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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 30, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. north korea receives unanimous condemnation at the united nations for firing a ballistic missile overjapan. as diplomats describe the latest action as outrageous, pyongyang releases pictures of the test, and says it will carry out similar drills in the future. good morning, it is wednesday 30 august. also this morning: a night—time curfew is declared in the flood—hit city of houston, in a move to prevent looting. a call for a ban on credit card firms extending spending limits without the cardholders‘ consent. i have been finding out how easy it is to travel between cities in the north of england, and how close the idea of a northern powerhouse is to becoming a reality.
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in sport: west indies have won a test match in england for the first time in 17 years. shai hope's historic century helped them to a famous victory, on a thrilling final day at headingley. that looks nice. low —— love cardamom... the great british bake off returned to our screens last night. we will be asking if the new recipe tickled the taste buds of one panel of viewers. and carol has the weather. good morning. across the north of the country today, we are looking at a breezy day, with sunshine and showers. warmer than yesterday. further south, though, it is the opposite. we have some persistent rain particularly in the south—east and it will feel colder than it was yesterday. i will have more details inis yesterday. i will have more details in 15 minutes. good morning.
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first, our main story: there has been unanimous condemnation of north korea's firing of a ballistic missile overjapan at a meeting of the united nations security council overnight. pyongyang has described the launch as the first step of operations in the pacific. the un security council has described the launch as outrageous, but stopped short of threatening further action against north korea. suzanne kianpour reports. here, we have north korea's not so diplomatic response to the slap on the wrist for its latest provocation. proudly releasing stills of its missile launch over japan. just as diplomats were meeting in new york, in an emergency gathering of the un security council, working on the first step in to north korea's destabilising activity. the world is united against north korea. there is no doubt about that. it is time for the north korean regime to recognise the danger they are putting themselves
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in. the united states will not allow their lawlessness to continue, and their lawlessness to continue, and the rest of the world is with us. the meeting result was unanimous at inconsequential. all members, including russia and china, signed on to including russia and china, signed ontoa including russia and china, signed on to a statement of condemnation, but no sign of new sanctions. translation: the ink on the last round of north korea sanctions has barely dried, and china, for one, has said all sides are to blame for the escalation in the region. after president trump repeated all options we re president trump repeated all options were on the table, and south korea responded with its own show of force, ina responded with its own show of force, in a test bombing near its border with the north. beijing has called on washington and seoul to freeze their joint called on washington and seoul to freeze theirjoint military exercises, as a means of getting pyongyang to the table for talks. but the us has made clear its commitment to its allies injapan and south korea. thank you, everybody... showing no sign of the
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trump administration will be changing its tune any time soon. we can talk now to our correspondent yogita limaye, whojoins us now from the south korean capital, seoul. good morning to you. round condemnation of reactions from north korea. i wonder what sort of difference that will make on the international stage. well, we have also had the president here speaking to the japanese prime minister this morning. they both, of course, discussed the threat from north korea, and they said they are going to push for tougher sanctions against the country. but clearly, from the message we have got from pyongyang this morning, along statement describing that missile launch, releasing photos of how kim jong—un monitored that launch, and also saying that he ordered his military to conduct more such drills of rockets that were targeted at the pacific, and saying this is only a pressie you'd to contain guam, once again making reference to the threat
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that north korea made two weeks ago, of sending four rockets in the waters around guam and creating a ring of fire around the us pacific territory. it is a strong message. the take away from it certainly is that the us is north korea's main enemy, but also defending its actions, saying that it is justified in conducting these missile test, because the us and south korean forces are currently conducting military drills of their own in this country. so this is a defensive mechanism by pyongyang. after 7:00am, we will be talking to a former ambassador to north korea, who also has experience of working with the un security council. theresa may begins a visit to japan today, herfirst as prime minister. during the three—day visit, she will be looking to discuss a post—brexit trade deal and the threat posed by north korea. chris masonjoins us from westminster. what will the pm be hoping to achieve over the next few days, chris?
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i expect, presumably, the talks are going to start with what has been going to start with what has been going on in the last couple of days with regards to north korea. yes, good morning to you. downing street a acutely aware of the context in which the prime minister is flying into japan this morning, theresa may saying she is outraged by the missile launch from pyongyang, so security will be an essential part of the discussions that she will have with the japanese prime minister, shinzo abe, overthe have with the japanese prime minister, shinzo abe, over the next couple of days. she will become the first european leader to attend the japanese national security council meeting, that meeting due to take place tomorrow. mrs mayjust landed in kyoto injust the place tomorrow. mrs mayjust landed in kyoto in just the last couple of minutes. she will be heading to an ancient tea ceremony in the coming hours, and then getting on a bullet train, one of the superfast trains which japan has, to tokyo a little later. trade and other massive part of the discussions, especially
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obviously in the context of brexit. a lot of jitters obviously in the context of brexit. a lot ofjitters and nervousness from the japanese government around the brexit process. there are 160,000 people employed byjapanese companies here in the uk. the prime minister saying that she hopes the uk can strike a free—trade deal with japan that is loosely based on the one that the eu is currently negotiating with tokyo. the uk has been part of that negotiation, given that we are still currently part of the eu. so lots of discussions on trade and security to come. the prime minister even meeting the emperor of japan at the prime minister even meeting the emperor ofjapan at the end of the visit on friday. thank you very much. a night—time curfew has been imposed in houston, texas, in a bid to deter looting in the wake of tropical storm harvey, which is now heading for louisiana. more than 30,000 people have been forced from their homes, and over 3,000 have been rescued from the floodwaters. large swathes of texas remain underwater, with almost 52 inches of rainfall since the hurricane made landfall on friday. keith doyle has more. hurricanes come and go.
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but, five days after it first hit the coast of texas, harvey continues to cause devastation. these are some of the residents of 20 nursing homes. another 20 hospitals have also been evacuated across the region. 3,400 people have been rescued, with the authorities reporting that harvey has claimed lives. it was the scariest thing we've ever seen. i — just — couldn't — just... there's no words for it. this is just devastating. 51 inches of rain has fallen so far, a record for the usa, and has swamped parts of houston and southern texas. 30,000 people have been forced out of their homes by the floodwater. the red cross has warned people could be in shelters for months. president trump visited corpus christi, 220 miles
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south—west of houston. he was greeted by state and federal teams co—ordinating the relief efforts. we won't say congratulations, we don't want to do that. we don't want to congratulate. we'll congratulate each other when it's all finished. he is determined not to repeat the mistakes of george bush, when hurricane katrina hit. in houston, the mayor has introduced a night—time curfew, amid fears of looting. to the west of this vast city, two huge reservoirs are overflowing. harvey's path is slow—moving and erratic. this force of nature may not be spent yet. keith doyle, bbc news. kezia dugdale has resigned as leader of scottish labour, after less than two years in the post. the lothians msp insists she is leaving the party in a much better state than how she found it. she has also rejected the idea her departure has anything to do with her previous criticism ofjeremy corbyn.
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most political leaders quit at a moment of crisis, something terrible has happened. i have decided that i think the labour party is very much on its uppers. it has made tremendous progress from the state that i found it in two, two .5 years ago, when it was literally on its knees. i have taken the party forward , knees. i have taken the party forward, it is in a much better state than i found it. now it is time to pass that baton onto next person. we have had five national elections in the next four years. now it is time for the next person to have one. one in five people struggling with debt have had their credit card limit raised without requesting it. that is according to research from the charity citizens' advice, which has called for the practice of extending credit without consent to be stopped. uk finance, the body which represents some of the country's biggest lenders, says it is working with regulators to help people manage their debt. 0ur economics correspondent andy verity has more. borrowing on credit cards
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has been growing by 9%, farfaster than wages, and citizens' advice says irresponsible practices are keeping people in debts that they cannot get out of. tracy banham ran into trouble when her small business ran into difficulty. she had a husband used credit cards to plug the holes. well it got to point where i was just paying off interest, basically — i were actually not — at one point, on one credit card, i were paying £700 a month, and just £60 of that were coming off the debt. that was just one of the credit cards. consumers have borrowed about £200 billion on unsecured loans, with about a third of that on credit cards. yet one in five borrowers have been given higher credit limits, without asking for them. 0n 2.2 million credit card accounts, borrowers spent more on charges and fees than on repayments, pushing them further into debt. citizens' advice says, if that goes on for two years, lenders should have to contact borrowers and offer for help,
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such as suspending interest payments. we think the most important thing is that credit card companies should stop raising credit limits without consulting the customer. we think this is a second thing the regulator can do to give better guidance for affordability checks for people who are extending their credit cards. the body that represents most credit card lenders says it is taking steps to prevent borrowers being offered more credit, and that it is working with regulators to help people manage their debts. andy verity, bbc news. new research suggests the distinctive rings of saturn may be considerably younger than previously thought. data gathered by the probe cassini, which is orbiting the planet, suggests they may be only 100 million years old. it indicates they could be the crushed remains of a moon or comet. sadly, cassini is transmitting its final burst of data before it plunges into saturn's atmosphere and burns up. it isa it is a sad ending, isn't it? yes, very sad ending, but i wasjust admiring saturn. exactly what you
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need at 6:12 a.m., which is when we say good morning to sally nugent. need at 6:12 a.m., which is when we say good morning to sally nugentlj think any cricket fan watching england yesterday, even the most determined england fan, might look at what the west indies did and have at what the west indies did and have a little bit of a quiet smile. it was pretty impressive, wasn't it? a little bit of a quiet smile. it was pretty impressive, wasn't mm was pretty impressive, wasn't mm was very impressive, and cricket needs a really strong west indies side. and oh my goodness, that might be what they have coming through. it was a historic day at headingley, where the west indies won their first test match in this country for 17 years, after they beat england by five wickets to win the second test and level the three—match series. west indies were chasing over 300 runs to win on the final day, but a century from shai hope and 95 from kraigg brathwaite set the platform for the stunning victory. alex 0xlade—chamberlain has turned down a move to chelsea from arsenal after the two clubs agreed a £40 million fee. it is believed the england international wants to move to liverpool, with a bid expected to come before tomorrow's transfer deadline. meanwhile, arsenal have rejected a £50 million bid from manchester city
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for alexis sanchez. in the past hour, roger federer progressed in the us open. there has been another big upset at the us open, after world number 45 naomi 0saka, from japan, beat defending champion and sixth seed angelique kerber, 6—3, 6—1, injust over an hour. it is the first time in 13 years that the champion has been knocked out in the opening round. and, resplendent in red, chris froome maintained his 36—second lead in his quest to add the vuelta a espana to his tour de france title. that man has endless energy. how is he not exhausted? he does, doesn't he? are you going to hang around for the papers? i am going to stay. are you wearing mulberry today?” the papers? i am going to stay. are
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you wearing mulberry today? i think it is aubergine. good morning. hope you're well. i am more purple i think but anyway! this morning we have split fortunes in the weather, it will hold true through the day as well. in the north and west we are looking at a breezy day with sunshine and showers and warmer than yesterday. in the south and east we've got rain, persistent rain later and it will be much cooler than yesterday. this is what we had yesterday, maidstone in kent, 29.3. today, 20, but in the rain it could be as low as 13. you will notice that for sure. two weather fronts will eventually collide in the south, producing that persistent rain. breezy in the north and here we are looking at sunshine and here we are looking at sunshine and showers, especially in scotland and showers, especially in scotland and northern ireland to start the day. as you can also see we've got clear skies so a chilly start for some but there will be sunshine around. both of our weather fronts
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meet in the south—east, producing persistent rain. behind them we have something drier and brighter but look at those temperatures, 13 in london in the rain, 13 in ipswich and also 12 in norwich am so a cool feel to things a with temperatures way below where they should be. moving into northern england, brighter spells, sunshine and showers and the same in scotland. if you dodge the showers it will feel pleasa nt you dodge the showers it will feel pleasant and the same if you dodge the breeze in the sun. a few showers in northern ireland interspersed with sunshine and the same in wales, fewer showers in wales but some around and looking at some sunny spells. sunny spells in the south—west as well with fewer showers. as we go through the evening and overnight, then surely we see the tail end of the rain pushing into the near continent. some clear skies. also some showers coming in, especially in the west. tem pts coming in, especially in the west. tempts you can see here are indicative of towns and cities, nine
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to 11 or 12. indicative of towns and cities, nine to 11 or12. in indicative of towns and cities, nine to 11 or 12. in the countryside the temperatures will be a bit lower and we could see some patchy mist and fog forming but it shouldn't be too problematic. that will lift tomorrow allowing sunshine through. we start the day with showers in the north and west but through the day further showers will develop. tomorrow you could get a shower almost everywhere and if you do you could see thunder. temperature is recovering in the south—east, highs of 20, 1a to about 17 or 18 for the rest of the uk. into friday, fewer showers around, more in the channel islands, and for most we are looking at a dry day with sunshine and again, feeling quite pleasant with highs up to 21. saturday's looking not too bad at all if you like it or dry with some sunshine. temperatures again 1a to about 21 and 21 celsius in old muggy is 70 fahrenheit. nice if you can find it! lovely
