Skip to main content

tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  August 29, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

11:00 am
this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11.003m: sirens sound injapan as north korea fires a missile over the country. floodwaters are continuing to rise in houston in texas, where many thousands of people have already been forced from their homes by tropical storm harvey. i have never been through anything like this. it was bad before. i'm so worried about the kids. brexit negotiations are continuing in brussels after the eu told the uk it needed to get serious about the withdrawal talks. also coming up: a video game to detect the signs of dementia. the game is designed to test one of the first things to go with the illness — the ability to navigate. the newest bridge across the firth of forth was lit up last night
11:01 am
to mark the symbolic handover of the project to the scottish government. good morning. it's tuesday, 29th august. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. japan and the united states have requested an urgent meeting of the un security council later today after north korea fired a missile that flew overjapan before crashing into the sea. the missile flew over northern japan before it crashed into the sea off the country's east coast. the launch prompted an alert and people were told to take cover in basements or concrete buildings. the japanese prime minister, shinzo abe, said the launch was an unprecedented, serious, and grave threat to his nation.
11:02 am
north korea has fired rockets over japan twice in the past, once in 1998 and again in 2009, but on those occasions pyongyang claimed those they were satellite launches, not weapons. just before midnight, foreign secretary borisjohnson tweeted that he was "outraged" by what he called north korea's "reckless provocation". the chinese government says the united and south are partly responsible for pressuring north korea, questioning whether all parties were pushing for peace. our correspondent yogida limaye reports on the latest north korean missile launch. siren. japan being woken up by a siren on tuesday morning as a north korean missile flew over the country. the rocket was launched from near pyongyang and it flew over the northern island of hokkaido, before splitting into three parts and landing into the sea to the east.
11:03 am
it is just the latest in a series of military missile tests conducted by north korea this year, but a more serious one because it flew overjapan. the last time that happened was nearly two decades ago. "the outrageous act of firing a missile over our country is an unprecedented, serious and grave threat," japanese prime minister shinzo abe said. at a us military base near tokyo, a military drill was conducted by japanese forces in response to the missile launch. across the sea in south korea, joint exercises are under way with american troops. they are held every august, and north korea usually responds with a show of strength. last year, it conducted a nuclear test in retaliation. this year, it has flown a missile that had the potential to cause serious harm. a strong message that despite international pressure, pyongyang has no intention to stop. yogita limaye, bbc news, seoul. our correspondent rupert
11:04 am
wingfield—hayes is in tokyo. you can imagine people breaking up here to the sound air raid sirens sirens and being told to find shelter in concrete basements is not a normal occurrence for people in japan. i think this is the first time mrs happens the second world war. people have been practising due to the increased number of missile tests from north korea, but this is the first time it has happened per rail, the public address system has been used to tell people there is a missile flying in our direction, find shelter. it is a very serious and aggressive thing for north korea to do. countries do not normally fire missiles over the territories of the neighbours. this is why we have seen this angry response from
11:05 am
the prime minister of japan, have seen this angry response from the prime minister ofjapan, calling itan act the prime minister ofjapan, calling it an act of violence and saying it is unprecedented. they are going to go to the un security council and demand action, especially from countries like china and russia. stephen mcdonnell is in beijing for us. china is saying that efforts toward georgia mingles talks over the nuclear weapons programme had reached a tipping point as a result of this. analyse that statement for us. of this. analyse that statement for us. i much friction is there between beijing and johnny? it is interesting. china, whenever there is one of these tests says that all parties should remain calm and that nobody should do anything to escalate the situation. we have that again today from the chinese foreign ministry, but there something else. they are really blaming the us and south korea for pressuring north
11:06 am
korea into carrying out this test and that is because as we heard before, the us and south korea are having these big war games. china says the military exercise you should stop in exchange for north korea halting its missile programme, at least halting the testing of the missile programme. china also says that the un resolutions, apart from calling for sanctions, also called for all parties to move towards peace talks. it has questioned rhetorically whether or not everybody, and that means by this the us and south korea whether everybody is heading towards these peace talks. can china bring any more influence to bear on north korea and what it does next?” more influence to bear on north korea and what it does next? i think there is no doubt that china can pile more pressure on north korea. it is the biggest trading partner by
11:07 am
a long shot with north korea and everything that china does by of sanctions hurts north korea. china has said today that it will maintain these sanctions, but the bbc asked for example but they backed more sanctions, and the chinese government has said that as a hypothetical question, we can't say whether we would, but they have stressed that the dumping sanctions are the answer and we need to move towards peace talks to provide a long—term solution. towards peace talks to provide a long-term solution. stephen, thank you very much. with me now is professor robert kelly, professor of political science at busan national university in south korea. diplomacy, sanctions, downright criticism, strong words from some nations. none of this has stopped north korea carrying out another missile launch. what did you think has prompted it to fire this latest
11:08 am
missile overjapan? thank you for having me. a couple of things. i think north korea is more confident in the past that these kind of provocations will be punished because north korea is now and nuclear power. nobody wants to actually formulate but that prints, but north korea has a nuclear missile and there is nothing we can do about it. back gives them confidence that they can get away with more staff. north korea like to provoke cheering these military drills with america and south korea. the north koreans like to respond in some way and missile tests have been one of their favourites, so this is something we can expect. do you think that sanctions just aren't
11:09 am
working? no, actually i don't. i think sanctions get an unfair rap on this. how much worse with the nuclear programme baby didn't have sanctions? people kick around that they might have 50 or 60 warheads now, but they might have 200 if we didn't have them sanctions. we need to go after north korean money in chinese banks. we shouldn't let up. there is no good kinetic options. we need to continue what we are doing which is the united nations and missile defence. what response be from south korea from japan, which beyond the rhetoric has traditionally kept a relatively low profile on this matter. it is on
11:10 am
japan now to find some way to respond to this. north korea has only done this twice before. this time it was a ballistic missile. this is about terrorising japanese civilians and it is hard to be a serious government without some kind of response. this will prove the position of the hawks injapan who wa nt position of the hawks injapan who want missile defence. i would imagine there would be pressure in japan to get this similar kind of missile defence system that south korea has. as the north koreans build more missiles that will be an increasing amount of pressure for missile defence and there will be an arms race around that. in terms of having more talks with north korea, does that stand any chance of success ? does that stand any chance of
11:11 am
success? pub of the nod. north korea has but a huge amount of money into nuclear weapons. i have heard numbers thrown around as a size 8% of their gdp has been put into this programme so they will not give it up programme so they will not give it up without some massive reason. the talks probably won't really go very far but we should keep trying, we might get some small concessions. we have been talking to north korea about their nuclear programme since the early i990s, but it has always been one step forward in two steps back. we should keep trying but i think we should be sceptical that there will be a grand agreement at there will be a grand agreement at the end of this. thank you very much for your time today. president donald trump has promised swift action to provide assistance for the states affected by tropical storm harvey. mr trump is flying today to texas, the worst affected state,
11:12 am
to assess the damage. flooding in the region is only expected to worsen in coming days as waters rise following a storm of historic proportions. a record 75cm of rain has already fallen on the city of houston in the wake of hurricane harvey, turning roads into rivers. the entire texas national guard have been called in to deal with the impact. nearly half a million people are in need of help following severe flooding caused by torrential rains. at least 30,000 people affected by the flooding are being housed in emergency shelters. there's unlikely to be any relief in the coming days with heavy rain expected to continue to fall over the region as the storm moves slowly eastwards. an emergency has also been declared in louisiana, with new orleans previously hit by hurricane katrina, which is likely to face heavy rain over the coming days. nada tawfik is in texas and sent this report. waiting for help to arrive
11:13 am
as the floods reached new heights. all day, emergency responders, neighbours, and even complete strangers, have answered pleas for help from those trapped across houston. but still, it has not been enough. there is so much water. we have our children with us. we're trying to save our babies, that's it. resources have been overwhelmed by the epic scale of this disaster. 20 helicopters have been flying missions and the state's entire national guard has been deployed to aid in the search and rescue. thousands have been saved but many more remain desperate. from midnight until where we are today, 290 have been rescued. we fully recognise that there are many other people out there in stressful situations and we intend to get to every one of them. houston is struggling
11:14 am
to stay afloat. few parts of the sprawling metropolis have been spared from the rising waters and torrential rain. every major highway has been affected and harvey is straining the city's infrastructure. it has been days since harvey first made landfall. but communities here in texas are just now feeling it's full impact. and with even more rain forecast, authorities fear that the worst is yet to come. president trump will travel to the lone star state today. he has promised rapid federal aid and texas will need it. the state faces years of rebuilding and recovery in the wake of this unprecedented storm. nada tawfik, bbc news, texas. president trump spoke about the disaster last night ahead of his visit to texas in a few hours' time. it is an historic amount of water, there has never been anything like
11:15 am
it. the people have been handling it incredibly well and the people of texas have really persevered. and we'll be live in houston at midday. a four—year—old boy has died in hospital after being found in a swimming pool in devon. police were called to reports of a missing child at an activity centre near bideford. after a search assisted by the police helicopter, the child was found in a swimming pool on the site and taken to hospital where he was pronounced dead. the boy's next of kin have been informed. joining me now from plymouth is our reporter clare woodling. an absolute tragedy, this young boy dead. what more do you know? devon and cornwall police were called to a nap house activity centre near bideford. there were reports of a
11:16 am
four—year—old boy going missing. they carried out an extensive search including the police helicopter and the boy was found in this in pool at the boy was found in this in pool at the site. the child was taken to north devon district will —— where he was pronounced dead. police are describing it as unexplained at this stage. it happened during a week—long summer holiday camp out for members of narcotics anonymous and their families. it for members of narcotics anonymous and theirfamilies. it is for members of narcotics anonymous and their families. it is the sixth yearin and their families. it is the sixth year ina and their families. it is the sixth year in a row that this event has taken place. year in a row that this event has ta ken place. the year in a row that this event has taken place. the charity has released a statement saying that very tragically something has gone horrifically wrong and a young child of one of our members drowned in the pool of one of our members drowned in the pool. we are devastated that are truly wonderful week has ended so tragically. a police investigation is underway. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: siren sound injapan is north korea
11:17 am
fires missile over the country. floodwaters continued to rise in houston where many thousands of people have been forced from their homes by tropical store and hadith. 0ur four—year—old boy has died after being found in the swimming pool near bideford in devon. after a delayed start at headingley because of rain, day two of the second test between england and the west indies is underway. england need to bowl out the jurors to win the series. the west indies need 322 to win. britain's johanna the series. the west indies need 322 to win. britain'sjohanna konta has been knocked out of the us open. joe ham because it was one of the favourites for the title in new york. there was also a stunning return to grand slam tennis for maria sharapova, who beat simona halep. alex 0xlade chamberlain is on the verge ofjoining chelsea from arsenal. a fee has reportedly been
11:18 am
agreed. liverpool have confirmed the deal for nappy cater to move to the club next summer. they have agreed to pay the release clause so he can move to anfield next year. i will be back with more of those stories at 11 o'clock. the boss of network rail has apologised to passengers after there were fresh delays at the uk's busiest railway station on the day it was supposed to get back to normal following long—running engineering works. rush hour services on several lines into waterloo were cancelled. almost half of the platforms at waterloo station have been closed since the 5th of august as engineers made changes to accommodate longer trains. mark carne said the £800 million overhaul of the station would help increase capacity by 30%. danjohnson is at waterloo for us.
