Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 31, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

6:00 am
hello. this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. theresa may insists she's not a quitter and vows to fight the next general election. the prime minister dismissed reports that she will stand down in two years' time. good morning. it's thursday the 31st of august. also this morning. it's 20 years since the death of princess diana. flowers are again being laid outside kensington palace. parents in england have until midnight to register for 30 hours of free childcare for three and four year olds, but some nurseries warn that they'll struggle to cope. good morning. luxury car maker, aston martin, hasjust announced a £500 million package of trade and investment with japan. it's one of the most eye catching deals to come out of a three—day trip to the country by the prime minister.
6:01 am
i'll have the all the details. in sport, it's transfer deadline day. and an early deal should see confirmation of alex 0xlade—chamberlain‘s move from arsenal to liverpool. and carol has the weather. good morning. it is a bright start for many. chilly as well. show is in the west. through the day, they will develop widely. —— showers. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may says she wants to lead the conservatives into the next general election saying she's in it "for the long—term." the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has given his support, but backbench conservative mps have told the bbc they're sceptical she'll be able to serve the full term. the prime minister is currently on a three—day trip to japan. there has been an awful lot of speculation about my future which has no basis whatsoever in it. i am in this for the long—term. there is a realjob to be done in the united
6:02 am
kingdom. it is about getting brexit done right and getting a proper partnership with the eu for the future. it is also about getting global britain and trading around the world and dealing with injustice within the uk but also going out and around the world, making sure we can do those trade deals which ring prosperity to our economy and bring jobs to the united kingdom. —— bring. ben wright is injapan. hejoins us live on he joins us live on breakfast. we have heard so much speculation over the summer. is theresa may ending it or is this starting it again? good morning. she is here on the second day of her three—day visit to japan, a visit ostensibly about trade. she is talking about the possibilities for britain after brexit. she has decided to use this moment after her
6:03 am
summer decided to use this moment after her summer holidays three months on from the botched general election to settle for good, for now, at least, this issue around her leadership. it isa this issue around her leadership. it is a change of tone from the prime minister. you'll remember after the election she talks to tory mps saying she will continue as long as they want her. now she says she is in itfor they want her. now she says she is in it for the long—term and will fight for the tories in the next election. when asked the question she could not say anything but that. to say she would only be doing it for the short—term would immediately make her a lame—duck prime minister. there is no great leadership challenge brewing at the moment. i think many tory mps will welcome this. they will be happy she will be there leading them through brexit. by there leading them through brexit. by there are those, including nicky morgan, who say they are doubtful in reality she will still be there in
6:04 am
2022. but a punchy and significant change of tone from the prime minister. thank you, joining us from tokyo. the brother of the manchester arena bomber will go on trial in libya in the next two months, in connection with the attack which left 22 people dead. hashem abedi was arrested in libya shortly after the bombing in may, carried out by his brother, salman. the prosecutor in the case said their father has been released. the first treatment to redesign a patient‘s own immune system so that it attacks cancer has been approved in the united states. the drug is made by extracting white blood cells from the patient, which are then genetically reprogrammed to seek out and kill the disease. the us food and drug administration said the decision was an historic moment and medicine is now "entering a new frontier." 20 years ago today, diana, princess of wales, died in a car crash in paris after being pursued by photographers. princes william and harry will mark the anniversary privately but members of the public are expected to gather outside kensington palace.
6:05 am
0ur correspondent, mark lobel, is there for us this morning. mark, people have already started laying flowers there haven't they? good morning. already tributes are being paid 20 years on. that is correct. as the sad news of her death reverberated around the country 20 years ago, kensington palace became a focal point at that time. 20 years on, it has happened again. people are writing this morning to pay respects. a cake has been brought. a portrait has been made. we had a look at some of the things put up on the board, including this photomontage brought in by maria from newcastle. why did you bring it? iwanted in by maria from newcastle. why did you bring it? i wanted to make a special montage for the 20th
6:06 am
anniversary. ijust make quite a few. this one made william and harry chuckle because of the picture of william in shades. have you ever met princess diana 7 william in shades. have you ever met princess diana? i never did. but i followed her from when she first came on the scene until she died. why did you think it was necessary to put these voters together? she was a truly remarkable lady and she will never be forgotten. —— photos. william and harry met with the famous charities she used to meet with, aids charities, for example. they also opened the white garden. they also opened the white garden. they will spend the rest of the day privately remembering their mother,
6:07 am
they said. thank you so much. and after 7am, we'll be speaking to former welsh guardsman, phil bartlett, who was a pallbearer at princess diana's funeral. today's the deadline for working parents of three and four year olds in england to apply for 30 hours of free childcare a week. the system will come into effect tomorrow, however, a new survey by the pre—school learning alliance suggests most nurseries think there's a funding shortfall. the government says pilot schemes have shown that nurseries are willing and able to provide extra hours. 0ur midlands correspondent, sima kotecha, reports. a promise from the government. 30 hours of free childcare a week for three—year—olds and four—year—olds. it makes you feel more empowered to actually ago and work full—time because you have got the help from the government for that 30 hours. it would actually be beneficial to parents that are trying to go back to work. we just want the minimal support, just so that we can work, and it is not such a financial strain.
6:08 am
tens of thousands of parents are entitled to this childcare, which is double the number of hours they used to get. but some parents have told us that ever since they have been able to sign up to the scheme, there have been problems. at one point its website wasn't working properly and that stopped parents from receiving a code which is needed to get the childcare. there have also been concerns about our nurseries will pay for the service, with some saying the money that ministers are providing is not enough. here they say that they are struggling to stay afloat. we can't afford to offer any totally free 30 hours childcare places. what we can do is offer the subsidised elements and ram that up with charging for meals and the extras that we provide here like french and drama and yoga and all the rest of it. the government says the policy's already having a positive impact in the areas that have trialled it since last year, and that independent analysis shows most providers were both willing and able to offer the extra hours.