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purple dress, by the way, carol! thanks very much, dan, you're not looking too bad yourself! what is mine, blue? yours is very nice, quite clearly green. i managed to get myself in a hole while trying to be nice. amazing the holes you can dig yourself, dan. i'm aware of this issue! you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: unanimous condemnation of north korea's missile launch over japan. the un security council labels it outrageous, but a defiant pyongyang warns there's more to come. a night—time curfew is declared in the flood—hit city of houston in an effort to stop looting, as 30,000 people have been forced to leave their homes. steph hasjoined us along with steph has joined us along with sally to have a look at the papers. good
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morning, steph. let's start with the guardian. they are accused of unlawfully throwing out 16 sixth formers to improve results, according to the grammar schools. this is the trumps before they went to texas, quite a few were mentioning melania's heels, inappropriate for flood hit texas but they did change when they arrived. she changed, she travelled in her massive heels. it's often the other way round, isn't it? she should have just gone other way round, isn't it? she should havejust gone in her trainers. this is what she was wearing when she arrived. this is their visit to texas, we will talk more about that later. a lot of the papers have been following this story about this christian child who is fostered in a muslim foster home and the time is picking up on that story. thejudge has ruled the child must leave and will be returned and
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reunited with her family —— times. thejudge urging reunited with her family —— times. the judge urging councils to seek culturally matched placements for vulnerable children. gps told 2/ hospital referrals. they will need approvalfrom a hospital referrals. they will need approval from a medical hospital referrals. they will need approvalfrom a medical panel —— to slash. and victoria beckham in pink pyjamas as well. we are talking about what everyone is wearing this morning. it seems to be a theme. front page of the daily telegraph. exa m front page of the daily telegraph. exam boards must introduce stricter guards to counter the temptation of cheating, say headmasters. the front page of the mirror, an interview with paul burrell at the anniversary of protest diana's death. a brilliant piece about shai hope leading the west indies to victory. he got his first test century on saturday and he got his second yesterday. an amazing performance
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from he and braithwaite, 2a and 23, great hope for the future. just quickly, in the mirror, we talked about wenger yesterday not getting angry enough at anfield. look, finally it's happened, apparently at training yesterday he got really cross, although i'm not entirely sure i can imagine a cross wenger, i imagine he goes quiet rather than louder. is he wearing a suit at training? that is a picture from pitch side. what is your accession with clothes this morning! have you got anything else? a lot of people saying he looks like a school teacher a lot of the time. saying he looks like a school teacher a lot of the timelj saying he looks like a school teacher a lot of the time. i asked him a rogue question once, he does get angry but it's a meaningful stare rather than shouting. he got cross with you? it's all right, we shook hands and moved on. moving on! steph? lots of the papers are
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talking about what's happening with the currency markets at the moment because the pound fell again yesterday to an eight year low against the euro. the times picks up on that this morning. fell to a fresh 80 low against a resurging hero. cache eight year low. it's a lot to do with north korea and the missile fired overjapan and the recep tayyip erdogan passions of hurricane harvey, that often spurs on investors to put their money elsewhere —— repercussions. it puts pressure on companies here buying things abroad. the telegraph talk about more price rises on the way because businesses that were protected against the fall in the pound are losing that defence and are starting to face the full force of the weak currency. this is very interesting, we always go on about m&s and how big it is and it's the bellwether of the retail world, you
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know a source, the online retailer, it's about 17 now, it has nearly taken over m&s in terms of its market value. —— asos. if you look at share price and number of shareholders. it is worth £11.93 billion compared to £5.05 billion at m&s. a double update, talking about clothes and sir chris hoy, who is saying in an article you shouldn't be wearing lycra if you are eight stone. he has said as a be wearing lycra if you are eight stone. he has said as 811! plus stone. he has said as 811! plus stone mammal myself this was a tongue in cheek article that wasn't meant to offend, i'm really sorry. whatever your age, meant to offend, i'm really sorry. whateveryourage, build, if you meant to offend, i'm really sorry. whatever your age, build, if you are ona bike whatever your age, build, if you are on a bike then you have my respect. a good update. tiger pictures yesterday, we concede the picture yesterday, we concede the picture yesterday but now we can see it. if you are watching this, and if you we re you are watching this, and if you were watching on monday, here it is.
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isn't that gorgeous? sumatran tigers have webbed feet, very good swimmers! narrow stripes as well! right that down! more on that later. losing a loved one can be an incredibly difficult time for families who have to take care of funerals and other formalities. but now many are facing the added distress of delays in registering a death. figures seen by bbc breakfast show most councils in england and wales are failing to register bereavements within the five—day target. emily unia has this report. last year, graham morgan's mother died. she was 86 and living in a ca re died. she was 86 and living in a care home. the family had to wait nearly three weeks for the funeral. it was a terrible situation to be honest with you, it was the worst you could ever have and the time of your life when everybody faces it
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that someone new to you passes away, it was terrible. he faced delays in getting a doctors certificate and waited a fortnight for an appointment to register her death with the local council. it has a "on your well—being because you're grieving, you're panicking, you want to get everything right —— has an impact on. you don't want to let them down and anything to go wrong. by them down and anything to go wrong. by law all deaths except those investigated by a coroner must be registered within five days but most councils in england and wales are failing to meet their rigid thracian targets. in 2011, 20 3% of all deaths in england and wales were registered after the five day limit —— registration targets —— 23%. by 2016 that figure had risen to more than 187,000, meaning 36% of all deaths took longer than five days to be registered. at the national
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association of funeral directors, which represents 4000 funeral homes, they conducted their own survey in 2015. they found families were waiting longer to see a registrar. there are cutbacks and staff sorted it at some registrars and that's happened throughout the uk, but what we're all so seeing is certain registrars will not make the appointment for the family unless the family already have a medical certificate for cause of death in their possession —— shortages. certificate for cause of death in their possession -- shortages. poppy once a funeral home in south london and is aware of growing delays. she says the whole process of dealing with death is confusing for brive families and more sensitivity is needed. grieving people should not be disregarded by local authorities. i think recognition that death and grief are incredibly difficult experiences that we're all going to have to go through so i don't see why people need to wait five or six days to register a death, it doesn't ta ke days to register a death, it doesn't take that long. the home office says local authorities are expected to
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ensure there is adequate provisions to register a death. the local government association told us various factors have contributed to delays but councils are working to reduce them. for graham morgan, improvements to the system, although too late for his family, would still be welcome. it causes chaos at a time in people's lives when you don't need that fails to be honest with you, your grieving and as it is. emily unia, bbc news. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: are better transport links needed to see the idea of the northern powerhouse become a reality? steph‘s taken a trip across the region to find out what's needed to ensure the project remains on track. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm chris rogers. 15 london mps are calling for a new law requiring councils
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to provide free school meals during the holidays. mp for hampstead & kilburn, tulip siddiq, told bbc london the lack of free school meals during the summer was exacerbating food poverty. the school holidays bill proposes that ten pence in every pound raised by the sugary drinks levy goes towards funding meals during the break. the financial firm deloitte warns nearly one in three of london's jobs could be at risk from technology over the next ten to 20 years. this is especially true in the so called low skilled economy where they are eight times more likely to be replaced than jobs that pay £100,000 or more. but they also say technology is leading to the creation of new opportunities. in the last 15 years technology has made big changes, so we've probably lost jobs, lost half made big changes, so we've probably lostjobs, lost half of made big changes, so we've probably lost jobs, lost half of secretary alljobs, half of clericaljobs, we
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lost two thirds of travel agents and two thirds of librarians due to the impact of technology but the good news is that is being more than made up news is that is being more than made upfor by news is that is being more than made up for by newjobs. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes, this morning which is good news. 0n the trains, southeastern still has no services to and from charing cross, waterloo east or london bridge until saturday due to ongoing engineering works. diversions are in place to cannon street, victoria or blackfirars. 0n the roads and in blackheath, shooters hill road is closed between charlton way and prince charles road due to a crash. in islington, upper street remains closed between liverpool road and city road for major roadworks. and in catford, the south circular has temporary traffic lights atjutland road due to gas works. let's have a check on the weather now with alena jenkins. good morning. after the warmth and sunshine of recent days, today will feel very much different. 0n
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sunshine of recent days, today will feel very much different. on and off for much of the day and feeling much cooler, temperatures down by some 12 or 13 celsius compared to the. it's not raining all the time this morning but the rain will slowly become a bit more persistent through the day, locally heavy in places this afternoon and only very slowly clearing eastwards. temperatures not much higher than what we've got at the moment, 15 or 16 the high this afternoon. that rain will slowly start to clear is through this evening and then became inc mainly dry overnight with increasingly clear skies and temperatures in rural spots eight or nine, holding to ten or 11 in town with plenty of sunshine to start the day tomorrow. slowly cloud will start to bubble up and that brings with it the chance ofa and that brings with it the chance of a few afternoon showers. some places escaping mainly dry but temperatures recovering in the sunshine to 19 or 20 celsius. this area of high pressure slowly building through friday and into the weekend so that will start to settle things down but there's still the chance of some showers on friday
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afternoon. should be mainly dry on saturday with plenty of sunshine but cloud increasing from the west on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: as waters continue to rise in texas, after 7:00am, we assess president trump's response to hurricane harvey. from body image to exam results, teenagers can face many worries. but, as new research finds, the fear of crime tops the list. we will ask what parents can do to help. # this ain't no technological
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breakdown. this is the road to hell. he has driven home for christmas and along the road to hell. but now, after suffering a stroke, chris rea is focussing on the road ahead. he will be here to tell us more about his journey before 9:00am. all that still to come, but now, a summary of this morning's main news: there has been unanimous condemnation of north korea's firing of a missile overjapan, at a united nations security council meeting overnight. pyongyang has described the launch as the first step of military operations in the pacific. the security council has demanded the country abandons its nuclear weapons programme, but has stopped short of threatening new sanctions on pyongyang. north korea is expected to be high on the agenda as theresa may begins a visit to japan today, her first as prime minister. she will be hoping to discuss a post—brexit trade deal. mrs may has described japan as a like—minded nation and a natural trading partner. a night—time curfew has been imposed in houston,
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texas, in a bid to deter looting in the wake of tropical storm harvey, which is now heading for louisiana. around 20 people are reported to have died as a result of the storm. more than 30,000 have been forced from their homes, and 3,000 have been rescued from the floodwaters. large swathes of texas remain underwater, with almost 52 inches of rainfall since the hurricane made landfall on friday. epic and historic, these are words used to describe this monster known as harvey. at thejob used to describe this monster known as harvey. at the job they have done is very special and i said let's fly over and see these great people, the nerve centre, really. and we appreciate it very much, and millions of people appreciated, that ican millions of people appreciated, that i can tell you. but the world is watching, and the world is very impressed with what you are doing. a christian girl, who is reported to have been fostered by a muslim family who didn't speak english, should live with a family member a judge has ruled.
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the london borough of tower hamlets council, insists the five—year—old was placed with an english speaking family of mixed race and that there were inaccuracies in the way the case was reported. the authority says cultural background and proximity to a child's family are always considered when choosing a foster home. kezia dugdale has resigned as leader of scottish labour, after less than two years in the post. the lothians msp insists she is leaving the party in a much better state than how she found it. she has also rejected the idea her departure has anything to do with her previous criticism ofjeremy corbyn. most political leaders quit at a moment of crisis, something terrible's happened. i've decided that i think the labour party is very much on its uppers. it's made tremendous progress from the state that i found it in two, 2.5 years ago, when it was literally on its knees. i've taken the party forward. it's in a much better state than i found it. now it's time to pass that baton onto the next person. we've had five national elections in 2.5 years. now it's time to move on and let the next person have four years
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to build one. one in five people struggling with debt have had their credit card limit raised, without requesting it, according to the charity citizens' advice. it has called for the practice of extending credit without consent to be stopped. uk finance, the body which represents some of the country's biggest lenders, says it is working with regulators to help people manage their debt. new research suggests the distinctive rings of saturn may be considerably younger than previously thought. data gathered by the probe cassini, which is orbiting the planet, suggests they may be only 100 million years old. it indicates they could be the crushed remains of a moon or comet. sadly, cassini is transmitting its final burst of data before it plunges into saturn's atmosphere and burns up. burns up is how they wrote it. i do think it is a dramatic end, isn't it? it is. i have done my work on thatis it? it is. i have done my work on that is it. good morning, sally.
