfielder has started every game for the gunners this season, but has refused a deal to remain at the emirates with just a year left on his contract. iam sure i am sure we will be talking about that story in the paper review in a moment. not a happy camp. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. details on houston as well as the local weather. when harvey made landfall, he was a category format. --4.
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landfall, he was a category format. ——a. part of the problem with him is that he is half onshore and half inland. he is driving further inland and weakening that one. warm waters of the gulf of mexico in the night it is still picking up a source of energy. all that water is being deposited as we have seen footage. you can see the amount of rainfall, over one metre which has left the catastrophic situation that we have got. this is what's left of harvey. an improving the situation across parts of texas. bringing some less than favourable situation is for the wheezy armour. turning coolerfor ask, parts of the south—east could see that once again. a weather front
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is sinking south, introducing a fair bit of cloud. breezy in the north, sunshine and showers. in the south, cloud. some patchy rain coming out of this and some murky conditions. the same across wales. drifting into northern england, this is where our weather front is resting. northern england, this is where our weatherfront is resting. for scotland, northern ireland and far north england, eight writers start with sunshine and a few showers. with the isobars, also fairly breezy. temperatures in aberdeen starting at about 10 degrees. parts of the far north thing sunshine. here is this weather front as we drift into the south—east. some cloud this morning and into the afternoon. could produce the odd shower. here is where we will see the highest temperatures. in some parts of the south—east, we could get up to 28 degrees. all aware we have got the cloud. in the north,
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temperatures not dissimilar to what we saw yesterday. a range from the mid— — high teens. getting into the south—east and bringing cloud with it, clearer skies. south—east and bringing cloud with it, clearerskies. showers south—east and bringing cloud with it, clearer skies. showers following behind. a band of rain coming from the south—west. meeting in the direction of lincolnshire. tonight, temperatures generally in double figures. cooler in rural areas. tomorrow, two bands of rain in the south—east. north of that, sunshine and showers. quite easy. in the south—east, we could have 28. there could be a temperature of the least 10 degrees. into the weekend, just to show you the contrast, some sheltered parts of scotland could be looking at a touch of frost. what a contrast. time to have a look at the papers.
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the launch of strictly is all over the papers. mollie is one of the favourites this year. and brexit talks descend into a slanging match as we are told to behave seriously. yesterday, we mentioned a child who was put into a foster family, a christian girl who was put in to a muslim care home. and i liked this story, you are never too old to start getting fit. even if you start
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in your a0s start getting fit. even if you start in youra0s and start getting fit. even if you start in your a0s and 50s, it can halve your risk of a stroke. it is never too late. the daily mirror, strictly is all over, and breast cancer statins. painkillers in racing blood pressure for arthritis sufferers. also quite a lot of pictures of the magic weather from the bank holiday. i have talked before about the bank of mum and dad helping people buy houses, now there is a story in the telegraph about parents having to fork out for rent for their kids as well. research found that parents will find {2.3 billion of rental payments in 2017, on top of the over $6 billion that they have paid out
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in mortgage repayments on behalf of their children. we talked this morning about plastic bags. quite an incredible story. we have to pay 5p in most stores for a plastic bag. we we re in most stores for a plastic bag. we were talking about how tesco are going to start charging more than that. in kenya, it is quite different. if you use a plastic bag, you could face four years in prison. they have got the toughest laws against pollution. anyone who sells or uses a plastic bag would face prison and fines. even if you arrive at the airport as a tourist, if you have duty—free in a plastic bag and you leave the airport, you are in trouble. you have to leave them at the airport. i will chat about arsenal in my next autumn. i don't
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wa nt to arsenal in my next autumn. i don't want to miss this story. this is the world's leading mammal, saying that middle—aged men need to be careful in lycra —— mamil. he says, never wear an aerodynamic helmet unless you are taking part in a time trial at the olympics. good advice. see you both later on. texas is preparing for more flooding as storm harvey continues to move through the state. thousands of people have already been rescued in houston and officials are expecting another half—a—million people to seek assistance over the coming days. let's speak now to alan becerill who's at home in houston, in the centre of some of the worst flooding. what's the situation where you are now? good morning. thank you for having
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me. right now we still have reined in the area. it comes and goes. sometimes it is light, sometimes it is heavy. conditions keep changing every hour around the area. i live close to the buffalo by you, one of the biggest exit damns in the area —— bayou. —— dams. a reservoir in the area, if that opens, that will make the area a lot worse here because it has already experienced a lot of water. you think you will have to leave your home soon? the condition from the authorities is, if you are safe in your home, stay
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where you are. most of the roads are blocked. the major interstate highways are on the way. it is difficult to go anywhere. close to downtown, there is shelter. authorities have created that. right now, they have close to 5000 people in that area. they keep moving people from the south and the south—west, from the west and north, you can see the authorities going back and forward with helicopters, trucks, fire trucks. so it is a very challenging situation right now. getting water supplies, nonperishable foods, that is all we can do at this point in time. fortu nately, can do at this point in time. fortunately, we have not lost electricity, that is a big advantage. hopefully it will stay that way. thank you for talking to us. please stay safe. moving now to
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a town outside of houston. what is going on there at the moment? to be honest, we have been pretty lucky. it is still raining, it has been raining constantly since friday afternoon. especially the last12— 2a hours, they have been horrific. the systems around here are keeping us the systems around here are keeping us above water, but like everyone else, we need to keep an eye on things. we need to keep an eye on the bayous. i have been very fortu nate to the bayous. i have been very fortunate to this point but i have to keep an eye on the situation closely. talking about supplies, can you get the food and water that you need? we pretty much stocked up before this hurricane hit, i went to
quote
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some local supermarkets. the ones that were open and had very long lines. very limited access to anything. i would honestly say that thatis anything. i would honestly say that that is a major concern of mine, as well as flooding, getting my hands on groceries and basic things that you need to live. lots of luck, please stay safe. thank you for joining us. the scale of flooding is terrible, it is getting worse. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. the unsolved murder of a palestinian cartoonist who was shot dead in london 30 years ago is being reinvestigated. naji salim hussain al—ali,
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who worked as a political cartoonist for a newspaper in kuwait, was shot in the head as he walked to his office in knightsbridge in 1987. police believe new information could now come to light. hundreds of specialist cleaners have spent the night clearing up tonnes of rubbish left after the notting hill carnival. dozens of streets have been swept before being given a deep clean with jet washers. during the carnival, all street bins are removed — meaning most of the rubbish is dumped on the ground. we have 200 employees working right through the night, they finish that probably six in the morning. we collect roughly about 300 tons of waste during that carnival period. as you imagine, it is all sorts of things, dusty bottles, glass, food, you name it. a hospital in kent has decided to ban smoking and e—cigarettes in outdoor areas. darent valley hospital in dartford will go smoke free in all public
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places from october, meaning people will no longer be permitted to smoke in designated shelters. the move follows a series of complaints about on—site smokers. a look at the travel now. it's all looking good on the tubes. but on the trains — upgrade works at waterloo are over—running. so platforms one to 1a remain closed. south western railway are warning of delays for most of the day. and on southeastern, there are no trains to and from charing cross, waterloo east or london bridge until saturday for engineering works. trains are diverting to cannon street, victoria or blackfirars. on the roads, this is notting hill gate where the carnival clean up i mentioned earlier has just finished. that's still closed at the moment. let's have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. looking like another warm and sunny day today. things are on the turn. make the most of it. yesterday, largely dry with some sunshine around. temperature wise, very much dependent on whereabouts you are. cloud increasing from the
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north—west, a cold front is approaching. although we are staying in the warmerair, approaching. although we are staying in the warmer air, the further south is too, the more chance you have of reaching 27 degrees. the north—west, likely to get to just below the mid— 20s. overnight, things are little cool 20s. overnight, things are little cool. a bit more comfortable for sleeping. temperature 13— 1a degrees. some rain coming through, and a northerly wind picking up. outbreaks of rain for much of the day, dry spells in between. a much wetter day. shocking temperatures compared with the past couple of days. only about 17 degrees. first thing on thursday, the back of the rain. brightening up to some sunny spells. sunshine around on friday, we may see a few showers dotted around. could be on the sunbury site. temperatures returning to where they should be for this time of year for thursday and friday. i'm back with the latest
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from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello. this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. we'll have news and sport injust a moment. and also on breakfast this morning, we'll be live at the new billion pound queensferry crossing between edinburgh and fife where last night the first ceremonial crossings over are there more uninsured drivers on our roads? new figures suggests there are and we'll be finding out how that's affecting our premiums. and exploring the psychopathic mind, using new letters written by moors murderer ian brady, a new documentary looks at whether psychopaths are born or made? a fascinating question, that, isn't it? but now, a summary of this morning's main news. the united nations security council is to hold an emergency meeting this afternoon, after north korea fired
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a ballistic missile over northern japan. the missile, which fell into the sea, triggered loudspeaker alerts warning people on the island of hokkaido to take cover. japan's prime minister said the launch represented a serious threat to his nation. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, said he was outraged. let's go to our news correspondent yogida limaye, who joins us now from the south korean capital of seoul. good morning. what has the reaction been? we have seen a strong response from south korea. the president has ordered his military to display overwhelming force against north korea. four south korean fighter jets conducted a live bombing drill against the north korean leadership, against the north korean leadership, a mock drill conducted here. it is significant. in the past three weeks all we have heard from the president is diplomacy and a peaceful resolution to the situation. but the
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latest testing from north korea seems to have left him with no option but to respond with force. we also know that top military officers from south korea and the us have spoken to each other and have said more measures are coming, but they have not said what they will be. thank you so much. the "catastrophic" flooding in texas is expected to get much worse, with officials warning they expect nearly half—a—million people to seek assistance. with waters still rising, helicopters and hundreds of specialist vehicles have been deployed in the rescue effort. an emergency has also been declared in neighbouring louisiana, which is in storm harvey's path. brexit negotiations are continuing in brussels after the eu told the uk it needed to get serious about the withdrawal talks. the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier has expressed concern about the lack of progress made so far and accused britain of ambiguity on key issues like its exit bill. the uk brexit secretary david davis said both sides had to show "flexibility and imagination."