6:09 am
but a survey out today suggests 40% of nurseries are worried they'll have to close down, because the cash they're given, they say, isn't enough to keep them in business. bbc news. the governor of texas has warned the amount of federal government aid it will need in the aftermath of hurricane harvey, is likely to be far in excess of the more than $100 billion made available after the storm which devastated new orleans 12 years ago. at least 25 people have been killed in the aftermath of the storm. pipelines and fuel production has closed. and overnight, the owners of a flooded chemical plant say there's no way to stop it exploding. 0ur correspondent, james cook, is following developments from houston. we are now in the skies above houston. lots of these floodwaters have receded very rapidly, especially in the downtown area. but other parts of the city are still
6:10 am
very badly affected. tens of thousands of homes have been damaged, possibly around 50,000 homes, damaged by this flooding. and we have seen these two reservoirs, the water has been spilling over these reservoirs. we watched as thousands of people were evacuated from that place alone. that was a very well co—ordinated rescue operation. are lots of other rescues have been taking place up here in the sky, with helicopters flying dangerous and daring missions to get people to safety. —— and lots. the nhs in england has issued new guidance for the victims of acid attacks after the number of patients needing specialist care doubled in two years. the advice is to report the attack, remove contaminated clothing, and rinse the skin immediately. surgeons say quick treatment is vital in minimising the extent of injuries. a law banning so—called legal highs in the uk is to be reviewed by the crown prosecution service,
6:11 am
after the collapse of the first ever contested cases under the new legislation. two separate trials of people accused of intending to supply nitrous oxide, more commonly known as "laughing gas," at music festivals were stopped after the courts heard the drug is exempt because it is used as a medicinal product. the drug charity, release, claims the new law is "fundamentally flawed." a man in toronto has caused quite a buzz after attempting to break the world record for the longest time an individual has had their head fully covered in bees. what possesses someone to do this?” think his head needs examining. juan carlos 0rtiz sat for 61 minutes in a sealed dome as more than 100,000 bees crawled over his face and neck. he broke the current record of 53 minutes and 3a seconds by almost eight minutes. how many bee stings do you think he
6:12 am
got? he looks all right. but surely he got a few. i would rather him than me. horrible. could you do it? bees are lovely. would you have hundreds of thousands on your head? not at all. and that box would make me claustrophobic. ‘no' is the easy a nswer to me claustrophobic. ‘no' is the easy answer to that. i would rather look over the detailed contract of premier league football. in fact, thatis premier league football. in fact, that is what i am doing. we will talk about alex 0xley chamberlain. it was not the best diet for them. —— start. they had some complaints.
6:13 am
they are ending that if this deal goes through. more than a billion pounds has been spent already and we're expecting millions more to change hands on the last day of football's summer transfer window. 0ne deal that looks set to be completed is alex 0xlade—chamberlain's £40 million move from arsenal to liverpool. maria sharapova is through to the second round of the us open. she came from a set down to win. an angry and frustrated nick kyrgios lost his first round tie to fellow australian, john millman. he blamed an injured shoulder but still had the energy to smash his racket. chris froome has taken a big step towards winning the vuelta a espana title as he opened up a big lead on the field after coming second in stage ii.
6:14 am
froome is aiming to become only the third man to win the tour de france and vuelta in the same year. he now leads by one minute and 19 seconds. injusta injust a few in just a few minutes i will bring you the back pages. they are full of what might happen through the day. what move might start another move? it starts tonight. it is the same issue as changing houses. you move and then you regret it. we will talk to someone later in the programme.” can't even believe he has time to talk to us. he did a deal eight seconds before the deadline. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. what a beautiful picture. isn't it gorgeous? good morning to you too. it is looking slightly better today.
6:15 am
we are also looking at sunshine and showers and you can see that each of cou nty showers and you can see that each of county down is sent in from a weather watcher yesterday. some of them will have some hail embedded as well. look at this clump, there are thunderstorms around liverpool this morning. there is a lot of dry weather of them. it is quite a chilly start to the day, many starting in single figures. through the day, further showers develop. you might catch one almost anywhere. in between, there will be some spells of sunshine. to the afternoon, showers across south—west england, some likely to be heavy, possibly thundery, and the same as we move into the south—east, east anglia, the midlands, some heavy with some hail thrown in as well as thunder. for northern england, ireland and scotland, sunshine and showers and in between some sunshine
6:16 am
with temperatures up to 14— i6. showers and in between some sunshine with temperatures up to 14— 16. you will notice in the south—east of the country that it won't be as cold as it was yesterday. through this evening and overnight very slowly the showers recede. some hang around the showers recede. some hang around the coastline. it will be a chilly night under clear skies. these are the temperatures in towns and cities, 8—12, might lower in the countryside with a touch of frost. and some patchy mist and fog as well. it will lift readily and many will get off to a dry start with one oi’ will get off to a dry start with one or two showers around from south—east scotland down to south—east scotland down to south—east england, and some in the west as well, though they will be fewer and further between. in between a lot of dry weather and sunshine around, temperatures 14 in the north, 2i sunshine around, temperatures 14 in the north, 21 in the south. 0vernight into saturday we will have clear skies under this high pressure, so clear skies under this high pressure, so it will be cold in the countryside, and a touch of frost.