11:19 am
ican imagine i can imagine that passengers were not in use this morning at this additional disruption to their travel. is there any disruption still continuing? there are certainly is, yes. it has been a miserable month for people who commute in and out of waterloo, and it was all supposed to be so different this morning. the project was supposed to have been completed and they expected the trains to be back on time. there was quite a lot of disruption this morning with trains delayed and cancelled. if we look up at the departure board, you can see there are quite a few trains that are delayed or cancelled. network rail is hoping that they will get things back to normal by around lunchtime. it was all down to this engineering work overrunning, the project to extend the platform so the station can take longer trains. that engineering work was meant to be finished in the early hours of the morning, but they had
11:20 am
to do safety critical signalling tests which overran this morning. an apology from network rail but things are starting to get back to normal. it is certainly a lot quieter at the station today than it would be normally. that is why network rail ta kes normally. that is why network rail takes the opportunity over the summer takes the opportunity over the summer when it is quieter to do this work. some commuters have been put off by this. the new longer platforms, the new longer trains are great, it has to be done. it is one of those things, the work has to be done and they have handled it ok over a period. done and they have handled it ok overa period. ithink done and they have handled it ok over a period. i think the done and they have handled it ok over a period. ithink the real way is suffering under its own success. ijust tried to take a in my stride. i knew this was going to happen sol am not going to let that stress me. what can you do? you just put up at
11:21 am
the? exactly, exactly. it's not the end of the world, is it? 0ther london stations are being affected with planned work, london bridge station is closed today. if you are waiting at waterloo and are delayed, free ice cream is being handed out. something to cool down those overheating commuters. brexit negotiations are continuing in brussels after the eu told the uk it needed to get serious about the withdrawal talks. the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier has expressed concern about the lack of progress made so far and accused britain of ambiguity on key issues like its exit bill. the uk brexit secretary david davis said both sides had to show flexibility and imagination. 0ur brussels reporter adam fleming joins me now. hello, adam. in a further brexit
11:22 am
related from a speech related comment from a speech earlier byjean—claude juncker, he is saying that he has read all the papers produced by her majesty's government and none of them is satisfactory, he says. so there are an enormous amount of issues to be settled. while the negotiators are locked in that room, and they are a sort of locked in because once they are in nobody is allowed a until the end of the session, in public the president of the european commission has been giving this speech to the eu ambassadors, the diplomats represent the eu around the world and he had two big things to say. the first thing was he wanted to reiterate that the eu timetable is still the way that these negotiations will work. there will be three priority issues, citizens
11:23 am
rights, financial settlement and the northern irish border have to be resolved sufficiently before talks can move to the next phase. that will rankle with david davis and others on the british side because they think those withdrawal issues are tied up with the future relationship issues and the want to get talking about trade and the future is in as possible. the second thing that will rankle with the brits is what you're referring to a moment ago. he said he read all of the uk government position papers published over the summer holidays with the requisite attention and he found that none of them, none of them were satisfactory. i think that would really annoys some of the british civil servant in this building today because they broke those papers over the summer and they are pretty proud of their work. no official response yet from the british government and look clarification from president juncker‘s press people. clarification from president juncker's press people. a spokesman person porter reza may have said
11:24 am
that the government is seeking to agree by october and eu summit to move on to discuss the future relationship after brexit. that is all the detail we have on that at the moment. resume a bleak, the eu is going to stick to the plant except i'd saying it wants a satisfactory agreement on those three key issues before any talks on the future can proceed. that statement from number ten downing st is consistent with the eu timetable that has been agreed for these stocks. all along, the eu side have said that they will decide if sufficient progress has been made on phase one. probably around 0ctober or maybe in december when there archery eu summit scheduled, and thatis archery eu summit scheduled, and that is when the other 27 eu leaders wolves via the starting gun on the next phase of thoughts about trade. that has been pencilled in for a while for october or december. there
11:25 am
has been a lot of debate behind the scenes about when sufficient progress will have been made and it looked like that was slip into december. what is interesting about that statement from theresa may's spokesperson is that it shows that she is getting ready to get involved in these talks. at the stage it is being conducted by david davis and his officials sitting round a table talking in very technical terms with documents. it sounds like theresa may is getting ready to dive into these talks at the political level and start going head—to—head with fellow 27 eu leaders to say, right, let's get a move on, let's talk trade. adam, thank you very much. the newest bridge across the firth of forth was lit up last night to mark the symbolic handover of the project from the constructors to the scottish government.
11:26 am
building on the queensferry crossing, which links edinburgh and fife, started in 2011 and now the billion pound bridge is almost ready to open to traffic. 0ur scotland correspondent lorna gordon is there for us this morning. it isa it is a pretty high—tech bridge, and opened with considerable pomp. it is a pretty high—tech bridge, and opened with considerable pomplj think the people who worked on this bridge are very proud of what they have done. the idea behind it is if you can get to the bridge on the road network you can get onto the bridge. this stretch of water has pretty windy weather in the depths of winter and you often hear the stories about the forth road bridge closing to high sided traffic or all traffic because the winds too high. the queensferry crossing will stay open to traffic. it funnels the wind about the traffic as they cross. last minute bits and bobs are going on to get it ready, but tomorrow morning it will finally open to vehicles. lighting up scotland's latest bridge. the queensferry crossing in the spotlight before opening
11:27 am
to drivers for the first time. in its own right, it is a feat of design, engineering and construction. in its own right, it is absolutely amazing. it is in every sense, in every way, an amazing achievement. the scale of this construction is impressive. it's the longest bridge of its kind in the world and this is a chance for some of the many thousands who worked on it to celebrate its completion. whata night, eh? i know, fantastic. it's the end of a long journey but it's been a wonderfuljourney. stressfuljourney but the most rewarding job i've ever been on and i've been on many a bridge. these guys have put a lot of work into this place. in years to come, there will be grandchildren saying, my grandad worked on that. that's what i want. there are now three bridges across this stretch of the forth, the legacy of the generations of workers who built them. for some, the story of these crossings, stretching back for centuries, is part
11:28 am
of their family's history. my great grandad worked on the forth rail bridge, my grandad worked on the forth road bridge and i worked on the queensferry crossing. three bridges, three centuries, all special in their own way. which is your favourite and why? definitely the queensferry crossing because it feels most like my bridge. are you chuffed? after seeing it all come together, i'm fair away with it. i am proud to have been working on the bridge. those who travel this busy route have had to contend with plenty of roadworks as the new bridge has taken shape. so what can they expect tomorrow? there have been miles of cones out there for a long time now, while the bridge was under construction. there will be a 40mph limit. i'm sure people want to see what the bridge looks like. we ask people to be careful, keep their eyes on the road. for now, it's all about admiring the view. tomorrow, a chance for all to enjoy the journey across this latest
11:29 am
bridge over the forth. there are no pedestrian walkways over it, it is only for vehicles, except that there has been heavily oversubscribed public ballot and tens of thousands, about 50,000 very lucky people have been given tickets to walk across this bridge this weekend. it is a ticketed event for what has been described as a once—in—a—lifetime opportunity. let's see what the weather will be like for anyone crossing the average. here's simon king. the weather was not looking too bad in scotland over the next few days,
11:30 am
and no strong winds, so no problems with distractions! much cooler today compare to the last few days for many of us and there is a mixture of sunshine and showers. the cooler weather is coming in behind the cold front which is gradually moving southward. there is a line of cloudy skies, rain and drizzle here and there, gradually moving to the south—east. 0n there, gradually moving to the south—east. on two showers may be in the south—east, a dual hold onto the heat here. further north and west it will be cool, mixture of sunshine and showers for scotland and northern ireland. 26 degrees is the high in london today. cloud will continue to move its way in through this evening and into tomorrow. it will turn pretty wet. 0utbreaks this evening and into tomorrow. it will turn pretty wet. outbreaks of brain in central, eastern and southern parts of england. tablature is well dean died in what they were today, 10 degrees difference. in the north and west, again, mixture of sunshine and showers. this is bbc newsroom live.