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lots of important numbers in the cricket, but today, of all days, i am going to give you all of them, because i think you need to know them all. you ready? it was a historic day at headingley, where the west indies won their first test match in this country for 17 years, after they beat england by five wickets to win the second test and level the three—match series. west indies were chasing over 300 runs to win on the final day. but two crucial dropped balls from alistair cook, and a century to shai hope and 95 from kraigg brathwaite, set the platform for the stunning victory. we are test cricketers for a reason. we are test cricketers for a reason. we know that we came here to play cricket, and we just need to go out and execute. the well, this summer's transfer window has seen all kinds of records broken. republic of ireland assistant manager roy keane believes the fees demanded by what he describes as average players are mind—boggling. billion. giggsy? 2 billion. the
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market value of players as mine bubbling, the figures for players, especially for the average players. the time to be a professional footballer is now. 2 billion, did he say, four ryan giggs? 3.75 for himself. in the past hour, roger federer has survived a scare to reach the second round of the us open. federer, looking to win a record 20th grand slam title, beat american teenager francis tiafoe in five sets. federer‘s great rival rafa nadal is also through to the second round, after a straight—sets win over serbia's dusan lajovic. the spaniard needed a tie—break to take the first set, but comfortably took
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the next two sets. after second seed simona halep and britain's world number seven, johanna konta, were knocked out of the us open, there has been another major shock at flushing meadows. world number 45 naomi 0saka, from japan, beat defending champion and sixth seed angelique kerber in straight sets. it was the first time in 13 years that the champion was knocked out in the opening round. she played good, especially also at the end of the match, and i'm always trying to go for it when i have the chance. and today, i mean, she just went for it. i think she took her chances, and yeah, she played a very good match. but for me, for sure, it wasn't the best day and not the best match.
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britain's chris froome has maintained his 36—second lead after stage ten of the vuelta a espana. after 102 miles in the saddle, italy's matteo trentin held off spain'sjosejoaquin rojas to claim victory. froome crossed the line 4.5 minutes later alongside his main rival, esteban chaves, although the colombian is nowjoint—second with ireland's nicolas roche, who made up time on the final descent. two of england's women's sports teams have met the prime minister at downing street. the rugby union team narrowly lost the world cup final to new zealand last saturday. but the cricketers, led by heather knight, went one better and lifted the world cup after a dramatic final win over india at lord's. the prime minister described the players of both teams as wonderful ambassadors. not the best picture of the prime minister to finish on. sorry, i was talking to you during. minister to finish on. sorry, i was talking to you duringlj minister to finish on. sorry, i was talking to you during. i normally know what you are saying. the pictures this morning, i think the
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prime minister arrived in japan pictures this morning, i think the prime minister arrived injapan a few minutes ago. so it must have been just before she left. few minutes ago. so it must have beenjust before she left.|j few minutes ago. so it must have been just before she left. i was mouthing the eu, japan. been just before she left. i was mouthing the eu, japanlj been just before she left. i was mouthing the eu, japan. i thought you said, did she play? —— mouthing to you. just wanted to make it clear. a night—time curfew has been imposed in houston, texas, in an attempt to deter looters as the rescue effort continues in the wake of tropical storm harvey. the storm, which is now heading for louisiana, has battered the region, leaving at least 15 dead and 30,000 people homeless. cbs news correspondent meg 0liver is in houston for us this morning. thank you once again for giving us are not dead on the situation there. we hear 30,000 people in houston are seeking emergency accommodation. we have mentioned the curfew as well. what more can you tell us about effo rts what more can you tell us about efforts on the ground that? the big news tonight is that another major
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shelter opened up. the energy centre is near the nfl stadium, and shelter opened up. the energy centre is nearthe nfl stadium, and it shelter opened up. the energy centre is near the nfl stadium, and it can accommodate 10,000 people. right now, people are lined up around the block to get in. they are expecting it to be half full by tomorrow morning. now, that shelter, that additional shelter, will have help ease conditions at the convention centre. this one is for 5000 people. they have roughly 10,000 inside there, but they won't turn anyone away. and in terms of the presidential visit, there are lots of pictures on the front pages of our papers here, and it is that really careful balance between being visible and being there at the scene of what is going on, but also not disrupting the effort to try and make people say. do you think that the trumps got it right? -- trumps. it is not for me to say, but i can tell you that the white house... he
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made a point of doing his two stop tour, going to boston and corpus christi, where there is a lot of damage, but here in houston, this is where the first responders are continuing to do rescue efforts, so the white house wanted to keep them further away so as not to interfere. whenever the president comes to town, you have to shut down roads and different things. you can't get around because the flooding is so bad. he is expected to come back to the region to tour, but the white house said he is trying to lay a foundation, basically, in terms of recovery. he wants to look back on this in five years and say that is how you rebuild. and what has the response been to the curfew that? well, at first the map imposed a 10pm to 5pm curfew —— mayor. then he moved to midnight. i wasjust talking to some police officers over here and they said this is just to cut down on any possible losers. if
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people are out and about, still trying to help other people, we are not going to interfere with that —— looters. and just a couple of minutes ago there were people walking by, and the volunteers who have turned out to help these shelters like the one behind me, they are non—stop. a few minutes ago two mothers walked by with little kids. it is after midnight here in the united states, and they are out here bringing supplies, still, to the shelter. so the state of texas is really hitting —— giving of themselves, and you see that. thank you for your time. carol has an update on the weather and you're going to start with america? that's right. record—breaking rainfall in houston from harvey. record—breaking four mainland usa. around houston we have
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51.88 inches of rainfall from this storm, one and one third metres. currently we still have an onshore and offshore element to tropical storm harvey, that means at the moment it is picking up energy and moisture from the warm gulf of mexico but today that storm will move inland and it will start to move inland and it will start to move north—east. it does mean it's not going to be raining any more in houston from this particular storm but there will still be issues with the rain that's already fallen and is causing such catastrophic flooding. the whole system moves north—east, bringing torrential rain into louisiana, mississippi and alabama. but the one salient thing is that the storm is actually moving. it's been more or less stationary since thursday in parts of texas. for ourselves, we've got mixed fortunes in the weather. for the north and west today, sunshine and showers. a different story for
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the south and east because here we have a couple of weather fronts that are going to merge and produce persistent rain, and you will notice a huge drop in the temperatures. yesterday in kent we had 29.3. today we will see 15 but then the rain even lower than that. away from the rain in the south—east and there is a mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers. into the afternoon and the rain will continue to push into the rain will continue to push into the south—east, drying up and brightening up behind it in the west midlands but feeling cold in this rain, at times london only 13, way below where we should be. moving into northern england, bright spells, sunshine and showers and the same in scotland, bright spells, sunshine and showers but they are showers so by no means will we all catch one. northern ireland also seeing that cocktail of sunshine, bright spells and showers and although we will have that too in wales the showers will be further and fewer between, in fact the same
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in south—west england but more sunshine than dull weather with those showers. through this evening and overnight the rain eventually clears away and behind we will have a clearance in the sky, temperatures could drop, patchy mist and fog forming and still a plethora of showers coming in across the north and west. these temperatures are indicative of what you can expect in towns and cities. in the countryside they will be that the lower. chilly start to the day tomorrow but drier and brighter for many start to the day tomorrow but drier and brighterfor many but start to the day tomorrow but drier and brighter for many but we will already start with the showers in the west that that bit lower. tomorrow you could catch a shower almost anywhere —— that bit lower. temperatures will be recovering in the south—east, looking at highs of 19 or20. the south—east, looking at highs of 19 or 20. elsewhere, 14 to about 18. then on friday, fewer showers around, a nippy start once again. a fair bit of sunshine around and the temperature range by then, 13 to 21. if you like your weather that bit
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drier, saturday and not looking too shabby at all. to hear it because it felt pretty nippy out there this morning! —— glad to hear. the northern powerhouse was an idea, which aimed to bring the cities of northern england together as an economic force to rival london. but in the last few weeks, big questions have been asked about how that's going to happen. steph been taking a look. it was about three years ago when george osborne, the then chancellor, announced the idea of the northern powerhouse to try to bring the north up powerhouse to try to bring the north up to the same standard in terms of the south—east for things like transport, connectivity and the jobs and prosperity so it was bridging that gap between the perception the north is more hard done by compared to the south. 0ne north is more hard done by compared to the south. one of the big criticisms was investment. i've been on one journey across the pennines to find out what businesses think.
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it was three years ago in manchester that the idea of creating a northern powerhouse was first announced. improving transport was a big part of it. the government says it is investing more than ever in transport up here, but there is a criticism that the north is still losing out to the south—east.“ criticism that the north is still losing out to the south-east. if the government had spent as much per head on the north as they did in london in the past ten years they would have spent £59 billion more on the north and to get things moving and getting the economy functioning better than it is at the moment so the government is responding to london rather than using transport spending to transform the northern economy, which would be to the national benefit. you can see from the departure board that there are loads of friends coming in and out of here and regular ones to and from london. that journey at the of here and regular ones to and from london. thatjourney at the moment ta kes london. thatjourney at the moment takes just over two hours but with
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hs two it should half that time, making it much faster to get to london. but what about getting of the north? i'm about 35 miles from barnsley, i'm going to get the train there to see what people think. when you talk to passengers about their experiences, the same things come up, overcrowding, frequency of trains and speed. there could be more services and they could be faster. your husband does manchester to huddersfield regularly, what are his thoughts on it? three to four times a month the train is delayed. does he moan about it regularly? definitely. generally it's ok, it could be faster. it's made worse when you see all the investment put into euston given the weekend that's just gone on full. think there's something missing. the trains are extremely full with commuters, there's not enough carriages to take all the passengers and it's mostly standing room only, as you can see
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today as well. i've arrived here after nearly two hours of travelling. for places like this, being better connected could make a big difference. how do you get around the area ? big difference. how do you get around the area? i travel on the train to work and back. what's that like for you? good, but the trains aren't as often as i'd like. when i use buses they tend not to turn up, they tend to breakdown and the service is intermittent. the north of england is badly served by travel. businesses argue they need better connectivity too. i've come to meet clive, who runs a furniture shopin to meet clive, who runs a furniture shop in barnsley. he wants the roads to be improved. a lot of businesses try tojust—in—time to be improved. a lot of businesses try to just—in—time deliveries, we may go to manchester by 3pm, that could take anywhere between 45 minutes and three hours. because of this variation we have to put a three hour delivery slot, if you do it in three quarters of an hour
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that's an awful lot of lost time. for many commuters and businesses here speeding up the process of getting between northern towns and cities can't come soon enough. for many of us it's the journey, not just the destination. it's interesting. it's a beautiful journey across the pennines. it can be a nightmare if you are doing it all the time. the other important thing about this is it's not just the important thing about this is it's notjust the north and the south, i get a lot of people that say in other parts of especially the south—west they say we are really underinvested, we keep hearing about the northern powerhouse, what about us? people in the midlands say that too. it's about the disparity between a lot of the country and london when it comes to how much is being invested. the department of transport are saying they are committed to the whole northern powerhouse project. it was the old regime, george osborne and david
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cameron who announced it, there was concern about whether the northern powerhouse thing would slide away so this meeting is important for that. the government saying they are still committed to it and they are pretty millions into it already and they are waiting for plans to be submitted so they can get cracking with faster routes are across the pennines. see you later. did you watch the bake of? did you watch last night? i am, but! watch the bake of? did you watch last night? i am, but i didn't. -- bake 0ff. last night? i am, but i didn't. -- bake off. there are loads of spoilers here but we are going to talk about it! the great british bake off was back on television last night for the first time since its move to channel 4. nervous viewers tuned in to see if the proof was in the pudding, hoping the recipe for the hit show hadn't changed too much. 0ur reporter, lara rostron, watched alongside a panel of fans, including the buzzfeed tv editor scott bryan, to see if the new presenting team had risen to the occasion. well, injust a
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well, in just a few minutes time the great british bake 0ff returns to our screens but on channel 4 this time and breakfast has been invited to watch it with none other than the bake 0ff giroud. to watch it with none other than the bake off giroud. thanks for bringing one of these along. i had to, didn't i?- one of these along. i had to, didn't i? —— guru. bake 0ff! one of these along. i had to, didn't i? -- guru. bake off! hello, bakers, welcome to the fabulous bake 0ff tent. what did you think? it feels very familiar but i was expecting to see mel and sue still. but if you squint nole fielding is a bit like mel and sue. cake squint nole fielding is a bit like meland sue. cake break. squint nole fielding is a bit like mel and sue. cake break. at least the adverts are cake related. does anyone want a tea? yes! bakers, you have 30 minutes left to make your fruity cakes. that is nice, that looks good. love cardamom, love a pair. i still miss mel and sue but