6:17 am
as we head into the weekend we have signs of a change coming into the west. 0n signs of a change coming into the west. on saturday we start off on a cold note with some frost and a lot of dry weather. 0ne cold note with some frost and a lot of dry weather. one or two showers in the south—east, it and they will be the exception rather than the rule. later in the day the cloud will build to the west with the arrival of the next set of systems. they are coming in from the west. it will be wet and windy for northern ireland, western scotland and the south—west, although it will grind toa south—west, although it will grind to a halt with some cloud develop ahead of it. a further east you are the dry and sunny at the weather is likely to be. thank you. -- sunnier. morning. let's have a look at the papers. two main stories, the first is, "i am no quitter" as theresa may pledges to lead the conservative party beyond brexit. this promise
6:18 am
the guardian says risks igniting anger among tory mps after suggestions she would go in 2019. drinking green tea on a japanese visit. very healthy. the times leading with theresa may, and the main picture of the two princes and the duchess yesterday outside kensington palace as they went to see the flowers left in memory of princess diana on the 20th anniversary of the death of her life and we heard from our reported earlier. the daily mail have a say in picture of the same event. and the next to it a picture of them in an identical picture two decades ago just after their mother died. that double picture on some of the front pages, on the sun as well, quoting the daily telegraph, saying that all of us lost someone that date, the sun speaking of the grief shared with the nation. 0ne sun speaking of the grief shared with the nation. one other thing we are talking about is this transfer window. and i mentioned it is like
6:19 am
an merry—go—round, one person gets on and another gets off. let's have a look at the mirror, going, going, gone, diego costa is going to be allowed to train at atletico madrid before moving back injanuary. this isa before moving back injanuary. this is a big story for arsenal, they say they are ready to sell alex sanchez to manchester city if they can get another player in, draxler from psg, and alex 0xlade—chamberlain gone more or less to liverpool, leaving chelsea furious, apparently, because they were expecting him to go there. and the mirror of the best double page spread. john, if i can ask for some help. the window, jurgen klopp reckons he smashed it. arsene wenger, potentially broke it. lots of talk in the papers today about arsenal and crisis at the club and the dealing. and why players are
6:20 am
moving at this point and what is their motivation. obviously, cash helps. first—team football is increasingly important and here in the guardian is gareth southgate talking about how he will only pick first team players for england. hmm. alex oxlade—chamberlain thinks he will get more games there. philip keating you or the entire shopping chain? —— coutinho. the co—op are after £140 million. co—op have now got exclusive talks with them now. it sounds very tranferry, doesn't it? it does. there are lots of these stores dominating the landscape. it is putting my story into perspective
6:21 am
now, talking about a £500 million aston martin deal, to .5 neymars. isn't it mad? two raccoons on the loose! they have escaped from a wildlife park. they have a nasty bite. the raccy horror show, says the sun. lonely chum left behind. they look cute! i know people who have woken up some mornings with bite and you don't want to go down that road. it is better than a skunk. i always say. much better. thank you for now. throughout the programme this morning we will have the latest on the political story from downing street as theresa may continues a trip from japan, getting more analysis and reaction from her
6:22 am
pledge to stay on until the next general election. but of of course we are marking 20 years on from princess diana's death. prince william and prince harry say they want their mother to be remembered for the positive impact she had around the world and the way she touched so many lives. 20 years on from the her death, we've been speaking to people who have special memories of meeting diana, princess of wales. # goodbye, england's rose...#l the young lady that i met that was a cracking young lady, and full of life, full of confidence. she was a breath of fresh airfor the monarchy — a stuffy monarchy that needed a bit of fresh air. my name isjohn walsh, and i met princess diana in 1991. she was patron of the turning point charity dinner. i picked up the menu for the evening, and i wrote on it, "next to my mrs, you're
6:23 am
the best—looking woman in the room, i would like to take a photograph." as i arrived there, she rather cheekily said, "who's this bird that's better looking than me? " she hadn't seen me, then. but then she said, "how would you like me?" "if you don't mind, i would like would like a photo of you frowning." and she said, "frowning?" and i said, "well, everybody has a photograph of you smiling," and at that point, she grinned, and that is one that i shot. it is a beautiful picture. i'm proud of it. i remember the moment. i will always remember the moment. my name is ken wharfe. i was the bodyguard to the late diana, princess of wales, from 1987 til i left her in '93.
6:24 am
people talk about, you know, did diana change things? yes, she certainly she did. i think the sort of beginning of that, there was her leap into trying to find a cure for aids at that point. i remember diana meeting the queen, here, in the mid—805, and the queen saying, "what are you going to do now?" and she said, "i want to get involved in the aids project — i think that's something worth getting involved with." and here we are, in the 215t century, and her son, harry, openly involved in the aids issue, with all the support of the palace. so that's the difference. my name is martin neary, and i directed the music at princess diana's funeral. candle in the wind, in its original version, would never be acceptable. and so in conversations with elton, i said to him, "this could work,
quote
6:25 am
can you write something else?" and within five hours, he had come back with goodbye england's rose. # your candle has burned out long before your legend ever will. she had a touch with people whichjust crossed all kinds of barriers. and that is very telling, and it was worldwide. and we are talking to a pallbearer at the funeral of princess diana 20 years ago that in the programme. hard to believe, isn't it, 20 years have passed. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. see you in a sec. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alice salfield. witnesses to acid attacks
6:26 am
are being told how they can help victims following a sharp rise in the number of incidents, particularly in east london. new guidance from the nhs urges people to immediately report the attack, carefully remove contaminated clothing and rinse skin in running water. a burns unit in chelmsford serving patients from london and the south—east has treated over 30 people for this type of injury so far. a man in his 70s was airlifted to hospital after he was shot in the neck with an air rifle in essex. a group of 12 and 13 year olds were seen running away from the scene, carrying what police believe could have been green air rifle bags. it happened in tilbury early on sunday evening. the man's injuries were not life—threatening. patients with coeliac disease could be forced to pay for gluten—free food as hertfordshire nhs is consulting on whether to stop issuing it on prescription. the clinical commissioning group is hoping to plug a 550 million pound shortfall in their budget over the next four years. but a leading coeliac charity says