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the source of a suspected chemical haze which drifted in from the sea yesterday in sussex is still not known. people on several beaches had to be evacuated and around 150 people received hospital treatment after reporting vomiting and irritation. officers say they don't now believe the toxic cloud came from northern france. more than half of us who were mis—sold payment protection insurance, or ppi, may not yet have claimed compensation. the financial conduct authority, is launching a campaign today encouraging people to claim before a deadline runs out in two years' time. so far, £27 billion has been paid out in compensation. now, notting hill carnival, it a lwa ys now, notting hill carnival, it always throws up something. have you
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seen this? i have not. a dancing policeman has become the star of this year's notting carnival, after video of him showing off his moves went viral on the internet. pc daniel graham kept crowds entertained with his body—popping. he's no stranger to taking centre—stage though, he was also a contestant on last year's britain's got talent. look at that! where does he... how did he learn that? absolutely fantastic. look at the crowd. the quy fantastic. look at the crowd. the guy on the pa was giving him some love. just get him involved in the next few weeks. was a brilliant idea. i love that they were trying to persuade him to start dancing and he is pretending he doesn't want to.
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i watched it 25 times yesterday and you start noticing things happening in the background. there are a couple having a an argument in the background. i was transfixed in it. how is that for drama? i have got some drama for you, i am afraid. a dramatic opening day at the us open where maria sharapova beat world number two simona halep. sharapova was playing in herfirst grand slam event since her drugs ban. and britain'sjohanna konta suffered a shock first—round defeat against unseeded serbian aleksandra krunic. the world number seven was among the favourites for the title and could have ended the tournament as world number one. konta won the first set, but the world number 78 fought back to pull off one of her biggest victories. it would be quite obnoxious of me to come in here expecting that i have a right to be in the second round. i am very much right to be in the second round. i am very much aware right to be in the second round. i am very much aware that to get that opportunity i need to work very hard. so, me losing in the first
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round is not ideal, as it is not for anybody. anybody coming here wants to be in for as long as possible. but i lost to a better player today. u nfortu nately, but i lost to a better player today. unfortunately, that is how sport goes. and heather watson's poor run at flushing meadows continues. she was knocked out by alize cornet in saight sets in the first round. despite winning the junior tournament in 2009, it's the seventh successive year the british number two has gone out in the first round. she's yet to win a match at the us open as a senior. it was a better day for britain's men though. kyle edmund won his first round match against robin hasse in straight sets. he's joined in the second round by youngster cameron norrie after his opponent, dmitry tursonov retired through injury in the third set. norrie, who is ranked outside the world's top 200, was leading by two sets to love at the time. england have a lead of 321 over the west indies in the second test going into the final days play at headingley. england had the better of day four,
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with six batsmen scoring at least half centuries in the second innings. ben stokes, getting himself 58. but the innings of the day went to moeen ali, who scored 8a off just 93 balls. a win for england will seal the series. the last day pitch, as a spinner, you always look how it will go. nice for the seamers. it is heart when it is overcast. hopefully i can get out to bowl tomorrow. —— hard. with the football transfer window closing in two days' time clubs are frantically finalising deals. ant it appears that alex oxlade chamberlain is set to join chelsea from rivals arsenal. the england midfielder has started every game for the gunners this season, but has refused a deal to remain at the emirates with just a year left on his contract.
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arsenal are looking to make some money from his transfer now, rather than lose him for nothing next summer. tour de france champion chris froome is considering competing in the world championships in norway next month. froome, who's currently leading the vuelta a espana, says he's considering both the team and individual time trials. he last rode in the world championships in 2013 when gb won bronze in the team event. you would think he might want a rest. great britain's ashley mckenzie was eliminated on day one at the world judo championships in budapest. the two—time olympian lost in his opening bout in the under 60 kilo category. britishjudo has sent a team of 12 athletes to the event in hungary including rio olympic bronze medallist sally conway who fights on friday. that is the thing with judo, one mistake and it is over, and i made that mistake. i will assess it. i had to try my hardest to get out of
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the pinning, but unfortunately i did not. i promised you a story about arsenal. they are on every front page. it is talking about the broken dressing room. they were defeated a-o dressing room. they were defeated a—0 on the weekend. you would imagine arsene wenger would have got an angry, raged, been mortified. according to this he was silent. he was so angry he did not speak. but you might want him to have something to say. what is going on with them? maybe he needs to be more vocal. to say. what is going on with them? maybe he needs to be more vocallj think fans want him to be furious. they want anger. interesting to see what happens in the next game. thank you. britain's busiest railway station is open for business as usual this morning after nearly a month
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of disruption but some minor delays are expected due to signalling issues. almost half of the platforms at waterloo station have been closed since the fifth of august as engineers made changes to accommodate longer trains. our reporter, simon clemison, joins us from waterloo now. simon, are services running as expected? good morning. so, what are the timetable is looking like for today? any delays? good morning. listen to this. it is the gentle buyers of the early—morning commute. —— buzz. it might be strange to want to listen to it after the bank holiday weekend. but that is what it is about. getting waterloo station back up about. getting waterloo station back up to full capacity, in fact, even greater capacity. that is what this engineering work has been about. i have to say, it has not gone according to plan for networkrail this morning. you can see delays and
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cancellations. there have been £800 million worth of engineering work undertaken here to create longer platforms and have four longer trains. it has been described as some of the biggest and most complex work ever done by the company. for that reason, they say they are having complexities and problems with signalling this morning. for safety, it is putting delays on the early services. how that will pan out during the day, we don't know. i have seen trains starting to come and go from here, so it is looking hopeful. and also to say, it is confusing, we have seen works at euston and so on, london bridge. a whole series of works peaked during
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the bank holiday weekend. they are trying to get back to normality. they may be doing it. it does not look very busy. you get the feeling many people are still on holiday. look very busy. you get the feeling many people are still on holidaym isa many people are still on holidaym is a slow return to normal. what an amazing bank holiday yesterday. terrible weather elsewhere in the world. we will have that soon. the headlines. north korea has fired a missile over northern japan in a move the japanese prime minister has called an "unprecedented" threat to his country. president trump has pledged his full support for the state of texas as the region continues to be hit by "catastrophic" flooding caused by tropical storm harvey. yesterday saw the hottest late—august bank holiday monday on record, with 28.2 degrees celsius at holbeach in lincolnshire. before we get the latest from carol, our cameras have been out and about capturing your fun in the sun, let's take a look music playing.
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it sounded like a grade two piano piece. good morning. today, somewhere in kent could hit 21 degrees. another statistic is that, if you are at all moral yesterday, you will notice a huge difference. the temperature will pick up through the day. for many of us, cool. quite a bit cooler than yesterday for some. it is also fairly easy. this weather front is
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fairly easy. this weather front is fairly weak, producing quite a lot of cloud and murky conditions. patchy rain across south—west england and wales. extending through yorkshire. to the north, a brighter start. the same across northern ireland. one or two showers and a brighter start across scotland. temperatures dropping, and showers mainly in the north and west. 1a celsius at eight o'clock in newcastle. then, back into some clearer skies in the south—east and east anglia. temperatures picking up quickly. temperature is flirting of the coast of kent, showers could come off the shore or push away. through the day, that weather front pushing south—east. it won't get
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here with the wind offshore. feeling nice, high temperatures up to 28 degrees. on the other side of that front, much cooler than it was yesterday. and it will be the same underneath the weather front. tonight and overnight, this weather front pushing down into the south—east. some spots of rain. showers coming in on the breeze from the northern half of the country. we have got a band of rain across south—west england, wales, into the midlands. heading in the direction of yorkshire. not a cold night, but it will be in the countryside. tomorrow, a band of rain. a second one coming back into the south—east. that will have an inverse impact on our temperatures. tomorrow could be 10 degrees lower than today. on the other side, back into a cocktail of sunshine and showers. breezy in the north, high temperatures 16— 17.
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thank you. hundreds of the uk's biggest companies will be made to reveal how much more their chief executives are paid compared to their average employee. it's part of government plans to increase transparency in the boardroom. steph‘s got all the details. the government are trying to do something about it. the pay packages of some of our top bosses can be tens of millions of pounds. sometimes these high pay packets are challenged by the company's shareholders — but that hasn't stopped many of them getting through. today's measures are designed to change that. under the proposals firms that have seen a shareholder revolt on pay will be named on a new public register. this is one step removed from the original proposal which was to give shareholders a veto on excessive executive pay. hundreds of our biggest companies will also be forced to reveal how
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much their chief executives get compared to their average employee. and there are new measures to ensure the employee's voice is heard in the boardroom. but it's a step back from having workers on the committees that set the pay of the top bosses. let's talk to dr roger barker who's from the institute of directors. good morning. what are your thoughts on this? will it have much of an impact? we welcome this as a broadly sensible package of measures, but i don't think it is going to have a huge impact. if you look at what the prime minister proposed about a year ago, it is a much less ambitious proposal. that is because of the politics of racks that and everything that has happened over the last year. broadly speaking, we welcome it. what are your thoughts on how we solve the problem of controversy around ceo pay?m on how we solve the problem of controversy around ceo pay? it is very important that investors continue to play a very act gives role in holding ceo pay to account. they have shareholder votes every
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year which they can use to show their discontent or a approval. they have got to keep the pressure on. it is shareholders that should be holding companies to account. the prime minister was talking about how the excesses of some bosses are undermining confidence in the social fabric of the country. do you agree? yes, if you look at the pay of losses of large companies over the last10— losses of large companies over the last 10— 15 years, it has really outstripped the performance of the companies themselves and the economy asa companies themselves and the economy as a whole. i don't think that does anything good to trust in uk businesses. wards and ceos, shareholders, they all have a responsibility to try and get this issue under control. another idea is about having employees' voices heard in the boardroom. of course, that means you have to have an employee in the boardroom. what do you think that will mean in practice? what
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they are proposing is that companies are givena they are proposing is that companies are given a choice as to how they can include the employee voice in the boardroom. there are various options given to companies. i think thatis options given to companies. i think that is a better approach than saying, you must have an employee sitting on your board or committee, because i think companies are different. they have different ways of taking account of the employee voice. getting a bit more flexibility to companies i think is a good reaction to these proposals. if you would like to share your views, please get in touch with us. it was the spanish soap that the bbc hoped would bring a little sunshine to the tv schedules, but eldorado lasted only for one year. 25 years on and you may be surprised to learn that the set is still standing, in a forest near to the costa del sol. our arts correspondent david sillito
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has been in search of eldorado, and asks if, in the age of brexit, is it the right time to revisit the idea of a euro soap? hello. i am looking for eldorado. 0k, hello. i am looking for eldorado. ok, i have slightly exaggerated how ha rd ok, i have slightly exaggerated how hard it is to find, but here it is, the original set of the short lived so, eldorado. intact, and abandoned. it all feels a bit indiana jones. welcome. he is not yourfather!