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i'm ok. i haven't missed it, i feel like i'm cheating by saying it but i haven't missed them. it's good that they are trying to be themselves, they're not trying to be mel and sue just like mary isn't trying to be proved and proved isn't trying to be mary. they are just getting on with it. that looks amazing. it is a chocolate butter sponge with peanut butter frosting. it is chocolate butter sponge with peanut butterfrosting. it is perfect. chocolate butter sponge with peanut butter frosting. it is perfect. ok, guys, butter frosting. it is perfect. ok, guys, right, judgement time, finnish, what do you make of it?|j would give channel 4 star baker this week. you would? i think the adverts we re week. you would? i think the adverts were a bit grating. you still enjoyed it. 0ne one thing is for certain it is still making me hungry. did you enjoy it? some people complained about the ad breaks. there are going to be them. it gives you the chance to make a tea and get a biscuit or a slice of cake. 0verwhelmingly quite a few positive comments. barbra says she
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loves it, but the adverts mean you can go to the kitchen for crisps, biscuits, perfect. michelle said she enjoys it, didn't think it would be good, i'll eat my words but i would rather eat the cake. 0ne good, i'll eat my words but i would rather eat the cake. one of the good things, the contestants are fabulous, they have brought together a really good bunch of contestants. pretty much the same programme, same music, same flow, just adverts. you're a tough judge when it comes to your egg club, you said there we re to your egg club, you said there were too many hollywood handshakes. you have to set the bar high. 0n the first challenge he was growing handshakes around like there was no tomorrow. coming up to 7am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm chris rogers. 15 london mps are calling for a new law requiring councils to provide free school meals during the holidays. mp for hampstead & kilburn, tulip siddiq, told bbc london
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the lack of free school meals during the summer was exacerbating food poverty. the school holidays bill proposes that ten pence in every pound raised by the sugary drinks levy goes towards funding meals during the break. the financial firm deloitte warns nearly one in three of london's jobs could be at risk from technology over the next ten to 20 years. this is especially true in the so called low skilled economy where they are eight times more likely to be replaced than jobs that pay £100,000 or more. however, it's not all bad news. in the last 15 years technology has made big changes, so we've probably lostjobs, lost half of secretarialjobs, half of clericaljobs, we lost two thirds of travel agents and two thirds of librarians due to the impact of technology but the good news is that is being more than made up for by newjobs. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes,
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this morning which is good news. 0n the trains, southeastern still has no services to and from charing cross, waterloo east or london bridge until saturday due to ongoing engineering works. diversions are in place to cannon street, victoria or blackfirars. 0n the roads and in blackheath, shooters hill road is closed between charlton way and prince charles road due to a crash. very quiet looking there this morning. in islington, upper street remains closed between liverpool road and city road for major roadworks. and in catford, the south circular has temporary traffic lights atjutland road due to gas works. let's have a check on the weather now with alena jenkins. good morning. after the warmth and sunshine of recent days, today will feel very much different. rain on and off for much of the day and feeling much cooler, temperatures down by some 12 or 13 celsius compared to yesterday. while it's not raining all the time
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this morning but the rain will slowly become a bit more persistent through the day, locally heavy in places this afternoon and only very slowly clearing eastwards. temperatures not much higher than what we've got at the moment, 15 or 16 the high this afternoon. that rain will slowly start to clear through this evening and then becoming mainly dry overnight with increasingly clear skies and temperatures in rural spots eight or nine, holding to ten or 11 in town with plenty of sunshine to start the day tomorrow. slowly cloud will start to bubble up and that brings with it the chance of a few afternoon showers. some places escaping mainly dry but temperatures recovering in the sunshine to 19 or 20 celsius. this area of high pressure slowly building through friday and into the weekend so that will start to settle things down but there's still the chance of some showers on friday afternoon. should be mainly dry on saturday with plenty of sunshine but cloud increasing from the west on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back
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to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. north korea receives unanimous condemnation at the united nations for firing a ballistic missile overjapan. as diplomats describe the latest action as outrageous, the regime releases pictures of the test and says it will carry out similar drills in the future. good morning, it's wednesday 30th august. also this morning: a night—time curfew is declared in the flood—hit city of houston in a move to prevent looting. there are calls for a ban on credit card firms extending spending limits without the cardholders' consent. i've been finding out how easy it is to travel between cities
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and towns in the north of england and how close the idea of a northern powerhouse is to becoming a reality. in sport, west indies have won a test match in england for the first time in 17 years. shay hope's historic century helped them to a famous victory on a thrilling final day at headingley. we're asking if children are more frightened of crime than they need to be, as new figures suggest it's one of their biggest worries. and carol has the weather. good morning. across scotland, northern england and northern ireland it will be a day of sunshine, bright spells and showers. a little bit warmer than yesterday. for the rest of england and wales, cloud around and some of us will see persistent rain and for some of us it will be 10 degrees colder than yesterday, especially in the north—east. more details on 15
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minutes. first, our main story. there has been unanimous condemnation of north korea's firing of a ballistic missile overjapan at a meeting of the united nations security council overnight. the regime has described the launch as "the first step" of operations in the pacific. the un security council has described the launch as "outrageous", but stopped short of threatening further action against north korea. suzanne kianpour reports. here we have north korea's not—so—diplomatic response to the slap on the wrist for its latest provocation, proudly releasing stills of its missile launch overjapan, just as diplomats were meeting in new york in an emergency gathering of the un security council, working on the first step in a response to north korea's destabilising activity. the world is united against north korea, there is no doubt about that. it is time for the north korean regime to recognise the danger they are putting themselves in. the united states will not allow their lawlessness to continue, and the rest of the world is with us. the meeting result was unanimous,
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but inconsequential. all members, including russia and china, signed on to a statement of condemnation, but no sign of new sanctions. the ink on the last round of north korea sanctions has barely dried. and china, for one, has said all sides are to blame for the escalation in the region, after president trump repeated all options were on the table, and south korea responded with its own show of force, in a test—bombing near its border with the north. beijing has called on washington and seoul to freeze theirjoint military exercises, as a means of getting pyongyang to the table for talks. but the us has made clear its commitment to its allies injapan and south korea... thank you, everybody... ..showing no sign the trump administration will be changing its tune anytime soon. in a few moments' time,
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we'll be talking to a former ambassador to north korea, who also has experience of working with the un security council. north korea is expected to be high on the agenda as theresa may begins a visit to japan today, her first as prime minister. during the three day visit, she'll also be discussing a post—brexit trade deal. chris masonjoins us from westminster. that post brexit trade deal will be essential if she is going to make real progress on this trip? absolutely, that is crucial for this three—day series of talks that the prime minister has. she has arrived injapan, 0saka, in the last half—hour and she will be heading to kyoto. she will be meeting the prime minister shinzo abe for a whole series of talks with him and then
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we'll get a bullet train to tokyo later today. essential other conversations about security, given the situation in north korea, but also trade. there's a huge amount of trade between the two countries. japan are hugely significant employer in the uk. there are many firms working here in the uk. they are about to nail down a trade deal. the uk has been part of that. fairly soon we will be outside of the eu. theresa may is hopeful that she can secure a similar dealfor theresa may is hopeful that she can secure a similar deal for the theresa may is hopeful that she can secure a similar dealfor the uk, in terms of trading with japan, and in the longer term managing to mould that you into something specific for britain, as opposed to being part of that eu deal. it will take some time and there is a keen awareness that there are jitters and there is a keen awareness that there arejitters on and there is a keen awareness that there are jitters on the japanese side about what they see as the potential danger of brexit from their perspective. lots of the
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meetings for the prime minister. she will even get to meet the emperor at the end of the trip, on friday. excellent. thank you for your time. a night—time curfew has been imposed in houston, texas, in a bid to deter looting in the wake of tropical storm harvey, which is now heading for louisiana. around 20 people are reported to have died and 30,000 have been forced from their homes, with over 3,000 having been rescued from the floodwaters. large swathes of texas remain underwater, with almost 52 inches of rainfall since the hurricane made landfall on friday. hurricanes come and go. but, five days after it first hit the coast of texas, harvey continues to cause devastation. these are some of the residents of 20 nursing homes. another 20 hospitals have also been evacuated across the region. 3,400 people have been rescued, with the authorities reporting that harvey has claimed lives. it was the scariest
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thing we've ever seen. i just couldn't — just... there's no words for it. this is just devastating. 51 inches of rain has fallen so far, a record for the usa, and has swamped parts of houston and southern texas. 30,000 people have been forced out of their homes by the floodwater. the red cross has warned people could be in shelters for months. president trump visited corpus christi, 220 miles south—west of houston. he was greeted by state and federal teams co—ordinating the relief efforts. we won't say congratulations, we don't want to do that. we don't want to congratulate. we'll congratulate each other when it's all finished. he is determined not to repeat the mistakes of george bush, when hurricane katrina hit. in houston, the mayor has introduced a night—time curfew, amid fears of looting.
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to the west of this vast city, two huge reservoirs are overflowing. harvey's path is slow—moving and erratic. this force of nature may not be spent yet. keith doyle, bbc news. kezia dugdale has resigned as leader of scottish labour, after less than two years in the post. the lothians msp insists she is leaving the party in a much better state than how she found it. she's also rejected the idea her departure has anything to do with her previous criticism ofjeremy corbyn. ajudge has ruled that a girl with a christian background who was reportedly placed with muslim foster pa rents reportedly placed with muslim foster parents should live with a member of herfamily. the parents should live with a member of her family. the london parents should live with a member of herfamily. the london borough of tower hamlets insists the five—year—old was placed with an english—speaking family of mixed race and there were inaccuracies in the way the case has been reported. one in five people struggling with debt have had their credit card limit raised without requesting it.
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that's according to research from the charity citizens' advice, which has called for the practice of extending credit without consent to be stopped. uk finance, the body which represents some of the country's biggest lenders, says it is working with regulators to help people manage their debt. 0ur economics correspondent, andy verity, has more. borrowing on credit cards has been growing by 9%, farfaster than wages, and citizens' advice says irresponsible practices are keeping people in debts that they cannot get out of. tracy banham ran into trouble when her small business ran into difficulty. she and her partner used credit cards to plug the holes. well, it got to point where i was just paying off interest, basically. i were actually not — at one point, on one credit card, i were paying £700 a month, and probably £60 of that were coming off the debt. that was just one of the credit cards. consumers have borrowed about £200 billion on unsecured loans, with about a third of that on credit cards. yet one in five borrowers have been given higher credit limits, without asking for them.
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0n 2.2 million credit card accounts, borrowers spent more on charges and fees than on repayments, pushing them further into debt. citizens' advice says, if that goes on for two years, lenders should have to contact borrowers and offer for help, such as suspending interest payments. we think the most important thing is that credit card companies should stop raising credit limits without consulting the customer. we think this is a second thing the regulator can do to give better guidance for affordability checks for people who are extending their credit cards. the body that represents most credit card lenders says it is taking steps to prevent borrowers being offered more credit, and that it is working with regulators to help people manage their debts. andy verity, bbc news. driver celebrating the opening of the new crossing this morning saw a convoy of vehicles across the bridge, with a police escort, many honking as you can see the mark the
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occasion. the new queensferry crossing which links the lothians and fife is the longest three power, cable and fife is the longest three power, ca ble state and fife is the longest three power, cable state bridging the world. new research suggests the distinctive rings of saturn may be considerably younger than previously thought. data gathered by the probe, cassini, which is orbiting the planet, suggests they may be only 100 million years old. it indicates they could be the crushed remains of a moon or comet. sadly, cassini is transmitting its final burst of data, before it plunges into saturn's atmosphere and burns up. let's get more on our main story. there's been widespread condemnation to the firing of a missile over japan by north korea. last night the regime confirmed it was responsible, and released these pictures, supposedly of the latest rocket launch. the state—run news agency said leader kimjong—un had ordered more drills targeting the region. last night, a meeting of the un security council drafted a statement calling on north korea
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to halt any more launches and abandon its nuclear weapons programme. but it stopped short of imposing new sanctions. we can talk now tojohn everard, a former ambassador to north korea, who also has experience of working with the un security council. a very good morning to you. thank you forjoining us. as former ambassador, can you explain to us what you think it is that north korea want to achieve? there's no point getting about this. the north koreans have said clearly what they wa nt to koreans have said clearly what they want to achieve. they are heading for the capability to deliver a nuclear warhead directly to a city on the continental united states and they believe that when they reach they believe that when they reach the stage that firstly the us will no longer be prepared to risk the destruction of one of its cities in supporting south korean allies and secondly north korea will be able to
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dictate terms over things like economic advantage and so on. so the un has now had this statement. we no sanctions were imposed. what can be done to stop north korea in those ambitions? frankly, very little. the last united nations security council resolution was probably about as far as the market will bear. about as far as the us will be able to persuade china and russia to go. there are question marks even now over whether that resolution could we implemented. so further sanctions probably unlikely. all options are on the table, says donald trump, but it's not clear what he by that. his advisers will be telling him clearly that to start a war on the korean peninsular would we are very bad idea and what else does he do? that's my question to you. exactly.