6:27 am
it's expensive and that many sufferers can't afford it. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes there are severe delays on the district line between earls court and wimbledon because of a signal failure. and minor delays on the jubilee line. more problems on the trains this morning — southeastern services via lewisham are running with delays following a signal problem there. and on the roads you can see the usual traffic buidling this morning on the a13 westbound from dagenham into barking. and finally — marylebone road is down to one lane westbound just after great portland street station for emergency gas works. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday was wet and chilly but today happily
6:28 am
things are looking up. a much nicer day of weather. yes it is a bit of a cool start but there will be lots of sunshine around to the morning and then we will see more cloud develop, sunny spells and some heavy showers later on this afternoon. a few alli mist patches around. they were last for too long. we did see a single figures last night. so it is a bit ofa figures last night. so it is a bit of a cool start. lots of sunshine around the more cloud will develop through the morning and we will see some showers breaking out. some of the showers could be heavy with the rumble of thunder. they will be widespread. there will be sunny spells around, top temperatures 20 degrees. the showers will rumble on for a time this evening and then they will fade away. another quite chilly night to come. temperatures will drop back to single figures away from the towns, so some early mist patches into tomorrow morning. and then tomorrow morning a nicer day with more sunshine. again, more showers mostly concentrated to eastern areas with top temperatures of around 21 degrees. and it is looking mostly dry at the weekend
6:29 am
with the best of the sunshine on saturday. again highs of 21 or 22 degrees. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to naga and jon. hello. this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. we'll bring you the news and sport headlines in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: with more than 40 million people affected by devastating floods in south asia. we'll get the latest on the relief effort from the red cross. we'll ask whether the law brought in last year to ban so—called legal highs is actually working? everyone in this room have their
6:30 am
eyes glued to mine for the entire session. and after 8:30, we'll meet two of the people tasked with educating greater manchester, and turning around a school once deemed to be the worst in the country. i would feel nervous in that situation. all that still to come. but now, a summary of this morning's main news. theresa may says she wants to lead the conservatives into the next general election saying she's in it "for the long—term." the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has given his support, but backbench conservative mps have told the bbc they're sceptical she'll be able to serve the full term. the prime minister is currently on a three—day trip to japan. there's been an awful lot of speculation about my future which has no basis in whatsoever. i'm in this for the long—term. there's a realjob to be done in the united kingdom. it's about getting brexit done right, it's about getting that deep and special relationship with the eu for the future. it's also about getting global britain and trading around the world and dealing with injustice
6:31 am
within the uk but also going out and around the world, ensuring we can do those trade deals which bring prosperity to our economy and bring jobs to the united kingdom. the brother of the manchester arena bomber will go on trial in libya in the next two months in connection with the attack which left 22 people dead. hashem abedi was arrested in libya shortly after the bombing in may, carried out by his brother, salman. the prosecutor in the case said their father has been released. from tomorrow, working parents of three and four years olds in england will be able to get 30 hours of free childcare. the deadline to apply is today, but the run up to the new system hasn't been without problems. a survey from the pre—school learning alliance suggests almost three quarters of childcare providers feel the government has underfunded the scheme. the government says pilots have shown funding was no barrier to nurseries delivering the extra hours. 20 years ago today, diana, princess of wales died in a car
6:32 am
crash in paris after being pursued by photographers. a range of public events have been organised to remember her death and flowers, cards and other tributes are again being laid outside kensington palace. her sons, princes william and harry, will mark the anniversary privately. the first treatment to redesign a patient‘s own immune system so that it attacks cancer has been approved in the united states. the drug is made by extracting white blood cells from the patient, which are then genetically reprogrammed to seek out and kill the disease. the us food and drug administration said the decision was an historic moment and medicine is now "entering a new frontier." the governor of texas has warned the amount of federal government aid it will need in the aftermath of hurricane harvey, is likely to be far in excess of the $100 billion made available after the storm that devastated new orleans 12 years ago. at least 25 people have been killed in the aftermath of harvey. pipelines and fuel production have been shut down and overnight, the owners of a flooded chemical plant warned that it would explode in the coming days.
6:33 am
a law banning so—called legal highs in the uk are to be reviewed by the crown prosecution service after the colla pse crown prosecution service after the collapse of the first ever tested case under the new legislation. two trials of those looking to supply laughing gas the music festivals we re laughing gas the music festivals were stopped when it was found to be exempt due to being used as a medicinal product. they claim that the new law is flawed. new york's gugenheim museum has been the venue for some provocative works of art over the years, but there has probably never been an exhibit quite like this. it's called "america" and is a fully functioning toilet made of 18 carat gold. the golden throne, designed by an italian artist, has replaced a traditional porcelain version in one of the museum's restrooms.
6:34 am
so you can use that? more than 100,000 visitors have queued up to spend a penny or should that be a cent with the million dollar work of art. incredible. lino on the floor. that is ridiculous. that is quite cool. cool? it would suit my house... wearing my slippers. i can see it. i can see it. you would get one.” have one already, i have four.” wonder how many alex 0xlade—chamberlains could you get?
6:35 am
40 golden toilets! you are reading those contracts too tightly. i have my phone on me to see if someone can give me any latebreaking deals. i think they are all asleep, to be honest. we're into the final day of a record breaking football transfer window. premier league clubs have spent comfortably more than a billion pounds so far and we expect millions more to be splurged today. liverpool look set to pay £40 million for arsenal's alex 0xlade—chamberlain. he won the fa cup last season with the gunners and turned down a move to chelsea. but arsenal are still hoping to keep alexis sanchez. they've rejected a £50 million bid from manchester city. he scored 24 league goals last season but only has a year left on his contract. the england and everton midfielder ross barkley is another who could be on the move.