11:31 am
the headlines... japan's prime minister, shinzo abe, has called north korea's ballistic missile launch an "unprecedented threat". here, theresa may said she was "outraged" by north korea's "reckless provocation". houston continues to bear the brunt of tropical storm harvey as flood waters are expected to rise further. as the third round of brexit negotiation talks get underway, the european union's chief negotiator, michel barnier, has warned the uk that "ambiguity" needs to be removed for progress to be made. and scientists have developed a virtual reality game which could help doctors diagnose dementia. 0ur our first 0urfirst visit to our first visit to the sports centre
11:32 am
now and will perry has the latest. england are looking for early wickets as they look to win the second test against the west indies and seal a series victory at headingley. resuming on 5—0 this morning the west indies need 322 to level the series at 1—1. this is how it looks currently at headingley with the west indies 15-0. johanna konta's wait for a maiden tennis grand slam continues. the british number one's been knocked out in the first round of the us open, losing to the unseeded serbian aleksandra krunic. konta was among the favourites for the title and could have ended the tournament as world number one. konta took the first set, but the world number 78 fought back to leave konta still looking for that elusive first grand slam title. it would be quite obnoxious of me to come in here expecting that i have a right to be in the second round. i am very much aware that to get that opportunity i need to work very hard.
11:33 am
so, me losing in the first round is not ideal, as it is not for anybody. anybody coming here wants to be in for as long as possible. but i lost to a better player today. unfortunately, that is how sport goes. there was a successful return to grand slam tennis for maria sharapova following her 15—month doping ban. the russian beat world number two simona halep in three sets. sharapova was given a wild card to enter the main draw. she's currently ranked 146th in the world. we have just competed against each other so well in the past and i have produced some good tennis. and despite not playing a lot of matches coming into this, it almost seemed like i had no right to win this match today and i somehow did and i think that is what i'm most proud of. a better day for
11:34 am
britain's men, though. kyle edmund won his first round match against robin haase in straight sets. he's joined in the second round by youngster cameron norrie after his opponent, dmitry tursonov, retired through injury in the third set. norrie, who's ranked outside the world's top 200, was leading by two sets to love at the time. the problems continue to mount for arsenal manager arsene wenger, beaten 4—0 by liverpool on sunday, now midfielder alex 0xlade—chamberlain looks set to leave the emirates and join chelsea. the england midfielder‘s contract expires next summer, he's refused to commit his future at the emirates. chelsea have declined to comment but it's understood they've agreed a transfer fee for the 24—year—old. arsenal have lost two of the opening two games to lead and despite signing a new contract the criticism of arsene wenger has intensified. where do we start? the amount of things that is going wrong. like you say, it does come back to arsene wenger‘s door. we are three games in
11:35 am
and literally at crisis point. we are losing players, people are talking about the 0x opening the doorforjulian draxler. talking about the 0x opening the door forjulian draxler. why talking about the 0x opening the doorforjulian draxler. why would he sign? i would like to go simply because i do not believe now that arsene wenger can motivate those players, with everything going on above him, and the way the players are performing on the pitch, for him to turn this around, for himself, for his own sanity. we at three games in and it is already an absolute nightmare. a few other football lines for you this morning. liverpool have confirmed a deal for rb leipzig's naby keita tojoin the club next summer. liverpool has agreed to pay the £48 million release clause that allows the guinea international to move to anfield next year. stoke have signed defender kevin wimmer from tottenham for £18 million. the 24—year—old has signed a five—year—deal with the club. wimmer becomes stoke's seventh signing of the summer. and everton goalkeeper jordan pickford has been ruled out of england's world cup qualifiers against malta and slovakia with a muscle injury.
11:36 am
the uncapped 23—year—old picked up the injury during sunday's premier league defeat at chelsea. that is all the sport, more in the next hour. new figures obtained by the bbc suggests levels of uninsured driving may be rising for the first time in more than a decade. claims handled by the specialist industry body, the motor insurer's bureau, increased by almost 10% in the year tojuly. they're investigating why but in the meantime the police continue to seize thousands of vehicles a week. vanessa baffoe reports from norfolk on the battle against uninsured driving. the end of the road for cars, a scrap yard in norfolk. if they are driven without proper insurance, the police have powers to tow them away. once a car has been seized by the police, the driver has a limited amount of time to get insurance, but if they don't, this could be the end of the line. sergeant chris harris from norfolk‘s road policing unit is out on patrol. cameras on his car and in secret
11:37 am
locations across the county automatically read hundreds of motor plates an hour. the system has flagged up a suspect car. they track the driver to a cul—de—sac in norwich. i have checked to see if the insurance is still held. they have just done some checks now and we have just heard that the driver was actually driving without proper insurance. in 2016, police forces across the uk seized 145,000 vehicles for insurance offences, of which approximately 58,000 were crushed. that is more than 1000 a week. the cameras used to identify drivers are part of a system called automatic number plate recognition, or anpr. its database is operated by milton keynes—based motor insurers bureau. they compensate victims of uninsured drivers on behalf of the industry. the money comes from £15
11:38 am
which is added to each premium. the number of claims they are seeing is increasing. back in norwich, the uninsured car is towed away. the driver will now have to obtain cover and pay a fixed penalty to get it back or his car could end up here. mps have been urged to launch an enquiry after it was revealed that a five—year—old christian girl in tower hamlets was repotedly placed into foster care with a non—english speaking muslim family. the fostering process requires a child's cultural background to be taken into consideration when being placed with a family. neil carmichael, the former mp who launched an enquiry into foster care, spoke to victoria derbyshire this morning. 0bviously obviously the children's commissioner will be launching an inquiry and she has said that and quite right too. i think the outcome
11:39 am
of the decisions that were made in tower hamlets about this particular child had not been taken into account with the proper processes and it is very clear that cultural language issues should be taken into account and they were not because the outcome would have been different if they had been. what we have to do is ask a few questions about the number of foster carers available in tower hamlets and elsewhere, whether or not the council was consulting other councils because of course it is not just foster carers within their geographical area that can help, there are other possibilities. but there are other possibilities. but the simple point you make is the right one that there are not enough foster carers which is one of the reasons why it is important to think carefully about the support they get from the councils that operate under, and that they do get appropriate payment and support wherever it is needed. statins could help reduce the risk of breast cancer — that's according to new research,
11:40 am
led by academics at aston university. patients taking the cholesterol—busting drugs were found to be 45% less likely to develop the illness. joining me now is our health reporter, michelle roberts. tell us about this study and what it set out to examine. this research looked at two groups of women and compared them. half of the women had high cholesterol and the other half had normal cholesterol. when they followed them, the risk of breast cancer appeared to be higher in the ones with normal cholesterol. initially you might ask what is going on and does that mean having high cholesterol is protected against cancer but that is not what the researchers think is happening. they do not have proved but they think it is something to do with the treatment the women might be on for their high cholesterol levels. there was a suspicion that stat ins might have this impact as well as dealing
11:41 am
with cholesterol, they might have an impact on breast cancer and the risk of developing it which is why the study was undertaken. a lot of scientists have been looking at statins, these drugs that lower cholesterol, they are used by a lot of people and commonly prescribed to people at high risk of heart disease but researchers are interested that it appears to have some effect in the lab on cancer. we don't have concrete proof yet so they are saying it would be interesting to look in more detail and test it to see if it really would lower the risk of breast cancer but that is the big if, and we don't have that proof yet. but it looks promising at least as a line of enquiry so what are the next steps? are there any further research studies set up yet? not at the moment that have been published and are undergoing that we know about, but that is the hope, that this would go into another trial to see categorically if giving a woman at statin might prevent them
11:42 am
having this increased risk of breast cancer. the interesting thing is also that many of the things that cause both high cholesterol and contribute to cancer risk our lifestyle things we can all manage ourselves, exercising and keeping a healthy weight, not smoking. in terms of whether it is a pill we should be taking or lifestyle things, that is another debate. more work needs to be done. thank you very much, michele. let's look at some of today's other developing stories. at least five people are reported to have been killed in an apparent suicide—bombing in the afghan capital, kabul. at least eight people have been injured in the explosion which took place outside a bank close to the diplomatic sector in the heart of the city. it's the second such attack in kabul in less than a week. a search is continuing after reports of a diver missing off the norfolk coast. it's thought the 68—year—old man was exploring a wreck site 12 miles east of great yarmouth.
11:43 am
a search including coastguard helicopters and rnli lifeboats was launched last night and will continue this morning. the source of a suspected chemical haze which drifted in from the sea yesterday in sussex is still not known. people in several beaches had to be evacuated and around 150 received hospital treatment after reporting vomiting and irritation but officers say they do not believe the toxic cloud came from northern france. the murder of a palestinian cartoonist who was shot dead on a london street 30 years ago is being re—investigated. naji salim hussain al—ali was a political cartoonist for kuwaiti newspaper al-qabas. he was shot in the neck as he walked to his office in west london in 1987. mr al—ali's satirical cartoons were often critical of the palestinian regime and he had received a number of death threats in the years leading up to his murder. despite a lengthy investigation, no one has been convicted of the crime. 0ver that period of time, 30 years,
11:44 am
people's allegiances change. people who might not have felt confident at the time in relation to coming forward, i'd encourage them now to speak to us. the police in particular do not close such enquiries. they always remain active and are constantly reviewed. as a result, if people feel they can help us, i'd encourage them to make contact. more than half of those mis—sold payment protection insurance, or ppi, may not yet have claimed compensation. the financial conduct authority is launching a campaign today encouraging people to claim before a deadline runs out in two years' time. so far £27 billion has been paid out in compensation. british actor ed skrein has pulled out of a hollywood movie role after he was cast as a character of asian heritage, attracting heavy criticism. the initial casting of the deadpool star prompted accusations of ‘whitewashing'.