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all options being discussed, but how do you stop what north korea seem to want? there's a growing consensus that this be stopped. that sooner rather than later north korea is going to achieve its ambition. it is going to achieve its ambition. it is going to achieve its ambition. it is going to have a missile on which it can mounta going to have a missile on which it can mount a nuclear device and that can mount a nuclear device and that can deliver this to the us. as i say, the sanctions are unlikely to ta ke say, the sanctions are unlikely to take effect. military options are deeply unattractive. both sides have said that they aren't interested in dialogue. the north koreans now have seven times used the same form of words, originally used by kim jong—un himself, saying they won't talk about their nuclear deterrent. donald trump and shinzo abe agreed yesterday that now is not the time to talk to north korea. so no dialogue. what you are painting is a kind of terrifying scenario in some ways. how dangerous is it? it is dangerous. i'm not saying
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we're heading towards nuclear war but we may be heading to the leverage threat of the use of nuclear weapons by north korea, which makes an unstable world even less sta ble. we know the prime minister, theresa may, is going to japan today. japan obviously as well very concerned about this. what can she do? probably very little. i know she will offer words of sympathy, condolence and understanding to the japanese but everybody knows the uk is not really a major player in this very difficult conundrum. it has the one card that the uk has an embassy in pyongyang, which of course neitherjapan or the united states do, which gives some kind of access but it would be wrong to think the uk is going to be able to help solve the problems in any major way. tell us the problems in any major way. tell us what this latest missile launch tells you about north korea's actual
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capabilities. the hwasong-12, the missile that was launched, is new, it was first paraded in april this year, an intermediate range missile which appears to really have quite a range. almost certainly capable of carrying a nuclear warhead. the technology probably stolen from a ukrainian missile factory. its intermediate missile capability is demonstrated. the next step will be to show it has got an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of carrying a nuclear warhead and that it's reliable and can threaten america. thanks very much. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: unanimous condemnation of north korea's missile launch overjapan. the un security council calls it outrageous, but in a defiant statement, the regime warns there's more to come. a night—time curfew is declared in the flood—hit city of houston
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in an effort to stop looting as 30,000 people have been forced to leave their homes. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. she's been updating us on houston over the last few days but also on the weather here. good morning. good morning. 0ur weather very different from houston, we have mixed fortunes today. breezy in the north and west, sunshine and showers with temperatures higher than yesterday. in the south and east, rain at times in the afternoon, some will be persistent and much cooler. you can see what i mean, yesterday in kent in the today and we had 29.3. today it's likely to be 15 or maybe even a bit more in the rainfall. the reason for the rain is we have two weather fronts, they will collide and produce persistent rain. the isobars quite well spaced
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in the north, breezy rather than windy, and a bright start to the day with sunshine and showers. the most prolific showers will be in scotland and northern ireland and a few in northern england. you can see this whole band of rain pushing into the south—east, joining forces with the other one and behind it we will see things brightening up and drying up as well. pretty wet across east anglia, essex and kent, cambridgeshire as well this afternoon, pegging back those temperatures with showers following on behind but again, bright spells or sunshine. breezy, sunshine and showers sums it up nicely for scotland. in between the showers we will see decent sunshine. in northern ireland, a similar story, bright spells, sunshine and showers but if anything, fewer showers this afternoon in wales, more drier weather, looking at sunshine, lengthy spells and the same in the south—west with a few showers knocking around. through the evening and overnight we eventually lose the rain, it goes to the near continent.
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behind it there will still be a plethora of showers, especially in the west but inland there will be a lot of dry weather and clear skies. although we can see temperatures in double figures in towns and cities, in rural areas they will be lower than this and we could see patchy mist and fog forming as well in parts of southern england but that shouldn't last too long tomorrow and for many tomorrow, a fine, dry and sunny start. however, we still have the showers in the west from the overnight period and if anything they will widely developed tomorrow, almost anywhere tomorrow could catch almost anywhere tomorrow could catch a shower and it could also prove thundery. the other thing about tomorrow is temperatures recover in the south—east, why of about 19 or 20. for the rest of the uk, we've got around 14 to 18, so roughly where we should be at this stage in august. 0n where we should be at this stage in august. on friday it's going to be a nippy start but under the clear skies we will see sunshine. a few showers around as well but not as
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many as we are looking and through thursday. highs of up to 21. on saturday, a lot of dry weather around. again we can't completely ruled out a shower but you'll be unlucky depending on your point of view if you catch one and highs of 21 in old muggy, 70 fahrenheit. definitely felt nippy this morning! see you later! let's get the latest from the business world now. steph‘s talking currencies, food prices and skills today. lots going on in the currency markets at the moment! good morning. not great news if you are changing your nggy not great news if you are changing your muggy to euros at the moment. the pound is worth almost the same as the euro after falls on the currency markets yesterday. the drop overnight was because investors worried about hurricane ha rvey and north korea were buying more euros as a safe haven in the market uncertainty. when they are worried about things like that they invest in areas they think are safer. at the moment they
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think are safer. at the moment they think euros are safer so they buy fewer euros and more dollars and pounds, meaning the pound fell to an 11 month low against the euro, but things like that can change on a daily basis depending on what happens. the brc is separately warning that food prices could rise after brexit unless plans to tackle red tape and improve ports are put in place. a lot of food we import comes from european countries. we often talk about the skills gap. soft skills like teamwork, communication and confidence are considered by young people, teachers and workers to be as important to achieving success in life as good grades, that's according to research from the prince's trust. they found 91% of teachers think
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schools should be doing more to help students develop soft skills, and nearly half of young people don't feel prepared to enter the work force without them. lots of people say that, loads of businesses say that to me, it's great kids have these good exam results but we need them to have a phone conversation and be able to deal with people and sometimes... they don't learn a lot about that at school and it puts pressure on them. social interaction goes a long way. a bit of communication! got round to it at the third time of trying! losing a loved one can be an incredibly difficult time for families who have to take care of funerals and other formalities. but now many are facing the added distress of delays in registering a death. figures seen by bbc local radio show most councils in england and wales are failing to register bereavements within the five—day target. emily unia has this report. last year, graham morgan's mother died. she was 86 and living in a care home. the family had to wait nearly three weeks for the funeral.
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it was a terrible situation to be honest with you. it was the worst you could ever have at a time of your life, and everybody faces it, when someone near to you passes away, it was terrible. he faced delays in getting a doctor's certificate and waited a fortnight for an appointment to register her death with the local council. it has a a big impact on your well—being because you're bereaved, you're panicking, you want to get everything right. you've loved your... in my case, my parents, you didn't want to let them down and anything to go wrong. by law all deaths except those investigated by a coroner must be registered within five days but most councils in england and wales are failing to meet their registration targets. in 2011, 23% of all deaths in england and wales were registered after the five—day limit. a total of 110,000 people. by 2016, that figure had risen to more than 187,000,
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meaning 36% of all deaths took longer than five days to be registered. the national association of funeral directors, which represents 4,000 funeral homes, conducted its own survey in 2015. they found families were waiting longer to see a registrar. at some registrars there are cutbacks and staff shortages, and that's happening throughout the uk. but what we're all so seeing is certain registrars will not make the appointment for the family unless the family already have the medical certificate for cause of death in their possession. poppy mardall runs a funeral home in south london and is aware of growing delays. she says the whole process of dealing with death is confusing for bereaved families and more sensitivity is needed. grieving people should not be disregarded by local authorities. i think recognition that death and grief are incredibly difficult experiences that we're all going to have to go through, so i don't see why people need to wait five or six days to register a death, it doesn't take that long.
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the home office said local authorities are expected to ensure there are adequate provisions to register a death. the local government association told us various factors have contributed to delays, but councils are working to reduce them. for graham morgan, improvements to the system, although too late for his family, would still be welcome. it causes chaos at a time in people's lives when you don't need that fails to be honest with you, you're bereaved enough as it is. emily unia, bbc news. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: are better transport links needed to see the idea of the northern powerhouse become a reality? steph‘s taken a trip across the region to find out what's needed to ensure the project remains on track. she's been on the trains! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc
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london news, i'm chris rogers. 313 people were arrested over the two—day event at notting hill, attended by over 1 two—day event at notting hill, attended by over1 million people. 15 london mps are calling for a new law requiring councils to provide free school meals during the holidays. the mp for hampstead & kilburn, tulip siddiq, told bbc london the lack of free school meals during the summer was making the issue of food poverty even worse. the school holidays bill proposes that ten pence in every pound raised by the sugary drinks levy goes towards funding meals during the holidays. the financial firm deloitte warns nearly one in three of london's jobs
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could be at risk from technology over the next ten to 20 years. this is especially true in the so called low skilled economy where they are eight times more likely to be replaced than jobs that pay £100,000 or more. however, other roles are being created in new technologyjobs. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes, this morning which is good news. 0n the trains, southeastern still has no services to and from charing cross, waterloo east or london bridge until saturday due to ongoing engineering works. diversions are in place to cannon street, victoria or blackfirars. 0n the roads and in blackheath, shooters hill road is closed between charlton way and prince charles road due to a crash earlier. it's very busy through the village as traffic is diverted. in islington, upper street remains closed between liverpool road and city road for major roadworks. let's have a check on the weather now with alena jenkins. good morning.
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after the warmth and sunshine of recent days, today will feel very much different. rain on and off for much of the day and feeling much cooler, temperatures down by some 12 or 13 celsius compared to yesterday. while it's not raining all the time this morning, the rain will slowly become a bit more persistent through the day, locally heavy in places this afternoon and only very slowly clearing eastwards. temperatures not much higher than what we've got at the moment, 15 or 16 the high this afternoon. that rain will slowly start to clear through this evening and then becoming mainly dry overnight with increasingly clear skies and temperatures in rural spots down to eight or nine, holding to ten or 11 in town with plenty of sunshine to start the day tomorrow. slowly cloud will start to bubble up and that brings with it the chance of a few afternoon showers. some places escaping mainly dry but temperatures recovering in the sunshine to 19 or 20 celsius. this area of high pressure slowly building through friday and into the weekend so that will start to settle things down but there's still the chance of some
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showers on friday afternoon. should be mainly dry on saturday with plenty of sunshine but cloud increasing from the west on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. there has been unanimous condemnation of north korea's firing of a missile overjapan, at a united nations security council meeting overnight. the regime described the launch as the first step of military operations in the pacific. the security council has demanded the country abandons its nuclear weapons programme, but has stopped short of threatening new sanctions on pyongyang. it is dangerous. i'm not saying that
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we are heading towards nuclear war, but we may well be heading towards the leveraged threat of the use of nuclear weapons by north korea. which makes an unstable world even less sta ble. north korea is expected to be high on the agenda as theresa may begins a visit to japan today, her first as prime minister. he/she is stepping off the plane in 0saka. —— here she is. she will be hoping to discuss a post—brexit trade deal. mrs may has described japan as a like—minded nation and a natural trading partner. a night—time curfew has been imposed in houston, texas, in a bid to deter looting in the wake of tropical storm harvey, which is now heading for louisiana. around 20 people are reported to have died as a result of the storm. more than 30,000 have been forced from their homes, and 3,000 have been rescued from the floodwaters. large swathes of texas remain underwater, with almost 52 inches of rainfall since the hurricane made landfall on friday. earlier i spoke to cbs news
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correspondent meg oliver and asked how people have reacted to the curfew. at first the mary imposed a ten p.m.—5a.m. curfew at first the mary imposed a ten p.m.—5 a.m. curfew and there was a lot of backlash on that. then he moved it to midnight. i wasjust speaking to police officers and they said this isjust speaking to police officers and they said this is just a speaking to police officers and they said this isjust a cut speaking to police officers and they said this is just a cut down for any possible looters. if people are still out on about, we're not going to interfere with people trying to help. until a few minutes ago there we re help. until a few minutes ago there were people over there walking by. the volunteers that have turned out to help these shelters, like the one behind me, they are non—stop. a few minutes ago, two mothers walked by with little kids. it is after midnight here in the us and they are out here bringing supplies to the shelter. the state of texas is really giving themselves and you see that wherever you look. kezia dugdale has resigned as leader of scottish labour, after less than two
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years in the post. the lothians msp insists she is leaving the party in a much better state than how she found it. she has also rejected the idea her departure has anything to do with her previous criticism ofjeremy corbyn. ajudge has ruled that a girl with a christian background, who was reported to have been placed with muslim foster parents, who spoke little english, should live with a member of herfamily. the london borough of tower hamlets, insists the five year old was placed with an english speaking family of mixed race and that there were inaccuracies in the way the case was reported. one in five people struggling with debt have had their credit card limit raised, without requesting it, according to the charity, citizens' advice. it has called for the practice of extending credit without consent to be stopped. uk finance, the body which represents some of the country's biggest lenders, says it is working with regulators to help people manage their debt. more than 40,000 people are expected in the small spanish town of bunol laterfor the annual
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tomato—throwing festival. what apparently started as an angry row between two rival farmers more than 70 years ago is now the world's biggest food fight. usually it takes less than an hour to turn around 110 tons of tomatoes into a pulpy mess. that's where i'm going to be next year, at this time. are you definitely going to go? i've watched those pictures over many years. we can have a louise minchin report from there. does it happen in lots of places or is it just does it happen in lots of places or is itjust that? that's where i'm going to go. what is it, august 30? when you are not there next year...