6:36 am
but the toffees have turned down an offer of £25 million from chelsea. he's missed all three league matches this season through injury, and some feel all transfers should be completed before the football starts. the recommendation is to close the window before the season starts so eve ryo ne window before the season starts so everyone knows where the players have gone so we can see what the first results will look like. and also they can make other clubs poorer. i think ithink sir i think sir alex ferguson could be right. why would you start making deals now when a player has already done three orfour deals now when a player has already done three or four games already this season. it's odd timing. and you can follow all the deals on the bbc sport website, which will have a live page with updates until the window closes at 11pm tonight.
6:37 am
five live have a special programme from seven this evening and there's a special football focus at quarter to 11 on bbc one. kyle edmund is the last british hope at the us open. he beat american stevejohnson in straight sets to get into the third round. aljaz bedene and cameron norrie both went out though. rain meant they were still completing the first round in new york yesterday. nick kyrios was a casualty. he injured his shoulder losing to fellow australian john millman. it didn't seem to hamper him though when he smashed his racket beyond repair after losing the third set. kyrios is one of a number of players to have suffered injury trouble recently, with five top players having withdrawn from this year's us 0pen. caroline wozniacki is out but another former world number one maria sharapova is through to the third round. the russian, playing herfirst grand slam since a 15—month doping ban, came from a set down to beat timea babos. i know i can do this. i have done it before. i want to have that feeling again. there is also the realistic
6:38 am
understanding that, 0k, again. there is also the realistic understanding that, ok, i have been in this situation for a while, it will take some time. of course, managing expectations is part of it and learning during the match is something that i haven't done. it may be possible to do a pitchside saliva test for concussion in the next few years if a new study is successful. this could seriously change sport. scientists at the university of birmingham want to make a hand—held test which could provide instant results so they're taking saliva samples from players in the top two tiers of english rugby union this season. it's the biggest study of its kind and could revolutionise the way head injuries are treated. what we want is to have a portable pitch side test which can be used by doctors, if you want, in a professional game, or potentially the parent, if they work as well as we hope, to see whether their son or daughter has had a concussion, or a school nurse potentially to assess
6:39 am
whether someone has had a concussion or not. chris froome has taken a big step towards winning the vuelta a espana title as he opened up a big lead on the field after yesterday's stage. froome is aiming to become the first rider to win the tour de france and vuelta in the same year since frenchman bernard ee—no in 1978. i was trying to think of something clever to say, like "taking a big step," "freewheeling towards..." clever to say, like "taking a big step," "freewheeling towards. you have some time, come up with it for next time. devastating floods and landslides are thought to have killed more than a thousand people in parts of india, nepal, and bangladesh. over the last month,, heavy monsoon rains have also forced hundreds of thousands of people from their homes. the red cross has described the situation as one of the worst regional humanitarian crisis in years. we can speak now to hanna butler who's from the organisation. she's at a camp for displaced people in northern india. thank you forjoining us. maybe you
6:40 am
could tell us what you have seen while you have been there. what has your experience been? right now i am ina your experience been? right now i am in a north—eastern state of india. before this i was in the worst affected state by the floods and also one of the poorest in india. the flooding hit a month ago here. i tell you what, there is still a lot of water and damage and people out of water and damage and people out of their homes. umm, people that are surviving are getting on with things as much as they can, but there has been a lot of damage. the numbers are huge across the region. 41 million people are affected in india alone. the damage is such that while people are looking after each other and surviving initially, coping
6:41 am
mechanisms will be stretched. they will soon start needing help with shelter and water and with helping them get back onto their feet. because these floods have washed away... i have seen homes totally washed away, and everything is gone. a couple of days ago, it looked like i was a couple of days ago, it looked like iwas ina a couple of days ago, it looked like i was in a lake, a river. soon someone i was in a lake, a river. soon someone would tell me know, this is where my house was. we have pictures now of people and possessions being carried down the street by water. we have seen many pictures out of the united states of tropical storm harvey. but responding to a disaster where you are is much more difficult. is it possible to compare the way that they have been able to deal with things in northern india? what is going on in the united states is terrible as well, like
6:42 am
what is going on here. here in india, bangladesh, nepal, the numbers are as significant, and the infrastructure is such that it is ha rd to infrastructure is such that it is hard to respond. a community i met a couple of days ago, they were flooded two weeks ago and they only got a ccess flooded two weeks ago and they only got access by road to war three days ago. in that time, they were provided with aid by the indian government. but it is a different landscape, the rain, way of working. but like in the united states, it is taking a toll. we can cast a rise over this side of the world to see what is going on. do you feel like you are winning at getting to grips with it? there is a long way to go. india is huge and needs will grow. the disaster is not over when the
6:43 am
floodwaters recede. at this stage, rescues floodwaters recede. at this stage, rescu es a re floodwaters recede. at this stage, rescues are still being carried out. we are getting a clear idea of the extent of the damage. thank you for joining us from the british red cross this morning. devastating pictures. umm. .. it is cross this morning. devastating pictures. umm... it is time to cross this morning. devastating pictures. umm. .. it is time to talk to carol. good morning. good morning. a mixture of sunshine and showers today. some of the showers will be heavy. some already are. thunder and lightning and hail. the satellite, yesterday's rain clearing away. look at this clump. it is going across the north—west of england and wales. this is quite a potent area of showers with torrential downpours and thunder and lightning coming out of this as well. if you are travelling, bear that in mind. western areas with showers to start. the rest of us, dry. showers developing through the