11:45 am
skrein said he wasn't aware of the character's mixed—asian heritage when he accepted the role in the comic book adaptation of hellboy. he took to twitter to announce he would be stepping down from the role, which was met with praise. for a full summary of the news you can go to our website where you'll be able to get more details. dementia scientists are using a virtual reality game to help to diagnose the disease. users have perused it about testing their navigational ability which was one of the first things to go when someone of the first things to go when someone develops the condition. prepare to enter a virtual world. you are now captain of a boat. your challenge is to use your sense of direction to chart a course through complex waterways and icy oceans and even feed hotdog—loving sea monsters. but this is not only a game.
11:46 am
it's collecting anonymous data while you play as part of the biggest dementia experiment in the world. this doesn't feel like medical research. it's fun. but one of the first things to go with dementia is our ability to navigate, and that's what you can test in virtual reality. the first version of this game was a smartphone app that had three million players and gave unprecedented insight into how our sense of direction declines with age. but making the leap into virtual reality will allow scientists to study dementia in greater detail. the value for us is to create a much richer data set. we're capturing 15 times more data from the vr version because we are separating out where their head looks and where the boats are moving. researchers hope that spotting unusual declines in navigational ability could eventually be used to test for dementia at its earliest stage. one by one...
11:47 am
his memories were lost. 850,000 people are already living with the disease in the uk. that figure is forecast to reach two million by 2051. most will have had the disease for more than a decade before their symptoms appear. what we really want to be doing is trying to identify people with dementia ten or 15 years earlier than we do at the moment with our classic ways of diagnosis. a game like sea hero quest and understanding how we navigate will help us get to that much earlier diagnosis. this technology still has a long way to go but it is only by diagnosing dementia early that there is any hope of preventing the irreversible damage to the brain. james gallagher, bbc news. and we will be talking to james about this in the next hour. in a
11:48 am
moment a summary about this in the next hour. in a moment a summary of the business news but first the headlines. sirens sound injapan as north korea fires a missile over the country. floodwaters continue to rise in houston in texas, where many thousands of people have already been forced from their homes by tropical storm harvey. a four—year—old boy has died after being found in a swimming pool in devon. hello. in the business news... ministers have published details of their plans for greater transparency about chief executives' pay, and giving workers a voice in the boardroom. the proposals call for greater power for workers in the boardroom. 0pposition mps have said the plans don't go far enough. fewer than half of those who were mis—sold payment protection insurance, or ppi, may have claimed compensation so far. the regulator says its now launching an advertising campaign to encourage people to act before a deadline to claim runs out in two years.
11:49 am
many refineries have shut and almost a fifth of oil and gas production in the gulf of mexico has been suspended amid the largest storm to hit in the us in more than a decade. analysts expect the economic impact of the storm to pass $40 billion. companies will have to give details on how much they pay their chief executives compared with the average pay of employees, under a package of government reforms. they're designed to increase boardroom transparency in publicly listed companies. firms with significant shareholder opposition to executive pay deals will be named on a new register. business secretary greg clark says the plans will make a difference, but unions attacked them as "feeble". so let's examine those corporate governance reforms in a bit more detail. joining me now is tracy vegro, executive director of strategy of the financial reporting council. let's talk through how this will
11:50 am
work. it is basically trying to give all of us an idea of how much the top boss is played against the average worker. what difference will it make? i think anything that will give greater transparency to all stakeholders, these proposals are directed at workers and employees more generally who are suppliers and customers of the company said it is not just about a one size fits all approach, it is how do you get stakeholder engagement and more involved questioning and accountability among the bigger corporates. i don't think anybody would deny what transparency —— that transparency is a good thing but will it make a difference? it is one thing knowing what they are paid but a different thing being paid more or closing that gap. i think it is
11:51 am
about the kind of diversity and cultural strategy of the organisation. you might not see an immediate change but over time you might see that customer or supplier power or general societal changes makes more of a shift. i don't think any one silver bullet answer will work on this because it is a different issue in different sectors. you see different models of how companies are springing up, social enterprise and cooperatives, so social enterprise and cooperatives, so at the corporate level i understand there has been a lack of trust in business and the society are asking a lot more questions. 0ver are asking a lot more questions. over time we will see that other methods also come in, the corporate government changes we consult on our about a planned review of the government's code anyway so a lot of people will contribute on that. we at the frc adam hague stakeholder panel of the own —— have a
11:52 am
stakeholder panel. we have taken on this printable broader stakeholder involvement and that is what the government is trying to do any package. it is also not ruling out legislation if it is needed and we will be consulting on that in tandem as well so that myriads of changes might seea as well so that myriads of changes might see a different shift and quicker than some people might expect. and the point about if customers are aware of issues, they might be able to vote with their feet if they don't like it. how aware are businesses that that could happen? i think people have had issues around corporate social responsibility policies for a long time but maybe they have become stale and one of the benefits of the social media and the immediacy of people giving feedback, people can ta ke people giving feedback, people can take a picture of the queue they have been in or morning or something as good companies focusing more sharply on what is differentiating them in terms of their customer offer. i think that suppliers, a lot more debate about how small
11:53 am
businesses are treated in terms of the payment form with bigger companies, so there are lots of things coming together at the same time also as the overseers of the corporate governance code that is why we did this review because these broader stakeholder issues are becoming more important. broader stakeholder issues are becoming more importantm broader stakeholder issues are becoming more important. it is good to talk to you. let's have a look at some market numbers. 0utsourcing firm mitie is being investigated by regulators over the timing of a profit warning made in september last year. interesting date with the currencies because we have seen with those escalating tensions it is affecting currency markets because people are taking it out of stocks and shares
11:54 am
and putting them into relative safe havens like gold. that's all the business news. thank you. strictly come dancing's class of 2017 lined up at a glitzy red carpet event last night. judge bruno tonioli paid tribute to the show‘s former host, sir bruce forsyth. 0ur entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba, mingled with the stars and sent us this report. glitterballs and glamour, sequins and sparkles. this year's new celebrities together for strictly. they have been busy rehearsing for their launch show, the first to be broadcast since the death of sir bruce forsyth. there will of course be a special tribute. he will always be with us. he is part our lives, he is part of this country. he's part of the show. he's part of this show. so the spirit of brucey is with us. as in previous series, the programme will be aiming to deliver entertainment,
11:55 am
and perhaps even the odd surprise. richard, we saw you come down that red carpet. yeah. you've got some moves. i've got some moves. i'm not sure if they will be good for anyone. but i'm releasing them, they are bubbling like a volcano of slightly uncoordinated dance. debbie, you've loved strictly as a viewer. how do you think you'll enjoy it as a contestant? i will make sure i enjoy it. i don't think there's any other way to do it. i hope i don't get too nervous. has your saturdays band—mate frankie, who of course did the show, given you any advice? frankie has been so excited about me doing this. she hasn't actually given me any advice yet but i will definitely be on the phone being like, frankie, tell me any tips you can! you are the first contestant to be in the show with a physical disability. how do you feel about being a bit of a trailblazer? yeah, i think it's really awesome. it shows the way that the show and life in general is going. this country, this world, we need more inclusion, we need more of this. as well as new contestants,
11:56 am
there is also a new head judge. shirley ballas taking over from len goodman. i don't feel too much pressure because i feel i have a good experienced team around me. so they've been taking care of me today. i don't feel any pressure at the moment, but we will see on the night. next month's launch show will give the public their first chance to see the new contestants in action. it will also be an opportunity for the programme and the viewers to remember sir bruce, a man who helped make strictly one of the most popular shows on tv. lizo mzimba, bbc news. the headlines are coming up in a moment. first we leave you with a look at the weather. good morning, yesterday we got to 20 degrees in lincolnshire but today will not be as hot but still some hot weather in the south—east.