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are you going to throw tomatoes at me? all of our viewers are going to say, you promised us, now you have let us down. there will be tomatoes thrown in the studio! good morning! great news for cricket fa ns good morning! great news for cricket fans this morning. the west indies, a fantastic performance from them yesterday. some cricket fans will be disappointed that england went on and won yesterday, but it was really and won yesterday, but it was really and to watch. so exciting. history was made. the west indies won their first test match in this country for 17 years, after they beat england by five wickets to win the second test and level the three—match series. west indies were chasing over 300 runs to win on the final day. but two crucial dropped balls from alistair cook, and a century to shai hope and 95 from kraigg brathwaite, set the platform for the stunning victory. we're test cricketers for a reason.
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we know that we came here to play cricket, and we just need to go out and execute. we heard a lot of things in the media. we decided you wouldn't bet on this. we looked at ourselves in the mirror, and decided we could play cricket. at no point were we complacent. we looked at the conditions, it was spinning. it was the fifth day, and we took the positive option. we wanted to try and win the game. we're a positive side, that wants to go on and try and win test matches. unfortunately we we ren't able to do that today, but if we'd taken all of our chances, it might have been slightly different. but credit to the west indies. they played fantastically well today. alex 0xlade—chamberlain has turned down a move to chelsea from arsenal, despite the two clubs agreeing a £40 million fee. it is believed the england international would prefer a move to liverpool, with a bid expected to come before tomorrow's transfer deadline. 0xlade—chamberlain is out of contract next summer. meanwhile, arsenal have rejected a £50 million bid from manchester city for forward alexis sanchez.
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the chile international scored 24 league goals last season, but is out of contract next summer. arsenal would like city's raheem sterling as part of any deal. lots of chopping and changing still to come. well, this summer's transfer window has seen all kinds of records broken. republic of ireland assistant manager roy keane believes the fees demanded by what he describes as average players are mind—boggling. david beckham ? billion. giggsy? £2 billion. roy keane? £3.75 million, i think. the market value of players is mind—boggling, the figures for players, especially for the average players. the time to be a professional footballer is now. roger federer has survived a scare to reach the second
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round of the us open. federer, looking to win a record 20th grand slam title, beat american teenager francis tiafoe in five sets. federer‘s great rival rafa nadal is also through to the second round, after a straight—sets win over serbia's dusan lajovic. the spaniard needed a tie—break to take the first set, but comfortably took the next two sets. after second seed simona halep and britain's world number seven, johanna konta, were knocked out of the us open, there has been another major shock at flushing meadows. world number 45 naomi 0saka, from japan, beat defending champion and sixth seed angelique kerber in straight sets. it was the first time in 13 years that the champion was knocked out in the opening round. she played good, especially also at the end of the match, and i'm always trying to go for it when i have the chance. and today, i mean, she just went for it. i think she took her chances, and yeah, she played
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a very good match. but for me, for sure, it wasn't the best day and not the best match. chris froome has maintained his 36—second lead after stage ten of the vuelta a espana. after 102 miles in the saddle, italy's matteo trentin held off spain'sjosejoaquin rojas to claim victory. froome crossed the line 4.5 minutes later alongside his main rival, esteban chaves, although the colombian is nowjoint—second with ireland's nicolas roche, who made up time on the final descent. two of england's women's sports teams have met the prime minister at downing street. theresa may welcomed the rugby union team, who narrowly lost the world cup final to new zealand at the weekend and also heather knight's world cup—winning cricketers. the prime minister said both england teams had contributed to a "breakthrough moment" forfemale sport. we've said that so many times over
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the years. is this the moment? that was the moment. with the rugby players, even in defeat, that was the moment. you watch the final against new zealand and you think, i don't care who is playing, that was a brilliant final. and live on tv. exactly. thank you very much. as parents, it can be easy to worry about your child's safety every time they leave the house and, according to a new report, this may be one issue you can both agree on. the children's society surveyed 3,00010—17 year olds about the problems they face. and the fear of being a victim of crime came out on top. that's ahead of issues such as their family struggling to pay the bills or having a parent who is seriously ill. yet, only 17% of teenagers surveyed had actually experienced crime or been the victim of antisocial behaviour themselves, suggesting the fear is greater than the reality. so why is crime such an important issue for young people and how can
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you talk to your child about it? we're joined by psychologist geoff beattie and ella brookbanks, who's mum to a 15—year—old son and daughter aged nine. good morning and thank you both very much forjoining us. with regards to your son, for example, is he fearful about things happening to him?|j about things happening to him?” wouldn't say he is specifically. he is quite immature young boy. he is educated on things, we talk to him openly about things that happen around the town. we are involved in things that happen. so him specifically, he is not, but i know there are a lot of parents out there who are not so clued on. where does that fear come from? what might actually be happening in society? there's often a discrepancy between level of crime and fear of crime. 0ver level of crime and fear of crime. over the last 20 years, violent crime has gone down in the uk and
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yet there is no hint of crime going down, so there is a discrepancy. if you ask people to estimate the probability of things happening, they are very bad at knowing how common things are or how where they are. what they do is they based their estimates on images they have on their heads. 0ne their estimates on images they have on their heads. one aspect of this is social media. the way we consume it these days is very image —based. we can see all kinds of horrible things that can happen and they are estimates of it happening to us. so i think social media is a big player in this. social media is all about sharing images rather than words and i think if people understand more about the probability of things happening de would be less fearful because it looks as if people are becoming more fearful. wasn't it a lwa ys becoming more fearful. wasn't it always similar? when i was growing up, fearof always similar? when i was growing up, fear of something happening to us was up, fear of something happening to us was greater than something actually happening. it looks as if the probability of crime now is
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actually decreasing. citing its about understanding what you can do to prevent yourself becoming a victim of crime. it's about self efficacy, about response —— knowing what responses are appropriate. it's about having conversations you know what the likelihood of something happening is. isaw what the likelihood of something happening is. i saw some statistics last week which was people under 14 are spending more time on social media than having conversations with the family. so there's this concept about what's going on on the street. you say your 15—year—old is quite savvy. how is it different with your nine—year—old daughter? savvy. how is it different with your nine-year-old daughter? she hears conversations that we have at home. 0ne conversations that we have at home. one of the most important thing is his communication with your children. i don't pick you should be scared of having any kind of conversation with your children. 0bviously conversation with your children. obviously it needs to be age—appropriate. what we sit at the table practically every night, apart
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from friday night in the night. —— pizza night. we told about things they've done that are really good, things we are not so happy about and we have those conversations. we are quite avid readers and i remember reading a book by a criminal psychologist. when i was younger, my auntie and uncle said i should read it before i stop going out and it kind of gave you hints and tips about how you should hold yourself while in certain situations and that really helped me. i've always been a fan of showing my children the world. did it show you or tell you or instruct you on what might be danger signs? it did. you are psychologist? so i was asked to read the book by my auntie and uncle. i lived in london when i was younger. it did help me in those kinds of situations. if i was out at night, i wouldn't go into certain places and
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i would act as a way and i think it's important to have those sorts of conversations. coming at some tips from you about dealing with the anxiety that some people will display? how do you approach that? first of all, you have to talk about what's out there, not conceptualise it. get a more realistic appraisal of what the threats are. reading is great because you want people to ta ke great because you want people to take precautions, but you don't want to terrify them. he wanted to go and explore. human beings have to take a level of risk. so it's about a realistic appraisal and i think the problem is that kids ruminate on stuff a lot, so the opposite of that of course is getting kids to be more active, spending less time thinking about what can go wrong and more time doing stuff with the family. thank you very much. i'm in, friday night pizza night by the way! curry night at ours!
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sunday. that's a great weekend, what's saturday night?” sunday. that's a great weekend, what's saturday night? i don't have one, maybe we should start one! what a buildup, friday, saturday sunday. carol is looking at the weather and a bit cold this morning? for some, you're right, and it will get colder by saturday morning, parts of the highlands will see frost. what we have at the moment for the north and west of the country is sunshine and showers, breezy conditions and feeling warmer than yesterday. for the south and east, the opposite is true with rain at times, more persistent through the day and much cooler. yesterday, frittenden in kent hit 29.3, today in the rain it will be barely 15, maybe 13. quite a drop. the rain has been caused by these two weather fronts that will collide and produce more persistent rain. as you can see from the isobars in the north, quite breezy.
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the rain falling in parts of the south—west, the midlands, turning more patchy towards lincolnshire and yorkshire and another line of light rain and drizzle in parts of the south—east. through the morning, these two are going to join forces and we will see heavy rain, but behind we are looking at the mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers with prolific showers in parts of scotland and northern ireland. even so, many will miss them all together. by 4pm, brightening up in the west midlands but we will still have the rain in the south—eastern quarter. under it it will feel considerably colder than yesterday. northern england seeing showers, sunshine and bright spells, the same in scotland, fairly hit and miss showers but more showers in scotland, as in northern ireland compared to what we're expecting in northern england. in between them all will be bright and sunny skies. fewer showers this afternoon in wales but we can't com pletely afternoon in wales but we can't completely ruled them out, here too there will be sunshine and also quite a bit of sunshine in
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south—west england with a few showers dotted here and there. through the evening and overnight we lose the rain from the south—east, skies will clear, a chilly night, particularly in the countryside, and still a peppering of showers in the north and west. week also see patchy mist and fog forming in parts of england, especially in the south—east where we've seen the rain that we could also. temperatures around nine to 11, in the countryside they will be lower —— we could also. tomorrow a chilly start, overnight showers left over in the west but through the day further showers will develop. if you catch a showers will develop. if you catch a shower almost anywhere tomorrow you could hear the odd rumble of thunder. temperatures recovering them south—east, highs of up to 20, but generally, 14 to 18 —— recovering in the. lot of sunshine around. fewer showers, temperatures up around. fewer showers, temperatures up to 21. 0f around. fewer showers, temperatures up to 21. of quick look at saturday shows a lot of dry weather and again
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a chilly start in the countryside —— a chilly start in the countryside —— a quick look. sunshine coming through, a few showers but many will miss them altogether. thanks for that, carol. thanks forthat, carol. looking thanks for that, carol. looking at your map it is handy to guide us into steph. we are talking about the northern powerhouse, you have been on a trip? i have. it's interesting, we heard about the northern powerhouse several years ago when it was first announced, the idea of creating... reducing the gap between the perceived view the north is worse off than the south. interestingly whenever i talk about this i get m essa g es whenever i talk about this i get messages from people in the south—west saying we have got rubbish things, we need more help, i've had a few of those this morning and the greater thing is, the difference between areas outside of london compare it to london and its investment and one of the big things is transport. we wa nted is transport. we wanted to look at the needs in terms of transport in the north. i went on a train journey yesterday around some of it to talk to
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businesses and people how they feel about it and this is the result. it was three years ago in manchester that the idea of creating a northern powerhouse was first announced. improving transport was a big part of it. the government says it is investing more than ever in transport up here, but there is a criticism that the north is still losing out to the south—east. if the government had spent as much per head on the north as they did in london in the past ten years they would have spent £59 billion more on the north, enough to get things moving and getting the economy functioning better than it is. so the government is responding to london rather than using transport spending to transform the northern economy, which would be to the national benefit. you can see from the departure board that there are loads of trains coming in and out of here and regular ones to and from london. that journey at the moment takes just over two hours but with hs2, it should halve that time, making it much faster
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to get to london. but what about getting around the rest of north? i'm about 35 miles from barnsley, i'm going to get the train there to see what people think. when you talk to passengers about their experiences, the same things come up — overcrowding, frequency of trains and speed. there could be more services and they could be faster. your husband does manchester to huddersfield regularly, what are his thoughts on it? about three to four times a month the train is delayed. does he moan about it regularly? definitely. generally it's ok, it could be faster. it's only made worse when you see all the investment put into euston the weekend that's just gone. you think there's something missing. the trains are extremely full with commuters, there's not enough carriages to take all the passengers and it's mostly standing room only, as you can see today as well. i've arrived here after nearly two hours of travelling.