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there has been a rather unfortunate accident. one of its main styles was polly perkins. —— stars. accident. one of its main styles was polly perkins. -- stars. iwouldn't give her any more brandy. polly perkins. -- stars. iwouldn't give her any more brandylj polly perkins. -- stars. iwouldn't give her any more brandy. i asked her, fancy a trip to eldorado? what are your thoughts looking at it?m isa are your thoughts looking at it?m is a terrible shame, what a waste! there were good act is, good storyli nes there were good act is, good storylines here. it was beautiful. would you want to bring eldorado back? yes, why not? there are a lot of people, when i worked in a show or do something, they ask, what happened to eldorado? -- actors. she is not the only one who would love
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to see it return. 10 million watched the final episode, but what would today's storyline be? i went in search of the real—life eldorado set on the costa del sol. the jive class was in full swing. is this eldorado? i think it is. it seems like heaven. it is. of course, eldorado in 1992 reflected a time of deepening european ties. the brexit vote changed everything. owuor panicked because of brexit. they sold their properties, they didn't want to wait to know what was going to happen. properties, they didn't want to wait to know what was going to happenm course, most stayed. people say it is going to be this or that, we say, nobody knows. nobody has come out and said, this is what will affect you, this is what won't. whatever
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happens, happens. it may have been lost to time, by 25 years on, the set is ready to go, just in case someone thinks it is a good time for a turbulent euro drummer. —— eurodrama. sometimes you havejust got to cut the ties and... you can email us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. there is one story i wanted to check on. did you know that apparently, hanging windchimes in the kitchen could be the secret to encouraging fussy children to eat their vegetables? that is according to in oxford professor. —— an. apparently
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windchimes inadvertently sweetened the taste and encouraged children... inadvertently? that peaceful noise increases the likelihood of your children eating their greens. a new study, if you sleep less than five hours, you are more reckless but you don't realise. i had about three hours' sleep last night. i am feeling reckless. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. the unsolved murder of a palestinian cartoonist who was shot dead in london 30 years ago
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is being reinvestigated. naji salim hussain al—ali, who worked as a political cartoonist for a newspaper in kuwait, was shot in the head as he walked to his office in knightsbridge in 1987. police believe new information could now come to light. hundreds of specialist cleaners have spent the night clearing up tonnes of rubbish left after the notting hill carnival. over that time period, people ‘s allegiances change. people who might not have felt confident coming forward , not have felt confident coming forward, i would encourage them to actually speak to us. dozens of streets have been swept before being given a deep clean with jet washers. during the carnival, all street bins are removed — meaning most of the rubbish is dumped on the ground. we have 200 employees working right through the night, they finish at probably six in the morning. we collect roughly about 300 tons of waste during that carnival period.
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as you imagine, it is all sorts of things, plastic bottles, glass, food, you name it. a look at the travel now. it's all looking good on the tubes. but on the trains, upgrade works at waterloo are over—running. so platforms one to 1a remain closed. south western railway are warning of delays for most of the day. and on southeastern, there are no trains to and from charing cross, waterloo east or london bridge until saturday for engineering works. trains are diverting to cannon street, victoria or blackfirars. and on the roads, camden road is closed in both directions between camden and lower holloway after a collision. let's have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. looking like another warm and sunny day today. things are on the turn. make the most of it. yesterday, largely dry with some sunshine around. temperature wise, very much dependent on whereabouts
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you are. cloud increasing from the north—west, a cold front is approaching. although we are staying in the warmer air, the further south east you are, the more chance you have of reaching 27 degrees. the north—west, likely to get to just below the mid—20s. overnight, things a little cooler. a bit more comfortable for sleeping. temperatures 13—1a degrees. some rain coming through, and a northerly wind picking up. outbreaks of rain for much of the day, dry spells in between. a much wetter day. shocking temperatures compared with the past couple of days. only about 17 degrees. first thing on thursday, we see the back of the rain. brightening up to some sunny spells. sunshine around on friday, we may see a few showers dotted around. could be on the thundery side.
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temperatures returning to where they should be for this time of yearfor thursday and friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker north korea's most provocative missile launch for years, as it fires a rocket overjapan. sirens wail. warning sirens were sounded as people were told to take cover. foreign secretary borisjohnson has expressed outrage at north korea's "reckless" actions.
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good morning, it's tuesday the 29th of august. also this morning. as texas deploys the entire national guard to deal with the worsening floods, 30,000 residents are left needing emergency shelter. it is probably 10—15 feet deep back there. your entire house is submerged? everybody's is. a spectacular sight as the new queensferry crossing lights up, to mark the end of six years of building work. more than half of those entitled to ppi compensation may not yet have madea claim. that's what the financial regulator says at the start of a two year countdown to the end of pp! claims. i'll have more in a moment. in sport, there's been a huge upset
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at the us open as britain's world number seven johanna konta is knocked out in the first round. as strictly struts back, we'll meet the stars of this year's competition as they danced their way down the red carpet last night. and carol has the weather. good morning. there is a 3—way split in the weather today. across scotland, northern england and northern ireland, sunshine, showers and breezy. through the central swathe, cloudy with some rain and in the south—east, sunny and warm. kent is potentially reaching 28. i will have more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the united nations security council is to hold an emergency meeting this afternoon, after north korea fired a missile over northern japan. the rocket, which fell into the sea, triggered loudspeaker alerts warning people on the island
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of hokkaido to take cover. japan's prime minister said the launch represented a serious threat to his nation. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, said he was outraged. our correspondent, yogida limaye, reports from the south korean capital of seoul. siren. japan being woken up by a siren on tuesday morning as a north korean missile through over the country. the rocket was launched from near pyongyang and flew over the northern island of hokkaido, before splitting into three parts and landing in the sea to the east. it is just the latest in a series of military missile tests conducted by north korea this year, but a more serious one because it went overjapan. the last time that happened was nearly two decades ago. "the outrageous act of firing a missile over our country is a gave and serious threat," said prime minister shinzo abe. at a military base near tokyo,
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a military drill was conducted in response to the missile launch. across the sea in south korea, joint exercises are under way with american troops. they are held every august, and north korea usually responds with a show of strength. last year, it conducted a nuclear test in retaliation. this year, it has flown a missile which had the potential to cause serious harm. a strong message that despite international pressure, pyongyang has no desire to stop. yogita limaye, bbc news. joining us from japan, is our tokyo correspondent, rupert wingfield—hayes. what's the response there? a certain level of consternation, fear from the public and anger from the political leadership. you can
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imagine that people on the west coast of japan and the north coast ofjapan, coast of japan and the north coast of japan, the island coast of japan and the north coast ofjapan, the island of hokkaido, work up to the sound of sirens. they are usually only here for an earthquake or is an army but the first time today, they were hearing it because of a missile that was really heading in their direction. they were told of a public address systems to head full basements and concrete buildings. —— like head for basements. it is something that hasn't happened here since the second world war. a very new reality forjapan and you can see the response from prime minister shinzo abe and his angry words, calling it an act of violence againstjapan. just how ruffled and angry the japanese government is. that north korea has dead to fly this missile over the top of the country. thanks for that. we will talk little later in the programme to a rear admiral about that and also somebody from the japanese embassy as well. the ‘catastrophic‘ flooding in texas is expected to get much worse — with officials warning they expect nearly half—a—million people to seek assistance.
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with waters still rising, helicopters and hundreds of specialist vehicles have been deployed in the rescue effort. an emergency has also been declared in neighbouring louisiana, which is in storm harvey's path. nada tawfik reports from houston. waiting for help to arrive as the floods reached new heights. all day, emergency responders, neighbours, and even complete strangers, have answered pleas for help from those trapped across houston. and still it has not been enough. there is so much water. we have our children with us. we have to save our babies, that's it. resources have been overwhelmed by the epic scale of this disaster. 20 helicopters have been flying missions and the entire state's national guard has been deployed
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to aid in the search and rescue. thousands have been saved, but many more have been desperate. from midnight until where we are today, 290 have been rescued. there are many other people out there in stressful situations and we intend to get to every one of them. houston is struggling to stay afloat. parts of the metropolis have been spared. every major highway has been affected. the city's infrastructure is being strained. it has been days since it made landfall. but communities in texas are just now finding the impact. authorities fear that the worst is yet to come. president trump will travel to the state today. he has promised rapid federal aid. texas will need it. the state faces years of recovery in the wake of this unprecedented storm. neda tawfik, bbc news, texas.