11:57 am
elsewhere for most of us a lot cooler than paired to yesterday with a mixture of sunshine and showers. you can see the sunshine in the south—east this morning but elsewhere a lot of cloud, this area is associated with a cold front which is moving gradually south and east and with it you can see the cloud and some outbreaks of light and patchy rain and drizzle as it moves south. a few showers this afternoon in parts of kent and east sussex but temperatures in the 20s. further north and west, quite a bit of cloud in south—west england and the midlands, lincolnshire and yorkshire which is where that weather front is but behind that there is something a bit brighter in west wales and northern england, scotla nd west wales and northern england, scotland and northern ireland with some sunny scotland and northern ireland with some sunny spells developing and we could have a few heavy showers also developing, one or two in northern ireland. it is in these northern and western areas where temperatures are
11:58 am
around 15—19d, but in the south—east you are holding on to that warmer weather. that will soon disappear as the cloud moves to the south—east and for many of us tonight it will be fairly quiet, a few showers in scotla nd be fairly quiet, a few showers in scotland but you can notice more rain spreading in from the south. 0vernight temperatures 12—1lid in central and southern areas but further north and west a bit colder with temperatures in rural areas into single figures. 0n with temperatures in rural areas into single figures. on wednesday we are being invaded by two areas of low pressure which will give us some heavy rain at times especially in the south—east. quite a bit of cloud in the midlands and southern parts, some outbreaks of rain here but for wales and northern england, scotland and northern ireland it will be a day of sunny spells and showers. noticeably cooler for all of us, a big difference in the south—east with temperatures are good 10 degrees below what they will be this
11:59 am
afternoon and elsewhere at those highs of around 16—18d. there's that and friday, a mixture of sunshine, one or two scattered showers in the afternoons. temperatures in the high teens and low 20s but for the weekend is looking largely dry and settled with a big area of high pressure developing and there are more details about that on the website. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday: floodwaters continue to rise in houston in texas, where many thousands of people have already been forced from their homes by tropical storm harvey. the fire department have rescued about 290 and we fully recognise that there are many other people out there in distressful situations. siren. sirens sound injapan as north korea fires a missile over the country. a four—year—old boy has died after being found in a swimming pool in devon. british actor ed skrein has pulled
12:00 pm
out of a role in an upcoming film after a backlash because he was cast as a character of asian heritage. also coming up: a video game to detect the signs of dementia. it's designed to test one of the first things to deteriorate with the illness — the ability to navigate. good afternoon. it's tuesday, 29th august. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. president donald trump has promised swift action to provide assistance for the states affected by tropical storm harvey. mr trump is flying today to texas, the worst affected state, to assess the damage. flooding in the region is only
12:01 pm
expected to worsen in coming days as waters rise following a storm of historic proportions. a record 75cm of rain has already fallen on the city of houston in the wake of hurricane harvey, turning roads into rivers. we can nowjoin our correspondent laura trevelyan in houston. iam in i am in the smithfield. this is a small texan town of less than 5,000 people which has experienced devastating historic levels of flooding. people here thought that temp two was going to impact the coast, but the colorado river here has burst its banks due to the
12:02 pm
immense rainfall as the tropical storm cindy swirled around euston affecting the entire area. people here have had to leave their homes. this small town has to set up an evacuation centre. the storm is not over yet. it is rolling to the east of houston, even affecting louisiana, where the president has declared emergency conditions. the president will come here today himself dizzy high relief actions are going in texas. waiting for help to arrive as the floods reached new heights. all day, emergency responders, neighbours, and even complete strangers, have answered pleas for help from those trapped across houston. but still, it has not been enough. there is so much water. we have our children with us. we're trying to save our babies, that's it. resources have been overwhelmed by the epic scale of this disaster.
12:03 pm
20 helicopters have been flying missions and the state's entire national guard has been deployed to aid in the search and rescue. thousands have been saved but many more remain desperate. from midnight until where we are today, 290 have been rescued. we fully recognise that there are many other people out there in stressful situations and we intend to get to every one of them. houston is struggling to stay afloat. few parts of the sprawling metropolis have been spared from the rising waters and torrential rain. every major highway has been affected and harvey is straining the city's infrastructure. it has been days since harvey first made landfall. but communities here in texas are just now feeling it's full impact. and with even more rain forecast, authorities fear that the worst is yet to come. president trump will travel to the lone star state today. he has promised rapid federal aid and texas will need it. the state faces years of rebuilding
12:04 pm
and recovery in the wake of this unprecedented storm. nada tawfik, bbc news, texas. so, the fears are that the worst of the storm is yet to come, and that may seem strange the storm is yet to come, and that may seem strange that hurricane harvey made landfall here on friday night, but the tropical storm cindy and you do swirled, taking advantage of all the moisture in the atmosphere because it has been such atmosphere because it has been such a hot summer. that rainfall now is what is causing the devastation. what i am now in smithfield texas, the colorado river rose to historic levels just a little bit west of where i am now. there is a mandatory evacuation order. another small community along the banks of the river, there they are expecting a
12:05 pm
river, there they are expecting a river that normally close at eight feet to flow at 59 feet. the problem there encapsulates the problem across the reason, —— the region, that mandatory evacuation order has been issued, but people can't give out because the roads are flooded, too. texans themselves rescuing their own neighbours, getting that there inflatable is. people have called that the texas navy. in louisiana, where they are expecting up louisiana, where they are expecting up to 11 inches of rainfall in the next few days, already there is the talk of the cajun navy getting ready there, so the regular people of louisiana getting out their kayaks and there boats and preparing to rescue their neighbours. memories are still very fresh of hurricane katrina in 2005. there is much anxiety there about the kind of flooding back could happen again in
12:06 pm
new orleans. you are also seeing those fears also in texas, the worries about how the authorities can try to control the flooding. the army corps of engineers yesterday created some flooding, they opened some of the dams because they felt it would be better to have suburban communities suffer rather than have much worse flooding in greatly populated areas. this is the situation that president trump will be flying into inner bouts and hour and a half he will leave the white house, then go to corpus christi in texas. he will be briefed on the relief efforts, then go to austen in texas where he will get a further briefing and further tours. president trump's approval ratings are below a0%, so this is a key moment for him, his first major natural disaster as president. he has to show that he is decisive, presidential. people feel he doesn't
12:07 pm
act ina presidential. people feel he doesn't act in a presidential manner. he has been tweeting furiously about berrigan, urging the relief —— praising the relief efforts. this is a moment for him that he knows is highly significant. he is well aware that george w bush was widely criticised for his response to hurricane katrina, for not appearing sharp enough, for praising the federal emergency management agency went generally bears response was seen went generally bears response was seen to be very slow. people here are waiting to hear what president trump has to say. thank you very much. we will be bringing you more about how those states are coping with the impact of the storm throughout the day. north korea has fired a missile which flew over northern japan before crashing into the sea off the country's east coast. the launch prompted an alert and people were told to take cover in basements or concrete buildings. north korea has fired a missile which flew over northern japan before crashing into the sea off
12:08 pm
the country's east coast. the japanese prime minister, shinzo abe, said the launch was an unprecedented, serious and grave threat to his nation. north korea has fired rockets over japan twice in the past, once in 1998 and again in 2009, but on those occasions pyongyang claimed those they were satellite launches, not weapons. the prime minister, theresa may, said she was "outraged" by north korea's "reckless provocation". 0ur correspondent yogida limaye reports from the south korean capital of seoul. siren. at warning that north korea missile has just flown the country. the rocket was launched from near pyongyang and it flew over
12:09 pm
the northern island of hokkaido, before splitting into three parts and landing into the sea to the east. the range are shorter than this intercontinental missile that north korea tested injuly, but the latest launches more dangerous in many ways because passed overjapan and have the potential to cause harm. the country's prime minister described it as an outrageous act and an unprecedented threat. but let the people of this nation worried. translation: i can't imagine what would happen if anything from the missile falls on the house, and i'm scared. despite sanctions being imposed, north korea keeps developing missiles and firing them over and over developing missiles and firing them overand overagain. developing missiles and firing them over and over again. this is a dreadful situation. hours after the missile launch, japanese troops conducted drills at a us based near tokyo. suchjoint
12:10 pm
conducted drills at a us based near tokyo. such joint exercises with american forces are also underway in south korea. they are preparations foran south korea. they are preparations for an attack from the north and pure and often uses them to justify the. here in south korea the president has ordered his military to display overwhelming force against north korea. it is a strong statement from a leader that for weeks has advocated dialogue. the stamp yeong yang seems to have gone too far and south korea also wants too far and south korea also wants to respond with a show of strength. for south korean fighter jets to respond with a show of strength. for south korean fighterjets staged live bombing drills, practising how they could attack the north korean leadership. an temp two display military might. but despite the strong tactics from both sides, many believe that the korean bellinger luck is not on the brink of war. despite all of the rhetoric, the bloodcurdling rhetoric that we hear, we have not seen things such as the
12:11 pm
mobilisation of forces, moving assets into the region. north and south korea calling up reservists. preparing logistics and bringing resources into the region. evacuating civilians. but north korea's missile test continue to provoke, despite sanctions and international condemnation. the world seems to have run out of ideas on how to stop them. 0ur correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes is in tokyo and gave us this update. you can imagine people waking up here to the sound of air—raid sirens and being told to find shelter in concrete buildings or basements is not a normal occurrence injapan. in fact, as far as i'm aware, this is the first time this has happened perhaps since the second world war. people have been practising for the last few months in towns up and down the coast of japan because of the increased number of missile tests by north korea. but this is the first time that it has happened for real, that the public address system has been used to tell people,
12:12 pm
there is a missile flying in our direction, find shelter. this is a very serious and aggressive thing for north korea to do. countries do not normally fire ballistic missile across the territory of their neighbours. that's why we've seen this very angry response from the japanese government, from prime minister abe, calling this an act of violence, saying it's unprecedented and speaking to president trump and them together saying they will take this to the un security council and demand action from the world community, especially countries like china and russia. steven mcdonnell has been giving us the latest from beijing. it is interesting. china, whenever there is one of these tests were north korea says that all parties should remain calm and no one should do anything to escalate the situation. we have that again today from the chinese foreign ministry. there was
12:13 pm
something else. they are really blaming the us and south korea for pressuring north korea into carrying out this test. that is because, as we heard before, the us and south korea are having these big war games. china says the military exercises should stop in exchange for north korea halting its missile programme. at least halting the testing of the missile programme. but china also says that the un resolutions, apart from calling for sanctions, also called for all parties to move towards peace talks. it isa parties to move towards peace talks. it is a question rhetorically whether or not everybody, and a means by this the us and south korea, whether everybody is heading towards these peace talks. can china bring any more influence to bear on north korea and what it does next?|j north korea and what it does next?” think there is no doubt that china
12:14 pm