6:44 am
day. some of those will be heavy as well with some thunder and hail. in between the showers, sunshine. temperatures responding nicely. yesterday, part of surrey, sussex, kent, they did not get higher than 13. today, 21. east anglia, the midlands, wales, northern ireland, scotland, the forecast is the same. a mixture of bright spells, sunshine, showers. some of them heavy and thundery with hail. good sunshine in between. through the evening and overnight, what we find is that slowly we lose the showers. we hang onto clumps on the coastline. mist and fog forming. a cold night to be the temperatures are what you can expect for towns and cities. the countryside, much lower. in some cases, grass frost first thing in the morning. a chilly start to the day. under the skies, beautiful as well. lots of sunshine. still showers. extending from
6:45 am
south—east scotland to south—west england. not all of us will see them. a peppering in the midwest to be for most of the uk, dry with sunny spells. temperature—wise, pretty good. 14 in the north. 21 to go towards the south. under the ridge of high pressure, friday to saturday, again, clear skies. another cool night. frost around. again, not everywhere. sunday, a new set of systems coming in from the atlantic. that will change the weather in the west. saturday, a chilly start. local grass frost. dry weather. sunshine. 0ne chilly start. local grass frost. dry weather. sunshine. one or chilly start. local grass frost. dry weather. sunshine. 0ne ortwo showers in the south—east. this will be the exception. the cloud is starting to build up later in the day from the west across northern ireland, heralding the arrival of this new set of fronts. sunday. that set of fronts will approach in the west, introducing more cloud, also
6:46 am
some rain, and windier conditions. it is slowly going to drift east. the eastern extent open to question. then grinds to a halt. sunny skies the further east you travel. back to you. thanks very much. it doesn't look too bad at all. especially when you see pictures from india. 0h, absolutely. we are talking about the prime minister going to japan. they have done a lot of business, and we have done a lot of business, and we have heard about a deal between japan and aston martin. lots of ground were put into place before brexit and japan is quite important. —— ground work. japan is the world's third biggest economy, and they bought over £10 billion pounds worth of british goods and services in 2015. but they're also one of the top countries putting money into the uk with big names like nissan,
6:47 am
toyota and hitachi employing thousands here. and one of the most eye catching deals to come out of the three day trip comes from aston martin the british carmaker, has announced a package of trade and investment deals worth around £500 million. it'll help secure jobs in their plants wales and the west midlands. mark wilson is cfo of aston martin. hejoins us from our birmingham studio. good morning. £500 million, it is a big figure, with trade deals we hear about that all of the time. what does it mean for you and japan?‘ lot of it is to do with the cars we will export to japan over the next five years as part of our plan to redevelop the product range at aston martin. we see japan as a big opportunity for us in terms of the products we sell and export terms, so products we sell and export terms, so the vast bulk of that is car exports. we are also investing in the japanese suppliers and in a
6:48 am
larger presence in japan. the japanese suppliers and in a larger presence injapan. we have talked about being a luxury accelerator business which is all to do in simple terms with understanding more about what the consumer wants. when you say it is all about exports, how can you guarantee japanese customers will buy your cars, because that seems to be what you're saying? japanese customers have bought our cars for a long time and they will be in the top five of the biggest market in the world as we move forward. there is nothing really changing but what we are doing is investing injapan because we see it as a huge growth market for and technology markets. he mentioned big market around the world. of course, brexit, the trade deal to be sorted out for the rest of the uk. when the vote to leave happened you said you were not happy with the lack of plan from the leave campaign. we are a year on. are you happy with the plan? yes, we have
6:49 am
seen happy with the plan? yes, we have seen substantial progress and we welcome the steps the government has taken in recent months to provide clarity. particularly around the white paper on the customs union and the transitional arrangements. we are pleased with what we see. we would still like to see more clarity more quickly. i don't think you can have too much clarity. we are very focused on this trade and making it easy to do business around the world. with the pound as weak as it is from a holiday perspective, for businesses like yours hasn't it been a good thing that the pound has fallen 20%? that has helped. we import goods and services as well. as the pound falls we pay more for those goods and services. yes, it has helped since the vote. finally on electric cars, we have talked about the future of cars in the uk, you have a shiny car that is for
6:50 am
petrol heads and diesel heads, that is how i would look at it. do you have to adapt to who your customer is and have quieter cars that don't sound as good? we are constantly adapting and we will be the first with a battery electric vehicle in 2019. we are on the front foot in regards to battery technology. when you talk about sound and emotion, thatis you talk about sound and emotion, that is important as well. there is no reason why quiet cannot also be beautiful. a lot of customers are very discerning people and they will wa nt very discerning people and they will want that going forward. we are changing and we see that as an important part of our future. thank you very much. the chief financial officer at aston martin. quite interesting how they are adapting. that is one that has happened today. yes, the vroom vroom is still
6:51 am
important. a law banning so—called legal highs in the uk is to be reviewed after the collapse of the first contested cases brought under the new legislation. two separate trials of people accused of intending to supply nitrous oxide, known as laughing gas, at music festivals were thrown out on wednesday after the courts heard the drug is exempt. it raises questions over the effectiveness of the psychoactive substances act, which was introduced last year. mark easton has more. we're joined now by dr robert ralphs, a lecturer in criminology and specialist in substance legislation, and dr 0liver sutcliffe who's a lecturer in psychopharmaceutical chemistry. both are from manchester metropolitan university. morning to you both and thank you for coming in. let's talk about nitrous oxide. these are the canisters you might see on the floor in the park and on the street. what does it do? basically the product even that is a gas that is used called laughing gas as an
6:52 am