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brexit negotiations are continuing in brussels after the eu told the uk it needed to get serious about the withdrawal talks. the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier has expressed concern about the lack of progress made so far and accused britain of ambiguity on key issues like its exit bill. the uk brexit secretary david davis said both sides had to show "flexibility and imagination". our brussels correspondent adam fleming joins us now. adam, how do we expect today to go? what can we expect to take place today? it is day two of round three and we are being warned it will all be very technical. we are told not to expect any breakthroughs. if you look at the scoreboard of where we are, there is still quite a lot of a disagreement. the issue of rights of eu citizens living in the uk after brexit comment the eu side wants the right to beacon —— guaranteed on the
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issue of northern ireland and the border of the republic of ireland, the uk said they published a big details, and imaginative position paper about solutions and the eu described it as the magical thinking and it was too waffly with not enough detail and policy proposals. on the big issues of money and how much money the uk owes the eu for its financial obligations, there is a massive dispute that and what the uk side is going to do it pick apart. the eu wants to talk about how much money they have. we will tell you at the end of the week what they have decided. it sounds like it's going very well. britain's busiest railway station is open for business as usual this morning after nearly a month of disruption, but some minor delays are expected due to signalling issues. almost half of the platforms at waterloo station have been closed since the fifth of august as engineers made changes to accommodate longer trains. network rail says it's working hard to minimise delays to passengers.
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hundreds of the uk's biggest companies will be made to reveal how much more their chief executives are paid compared to their average employee under government measures due to be announced later today. the plans are designed to increase boardroom transparency in publicly listed companies. firms who face significant shareholder opposition to executive pay deals will also be named and shamed on a new register. the stars gathered for a glitzy launch for the new series of strictly come dancing last night. the latest line—up of celebrities attended the red carpet event for the first outing since the death of former presenter sir bruce forsyth. new head judge shirley ballas also made herfirst red carpet appearance. glitterballs and glamour, sequins and sparkles. this year's new celebrities together for strictly. they have been busy rehearsing
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for their launch show, the first to be broadcast since the death of sir bruce forsyth. there will of course be a special tribute. he will always be with us. he is part of the show, our lives, the country. the spirit of brucey is with us. as in previous series, the programme will be aiming to deliver entertainment, and perhaps even the odd surprise. richard, we saw you come down the red carpet. yeah. you've got some moves. i've got some moves. i don't know if they will be good for anyone. but i am releasing them as they are bubbling like a volcano of slightly uncoordinated dance. you have watched strictly come dancing as a viewer. how will you enjoy it as a contestant? i will make sure i enjoy it. i don't think there's any other way to do it. i hope i don't get too nervous. has frankie given you any advice? she is so excited about me doing this. i have not got any advice yet
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but i will definitely be on the phone asking for them. you are the first contestant to be in the show with a physical disability. how do you feel about being a trailblazer? it's awesome. it shows the way that the show and life in general is going. the country is becoming more inclusive. as well as new contestants, there is also a new head judge. shirley ballas taking over from len goodman. i don't feel much pressure. i have a good amount of experience. i don't feel any at the moment, but we will see on the night. next month's launch show will give the public their first chance to see the new contestants in action. it will also be an opportunity for the programme and the viewers to remember sir bruce, a man who helped make strictly one of the most popular shows on tv. bbc news. back to the main story. north korea
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has fired a missile overjapan. the missile was launched shortly after 6am local time from a site close to the north korean capital, john young. it flew nearly 3000 kilometres and over the northern japanese island of hokkaido, triggering warning sirens. the japanese prime minister, shinzo abe, said the launch was an unprecedented, serious, and grave threat to his nation. north korea has fired rockets over japan twice in the past — once in 1998 and again in 2009 — but on those occasions pyongyang claimed those they were satellite launches, not weapons. just before midnight, foreign secretary borisjohnson tweeted that he was "outraged" by what he called north korea's "reckless provocation". joining us from our southampton newsroom is a former nato commander, and security expert, rear admiral chris parry. thank you forjoining us. how
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serious is this? what we are seeing isa serious is this? what we are seeing is a change in tactics from north korea. they were thoroughly frightened off by what america said they would do to them if they continue down this path. what they are doing now is trying to provoke america's allies in the region. what we need to understand is the context in which this decision are being made. north korea, as a regime, is possibly on its last legs. you have extensive salmon, droughts, and used are seeing the start of significant u nrest are seeing the start of significant unrest —— famine. all the costs involved in this nuclear programme and it really can't get off the train. what it is doing is trying to get attacked so it can project outwards all the problems it has internally. do you think that will
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happen? rola with these sorts of actions, they are feeling the water. this is something that has happened before —— with these sorts of actions. i wouldn't say the rocket we re actions. i wouldn't say the rocket were guided overjapan. they have gone for one of america's allies in the region and i think they will step up the aggravation the more desperate the situation gets in north korea. and if this is a regime on its last legs, to you think that's what makes it more dangerous? yes, indeed. we need to understand if you look at the end of the second world war, you had an nazi regime that was completed —— committed to fight to the last surrender. if you back them into a corner, they will lash out. i think we will seek escalating levels of violence. the next thing we might need to look out for is the possibility of an underground nuclear test around september nine which is a big celebration day in north korea and think the intelligence suggests that preparations are being made to that.
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another demonstration of how you push outwards all your problems. if you look on social media at the moment, i detect you are seeing increasing unrest in north korea. can you also explain to us, the japanese, there were warnings in hokkaido. why would they not shoot it down? two reasons. one, they probably couldn't because they don't have the system that is deployed to south korea. i also think they probably plotted its trajectory as it passed overhead, 350 miles above japan, saw that it would pass over the top and thought, well, actually, we don't want to undercover alt best systems, when need to save them for the day where we actually do see a missile coming in to land on japanese territory. i do think we shouldn't be in any doubt that foreign ballistic missile is over other peoples country since all sorts of signals which could be interpreted the wrong way sometimes. absolutely. it sounds like an extreme dangerous situation. we know there is a meeting later this
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afternoon with the un security council. what can be done to bring down the pressure and make things better in some ways? i think there has to be a unanimous vote today to say to north korea, enough is enough. you are notjust upsetting the us and its allies, you are upsetting the rest of the world. you are capable of striking a wide region, we know that. we need to come to a situation where you are talking to us, rather than waving your fist. no doubt, talking to us, rather than waving yourfist. no doubt, at some talking to us, rather than waving your fist. no doubt, at some stage, the world's two superpowers will force you to do it. very good to talk to you. and after eight o'clock we'll be talking to a senior official
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from the japanese embassy in london. we have been talking a lot about the damage from harvey, carol has those details and our weather as well. when harvey made landfall, it was a category four. it has been downgraded to a tropical storm, but we are still seeing a lot of rainfall causing problems. devastating winds in rock port, the reason we still have all this rain is because the tropical is dorm is half onshore and half offshore —— rockport. it is picking up energy and moisture from the gulf of mexico and moisture from the gulf of mexico and depositing it across texas. to give you an idea of the rainfall we have seen in texas, some parts have seen over a metre. on tuesday and wednesday, you will notice that the
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wind is starting to drive further north. we will see an improvement in houston, but conditions likely to worsen across louisiana and mississippi. we have sunshine and showers today, cool than it was yesterday. yesterday in lincolnshire it got over 28 degrees, kent might see that today. breezy conditions, sunshine and showers. here is the end of the weather front. murky with some cloud. patchy rain coming out of the weather front. something brighter to start the day. some showers around. yesterday at this time of day, the temperature was 17 degrees. if you are there, you will notice the difference. back under
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that weather front in parts of yorkshire in lincolnshire. patchy rain. for east anglia, essex and kent, sums of money skies. some showers not far from london. kent, sums of money skies. some showers not farfrom london. through the day, that weather front slowly moving south—east. not getting into the south—east. the highest sunshine and temperatures. feeling pleasant on the shoreline. brightening up across northern england. hanging on to sunshine and showers. breezy conditions across scotland and northern ireland. overnight, breezy. rain in the south—east, it could be thundery. in between, the temperature dropping, especially in the south. more temperature and rain coming in through the south—west. tomorrow, these bounds of rain
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joining forces. temperature is a good 10 degrees lower. to the north, act in two breezy conditions, sunshine and showers. if you like it hot, this is the last day we are likely to see it for a little while. did you just forget my name? she was just saying, carol never makes a mistake! i'm sorry, how could i ever forget your name? dan is very forgettable, but blue is... ——
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louise... that is very funny! more than half of those mis—sold payment protection insurance, or ppi, may not yet have claimed compensation. i can't believe i am still talking about it. it has been 20 years since they first sent it out. the regulator, the financial conduct authority, is launching a campaign later today encouraging people to claim before a deadline runs out in two years' time. they are trying to get people who are owed money to claim it. there we re are owed money to claim it. there were 6a million policies sold, not all of them were mis— sold. so not
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everybody was mis— sold this payment protection insurance. when you look at how many people have claimed, 12 million people have. £27 billion has been paid out so far. that is megamoney. if you look at how much the banks have set aside for it, it is £37 billion. this has cost banks an awful lot of money. management companies have made a fair whack out of this. it is worth remembering that you don't have to use them to get this money back. there are lots of options online to do it for free. they are saying today that this is the last time to get that money back. the newest bridge across the firth of forth was lit up last night to mark the symbolic handover of the project from the constructors to the scottish government. building on the queensferry crossing, which links edinburgh