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for places like this, being better connected could make a big difference. how do you get around the area? i travel on the train to work and back. what's that like for you? good, but the trains aren't as often as i'd like. when i use buses they tend not to turn up, they tend to breakdown and the service is intermittent. the north of england is badly served by travel. businesses argue they need better connectivity too. i've come to meet clive, who runs a furniture shop in barnsley. he wants the roads to be improved. a lot of businesses try to just—in—time deliveries, we may want to get to manchester by 3pm. that could take anywhere between 45 minutes and three hours. because of this variation we have to put a three—hour delivery slot, meaning if you do it in three quarters of an hour that's an awful lot of lost time.
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for many commuters and businesses here speeding up the process of getting between northern towns and cities can't come soon enough. for many of us it's the journey, not just the destination. we were saying when we were watching that, it is such a prettyjourney around the north, but the problem is it can take a lot longer when you compare it to how quickly we can get to london from here. there's lots of complaints about that. the argument is there should be more investment in transport in the north. the government have been talking about this, there were concerns the northern powerhouse may lose focus because of brexit because the government has changed since northern powerhouse was first announced. department for transport has said they are still committed to the whole project, including developing a better train network from east to west, which is really important for lots of businesses. they say their putting millions into
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it already and they are waiting for plans to be submitted so they can get cracking with making the trains better across the pennines and around the north. excellent if that happens! flying cars may be? by the time we get to these things being done we could be in drones. just being dropped off? i like bad! —— i like that. the great british bake off was back on television last night for the first time since its move to channel 4. i would say 60 to 70% of people enjoy it. 0ur reporter, lara rostron, watched alongside a panel of fans. well, in just a few minutes time the great british bake 0ff returns to our screens but on channel 4 this time and breakfast has been invited to watch it with none other than the bake 0ff guru, correspondent scott bryan. thanks for bringing one of these along. i had to, didn't i? bake 0ff! cheers! hello, bakers, welcome to the fabulous bake 0ff tent. what did you think?
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it feels very familiar but i was expecting to see mel and sue still. but if you squint noel fielding is a bit like mel and sue. cake break. at least the adverts are cake—related. does anyone want a tea? yes! bakers, you have 30 minutes left to make your fruity cakes. that is nice. that does look good. love cardamom, love a golden pear. i still miss mel and sue but i'm 0k. i haven't missed it, i feel like i'm cheating by saying it but i haven't missed them. it's good that they are trying to be themselves, they're not trying to be mel and sue just like mary isn't trying to be prue and prue isn't trying to be mary. they are just getting on with it. that looks amazing.
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it is a chocolate butter sponge with peanut butter frosting. it's perfect. 0k, guys, right, judgement time, finished, what do you make of it? i would give channel 4 star baker this week. you would? i think the adverts were a bit grating. you still enjoyed it. tell us what you think. so many of you i know watched it last night, including new. i enjoyed it very much. elaine said my belief was too many hollywood handshakes, very early on the handshakes —— including you. didn't like the adverts but my five—year—old grandson and i enjoyed it, making imaginary cakes and commenting on the tastes. people complained about the adverts, but they said they using the adverts to have a piece of cake. didn't want to enjoy it much but i did, seemed rushed because of the adverts, but we will watch the rest of the series
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and someone whispered quietly that they preferred prue to mary berry. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm chris rogers. the head of the metropolitan police federation says it's a disgrace that 31 officers were injured at this yea r‘s 31 officers were injured at this year's notting hill carnival. it's a merged some were attacked with bottles a nd merged some were attacked with bottles and other objects while others had blood spat out. ken marsh, who leaves the federation, says he will be talking to the mayor and scotland yard about the incidents. 313 people were arrested at the annual event, which was attended by over 1 at the annual event, which was attended by over1 million people. 15 london mps are calling for a new law requiring councils to provide free school meals during the holidays. the mp for hampstead & kilburn, tulip siddiq, told bbc london the lack of free school meals during the summer was making
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the issue of food poverty even worse. the school holidays bill proposes that ten pence in every pound raised by the sugary drinks levy goes towards funding meals during the holidays. the financial firm deloitte warns nearly one in three of london's jobs could be at risk from technology over the next ten to 20 years. this is especially true in the so called low skilled economy where they are eight times more likely to be replaced than jobs that pay £100,000 or more. however, other roles are being created in new technologyjobs. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes, this morning which is good news. 0n the trains, there was an earlier signal failure at london waterloo meaning some lines were blocked for a time. we're being told things are now running normally. 0n the roads in blackheath, shooters hill road has now re—opened
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after an earlier crash between charlton way and prince charles road. in islington, upper street remains closed between liverpool road and city road for major roadworks. let's have a check on the weather now with alena jenkins. good morning. after the warmth and sunshine of recent days, today will feel very much different. rain on and off for much of the day and feeling much cooler, temperatures down by some 12 or 13 celsius compared to yesterday. while it's not raining all the time this morning, the rain will slowly become a bit more persistent through the day, locally heavy in places this afternoon and only very slowly clearing eastwards. temperatures not much higher than what we've got at the moment, 15 or 16 the high this afternoon. that rain will slowly start to clear through this evening and then becoming mainly dry overnight with increasingly clear skies and temperatures in rural spots down to eight or nine, holding to ten or 11 in town with plenty of sunshine to start the day tomorrow.
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slowly cloud will start to bubble up and that brings with it the chance of a few afternoon showers. some places escaping mainly dry but temperatures recovering in the sunshine to 19 or 20 celsius. this area of high pressure slowly building through friday and into the weekend so that will start to settle things down but there's still the chance of some showers on friday afternoon. should be mainly dry on saturday with plenty of sunshine but cloud increasing from the west on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. north korea receives unanimous condemnation at the united nations for firing a ballistic missile over japan. as diplomats describe the latest action as outrageous — the regime releases pictures of the test and says it will carry out similar drills in the future. good morning — it's wednesday 30th august.
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also this morning... a night—time curfew is declared in the flood—hit city of houston in a move to prevent looting. theresa may arrives injapan for a three day visit to discuss a post—brexit trade deal. north korea will also be high on the agenda. not great news if you're changing your money to your rows with the pound falling to an 11 month low. i will be looking at why. and in sport, the west indies win a test match in england for the first time in17 test match in england for the first time in 17 years. shai hope's historic century helped them to a thrilling victory on the final day at headingley. and how a sea creature that lived 100 million yea rs creature that lived 100 million years ago is providing lessons for the submarine designers of the future. it's all about the four
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flippers. and carol has the weather. you might need some flippers as well because in the south and east heavy and persistent rain is coming our way. it is light at the moment, and it will feel cooler than yesterday. in the north and west, a breezy day with bright spells and a little warmer than yesterday. more details in15 warmer than yesterday. more details in 15 minutes. first, our main story. there has been unanimous condemnation of north korea's firing of a ballistic missile overjapan at a meeting of the united nations security council overnight. the regime has described the launch as "the first step" of operations in the pacific. the un security council has described the launch as "outrageous" but stopped short of threatening further action against north korea. suzanne kianpour reports. here we have north korea's not—so—diplomatic response to the slap on the wrist for its latest provocation, proudly releasing stills of its missile launch overjapan, just as diplomats were meeting
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in new york in an emergency gathering of the un security council, working on the first step in a response to north korea's destabilising activity. the world is united against north korea, there is no doubt about that. it is time for the north korean regime to recognise the danger they are putting themselves in. the united states will not allow their lawlessness to continue, and the rest of the world is with us. the meeting result was unanimous, but inconsequential. all members, including russia and china, signed on to a statement of condemnation, but no sign of new sanctions. the ink on the last round of north korea sanctions has barely dried. and china, for one, has said all sides are to blame for the escalation in the region, after president trump repeated all options were on the table, and south korea responded with its own show of force, in a test—bombing near its
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border with the north. beijing has called on washington and seoul to freeze theirjoint military exercises, as a means of getting pyongyang to the table for talks. but the us has made clear its commitment to its allies injapan and south korea... thank you, everybody... ..showing no sign the trump administration will be changing its tune anytime soon. we can talk now to our correspondent, yogida limaye, who joins us now from the south korean capital, seoul. it seems nothing is bringing down this rhetoric and the intensity of this rhetoric and the intensity of this conversation, is it? and actions as well, with the latest missile test north korea conducted yesterday. we have seen notjust strong words now, we have also seen actions. the statement they have put out today, along with photographs they released of the missile test,
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they released of the missile test, they say this is just a pro you'd to contain guam, making reference to the threat they made three weeks ago that they would fire missiles to the waters around guam. also the north korean leader kim john and has ordered his military to conduct more such missile drills targeted at the pacific. north korea also today justified their actions saying this was to counter the us and south korean drills being conducted here in south korea. —— north korean leader kimjong in south korea. —— north korean leader kim jong on. in south korea. —— north korean leader kimjong on. we in south korea. —— north korean leader kim jong on. we always see some sort of retaliation from north korea. i don't think anyone would imagine it would be a rocket that flew over japan. theresa may begins a visit to japan today, herfirst as prime minister. a post—brexit bi—lateral trade deal, defence cooperation and the threat posed by north korea will be among the issues mrs may will discuss with the japanese prime during the three day trip. chris mason joins us now. chris, what is the pm hoping to achieve from the visit? north korea is high on the agenda,
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but the trade deal with regard to what will happen post—brexit is essential for the prime minister to say this trip has been a success. absolutely. clearly the context is what has happened in north korea. the prime minister on the plane overnight said she was outraged by the actions of pyongyang. she has arrived in 0sa ka the actions of pyongyang. she has arrived in osaka overnight and is heading to the ancient capital of kyoto. lots of focus on security and also on trade. trade betweenjapan and the uk absolutely essential. japan and japanese companies employing around 160,000 people in the uk. and tokyo has publicly had a case of the wobbles over brexit and they are nervous over what they see as the potential implications of brexit. lots of reassuring noises no doubt from theresa may. she is also keen to try to secure in the long
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term a trade deal between the uk and japan. there is one, or soon will be, between the eu and japan, which the uk has been part of negotiating. it seems the government here is keen to do it seems the government here is keen todoa it seems the government here is keen to do a cut and paste job it seems the government here is keen to do a cut and pastejob in the short term to make sure the uk has deal in the short—term. lots of people to meet over the next three days, a decent length of trip. she will go on a bullet train to go to tokyo later, and she will meet the emperor on friday before flying back to the uk. a night—time curfew has been imposed in houston, texas, in a bid to deter looting in the wake of tropical storm harvey, which is now heading for louisiana. around 20 people are reported to have died and 30,000 have been forced from their homes — with over 3,000 having been rescued from the floodwaters. large swathes of texas remain underwater, with 52 inches, just over 1.3 metres, of rainfall since the hurricane made landfall on friday. keith doyle has more. hurricanes come and go.
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but, five days after it first hit the coast of texas, harvey continues to cause devastation. these are some of the residents of 20 nursing homes. another 20 hospitals have also been evacuated across the region. 3,400 people have been rescued, with the authorities reporting that harvey has claimed lives. it was the scariest thing we've ever seen. i just couldn't — just... there's no words for it. this is just devastating. 51 inches of rain has fallen so far, a record for the usa, and has swamped parts of houston and southern texas. 30,000 people have been forced out of their homes by the floodwater. the red cross has warned people could be in shelters for months. president trump visited corpus christi, 220 miles south—west of houston.
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he was greeted by state and federal teams co—ordinating the relief efforts. we won't say congratulations, we don't want to do that. we don't want to congratulate. we'll congratulate each other when it's all finished. he is determined not to repeat the mistakes of george bush, when hurricane katrina hit. in houston, the mayor has introduced a night—time curfew, amid fears of looting. to the west of this vast city, two huge reservoirs are overflowing. harvey's path is slow—moving and erratic. this force of nature may not be spent yet. keith doyle, bbc news. more on that throughout the programme for you this morning. kezia dugdale has resigned as leader of scottish labour, after less than two years in the post. the lothians msp insists she is leaving the party in a much better state than she found it. she's also rejected the idea her departure has anything to do with her previous criticism ofjeremy corbyn.