can pile more pressure on north korea. it is the biggest trading partner by a but north korea and everything that china does by way of sanctions hurts north korea. china has said today it is going to maintain the sanctions as long as it agreed to the sanctions at the united nations. the bbc asked would pay back more sanctions and the chinese government has said that as a hypothetical question, we can't really say that we would do that, but they have stressed that the dumping sanctions are the answer and we need to move towards peace talks to provide some type of long—term solution. steven macdonald talking to us from beijing. steven macdonald talking to us from beijing. a four—year—old boy has died in hospital after being found in a swimming pool in devon. police were called to reports of a missing child at an activity centre near bideford. after a search, assisted by the police helicopter, the child was found in a swimming pool on the site and taken
12:15 pm
to hospital where he was pronounced dead. the boy's next of kin have been informed. a short time ago i spoke to our plymouth reporter, clare woodling. devon and cornwall police were called to northam house... sorry, knapp house activity centre in northam just before 3pm yesterday, after reports of a four—year—old boy going missing. they carried out an extensive search involving a police helicopter and the boy was indeed found in the swimming pool at the site. the child was taken to north devon district hospital, where he was pronounced dead. the family of the child have been informed. police are describing it at this stage as unexplained. it happened during a week—long summer holiday camp for members of narcotics anonymous and their families. it's the sixth year in a row that this event has taken place. today, the charity has released a statement that says, very tragically something has gone horrifically wrong and a young child of one of our members drowned in the pool. the statement from the charity
12:16 pm
went on to say that, we are devastated that a truly wonderful week has ended so tragically. a police investigation is underway. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: floodwaters continue to rise in houston in texas, where many thousands of people have already been forced from their homes by tropical storm harvey. sirens sound injapan as north korea fires a missile over the country. a four—year—old boy has died after being found in a swimming pool in devon. let's head to the sports centre for the latest. england's cricketers have had early breakthrough as they try to win the 2nd test against the west indies and seal a series victory at headingley on the final day. the tourists resumed this morning on 5—without loss. sturat broad got keiren powell for 23. the west indies need a 2nd innings total 322 to level the 3
12:17 pm
match series at 1—all. they're currently 53 for 1. johanna konta's wait for a maiden grand slam victory continues after the british number one was knocked out in the first round of the us open, losing to the unseeded serbian aleksandra krunic. konta was among the favourites for the title and could have ended the tournament as world number one. konta took the first set, but the world number 78 fought back to end another season for konta without a major title. there was a successful return to grand slam tennis for maria sharapova following her 15 month doping ban. the russian beat world number two simona halep in three sets. sharapova was given a wildcard to enter the main draw — she's currently ranked 146th in the world. we have just competed against each other so well in the past and i have
12:18 pm
produced some good tennis. and despite not playing a lot of matches coming into this, it almost seemed like i had no right to win this match today and i somehow did and i think that is what i'm most proud of. the problems continue to mount for arsenal manager arsene wenger, beaten 4—0 by liverpool on sunday. now midfielder alex 0xlade—chamberlain looks set to leave the emirates and join chelsea. the england midfielder‘s contract expires next summer, he's refused to commit his future at the emirates. chelsea have declined to comment but it's understood they've agreed a transfer fee for the 24—year—old. liverpool have confirmed a deal for rb leipzig's naby keita tojoin the club next summer. liverpool has agreed to pay the £48 million release clause that allows the guinea international to move to anfield next year. stoke have signed defender kevin wimmer from tottenham for £18 million on a five—year—deal. the austrian becomes stoke's seventh arrival this summer. jordan pickford has been ruled out of england's world cup
12:19 pm
qualifiers against malta and slovakia with a muscle injury. the uncapped everton keeper picked up the injury during sunday's premier league defeat at chelsea. england have another wicket. hope has gone. that's all sport for now. i'll have more after the 1 o'clock news. the boss of network rail has apologised to passengers after there were fresh delays at the uk's busiest railway station on the day it was supposed to get back to normal following long running engineering works. rush hour services on several lines into waterloo were cancelled. almost half of the platforms at waterloo station have been closed since 5th august as engineers made changes to accommodate longer trains. mark carne said the £800 million overhaul of the station would help increase capacity by 30%. overhaul of the station would help
12:20 pm
brexit negotiations are continuing in brussels after the eu told the uk it needed to get serious about the withdrawal talks. the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, has expressed concern about the lack of progress made so far and accused the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, has expressed concern about the lack of progress made so far and accused britain of ambiguity on key issues like its exit bill. the uk brexit secretary, david davis, said both sides had to show "flexibility and imagination". a short time ago, i spoke to our brussels reporter adam fleming, who is following the talks taking place. jean—claudejuncker has been giving this speech to the eu's ambassadors, the diplomats who represent the eu around the world. he had two things to say, he reiterated that the eu's timetable is still the way these negotiations are going to work. in other words, there will be the three priority issues of citizens' rights, the financial settlement and the northern irish border, have to be resolved sufficiently for talks can move to the next phase. that will rankle with david davis and the other people on the british side because they think those withdrawal issues are tied up with the future relationship issues
12:21 pm
and they want to talk about trade and the future as soon as possible. secondly, what will also rankle with the brits, he said he read the uk government position papers that have been published over the summer holidays with the requisite attention and he found that none of them — none of them — were satisfactory. i think that will really annoy some of the british civil servants in this building today because they wrote those papers over the summer and they are actually pretty proud of their work. no official response from the british government yet and qualification from jean—claude juncker's spokespeople, who are briefing journalists for their daily lunchtime press conference right now. if i canjust bring in a line that we are just receiving from a spokeswoman for theresa may, who is saying that the government is seeking to agree by october and eu summit to move on to discuss future relationship after brexit. that's the statement, all the detail we have on that.
12:22 pm
presumably, the eu is going to stick to the plan it set out, saying it wants a satisfactory agreement on those three key issues before any talks on the future can proceed. that statement from downing street that you read out is consistent with the eu timetable that has been agreed for these talks. all along, mr barnier, and the eu side, has said that they will decide if sufficient progress has been made on phase one probably around october or maybe december, when there are two eu summits scheduled. that is when the other 27 eu leaders will kind of fire the starting gun on the next phase of talks about trade. that has for a while been pencilled in for october or december. there has been a lot of debate behind the scenes about when sufficient progress will be made because the talks are going more slowly than expected and it looked as though this was slipping to december. what is interesting about that statement is it shows that theresa may is getting ready to get
12:23 pm
involved in these talks. at this stage, it is being conducted by david davis and his officials, speaking to michel barnier and his officials, sitting round a table talking in technical terms with documents. it sounds as though theresa may is getting ready to dive into these talks at a political level and start going head—to—head with her fellow 27 eu leaders to say, right, let's get a move on, let's talk trade. the newest bridge across the firth of forth was lit up last night to mark the symbolic handover of the project from the constructors to the scottish government. building on the queensferry crossing, which links edinburgh and fife, started in 2011 and now the billion pound bridge is almost ready to open to traffic. 0ur scotland correspondent lorna gordon reports. people are clamouring to be amongst
12:24 pm
the first to go across it, aren't they? i think they really are. this is one of the busiest transport routes in scotland and people who use the other two bridges here, the real bridge or the old road bridge, or those who live in the communities along this stretch of the fourth have watched really closely as the temp one has risen up out of the water and into the sky. tomorrow, britain's tallest bridge will finally open to traffic. lighting up scotland's latest bridge. the queensferry crossing in the spotlight before opening to drivers for the first time. in its own right, it is a feat of design, engineering and construction. in its own right, it is absolutely amazing. it is in every sense, in every way, an amazing achievement. the scale of this construction is impressive. it's the longest bridge of its kind in the world and this is a chance for some of the many thousands who worked on it to
12:25 pm
celebrate its completion. whata night, eh? i know, fantastic. it's the end of a long journey but it's been a wonderfuljourney. stressfuljourney but the most rewarding job i've ever been on and i've been on many a bridge. these guys have put a lot of work into this place. in years to come, there will be grandchildren saying, my grandad worked on that. that's what i want. there are now three bridges across this stretch of the forth, the legacy of the generations of workers who built them. for some, the story of these crossings, stretching back for centuries, is part of their family's history. my great grandad worked on the forth rail bridge, my grandad worked on the forth road bridge and i worked on the queensferry crossing. three bridges, three centuries, all special in their own way. which is your favourite and why? definitely the queensferry crossing because it feels most like my bridge. are you chuffed?
12:26 pm
after seeing it all come together, i'm fair away with it. i am proud to have been working on the bridge. those who travel this busy route have had to contend with plenty of roadworks as the new bridge has taken shape. so what can they expect tomorrow? there have been miles of cones out there for a long time now, while the bridge was under construction. there will be a 40mph limit. i'm sure people want to see what the bridge looks like. we ask people to be careful, keep their eyes on the road. for now, it's all about admiring the view. tomorrow, a chance for all to enjoy the journey across this latest bridge over the forth. there will be a little bit of toing and froing over the next few days. there is no pedestrian walkway on this bridge. cyclists and pedestrians will continue to use the
12:27 pm
old forth road bridge, except, that is, this coming weekend when asked her very popular public ballot, 50,000 people manage to get tickets to walk across the queensferry crossing. we are hearing a lot of people are very excited about that opportunity, which has been described as a once—in—a—lifetime event. just a brief line from our political correspondence. the prime minister of‘s spokesperson had said earlier that the government believes it is ina good that the government believes it is in a good position and would like to move on to the future relationship, in addition to that, the spokeswoman has been asked weather the future relationship between the uk and the eu could be discussed alongside the stuff on the table now. her response was, our desire is to discuss both
12:28 pm
at the same time. that is what we are working towards. the eu is adamant that the three key issues that wants to be sorted out must happen before any talks on the future. now the weather with tomasz shafernaker. yesterday was a really warm day across some parts of the country. the warmest in decades as far as late august bank holiday monday is concerned. today, many parts of the country are experiencing much fresher weather. in fact, country are experiencing much fresherweather. infact, in country are experiencing much fresher weather. in fact, in the teams rather than the mid or high 20s. teams rather than the mid or high 205. a teams rather than the mid or high 20s. a lot more cloud this afternoon across the country, even some spots of rain and there. temperatures typically around 20 degrees or below, it is just in east anglia where we are retaining some of that heat from yesterday. 26 degrees in london. noticed these colours across the south—east, there could be some
12:29 pm
heavy rain with hip and missed thunderstorms in the south—east. brin also in the south—west and the midlands. a fresher night, as well. there will be some rain across southern parts of the uk tomorrow, the better the weather in the northern parts of england. scotland and northern ireland will have some showers. 0nly and northern ireland will have some showers. only 17 degrees in london. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines... houston continues to bear the brunt of tropical storm harvey as flood waters are expected to rise further. president trump will visit texas a little later. japan's prime minister, shinzo abe, has called north korea's ballistic missile launch an "unprecedented threat". the un security council is expected to hold an emergency meeting in response. a four—year—old boy has died after being found in a swimming pool in devon.