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and fife, started in 2011 and now the billion pound bridge is almost ready to open to traffic. our scotland correspondent lorna gordon is there for us this morning. how is it working this morning?m looks amazing, but very empty. tomorrow morning, a very different pit tour. this is the new crossing, it is one of the busiest routes. the theory is that if you can get to this ridge, if the roads around it are clear, you can get on it. it is are clear, you can get on it. it is a very clever bridge with lots of barriers to disrupt the wind flow. a very special light show for those yesterday who were watching this bridge being built through the yea rs. lighting up scotland's latest bridge
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before drivers cross for the first time. in its own way, it is a feat of design, engineering and construction, it is absolutely amazing. it is, in every sense and every way, an amazing achievement. the scale of the construction is impressive. it is the longest ridge of its kind in the world. this is a chance for some of the many thousands who worked on it to celebrate its completion. one night, fantastic. it is the end of a long journey, but it has been wonderful. a most rewarding journey, i have been on many a bridge. these guys have put in a lot of work. there are going to be their grandchildren looking at it proudly. there are three temperatures across this stretch of the force. the legacy of
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generations of workers who built them. for some, the story of these crossings, stretching back three centuries, is part of their families' history. my great grandad worked on one, my grandad worked on one, and my dad worked on the queensferry quashing. all special in their own way, but which is your favourite and why? definitely this one, it feels most like my bridge. argued tuft? after seeing it all come together, i am feeling very proud. those who travel this busy route have had to contend with plenty of roadworks as the new bridge has taken shape. what can they expect tomorrow? it was closed for a long time while the bridge was under construction. i am sure people wa nt to under construction. i am sure people want to see what the bridge looks like. we ask people to drive carefully a nd like. we ask people to drive carefully and keep their eye on the
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road. for now, it is about admiring the view, then tomorrow is a chance for a all to enjoy a journey across this latest bridge over the forth. longest type of ridge bridge of its kind in the world. what makes it even more special is its setting, alongside the other temperatures. three of them. it is a famous world heritage site. the forth rail bridge isafamiliar heritage site. the forth rail bridge is a familiar sight for those who cross between edinburgh and fife. now there is a billion pound crossing. it is interesting that there are no pedestrian walkways. tens of thousands of people will get the opportunity to walk across it this weekend. a once—in—a—lifetime
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opportunity for those people. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. the unsolved murder of a palestinian cartoonist who was shot dead in london 30 years ago is being reinvestigated. naji salim hussain al—ali, who worked as a political cartoonist for a newspaper in kuwait, was shot in the head as he walked to his office in knightsbridge in 1987. police believe new information could now come to light. hundreds of specialist cleaners have spent the night clearing up tonnes of rubbish left after the notting hill carnival. dozens of streets have been swept before being given a deep clean with jet washers. during the carnival, all street bins are removed —
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meaning most of the rubbish is dumped on the ground. waterloo station is struggling to return to normal this morning — after nearly a month of disruption. almost half of the platforms have been closed for works to accommodate longer trains. but because of signalling issues it's taken longer than planned. simon clemison sent this report a few moments ago. waterloo starting to get busy again this morning. lots of passengers here. that is what network rail wa nts to here. that is what network rail wants to see. they don't want to see what is happening on the departures board above them, delays. i have seen transporting and leaving. frustration amongst passengers, but the rain station is trying to get back to normal. there are signs that some of it is working, but not enough, not yet. a look at the travel now. southeastern has no trains
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to and from charing cross, waterloo east or london bridge until saturday for engineering works. trains are diverting to cannon street, victoria or blackfirars. there are minor delays on the dlr at the moment. and on the roads, camden road is closed in both directions between camden and lower holloway after a collision. let's have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. looking like another warm and sunny day today. things are on the turn. make the most of it. yesterday, largely dry with some sunshine around. temperature wise, very much dependent on whereabouts you are. cloud increasing from the north—west, a cold front is approaching. although we are staying in the warmer air, the further south east you are, the more chance you have of reaching 27 degrees. the north—west, likely to get to just below the mid—20s. overnight, things a little cooler. a bit more comfortable for sleeping. temperatures 13—1a degrees. some rain coming through, and a northerly wind picking up. outbreaks of rain for much of the day, dry spells in between. a much wetter day. shocking temperatures compared with the past couple of days. only about 17 degrees.
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first thing on thursday, we see the back of the rain. brightening up to some sunny spells. sunshine around on friday, we may see a few showers dotted around. could be on the thundery side. temperatures returning to where they should be for this time of yearfor thursday and friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. the united nations security council is to hold an emergency meeting this afternoon, after north korea fired a ballistic missile over northern japan. the missile, which fell into the sea, triggered loudspeaker alerts warning people on the island of hokkaido to take cover.
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japan's prime minister said the launch represented a serious threat to his nation. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, said he was outraged. the former nato commander, and security expert, rear admiral chris parry said the international response was. we need to say you are notjust upsetting the united states, but the rest of the world. people need to say enough is enough. we need to come to a situation where north korea is talking to us, rather than waiting your fist. no doubt, at some stage, the world's waiting your fist. no doubt, at some stage, the worlds to treat suit ——2 superpowers will come together and force you to do so. the ‘catastrophic‘ flooding in texas is expected to get much worse — with officials warning they expect nearly half—a—million people to seek assistance. with waters still rising,
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helicopters and hundreds of specialist vehicles have been deployed in the rescue effort. an emergency has also been declared in neighbouring louisiana, which is in storm harvey's path. brexit negotiations are continuing in brussels after the eu told the uk it needed to get serious about the withdrawal talks. the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier has expressed concern about the lack of progress made so far and accused britain of ambiguity on key issues like its exit bill. the uk brexit secretary david davis said both sides had to show "flexibility and imagination". hundreds of the uk's biggest companies will be made to reveal how much more their chief executives are paid compared to their average employee under government measures due to be announced later today. the plans are designed to increase boardroom transparency in publicly listed companies. firms who face significant shareholder opposition to executive pay deals will also be named and shamed on a new register. police in east sussex are still working to establish
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the source of a suspected chemical haze which drifted in from the sea. people on several beaches had to be evacuated and around 150 people received hospital treatment after reporting vomiting and irritation. officers now say they believe that the cloud didn't come from northern france. more than half those mis—sold payment protection insurance, or ppi, may not yet have claimed compensation. the financial conduct authority, is launching a campaign today encouraging people to claim before a deadline runs out in two years' time. so far 27 billion pounds has been paid out. a dancing policeman has become the star of this year's notting carnival, after video of him showing off his moves went viral on the internet.
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pc daniel graham kept crowds entertained with his body—popping. he's no stranger to taking centre—stage though — he was also a contestant on last year's britain's got talent. he was also encouraged by people on the pda. it went down very well with the pda. it went down very well with the crowd. i'm not surprised. —— pa. the man on the pa said on the long video, "i do not believe you are a policeman". how many times have you watched it? about 30. he has his body kit on and is still managing to dance. bring him into strictly, week four. age and if they broke the rules and brought someone in. do it! not great news for the
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johanna konta overnight. we were expecting great things of her at the us open and itjust didn't go her way. she has a powerful, powerful game but it didn't go well for her last night. its been a dramatic opening day at the us open — britain'sjohanna konta suffered a shock first—round defeat against unseeded serbian aleksandra krunic. the world number seven was among the favourites for the title and could have ended the tournament as world number one. konta won the first set, but the world number 78 fought back to leave konta still looking for that elusive first grand slam title. it would be quite obnoxious of me to come in here expecting that i have a right to be in the second round. i am very much aware that to get that opportunity i need to work very hard. so, me losing in the first round is not ideal, as it is not for anybody. anybody coming here wants to be in for as long as possible. but i lost to a better player today.
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unfortunately, that is how sport goes. and there was a successful return to grand slam tennis for maria sharapova — she beat world number two simona halep in three sets. sharapova needed a wildcard to enter the main draw as she is currently ranked 1a6th. but heather watson's poor run at flushing meadows continues. she was knocked out by alize cornet in straight sets in the first round. it's the seventh successive year watson has gone out in the first round — she's yet to win a senior match at the event. it was a better day for britain's men though. kyle edmund won his first round match against robin hasse in straight sets. he's joined in the second round by youngster cameron norrie after his opponent, dmitry tursonov retired through injury in the third set. norrie — who's ranked outside the world's top 200 — was leading by two sets to love at the time. england have a lead of 321 over the west indies in the second test going into the final days play at headingley.
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england had the better of day four, with six batsmen scoring half centuries in the second innings — ben stokes getting himself 58, but the innings of the day went to moeen ali who scored 8a off just 93 balls. a win for england will seal the series. the last—day pitch, as a spinner, you always look how it will go. nice for the seamers. it is hard when it is overcast. hopefully i can get out to bowl tomorrow. with the football transfer window closing in two days time clubs are frantically finalising deals. and it appears that alex oxlade chamberlain is set to join chelsea from rivals arsenal. the england midfielder has started every game for the gunners this season, but has refused a deal to remain at the emirates with just a year left on his contract.