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most political leaders quit at a moment of crisis, something terrible's happened. i've decided that i think the labour party is very much on its uppers. it's made tremendous progress from the state that i found it in two, 2.5 years ago, when it was literally on its knees. i've taken the party forward. it's in a much better state than i found it. now it's time to pass that baton onto the next person. we've had five national elections in 2.5 years. now it's time to move on and let the next person have four years to build to the next one. ajudge has ruled that a girl with a christian background, who was reported to have been placed with muslim foster parents who spoke little english, should live with a member of herfamily. the london borough of tower hamlets, insists the five—year—old was placed with an english speaking family of mixed race and that there were inaccuracies in the way the case was reported. south west trains passengers heading into the country but my busiest
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train station at london waterloo have been told to expect more signalling problems. the station was due to open yesterday after a month of engineering works. disruption is expected to last until around 11am this morning and the advice is to check for service updates before you travel. one in five people struggling with debt have had their credit card limit raised, without requesting it. that's according to research from the charity, citizens' advice, which has called for the practice of extending credit without consent to be stopped. uk finance, which represents some of the country's biggest lenders, says it is working with regulators to help people manage their debt. new research suggests the distinctive rings of saturn may be considerably younger than previously thought. data gathered by the probe, cassini — which is orbiting the planet — suggests they may be only 100 million years old. it indicates they could be the crushed remains of a moon or comet. sadly, cassini is transmitting its final burst of data, before it plunges into saturn's atmosphere and burns up. a dramatic way to bow out. thanks
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for being with us on breakfast this morning. in the wake of tropical storm harvey, president trump is facing arguably his biggest challenge since taking office injanuary. yesterday he flew to texas to assess the damage and relief effort for himself. during the visit mr trump said "texas can handle anything" — but how has he handled the federal response? one that he says should stand as an example of how to react to a natural disaster in the future. we're joined now by scott lucas — a professor of american studies at the university of birmingham, and in washington we have anneke green — a republican commentator and former advisor to george w bush. good morning to both of you. going to washington first, how do you assess the last 24 hours for president trump? has he done the
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right thing and said the right things? he has. he's actually done a good job even before the last 24 hours, starting on friday when he released the disaster assistance funds, which every president needs to do so that federal funds are available to those impacted by disasters. he has made very clear that the storm is a top priority. he was tweeting about it yesterday and talking about a meeting with cabinet officials. 0n the trip he took to texas, when he was sure to avoid areas that would pull away resources , areas that would pull away resources, he took several cabinet officials with him that would be releva nt. officials with him that would be relevant. scott lucas, has he done a good job? let's be clear, we have seen great acts of compassion, sacrifice and heroism in texas. and then we have seen donald trump. he we nt then we have seen donald trump. he went there for a photo opportunity. he didn't say a single word about the victims in his appearances
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yesterday. not a word to the families or those who had lost everything. instead he had staged rally where he waved a texas and said, what a crowd and what a support! i understand politicians have to create an image, but the way the created the image. if he hadn't gone, you would criticise in the same way? i do think he should have gone, especially after what happened with katrina in 2005. i think it was the tone that was struck. his initial tweets coming he said it's a big hurricane, it's big and huge, but he was also tweeting about mexico should pay us for the wall and what a great victory he had in missouri last year. it all comes back to trump rather than those suffering. a president leads not by saying, it's me, but about saying, it's all of us. lets put those criticisms across to washington. what about those criticisms he hasn't engaged? i don't agree
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comparatively with how other presidents have engaged to disasters, he has done a lot more. everybody is vulnerable to the charge that is for a photo 0p. everybody is vulnerable to the charge that is for a photo op. the challenge is how to translate compassion to action without getting in the way. i asked a senior administration official yesterday on administration official yesterday on a very close group call about that question, were they worried about avoiding the mistakes that were made with hurricane katrina by the bush administration during which president bush, in his attempts bush was depicted as being out of touch. they said they were not worried about optics, they were worried about optics, they were worried about the people who needed help. we are looking at some of the pictures right now as we talk to you. this human scale of this is quite something. how able is texas to cope with it? it's not something... in
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some ways it's so severe it is not something they can prepare for. i know the mayor of houston was relu cta nt know the mayor of houston was reluctant to issue an evacuation order. in previous hurricanes like rita, when people evacuated there was a higher death toll in that process. there were supplies from the red cross and other charitable organisations, as well as provisions from the central government set up. we saw in some of the conversations between trump and the head of the emergency management agency that they are very conscious of not repeating something like the superdome, with how to get at her 0n the issue of how texas is reaction, there are lots of comments about how this is a very texan response. they are dealing with a terrible situation as best they can. i think it's a very human response. it shown the best that can still
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come out of america. a lot was learned from katrina. for example by an tasking anybody if they are an immigrant. which in the wake of the current policy is significant. they aren't tasking anyone regarding colour. it simply, let's not get into the division of new orleans. at local state and federal level it's important. 0ne local state and federal level it's important. one thing i'll say, trump isa important. one thing i'll say, trump is a figurehead president, it's the agency is doing the hard work. whether it can benefit his reputation, that remains to be seen. thank you very much for your time. carroll has been giving us an update on the weather in the uk but also concentrating on what will happen over the next few hours and days with tropical storm harvey. good morning. now harvey has produced a record—breaking amounts of rainfall near houston. you can see the rain illustrated by the bright echoes. 51.88 inches of rainfall, roughly
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1.3 metres. part of the problem is that we have got half of the storm inland, half offshore. so it's still picking up its energy from the gulf of mexico and its moisture. it's been fairly stationary so it's been depositing all of that in texas, particularly in houston. although it is moving away, there will be further issues with flooding around this particular area. talking of it moving, it's drifting north—eastwards. it'll make landfall through the course of today. pushing up through the course of today. pushing up through louisiana, mississippi and alabama. the critical thing is it is moving but it's still going to produce torrential rain and the risk of flash flooding. back at home weather is completely different. in the north and west we are looking at a breezy day with sunshine and showers. in the south and east will have rain at times, feeling much cooler than yesterday. yesterday in
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parts of kent we hit 29.3. today will be lucky to see 15! it's these weather fronts producing the will be lucky to see 15! it's these weatherfronts producing the rain. in the north of the isobars are well spaced so it's breezy with sunshine and showers, particularly showery in scotla nd and showers, particularly showery in scotland and northern ireland, also northern england and wales. as the rain pushes to the south—east it will start to brighten up nicely behind it. at 4pm we'll see some sunshine in the west midlands but as we move towards the south—eastern quarter of the country, we're looking at a lot of rain. 13 degrees for some of us, a huge drop. across northern england and scotland we are back into the mixture of sunshine and showers. in between feeling quite pleasant, breezy across scotla nd quite pleasant, breezy across scotland too. for northern ireland quite a few showers. in between bright with sunny skies. few wish i was in wales and more sunshine this afternoon. it's the same for south west england. fewer showers and more
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sunshine. feeling pleasant enough, not as warm as it has done. through the course of the evening we lose that rain as it pushes off. behind the skies it is clear with some showers coming in from the west, and some mist and fog patches coming. temperatures 9—12 in towns and cities. in the countryside they will be lower than that. a cooler start to the day tomorrow but a lot of dry weather with some sunshine. showers are already in the west, if anything developing further elsewhere as we go through the day. tomorrow you could catch a shower or almost anywhere. there's a risk it could be thundery. temperatures in the south—east around 19—20. generally 14-18, south—east around 19—20. generally 14—18, roughly where they should be. 0n 14—18, roughly where they should be. on friday another chilly start to the day, dry weather with fewer showers and a temperature range from 14 in the north to 21 in the south.
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thank you. let's have a currency chat. good morning. not great news if you're changing money to euros at the moment. we're very nearly at a one pound for one euro level. it's because yesterday investors who buy and sell currency got spooked by what's happening in north korea and the us with hurricane harvey, and what that might mean for the global economy. and when they're worried about that, they will buy more euros and fewer dollars and pounds. this meant the pound fell to an 11—month low against the euro. of course, we see markets move up and down all the time so that might change in the future. the weakness of the pound is putting pressure on the supermarkets. the latest research
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from the british retail consortium shows that food prices rose by 1.3% over the past year. more than three quarters of the food we import comes from european union countries. another story before i go. we talk a lot about the skills gap. soft skills such as teamwork, communication and confidence are considered by young people, teachers and workers to be as important to achieving success in life as good grades. that's according to research from the prince's trust. they found 91% of teachers think schools should be doing more to help students develop soft skills, and nearly half of young people don't feel prepared to enter the workforce without them. lots of businesses always talk to me about that. thank you. i'm very excited about
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our next story largely because of thejumper we our next story largely because of the jumper we are about to bring you an bbc breakfast! millions of years ago, while dinosaurs dominated the land, giant reptiles called plesiosaurs prowled the seas. they may be gone, but their certainly not forgotten. scientists are now studying their unique four—flippered swimming technique in the hope that it could lead to the development of more efficient submarines. palaeontologist professor bill sellers, from the university of manchester, joins us now. we area we are a bit disappointed because normally you have a jumper that matches our story but not quite today! near enough! tell us a bit about this fabulous dinosaur the plesiosaur. this is the age of reptiles. we have dinosaurs on the land, plesiosaurs in the sea along with it the sores and pterosaur is flying in the air. these aren't quite dinosaurs but they are all living at the same time. these are big meat eating animals. they have
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four paddles and there has been a huge argument about how they swam for years. what is now thought about how they used those. the more interesting side is how that can be applied to modern engineering. the argument is that they moved the four flippers together or weather there was some sort of weird movement weather front ones go up and the back ones going down and how they might interfere with each other. no one really knows, we can'tjust go and watch a plesiosaur swimming. so they've made a model of this animal and put it in a flume and you can actually see the mechanics of the movement of the flippers. it's understanding the mechanics which is how you can lead into building a robot which can do this sort of things. this is a graphic of it in the flume. how exciting is it and
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what has it told you about how they swim. unlike everything we have today, things like sea turtles that have from linz and pull themselves through the water, the back limbs are actually really important. it's the coordination of the front and back limbs that makes this animal swim efficiently. we can see what they might have been doing here on they might have been doing here on the picture. how could that help us? if you wanted to build a submarine that had some of the properties of one of these animals, and there are some advantages. we already know that things like dolphins swim unbelievably efficiently and they go slightly faster and quieter than you would predict. particularly if you we re would predict. particularly if you were trying to build something like a stealth underwater vehicle that wouldn't disturb anything. maybe flapping movement of artificial flippers is exactly what you want to do. at the moment we don't know how to build things like that.
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understanding how these animals actually did this will give us a huge leg up when we come to build things like this ourselves. can i have more detail on the jumper? things like this ourselves. can i have more detail on thejumper? last time which dinosaur did you have on thejumper? time which dinosaur did you have on the jumper? i had time which dinosaur did you have on thejumper? i had bt wrecks time which dinosaur did you have on the jumper? i had bt wrecks on the back. your mum has knitted these. i have about 40 actually! she's been making them for years. this is an orca. actually very like a modern plesiosaur, similar body size and predatory habits. in the dinosaur world they were pretty successful, where they? yes, they were around 1oo where they? yes, they were around 100 million years. they'll both extinct at the same time. we lose the dinosaurs and the pterosaurs at the dinosaurs and the pterosaurs at the end of the crustaceans period. not something you'd want to swim
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with? maybe i would. it's interesting how this dinosaur engineering story comes together. borrowing from animals and creating mechanisms like that is really fashionable at the moment. particularly things like reducing emissions and improving energy efficiency, that's where animals are really good. you don't drink islands of petrol to walk to work because we are much more efficient than that —— gallons of petrol. please come back and bring another jumper! gallons of petrol. please come back and bring anotherjumper! thank you to pam for knitting them! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. it's going to feel significantly colder today across the south—east of england with temperatures taking in13 of england with temperatures taking in 13 celsius degree plummet. for north and western parts who will continue with sunshine and showers.
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it's in the south and east where there will be rain today and it will feel much cooler. you can see where we have the rainfall this morning our past parts of the midlands, south east england, and further north and west there is a mixture of sunshine and showers. going into this afternoon, it will stay pretty wet across the south—east. but for scotland, a fair few showers dotted around and some of them could be heavy. maximum temperatures of 16 or 17. similar story in northern england and northern ireland. west wales having the best of the sunshine, still cloudy in south—east wales. perhaps the west midlands as well and the south—west of england with an increasing amount of brightness. still the odd shower but still wet in the south—east. temperatures of 13—15 if you are stuck beneath the cloud and rain, and it will feel much cooler. the rain continuing to move away towards the east over the evening. clear
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skies tonight and it will turn quite chilly, temperatures in the towns and cities, but is down to mid single figures in the countryside. starting off with heavy showers tomorrow morning. in the afternoon those showers will spread across many parts and all of us at some point we'll see some showers. there will be sunshine in between and temperatures typically in the range of 17 in the north to 20 in the south. friday is looking much drier, showers disappearing. light wind and sunshine and perhaps the odd shower into the south—east but highs of around 16—21. i will see you later, goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. doing a deal injapan. the uk prime minister travels to tokyo to talk trade, but will the talks be overshadowed by north korea? live from london, that's our top story on wednesday 30th august. theresa may meets shinzo abe
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to discuss life after brexit. but the uk can't strike any sort of free—trade deal until it actually quits the eu — so what progress will they make? we'll have an expert view. also in the programme, in touching distance of parity. a strong euro and weak pound push the two closer.
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