anaesthetic medically and also in the food industry to produce whipped cream. where do you get these? the canisters you can see on the images you can purchase from any food supplier if necessary. the larger cylinders potentially would be purchased by medical and hospitals. what is the problem when it comes to these cases in court? why can't they be prosecuted for intent to supply dangerous substances? when it was referred to a blanket ban it was banned with any psychoactive effect and it was most notably exempted for nitrous oxide, anything for food, any medicinal purpose, and with nitrous oxide it can be used as a
6:53 am
whipping agent, it has a medical use, traditionally in dentistry, also in childbirth. quite odd, ifi had a load of these canisters and was going into this festival, it is a pretty odd defence, and i am not making any comment on this case, if you have a load of these and you think, iam you have a load of these and you think, i am going to whip up some cream, it won't fly, will it? stu d e nts cream, it won't fly, will it? students are coming back to university and i can guarantee up and down the country they will be finding hundreds or thousands of canisters. there is a lot of talk about the bake off this week and people baking again. when you look at some of the sales online, that can't be put down to the increasing young people getting back into baking. people are buying them in hundreds. where does it leave this law? is it fit for purpose? we had a
6:54 am
drug policy reform group, academics, lawyers, police forces around the country saying this was going to be unenforceable. it is most commonly used for young people under 25 after cannabis in the uk and that continues. what does it do to you physically? the substance itself a cts physically? the substance itself acts on the central nervous system like most psychoactive substances act. what it does is it has a d e p ressa nt act. what it does is it has a depressant effect causing anaesthesia, so it makes you feel more relaxed, which is why it is used in childbirth. it has a calming effect. does it limit your intake of oxygen? people collapse from this. and there can be instances when if you take enough of a substance in like nitrous oxide or carbon dioxide your body will struggle to
6:55 am
potentially process oxygen efficiently and that can lead to potential unconsciousness. this wasn't just dealing potential unconsciousness. this wasn'tjust dealing with nitrous oxide, it was dealing with all kinds of substances. are they affected with this as well, or is it not a straightforward because they are not involved in food? six months after the act came out the government released figures to show 500 people had been arrested linked with the psychoa ctive su bsta nces had been arrested linked with the psychoactive substances act. when you look deep into that 70% were linked with possession or the attempt to supply nitrous oxide. this act is significant. in the metropolitan police loan there was a arrests —— alone there were a arrests. this is a significant case. thank you very much for explaining. you're watching breakfast.
6:56 am
still to come this morning: 4 billion years from now when the sun turns into a red giant, cattina and toyota will be trucking out there through the stars — we will still be out there —— voyager will still be out there —— voyager will still be out there —— voyager will still be trucking out there through the stars. before 9am, we'll hear about the incredible voyager mission and learn why some consider it to be humankind's greatest achievement. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are on planet earth. we will be back with you in a second. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alice salfield. a man in his 70s was airlifted to hospital after he was shot in the neck with an air rifle in essex. a group of 12 and 13 year olds were seen running away from the scene, carrying what police believe could have been green air rifle bags. it happened in tilbury early on sunday evening. the man's injuries were not life—threatening. witnesses to acid attacks are being told how they can help victims following a sharp rise
6:57 am
in the number of incidents, particularly in east london. new guidance from the nhs urges people to immediately report the attack, carefully remove contaminated clothing and rinse skin in running water. a burns unit in chelmsford serving patients from london and the south—east has treated over 30 people for this type of injury so far. a leading food specialist is warning that we could struggle to find enough for the capital's growing population to eat. almost half the food we consume comes from abroad, which according to a "food futurologist" is unsustainable and leaves us vulnerable. 0ne one of the things about growing locally and keeping things as close as possible is of course there is less of a carbon footprint but the other thing is we start to eat seasonally and that makes a really big difference in terms of cost as well, because of course it is going to be so abundant. if you know anyone who is growing corguettes at the moment, they are unable to give
6:58 am
them away. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes there are severe delays on the district line between earls court and wimbledon because of a signal failure. and minor delays on the jubilee line. more problems on the trains this morning — southeastern services via lewisham are running with delays following a signal problem there. some trains have been cancelled and others have been diverted. and great northern trains are suspended between finsbury park and moorgate because of signalling problems. services have been diverted to king's cross. and if we look at the roads you can see the traffic building on the a13 westbound from dagenham into barking. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday was wet and chilly, but today, happily, things are looking up. a much nicer day of weather. yes, it's a bit of a cool start but there'll be lots of sunshine around through the morning, and then we'll see more cloud develop, sunny spells and some heavy showers later on this afternoon. a few early mist patches around. they won't last for too long. and we did see single figures last night, so it's a bit of a cool start.
6:59 am
lots of sunshine around, then more cloud will develop through the morning and we'll start to see some showers breaking out. some of the showers could be heavy, perhaps a rumble of thunder. they will be widespread. there will be sunny spells around, top temperatures 20 degrees. the showers will rumble on just for a time this evening and then they will fade away. another quite chilly night to come. temperatures will drop back into single figures i think away from the towns, so a few early mist patches into tomorrow morning. and then tomorrow morning a nicer day in that we'll see more sunshine. again, more showers mostly concentrated to eastern areas, with top temperatures of around 21 degrees. and it's looking mostly dry again at the weekend. the best of the sunshine on saturday. again, highs of 21 or 22 degrees. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. theresa may insists she's not a quitter and vows to fight the next general election.