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arsenal are looking to make some money from his transfer now, rather than lose him for nothing next summer. tour de france champion chris froome is considering competing in the world championships in norway next month. froome, who's currently leading the vuelta a espana, says he's considering both the team and individual time trials. he last rode in the world championships in 2013 when gb won bronze in the team event. great britain's ashley mckenzie was eliminated on day one at the world judo championships in budapest. the two—time olympian lost in his opening bout in the under 60 kilo category. britishjudo has sent a team of 12 athletes to the event in hungary including rio olympic bronze medallist sally conway who fights on friday. that is the thing with judo, one mistake and it is over, and i made that mistake. i will assess it. i had to try my hardest to get out of the pinning, but unfortunately i did not. love the idea mentioned they are of
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people frantically doing last—minute visitors. don't you think that by now most of the business is done? maybe not signed, sealed and delivered it done. it's been busy. some of the wash that is being flicked around is ridiculous. —— some of the dosh. the high cost of car insurance may make it tempting for some people to drive uninsured, but those drivers could be pushing up the price of premiums for everyone. new figures suggest the number of uninsured drivers may be rising for the first time in more than a decade — that's according to the motor insurance bureau. vanessa baffoe reports. the end of the road cars. a scrapyard norfolk. if they are driven without proper insurance, the police have powers to tow them away. once a police have powers to tow them away. oncea car police have powers to tow them away. once a car has been seized by police, the driver has a limited amount of time to get insurance but if they do not, this could be the
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end of the line. sergeant chris from norfolk‘s police unit is out on patrol. cameras on his car in a secret location across the county automatically read hundreds of number plates per hour. the system has flagged up a suspect‘s car. they track the driver to a cul—de—sac in norwich. they have just done checks and they heard the driver has been driving without proper insurance. in 2016, police forces seized 1a5,000 vehicles through insurance and says —— offences of which approximately 58,000 were crushed. that is more than 1000 per week. the camera is used to identify drivers as part of a system called automatic on the plate recognition. it's database is
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operated by the insurance euro. they compensate victims of uninsured drivers on the half of the industry. the money comes from £15 which is added to each premium and the number of claims they are seeing is increasing. back in norwich, the uninsured car is towed away. the driver will now have to obtain cover and pay a fixed penalty to get it back or his car could end up here. that's what can happen if you don't go pick your car up. for more on this, we arejoined by go pick your car up. for more on this, we are joined by the go pick your car up. for more on this, we arejoined by the motoring editor in the insurance comparison site confuse.com. it has a big impact. as we heard, all drivers have to pay into this pot and so essentially, it's all the drivers who are legally insured were paying the price. if the honest ones who are picking up the tab. an average of about £1000 to insure a car is
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really high. it is and what we are seeing with all the research we have done at confuse.com, it is the cost of motoring overall that is going up, notjust of motoring overall that is going up, not just insurance. of motoring overall that is going up, notjust insurance. the leather reasons why insurance is going up that its motoring generally going up and in many areas, certainly where i live, i haven't got a choice. there is no public transport so i rely on my car to get me and my family around. just looking at the punishments for driving uninsured, six points off the licence, a story to £20 per day. £50 —— £150 collection fee. your car will be crushed if it is not collected. is there anything that can put drivers off and stop them from driving uninsured? i think the real question here is what the cost of motoring hit is in general. we all know our ca rs are hit is in general. we all know our cars are going to be crushed and we know that there are fines imposed if we decide to drive uninsured, as well as penalties on your licence. people are prepared to take the risk
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andi people are prepared to take the risk and i think that it's because the cost of motoring, across the board, is going up so high. i do know the answer, i think the industry as a whole, whether it be fuel prices, maintenance and obviously the car insurance, road tax. all the associated costs is that i think are putting a lot of pressure on the motorist which is why people are taking the chances. also the risk of having their car crushed is not enough. a few comments, dancers is probably the astronomical cost of car insurance of fuelling the rise. lee says it doesn't surprise him. the cost of his insurance has gone up the cost of his insurance has gone up 20% and he has switched providers which has made a slight difference is that some people can't afford it. bill says surely it's easy to a writer kate the number of uninsured drivers. —— eradicate. cars could install a system meaning that it is not insured, it won't move. —— car manufacturers could install. not
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long ago, cars were easy to repair. nowadays, you have parking sensors, cameras and radars as well as the bodywork cost. we know the cost of repair is going up. this is reflected in car insurance and also with many more people not owning their car outright and perhaps going to an independent repair shop, more and more cars are bought on some kind of lease purchase or hire purchase scheme which requires the car to actually go back to the main dealer to be repaired which has an associated cost. there are a multitude of reasons. it is not simple to say there is one reason why. but car insurance is definitely going up. the research that we have seen is that it is at 18% last quarter. you think the insurers are justified in the increase? the insurers themselves don't have huge reserves so they are not actually making a vast amount of money from people ‘s car insurance premiums. they are actually paying this out.
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they are actually paying this out. the other thing to bear in mind is that we have seen two massive changes to the market recently. we have that changes to improve the tax which is a levy put on your premium by the government and for many years that was bumping around a5 or 6% and that was bumping around a5 or 6% and thatis that was bumping around a5 or 6% and that is now 12%. that is huge. ——a, five or 6%. in june that is now 12%. that is huge. ——a, five or 6%. injune this year, we saw changes to the discount rate which is the rate where you have a serious life injury, their premiums are being affected as well. we know why premiums are changing but u nfortu nately, why premiums are changing but unfortunately, it's a sign of the times. thank you for your time. were to do what you think about it. a lot of people are struggling to pay for car insurance.
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ypu're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. north korea has fired a missile over northern japan in a move the japanese prime minister has called an unprecedented threat to his country. president trump has pledged his full support for the state of texas as the region continues to be hit by catastrophic flooding caused by tropical storm harvey. a lovely picture. thank you, it is from one of our weather watchers. lovely day to start in essex, yesterday, temperatures reached over 28 degrees. the warmest august day in the uk so far this year. today, we might see 28, but it is more likely to be around kent. today's forecast is one of sunshine and
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showers, for many of us, cooler than yesterday. in the north of the country, breezy with showers. this weather front is moving south, hoping today is more likely to be 20- 21. hoping today is more likely to be 20— 21. ahead of that, one or two showers. in the south—east, dry and bright. showers from the word go across scotland, northern ireland and the south—east. where we have our weather front moving south, the odd spot of rain. if you are heading down the coast, with the offshore wind, it will feel warmer than yesterday. southern areas, generally a murky start. brightening up nicely across england. for northern ireland, hanging on to sunshine and a few showers. through the course of the day, breezy. bright spells
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across the day, breezy. bright spells a cross m ost the day, breezy. bright spells across most of scotland. temperatures getting up to 17— 19. for northern england in the north—east, some sunshine. then back into our weather front, slipping south. producing patchy rain and cloud. that continues into the evening and overnight, could be sunbury at times. in kent, for example. another band coming south—west. north of that, clear skies. breezy, and some showers. tomorrow, starting with that scenario across northern england and ireland. showers peppering western scotland. two bands of rain in the south eventually merging. wind coming across norfolk and kent. today we could hit 28, tomorrow, at 16 or 17. as we had into thursday, a
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lot of dry weather around. a peppering of showers in the north. a few in the south—west, the south—east hangs onto the brightest skies. temperatures way down compared to what we are looking at. thank you very much. all this summer on bbc breakfast we've been talking to some of the uk's most inspirational businesswomen. this morning steph‘s talking to a woman who started a wellbeing—business empire. anyone who likes to give themselves a bit of a treat might already know this business. we're talking about the upmarket wellbeing fragrance brand neom organics founded by nicola elliott and her business partner oliver mennell.
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it was started in 2005 when nicola was working a 60 hour week at a glossy magazine whilst also training as an aromatherapist. she started small — with a range of 5 candles — but the business now has a multi—million pound turnover with 3 stand—alone shops and it's sold in high end department stores likejohn lewis and selfridges in the uk as well as overseas. nicola elliott of neom organics joins me now. tell us about why you started the business. was there a light bulb moment? you were working for a magazine? yes, i was a journalist. i was working crazy hours and i decided to do something that would give me a bit more flexibility. you start your own business and you think it is going to be so much easier, of course, it isn't. i work as hard as idid course, it isn't. i work as hard as i did back then. i had a real vision, i think that is why the brand has become as strong as it is. it was always about creating a well—being brand. it was always about inspiring people to lead naturally healthy lives. i did that alongside myjournalism job, i trained as a nutritional list and and aromatherapist. we were set up to be very much helping people with
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sleep, stress levels, mood, boosting energy. how we could do that in a natural way and how we could start that well—being journey. natural way and how we could start that well-being journey. you are a journalist, very busy, training to be and aromatherapist, when did you ta ke be and aromatherapist, when did you take that step? what did you do?|j take that step? what did you do?” went down to a four—day week, which i would always advocate. it gives you the opportunity to test the market. you don't have to do a full job from one to the other. i created blends, tested them on friends, whether it would help people sleep and so on. once i got a green light, i took the leap. try and think of places and ways that you can test it out where you can be a bit more confident. was at a big investment for you? no, i had sold my car and my business partner had some
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savings. we got together about £10,000. it was everything we had. we put it into stock. if you have a stock —based business, but is not too bad, we always thought, we've got these candles, we can sell them somewhere if we need to. it is such a big and competitive market, you are fighting with massive brands. how do you make yourself different? how do you make yourself different? how do you do that? you have to have a point of difference. it has to be authentic. i think if we had just created are foils that not nice or candles in a lovely box, that is subjective. i think you've got to have that story. we were really passionate about the well—being story. we were really passionate about testing the blends to see whether they worked. there is a whole lot of smelly candles and bath oils, but how many of them can help
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you sleep? boost your energy? that had to be key to the brand, the story and the authenticity. the rest of it is the icing on the cake. the business has grown, what's next? we are on a stall roll at the moment, we have one in leeds and one in kings road. we are hoping to open another one around christmas. the uk is still a big area for us. we will be rolling out our retail. you can come and experience it. that is the future of retail, where you can experience the brand, get involved. you are not just experience the brand, get involved. you are notjust picking up products, we did a discovery test where you can come in and we will find out you've got well—being needs. we figure out the underlying
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causes. that is key to the future. product like yours is a treat, not a necessity. how does the business world feel to you? we are in times where people are on low wages and have not seen a pay rise. how does it feel for you? i feel that well—being, right now, when we are in these kind of times, it has to be a necessity. if you can kickstart that journey, we found a necessity. if you can kickstart thatjourney, we found our business... the lipstick effect, you purchase things to make yourself feel good. you don't need to spend a huge amount to kickstart your well—being journey. people come in and they might prioritise 15 minutes
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in their bars. they may not be able to go toa in their bars. they may not be able to go to a spa, but there will maximise that time —— bath. we need to be making well—being a priority and not a luxury. thank you. i have really enjoyed all the interviews we have done this year. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. the unsolved murder of a palestinian cartoonist who was shot dead in london 30 years ago is being reinvestigated. naji salim hussain al—ali, who worked as a political cartoonist for a newspaper in kuwait, was shot in the head as he walked
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to his office in knightsbridge in 1987. police believe new information could now come to light. hundreds of specialist cleaners have spent the night clearing up tonnes of rubbish left after the notting hill carnival. dozens of streets have been swept before being given a deep clean with jet washers. during the carnival, all street bins are removed — meaning most of the rubbish is dumped on the ground. waterloo station is struggling to return to normal this morning — after nearly a month of disruption. almost half of the platforms have been closed for works to accommodate longer trains. but because of signalling issues it's taken longer than planned. simon clemison sent this report a few moments ago. london waterloo starting to get busy again this morning. lots of passengers here. that is what network rail wants to see. they don't want to see what is happening on the departures board above them, delays and cancellations. i have seen trains
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boarding and leaving. frustration amongst passengers, but the train station is trying to get back to normal. there are signs that some of it is working, but not enough, not yet. a look at the travel now. southeastern has no trains to and from charing cross, waterloo east or london bridge until saturday for engineering works. trains are diverting to cannon street, victoria or blackfirars. and the overground is part suspended between edmonton green and cheshunt. and on the roads, camden road is closed in both directions between camden and lower holloway after a collision. let's have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. looking like another warm and sunny day today. things are on the turn.