12:30 pm
police say that the death is being treated as unexplained as investigations continue. and from next year listed companies will have to reveal the pay ratio between bosses and their workers. the prime minister has attacked firms with excessive pays as "the unacceptable face of capitalism". we arejust we are just hearing from president trump regarding north korea, saying all options are on the table, that isa all options are on the table, that is a statement from the white house. there had been some cooling of the rhetoric coming from the us, but now president trump is quoted as saying that all options are on the table for north korea. let's get more now on the latest ratcheting up of tension by north korea, and that missile it fired that flew over northern japan before crashing into the sea.
12:31 pm
it prompted sirens to be sounded in hokkaido, warning people to get to shelter. 0n the line is amanda harlow, who is a hokkaido resident. she is an english teacher and she and her partner were watching tv this morning when news broke that a missile had been fired. thank you for joining missile had been fired. thank you forjoining us. it was a normal morning i assume, tell us what happened. we were watching tv, actually a drama and not regular television and suddenly the alarm bells started ringing on both our phones and in the living room and normally that is a tsunami or at iphone, and we can pick up the phone and there is a message injapanese and there is a message injapanese and it says that a missile is
12:32 pm
heading for hokkaido and to take cover, go to underground area. what was your reaction to that when you we re was your reaction to that when you were expecting a weather warning? ...we were expecting a weather warning? we switched onto regular television and absolute shock. we are used to having a lot of missile launchers, but to actually have this and —— alarm system announcing the missile and that is approaching where i live, that was very scary. where is your nearest shelter?” think it is probably the local supermarket parking area, about five minutes from my house, a basement area of the supermarket. we sat
12:33 pm
there and thought, should we go there and thought, should we go there or what do we do. it was a very surreal experience having that discussion in your living room in the morning. as you described that, that was the word running through my head,it that was the word running through my head, it must have been surreal but you decided to stay put? we decided to stay put and continue watching japanese television which goes into emergency mode very quickly because of earthquakes. we watched the television and maybe five minutes later there was another announcement that the missile had passed over hokkaido. and wejust that the missile had passed over hokkaido. and we just sat there watching, shocked. i understand you continued into work and needless to say that has been the topic of
12:34 pm
discussion with your students? yes, all day. i teach adults, and discussion with your students? yes, all day. iteach adults, and i discussion with your students? yes, all day. i teach adults, and i think most people felt the same, shock, and is there any point in coming? the reality... if it is 300 miles away, do i have a chance of escape? if it is further away, do i do anything? those kind of thoughts running through your head are very strange. thank you very much for taking the time to talk to us about this surreal experience as you described. and just some more coming in from the white house and president trump
12:35 pm
who has said that all options were on the table for north korea, also saying that north korea has signalled its contempt for its neighbours, all members of the united nations, and for minimum standards of acceptable international behaviour. that is the response from the white house as the united nations prepares to hold an emergency meeting on the situation in that part of the world. british actor ed skrein has pulled out of a role in the upcoming hellboy reboot film after a backlash because he was cast as a character of asian heritage. the deadpool and game of thrones star said he did not know the race of major ben daimio when he accepted the part in the comic book adaptation. he said he was stepping down "so the role can be cast appropriately". his casting is the latest incident to attract accusations of hollywood "whitewashing". other recent rows involved actors such as scarlett joha nsson who was cast as the lead character
12:36 pm
in a remake of the japanese anime film ghost in the shell, and tilda swinton was criticised after she was cast as the tibetan sorcerer ancient 0ne in marvel‘s doctor strange. joining me is on skype from la is nancy wang yuen. she is the author of reel inequality: hollywood actors and racism, a book that examines the barriers actors of colour face in hollywood and how they creatively challenge stereotypes. thank you forjoining us. clearly this has brought the issue of whitewashing into the headlines again and what has been the response in the industry so far?” again and what has been the response in the industry so far? i think that people are saying he has done a very unselfish act and i think it is amazing he is stepping up and acknowledging that whitewashing is a problem and he wants no part of it.
12:37 pm
and it looks like the producers of hellboy will have to cast someone of asian heritage? yes because he has put them in a public position by announcing his decision and everyone knows that is right he is stepping down so if they were to cost another white actor it would really shame them. in the past when actors have been cast in a role of someone of whom they are not of that heritage, they have perhaps defended their position saying that we are actors and we can adapt to a role and there is that argument for those that say that producers and directors should be free to cast who they choose. yes, in an ideal world where everybody could get every role, that would be the case but in the us there is definitely an underrepresentation of people of colour and to make that comparison is not really fair. do you think
12:38 pm
that something like the actions taken by ed skrein are going to lead to more actors, is that agents want to more actors, is that agents want to cast them in a role of a character with a different heritage, that it character with a different heritage, thatitis character with a different heritage, that it is going to lead to more actors saying, i'm not going to do that, or the producers and directors in the first place thinking in more detail about who they are actually casting in the given roles?” detail about who they are actually casting in the given roles? i think it is up to the producers. for example, ghost in the shell did poorly and they have to recognise that whitewashing in general does not do good business. it is not up to the actors although it is great to the actors although it is great to have allies in the industry on behalf of actors of colour. thank you for your time. companies will have to give details on how much they pay their chief executives compared with the average pay of employees, under a package of government reforms. they're designed to increase boardroom transparency in publicly listed companies.
12:39 pm
business secretary greg clark says the plans will make a difference, but unions attacked them as "feeble". our business reporter rob young has more. the government has been talking tough on high pay. the prime minister has said some company bosses get too much money. she has described some of them as the unacceptable face of capitalism. last year the chief executives of britain's 100 biggest listed companies were paid an average of £4.5 million. that is 129 times the salary of the average british worker. in future, companies listed on the london stock exchange such as bp will not only have to publish how much they pay the boss but also how much their average employee gets. they will also have to justify the difference between those two figures. to ensure they do all of this, ministers plan to pass a law. i think it's right you should have transparency, that when boards are setting pay and when they are disclosing pay, they shouldn't do itjustjust with an eye on pay in the board
12:40 pm
but they should look at pay across the company and be prepared to set out publicly how they can justify boardroom pay in the context of the pay that the rest of the workforce gets. ministers are facing criticism that their actions don't match their words. the government has watered down some of its original proposals. shareholders won't, as promised, get a binding vote on pay every year instead of the current three—year cycle, but there will be a new register where significant shareholder rebellions on pay will be recorded. rob young, bbc news. rebecca long—bailey, labour's shadow business secretary, has also criticised the proposals. she's in our salford studio. good afternoon. unions are saying these proposals have been watered down beyond recognition but do you
12:41 pm
agree that they are at least somewhat better than what went before? this is mere sleight of hand by the conservatives. they have significantly watered—down proposals. not long ago theresa may was trying to position her party as the party of workers, claiming she was going to give them a real and meaningful voice on executive boards and this simply has not happened. the voice she has given by advising companies to choose between an advisory council or an employee representative simply is not good enough and it does not have any legal teeth or meaningful way to get employees or other stakeholders like pension funds involved in the day—to—day running of companies. pension funds involved in the day-to-day running of companies. you don't believe that businesses were actually think to themselves, even if the is a lone representative of the workers on the board, that they will need to pay attention to what that person is saying what they will
12:42 pm
be held up tojudgment by that person is saying what they will be held up to judgment by the that person is saying what they will be held up tojudgment by the media for example, as well as other political parties and so on?” for example, as well as other political parties and so on? i think the proposals put forward simply aren't good enough. if we look at the list of companies that would be named and shamed, it is going to be held by the investors association which was criticised in the review commissioned by george osborne as having very little ability to actually coordinate or liaise with british business so why they have been chosen as the body to hold the register rather than the financial conduct authority is very worrying. i think the tories miss the point here, that the world of corporate government is very complex and tinkering around the edges will not stop scandals like british home stores and so on. we need to take a root and branch approach and that is what the labour party has been doing. set out what you would do. we have been carrying out a wide—ranging policy review into corporate governance with trade unions, business and leading
12:43 pm
academic experts. in our manifesto we called for an amendment of the companies act which currently provides directors with a duty to their shareholders own league and we wa nt to their shareholders own league and we want to have this expanded to include employees and other stakeholders so there it i direct responsibility for directors to look after the interests of its shareholders and employees and other stakeholders. we have also examined a wide range of policy options which of course we would consult on if we we re of course we would consult on if we were in government, like looking at the german model of stakeholder boards where there would be a separate board to the executive board made up of stakeholders to look at the long—term decision—making structure of the releva nt com pa ny. decision—making structure of the relevant company. it is willie important to note that over the last few decades the way companies are run and owned has significantly changed —— really important. in the 50s we had shareholders who own shares for a period of four or five
12:44 pm
yea rs shares for a period of four or five years but now that it about four months. would you want to see a balance between the rights of shareholders and employees or would you be favouring the employees in the model you are talking about? you be favouring the employees in the model you are talking abounm is about a collaborative approach and making sure all stakeholders have their voices heard equally. rebecca long—bailey, thank you very much. there is a new video game launching today, but it's actually more of an experiment. scientists are using it to study dementia by measuring navigation skills, one of the earliest things to decline in people with the disease. james gallagher has the story and has been to play the game. prepare to enter a virtual world. you are now captain of a boat. your challenge is to use your sense of direction to chart a course through complex waterways and icy oceans and even feed hotdog—loving sea monsters. but this is not only a game. it's collecting anonymous data while you play as part of the biggest dementia experiment in the world. this doesn't feel
12:45 pm
like medical research. it's fun. but one of the first things to go with dementia is our ability to navigate, and that's what you can test in virtual reality. the first version of this game was a smartphone app that had three million players and gave unprecedented insight into how our sense of direction declines with age. but making the leap into virtual reality will allow scientists to study dementia in greater detail. the value for us is to create a much richer data set. we're capturing 15 times more data from the vr version because we are separating out where their head looks and where the boats are moving. researchers hope that spotting unusual declines in navigational ability could eventually be used to test for dementia at its earliest stage. one by one... his memories were lost.