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make the most of it. yesterday, largely dry with some sunshine around. temperature wise, very much dependent on whereabouts you are. cloud increasing from the north—west, a cold front is approaching. although we are staying in the warmer air, the further south east you are, the more chance you have of reaching 27 degrees. the north—west, likely to get to just below the mid—20s. overnight, things a little cooler. a bit more comfortable for sleeping. temperatures 13—1a degrees. some rain coming through, and a northerly wind picking up. outbreaks of rain for much of the day, dry spells in between. a much wetter day. shocking temperatures compared with the past couple of days. only about 17 degrees. first thing on thursday, we see the back of the rain. brightening up to some sunny spells. sunshine around on friday, we may see a few showers dotted around. could be on the thundery side. temperatures returning to where they should be for this time of yearfor thursday and friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello this is breakfast,
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with louise minchin and dan walker. north korea's most provocative missile launch for years, as it fires a rocket overjapan. sirens warning sirens were sounded as people were told to take cover. foreign secretary borisjohnson has expressed outrage at north korea's "reckless" actions. good morning it's tuesday the 29th of august. also this morning: as texas deploys the entire national guard to deal with the worsening floods, 30,000 residents are left needing emergency shelter. it is probably 10—15 feet deep back there. your entire house is submerged? everybody's house back there is submerged. a spectacular sight as the new queensferry crossing lights up,
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to mark the end of six years of building work. despite £27 billion being paid out in compensation for pp! misselling, more than half of us owed money still haven't claimed it. a new campaign is being launched to get us to claim. in sport theres been a huge upset at the us open as britain's world in sport there's been a huge upset at the us open as britain's world number seven johanna konta is knocked out in the first round. # i can't see straight when i'm thinking about you. he was hand picked by ed sheeran as one for the future. jamie lawson will be here to tell us about his new album. as strictly struts back, we'll meet the stars of this year's competition as they danced their way down the red carpet last night. and someone who has done that already, carol has the weather. we have a 3—way split in the weather. in the north, breezy with sunshine
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and showers. elsewhere, cloudy with patchy rain but it will brighten up later. in the south—east, sunny and warm. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the united nations security council is to hold an emergency meeting this afternoon, after north korea fired a missile over northern japan. the rocket, which fell into the sea, triggered loudspeaker alerts warning people on the island of hokkaido to take cover. japan's prime minister said the launch represented a serious threat to his nation. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, said he was outraged. our correspondent, yogida limaye, reports from the south korean capital of seoul. siren. japan being woken up by a siren on tuesday morning as a north korean missile flew over the country. the rocket was launched from near pyongyang and flew over the northern island of hokkaido, before splitting into three parts and landing into the sea to the east. it is just the latest in a series of military missile tests conducted
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by north korea this year, but a more serious one because it flew overjapan. the last time that happened was nearly two decades ago. "the outrageous act of firing a missile over our country is an unprecedented, serious and grave threat," japanese prime minister shinzo abe said. at a military base near tokyo, a military drill was conducted by japanese forces in response to the missile launch. across the sea in south korea, joint exercises are under way with american troops. they are held every august, and north korea usually responds with a show of strength. last year, it conducted a nuclear test in retaliation. this year, it has flown a missile that had the potential to cause serious harm. a strong message that despite international pressure, pyongyang has no intention to stop. yogita limaye, bbc news. joining us from japan, is our tokyo correspondent, rupert wingfield hayes.
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what's the response there? you can imagine, people waking up to the sound of air raid sirens and being told to find shelter in concrete buildings or basements is not a normal occurrence for people injapan. as far as i am aware, i think this is the first time this has happened since the second world war. people have been practising in towns up and down the coast of japan, because of increased tests by north korea, but this is the first time it has happened for real. the public address system is being used to tell people, there is a missile flying in our direction, find shelter. this is a very aggressive thing for north korea to do. people don't normally fire ballistic missiles over the territory of their neighbours. that is why we have seen
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this angry response from shinzo abe, calling it an act of violence and saying it is unprecedented. then speaking to president trump and they will now take it to the security council and demand action from other countries especially china and russia. we will be getting more on that throughout the day. and after 8.30 we'll be talking to a senior official from the japanese embassy in london. the ‘catastrophic‘ flooding in texas is expected to get much worse — with officials warning they expect nearly half—a—million people to seek assistance. hundreds of specialist vehicles have been deployed in the rescue effort. an emergency has also been declared in neighbouring louisiana, which is in storm harvey's path. nada tawfik reports from houston. waiting for help to arrive as the floods reached new heights. all day, emergency responders, neighbours, and even complete strangers, have answered pleas for help from those trapped across houston. but still, it has not been enough.
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there is so much water. we have our children with us. we're trying to save our babies, that's it. resources have been overwhelmed by the epic scale of this disaster. 20 helicopters have been flying missions and the state's entire national guard has been deployed to aid in the search and rescue. thousands have been saved but many more remain desperate. from midnight until where we are today, 290 have been rescued. we fully recognise that there are many other people out there in stressful situations and we intend to get to every one of them. houston is struggling to stay afloat. few parts of the sprawling metropolis have been spared from the rising waters and torrential rain. every major highway has been affected and harvey is straining the city's infrastructure. it has been days since harvey made landfall.
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but communities here in texas are just now feeling it's full impact. and with even more rain forecast, authorities fear that the worst is yet to come. president trump will travel to the lone star state today. he has promised rapid federal aid and texas will need it. the state faces years of rebuilding and recovery in the wake of this unprecedented storm. nada tawfik, bbc news, texas. brexit negotiations are continuing in brussels after the eu told the uk it needed to get serious about the withdrawal talks. the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier has expressed concern about the lack of progress made so far. the uk brexit secretary david davis said both sides had to show "flexibility and imagination". our brussels correspondent adam fleming joins us now. adam, how do we expect today to go? what do we expect today? we expect a lot of very technical talks, not
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leading to a massive breakthrough on any of the big issues. there is still disagreements on those issues, so citizens rights, the rights of eu nationals who live in the uk after brexit. the european side but like those rights to be guaranteed at the european court of justice. those rights to be guaranteed at the european court ofjustice. the british courts could do thatjob fine. on the issue of money and whether the uk has financial obligations to the eu after it leaves, the european commission negotiators and michel barnier who ru ns negotiators and michel barnier who runs their negotiating team, wants the uk to say what things the uk will be willing or not willing to pay for. the british side is doing an analysis as to whether it is the eu side is to the leader—macro legally able to ask for a bill. david davis says all of this is linked together so you need to start talking about the future relationship right now. very
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technical negotiations and discussions. thank you very much. hundreds of the uk's biggest companies will be made to reveal how much more their chief executives are paid compared to their average employee under government measures due to be announced later today. the reforms are aimed at increasing boardroom transparency in publicly listed companies but do not include plans for executive pay to be approved by a shareholder vote as promised in the conservative ma nifesto. police in east sussex are still working to establish the source of a suspected chemical haze which drifted in from the sea. people on several beaches had to be evacuated and around 150 people received hospital treatment after reporting vomiting and irritation. officers now say they believe that the cloud didn't come from northern france. the number of uninsured drivers on british roads may be increasing for the first time in more than a decade according to new data obtained by the bbc. the motor insurance bureau, which processes claims by victims of uninsured drivers, say there was an increase of 10% tojuly of this year.
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that rise could suggest that there are more uninsured people driving on uk roads. the stars gathered for a glitzy launch for the new series of strictly come dancing. the latest line—up of celebrities attended the red carpet event last night. newjudge shirley ballas made her first appearance with the rest of the team, with many paying tribute to the show‘s former host sir bruce forsyth. iam going i am going to make sure i enjoy it, i don't think there is any other way to do it. i have some moves but i don't know if they will be good enough for anyone. frankie has been so enough for anyone. frankie has been so excited, she hasn't given me advise yet, but i will be on the phone, frankie, give me allthe tips you can.
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she is one of the hot favourites. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning... north korea has fired a missile over northern japan in a move the japanese prime minister has called an "unprecedented" threat to his country. let's get some more reaction. thank you for your time on this, daniel. we know north korea has said it has fired rockets over japan we know north korea has said it has fired rockets overjapan before, what is new about these developments over the weekend? north korea is increasing its capability. they have desired to have nuclear weapons for a long time and delivery systems to strike the united states. so they have been conducting a lot of flight tests recently and increasing the range. this is a new threat the international community is going to
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have to deal with. is this a threat to japan have to deal with. is this a threat tojapan or is have to deal with. is this a threat to japan or is this a message to not only japan, but the to japan or is this a message to not onlyjapan, but the rest to japan or is this a message to not only japan, but the rest of the world as well? the first thing we have to think about when we look at these increasing capabilities is north korea's motivations, what are they trying to achieve? we need to connect their capabilities with their political objectives. north korea is dissatisfied with several things. first, being the division of the peninsula, they would like to unify the peninsular on its terms. they are dissatisfied with the un security council sanctions. they would like those sanctions lifted and they are dissatisfied with the security architecture in east asia, which includes bilateral security alliances with the us, japan, australia and they would like to see that security architecture dismantled. they will try to use
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their capabilities for coercive purposes to achieve those political objectives. in terms of pressure the world can exert, what is the best possible outcome for trying to scale back this increased military might we are seeing from north korea? the international community should be united and cooperate in raising the costs to north korea. secondly, the signal should be very clear, the international community's resolve that if north korea uses these capabilities, they will not achieve their political objectives. that includes a number of things, including alliances, military training, extended deterrence, deterrence by denial, including missile defence systems, economic sanctions. there is a whole tool box
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of instruments the international community will have two years. president trump has talked about military action at some stage, is there anything short of that that would make a difference in north korea? that is an open-ended question, if you are asking about north korea abandoning its nuclear weapons and delivery systems, i would argue that would constitute revolutionary change in north korea. it would be a complete reversal and abandonment of their identity, their ideology and their doctrine. without some fundamental change in north korea, they are not going to do that. what we have to think about is what the response should be and under what conditions. people talk about a military option, but they stop the discussion there. we have to talk about what conditions and to achieve water. basically we get back to deterrence. if north korea were
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ever to use these weapons or try to use force or coercion against its neighbours, then the international community should be unified in its resolve to respond accordingly. thank you very much for your time. we are getting reaction from the japanese embassy here in the uk later on. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. a lovely day for so many people. a lovely day for so many peoplem certainly was. we have a fine start to the day across parts of the uk. another beautiful photo from essex, this lovely, blue sky. it is not like it everywhere. there is quite a bit of cloud around, producing some murky conditions and some patchy rain here and there. it is courtesy of this weather front slowly
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slipping southwards. there is sunshine and showers. here is the weather front through this course of the morning. slowly moving south. sunshine and showers and breezy for scotla nd sunshine and showers and breezy for scotland and northern ireland. kent could hit 28 celsius. the sun will come out after a murky start. as we head into northern england, we are looking at some sunshine. sunshine and showers although they will be fairly few and far between. they will be prolific in scotland but they are showers so not everyone will catch one in between. moving
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down into yorkshire after a cloudy start, it will brighten up in the afternoon. here goes the weather front, rejuvenating. we could see thunderstorms. then we have another system coming in from the south—west. there will still be a peppering of showers. it will be a cool night in the countryside. there will be some showers and they will be breezy and eventually the twain shall meet. you will notice the huge difference in temperatures tomorrow. where we have had 27 or 28 we're looking at 16 or 17. the temperatures tomorrow will be very similarto temperatures tomorrow will be very similar to what we're looking at today. thursday will have a lot of
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dry weather around. there will be light breezes and the temperatures will be 13 — 20. light breezes and the temperatures will be 13 - 20. did you call it a dizzy cocktail earlier? yes. thank you very much. ppi, we are talking about. we've been talking about it for years. i feel like i've been talking about it forever. i would struggle to find anyone who has not had one of those annoying calls. a lot of people have claimed back money but interestingly, more than
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half have been mis—sold that have not claimed that back. the figures we re not claimed that back. the figures were something like 50 million policies sold. 6a million of them we re policies sold. 6a million of them were salt. if you look now at the number of people who have claimed, £27 billion has been paid out of compensation. it is a staggering amount of money. it has caused problems for the banks. they've set aside £30 billion to deal with compensation. there is a new campaign to encourage more people to claim. you don't have to. but they are saying there are still people out there who are owed compensation. in two years you will not be able to do that. that's why they're running this campaign. we've had loads of
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e—mails from people about this as well saying, i had ppi on my first mortgage. i was young and single, how do i know i was mis—sold at? that is interesting, you can go online, put in your details and the banks will do their work for you. but there are also claims management organisations that will do it for you. there are various messages, one said they got their money back really quickly, another said they are waiting. there are lots of different experiences. still worth having a go. until the door closes. thank you. the newest bridge across the firth of forth was lit up last night to mark the symbolic handover of the project from the constructors to the scottish government. building on the queensferry crossing, which links edinburgh and fife, started in 2011 and now the billion pound bridge is almost ready to open to traffic. our scotland correspondent lorna gordon is there for us this morning.
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it doesn't look busy at the moment because it is not open yet. not open quite yet but tomorrow it will be busy with commuters, lorries taking the goods throughout scotland. at the goods throughout scotland. at the moment there is some last—minute work going on but this is quite a lovely bridge, it is the tallest bridge in the uk and those fans you can see behind me, they shimmer in the late, they are quite special and last night there was a very special display to commemorate this official handing overfrom display to commemorate this official handing over from the display to commemorate this official handing overfrom the bridge from the workforce to the people of scotland. lighting up scotland's latest bridge. the queensferry crossing in the spotlight before opening two drivers for the first time. in its own right it is a feat
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of design, engineering and construction, absolutely amazing. it is, in every sense, an amazing achievement. the scale of this construction is impressive. it is the longest bridge of its kind in the longest bridge of its kind in the world. it is a chance for some of the many thousands who worked on it to celebrate the completion. what a night? fantastic. it is the end of a night? fantastic. it is the end of a long journey but it has been wonderful. stressful but the most rewarding job i've ever been on and i've been on many bridges. s rewarding job i've ever been on and i've been on many bridges. 5 these quys i've been on many bridges. 5 these guys have put a lot of work in. there will be grandchildren who say, my grand dad built that. there are three bridges across this stretch of the fourth. for some, the story of these crossings is part of their families history. migrate grandad
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worked on the forth rail bridge. my grandad worked on the forth road bridge and i worked on the queensferry crossing. three bridges, three centuries, all special, which is your favourite? definitely the queensferry crossing because it feels most like my bridge. are you chuffed? after seeing it come together i feel a little bit proud together i feel a little bit proud to have been working on the bridge. was travelling this busy route have contented with plenty of roadworks. what can they expect tomorrow? there have been a lot of cones out there for a long time. there will be a a0 mph limit. i'm sure people will want to see what the bridge looks like. we would ask people to drive carefully a nd we would ask people to drive carefully and keep their eye on the road. for now it is all about admiring the view and then enjoy the journey across this latest bridge over the forth. there will be some
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toing and froing over the next week. it opens tomorrow morning, it stays open for a couple of days, and then it shuts again to allow pedestrians to walk across the bridge. they would not normally be able to do that, but there has been a public ballot and tens of thousands of people will be lucky enough to get that once—in—a—lifetime opportunity to walk across. what makes it even more special is the fact that this is three bridges from three centuries spanning this location. it isa centuries spanning this location. it is a place which many people have identified with. they've travelled across the rail bridge and the road bridge and now they will get the chance to travel across the queensferry crossing. thank you very
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much indeed. some people have been in this ballot to walk. somebody sent me a copy of the beautiful invitation with a picture of the bridge. we have some fantastic guests coming up we have some fantastic guests coming upforyou. we we have some fantastic guests coming up for you. we havejohn culshaw. he will do one of his most requested impressions. you can probably guess who that is at the moment. also, hopefully an impression of someone who is here. there is also a programme we will talk about, i knew horizon programme, and it asks us, are psychopaths born or made? one of the main things was they were in
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conversation with ian brady, obviously very controversial. we will talk about the rights and wrongs of that. and jamie lawson will be on the silver. he was signed by ed sheeran and the last time they we re by ed sheeran and the last time they were both here together. two years ago. before they spoke to us, his single was outside number ten. by the time they got back to the station it was number one. the power of bbc breakfast. i wonder if we will have the same effect today. we will have the same effect today. we will be talking about the programme about psychopaths. we will have the national headlines in a couple of minutes after whatever is happening wherever you are. this is the fresher and cooler air. there will be a mixture of sunshine and showers. most of the showers towards scotland and northern ireland. but here it is, a week—old
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front. it will introduce a bit of cloud. one or two spots of rain but that will fizzle away. the cloud, as it moves south and east, bringing cloudier skies compared to yesterday. temperatures still in the mid—20s. cloud for south—west england, the midlands and into lincolnshire but sunny spells developing across wales and the far south—west and into northern england as well. temperatures 18 celsius in manchester. the scotland and northern ireland today, looking at a mixture of sunny spells and showers. some of the showers in western scotla nd some of the showers in western scotland could be heavy. there could be thunder as well. temperatures are about 16, 17 celsius. further south and east, we could see her eyes of 2a and 26. holding onto the hot weather. as the cloud moves further south and east, it will introduce
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the cooler, fresher air and there will be rain moving into the south as well. quite a chilly night in scotla nd as well. quite a chilly night in scotland and northern ireland, especially in the countryside. temperatures in too low and single figures. a couple of weather systems on wednesday bringing rain, particularly towards the south—east of england where the rain could be heavy on wednesday afternoon. elsewhere we have showers across scotla nd elsewhere we have showers across scotland and northern ireland. plenty of dry weather and east and west areas that showers across wales and northern england. cloudy across the midlands, eastern and southern areas into the afternoon. as a result it will feel cooler into the south—east corner. 17 degrees, 10 celsius cooler compared to today. on thursday and friday, and mixture of sunny spells and showers. temperatures in the high teens and low 20s. going into the weekend, things are looking fine and settled. hello, welcome to business life from
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the bbc. new figures show the most qualified eu workers are turning their backs on the uk. live from london it is our top story. as the eu's chief negotiator talks of slow progress in the brexit negotiations, uk manufacturers are warning of a looming skills shortage and recruitment crisis if they cannot hire eu workers after brexit.
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also, keeping the lights on. a giant
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