12:46 pm
850,000 people are already living with the disease in the uk. that figure is forecast to reach two million by 2051. most will have had the disease for more than a decade before their symptoms appear. what we really want to be doing is trying to identify people with dementia ten or 15 years earlier than we do at the moment with our classic ways of diagnosis. a game like sea hero quest and understanding how we navigate will help us get to that much earlier diagnosis. this technology still has a long way to go but it is only by diagnosing dementia early that there is any hope of preventing the irreversible damage to the brain. james gallagher, bbc news. and james joins me now. we saw in the report what scientists are trying to do by getting people to play this game which has been
12:47 pm
described as the largest dementia study in history. it is fascinating, playing the game for two minute generator the same amount of data scientists would normally take five hours to collect and with the equivalent of 63 years of this already played the scientists now have a huge amount of data to go through. that is incredible.“ have a huge amount of data to go through. that is incredible. if you think normally you would have to get someone think normally you would have to get someone to come in, find time to go into a laboratory, a couple of research scientists getting the kit ready, someone to record it and get it going and it could take hours to do one person but this is somebody playing on a phone or virtual reality headset in their spare time and the data gets sent to the site is automatically. the first game was almost too popular, 3 million people, but the big challenge is now analysing a huge amount of data. people, but the big challenge is now analysing a huge amount of datam somebody plays this presumably people can download it with the
12:48 pm
right kit. with the right equipment, a standard smartphone version which you can get on cap! android and apple and there is a more sophisticated virtual deep product which you can use —— at which you can get on android. and does their results automatically get sent to the scientists? it all gets collected anonymously so you put in a double of details like your age, if you are a man or woman, and that is all the personal data and everything else is recorded from the game. people might play it and think i have not done very well and start worrying. it doesn't mean you have dementia. i wanted to ask because people might worry if they had difficulty with it. they should not extrapolate from that that they have a problem. exactly and this is one of the findings that has come from this game, that what they have shown is the ability to navigate around declines consistently, you are at
12:49 pm
your peak at about 18 and it is downhill all the way! but that decline is normal and figuring out what is normal is the first stage of this research and then you can figure out what is unusual and when dementia kicks in. you will never find out from playing this if you have the metcher but it might help scientists in the future. thank you for talking to us, james. mps have been urged to launch an enquiry after it was revealed that a five—year—old christian girl in tower hamlets was repotedly placed into foster care with a non—english speaking muslim family. the fostering process requires a child's cultural background to be taken into consideration when being placed with a family. neil carmichael, the former mp who launched an enquiry into foster care, spoke to victoria derbyshire this morning. obviously the children's commissioner will be launching an inquiry and she has said that and quite right too. i think the outcome of the decisions that were made in tower hamlets about this particular child have not been taking into account
12:50 pm
the proper processes and it is very clear that cultural and language issues should be taken into account and they were not because the outcome would have been different if they had been. what we have to do is ask a few questions about the number of foster carers available in tower hamlets and elsewhere, whether or not the council was consulting other councils because of course it is not just foster carers within their geographical area that can help, there are other possibilities. but the central point you make is the right one, that there are not enough foster carers which is one of the reasons why it is important to think carefully about the support they get from the councils that they operate under, and that they do get appropriate payment and support wherever it is needed. tower hamlets council has given us this statement. "we do not recognise
12:51 pm
the story that was written in the times. our legal team has corresponded with them about the story which poses a serious risk of identifying a child in our care so understandably we cannot comment much wider than that but we would urge serious restraint and responsibility in covering the story. " new figures obtained by the bbc suggests levels of uninsured driving may be rising for the first time in more than a decade. claims handled by the specialist industry body, the motor insurer's bureau, increased by almost 10% in the year tojuly. they're investigating why but in the meantime the police continue to seize thousands of vehicles a week. vanessa baffoe reports from norfolk on the battle against uninsured driving. the end of the road for cars, a scrap yard in norfolk. if they are driven without proper insurance, the police have powers to tow them away. once a car has been seized by the police, the driver has a limited amount of time to get insurance, but if they don't, this could be the end of the line. sergeant chris harris from norfolk‘s road policing unit is out on patrol. cameras on his car and in secret
12:52 pm
locations across the county automatically read hundreds of number plates an hour. the system has flagged up a suspect car. they track the driver to a cul—de—sac in norwich. i have checked to see if the insurance is still held. they have just done some checks now and we have just heard that the driver was actually driving without proper insurance. in 2016, police forces across the uk seized 145,000 vehicles for insurance offences, of which approximately 58,000 were crushed. that is more than 1000 a week. the cameras used to identify drivers are part of a system called automatic number plate recognition, or anpr. its database is operated by milton keynes—based motor insurers bureau. they compensate victims of uninsured drivers on behalf of the industry. the money comes from £15 which is added to each premium.
12:53 pm
the number of claims they are seeing is increasing. back in norwich, the uninsured car is towed away. the driver will now have to obtain cover and pay a fixed penalty to get it back or his car could end up here. vanessa bafoe, bbc news. the stars gathered for a glitzy launch a new series of strictly come dancing last night. the latest line—up attended the red carpet event for the first outing since the death of former presenter sir bruce forsyth. the new head judge also made herfirst red carpet appearance. i'm going to make sure i enjoyed it because i don't think there's any other way to do it. i've got some moves but i'm not sure if they'll be good for anyone but i'm releasing them and they are bubbling up releasing them and they are bubbling up like a volcano of uncoordinated
12:54 pm
dance! frankie has been so excited, no advice yet but i'm definitely going to be on the phone asking for any tips. an american news website has suffered a backlash after using a picture of scotland's first minister as a generic scientist. the website vox used a picture of nicola sturgeon looking into a microscope to accompany an article about american health—care reforms. vox apparently missed the caption on the getty website explaining the picture showed the first minister on a visit to a science laboratory. more on all of those stories coming up more on all of those stories coming up on the news channel through the day. in a moment the news at one with jane hill, and we'll say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first the weather with tomasz schafernaker. well, yesterday was a really warm day for some of us. the hottest bank holiday monday we've had in a long time. not for everybody but many of us had that very warm day. today, overall across the country, it is looking a bit cooler.
12:55 pm
more cloud and certainly you can see it on the satellite image, another weather front in the north bringing some spots of rain. temperatures at best probably getting into the upper teens for most, with this weather front crossing through. also, some spots of rain as well. additionally, the breeze increasing across scotland and bringing some showers. the middle of the afternoon, let's see how things are shaping out across the south of the country. chance of one or two showers breaking out as well, in london, 26, we might even squeeze out 27—8 in the far south—east, warm enough there in central southern england. for most of us, temperatures are 16—18. yesterday through here we had temperatures some 5—10 degrees higher so a real drop in temperature. a bit fresher across scotland and in northern ireland, 15 degrees in the middle of the afternoon. peaking around the mid or high 20s in the south—east, some 10 degrees lower for belfast and glasgow. this evening, we continue to see
12:56 pm
showers across the north. potentially spots of rain in the south in the evening. 0vernight, we could see some thunderstorms clipping the extreme south—east. they will be very isolated so most of us will not get any thunder, don't expect to get any. tomorrow, wednesday, weather fronts across southern parts of the uk — that spells rain. looks as though it will be affecting south—western parts of england, possibly wales, maybe the midlands and also closer to the south—east of the country. this is where the rain could be heavier. it may be the case that the heaviest rain will go away into the continent. there will be some rain around, exactly how heavy it will be is unsure, but be prepared at least with the umbrellas for some rain. in other parts of the country tomorrow, fresh and bright for manchester, glasgow and belfast, occasionally interrupted by some showers. thursday and friday, a mix of showers here and there but essentially
12:57 pm
the weather is improving. that's the latest. laing. north korea fires a missile over northern japan. the japanese prime minister calls it an unprecedented threat. the missile flew over hokkaido island before crashing into the sea. the un security council is to hold an emergency meeting. we'll be live in seoul and tokyo. also this lunchtime: 450,000 people are in need of help in texas after catastrophic flooding. forecasters say there will be more rain in the next few days. an attempt to curb excessive salaries. the government says listed companies will have to reveal the pay ratio between bosses and workers.
12:58 pm
police are investigating the death of a four—year—old boy at a swimming pool in north devon. and, the light fantastic: a multi—coloured show for the handover of
12:59 pm
1:00 pm

181 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on