7:00 am
the prime minister dismissed reports that she will stand down in two years' time. good morning. it's thursday the 31st of august. also this morning: it's 20 years since the death of princess diana. flowers are again being laid outside kensington palace. parents in england have until midnight to register for 30 hours of free childcare for three and four year olds, but some nurseries warn that they'll struggle to cope. good morning. there were even less houses to choose from injuly good morning. there were even less houses to choose from in july as good morning. there were even less houses to choose from injuly as the number of houses on the market dropped to the most in 15 years. in sport, it's transfer deadline day. and an early deal should see confirmation of alex 0xlade—chamberlain's move from arsenal to liverpool. and carol has the weather. good
7:01 am
morning. a chilly start to the day. for many, a dry and sunny one. we have some heavy and thundery showers in parts of the west, especially the north—west of england and north—west wales at the moment. they will develop widely through the day. i will have more details in 15 minutes. we will see you then. good morning. theresa may says she wants to lead the conservatives into the next general election saying she's in it "for the long—term." the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has given his support, but backbench conservative mps have told the bbc they're sceptical she'll be able to serve the full term. the prime minister is currently on a three—day trip to japan. there's been an awful lot of speculation about my future which has no basis in whatsoever. i'm in this for the long—term. there's a realjob to be done in the united kingdom. it's about getting the brexit deal right, it's about getting that deep and special relationship
7:02 am
with the eu for the future. but it's also about getting global britain, trading around the world, yes, dealing with injustice within the uk, but also going out and around the world, ensuring we can do those trade deals which bring prosperity to our economy and bring jobs to the united kingdom. 0ur political correspondent, ben wright, is injapan. ben, it seems that even over there, theresa may can't escape questions about her leadership? she wants to talk about good foreign relations and trade, but not eve ryo ne relations and trade, but not everyone wants to. that is correct. this is a trip that was advertised asa this is a trip that was advertised as a trade mission. she is here with business leaders. she wants to talk to japanese leaders about how brexit will pan out, looking at a future trade deal with japan and the uk, yet she has also used this trip
7:03 am
fresh off the back of her summer holidays, three months on from the general election which she botched, losing the tory majority, she is using it to reassert her authority, i think, to her cabinet and party, making it quite clear there was no va ca ncy making it quite clear there was no vacancy at the top and there would not be for another five years. i asked her whether she was going to lead the tories do the next general election in 2022. she was emphatic that she would. she could have said i would get through brexit and we would see, give some date in the future she would want to leave, but that would immediately make her a lame—duck prime minister. perhaps there is no alternative but to be assertive about intentions to be there for the long—term. it is a very interesting development. i think it shows she really plans now to stick around through brexit and
7:04 am
beyond. now it is about whether the parliament agreed. boris johnson backs are completely, that is clear. she has some issue with remain—leaning tory mps who want her gone before the next general election, but for now, she has solidified her place. we will talk to you later in the programme. for now, goodbye. the brother of the manchester arena bomber will go on trial in libya in the next two months, in connection with the attack which left 22 people dead. hashem abedi was arrested in libya shortly after the bombing in may, carried out by his brother, salman. the prosecutor in the case said their father has been released. from tomorrow, working parents of three and four years olds
7:05 am
in england will be able to get 30 hours of free childcare. the deadline to apply is today, but the run up to the new system hasn't been without problems. a survey from the pre—school learning alliance suggests almost three quarters of childcare providers feel the government has underfunded the scheme. the government says pilots have shown funding was no barrier to nurseries delivering the extra hours. 20 years ago today, diana, princess of wales, died in a car crash in paris after being pursued by photographers. princes william and harry will mark the anniversary privately but members of the public are expected to gather outside kensington palace. 0ur correspondent, mark lobel, is there for us this morning. mark, people have already started laying flowers there haven't they? we saw the princes at the gates taking public appearances. this is where the people will go today. what are you seeing at the moment? exactly. they will come here today. as the sad news reverberated around the world 20 years ago, now it is
7:06 am
doing so again. people are coming here to pay respects. after william and harry came yesterday, people have been arriving and putting down flowers, like these roses here which terry brought. you had the chance to meet her when she was alive. how did it go? it was a privilege. she was giving blankets and food for the homeless. she had her own feelings about the people. it happened one night she came along and we were going to be evicted the following day. i don't know what made her come, but she looks down at us all, and we were all amazed, just like an angel, she spoke to us all, and one of the guys offered her a spoonful of the guys offered her a spoonful
7:07 am
of beans and, very sweet, she knelt down, she said she ate already. it we nt down, she said she ate already. it went down so well, it is unbelievable. she gave everyone a lovely smile. the human touch, working with charities. that is what her sons have taken from her. thank you. and in around 15 minutes, we'll be speaking to former welsh guardsman, phil bartlett, who was a pallbearer at princess diana's funeral. the first treatment to redesign a patient‘s own immune system so that it attacks cancer has been approved in the united states. the drug is made by extracting white blood cells from the patient, which are then genetically reprogrammed to seek out and kill the disease. the us food and drug administration said the decision was an historic moment and medicine is now "entering a new frontier." the governor of texas has warned the amount of federal government aid
7:08 am
it will need in the aftermath of hurricane harvey, is likely to be far in excess of the more than $100 billion made available after the storm which devastated new orleans 12 years ago. at least 25 people have been killed in the aftermath of the storm. pipelines and fuel production has closed. and overnight, the owners of a flooded chemical plant say there's no way to stop it exploding. 0ur correspondent, james cook, is following developments from houston. we are now in the skies above houston. and lots of these floodwaters have receded, really, very rapidly, particularly in the downtown area. but other parts of the city are still very badly affected. tens of thousands of homes have been damaged, possibly around 50,000 homes, damaged by this flooding. and we've seen these two reservoirs, the water has been spilling over those reservoirs.
7:09 am
we watched as thousands of people were evacuated from that place alone. that was a very well co—ordinated rescue operation. and a lot of the rescues have been taking place up here in the sky, with helicopters flying what are dangerous and daring missions to get people to safety. devastating floods and landslides are thought to have killed more than a thousand people in parts of india, nepal, and bangladesh. over the last month,, heavy monsoon rains have also forced hundreds of thousands of people from their homes. the red cross has described the situation as one of the worst regional humanitarian crisis in years. a law banning so—called legal highs in the uk is to be reviewed by the crown prosecution service, after the collapse of the first ever contested cases under the new legislation. two separate trials of people accused of intending to supply nitrous oxide, more commonly known as "laughing gas," at music festivals were stopped after the courts heard the drug
7:10 am
is exempt because it is used as a medicinal product. the drug charity, release, claims the new law is "fundamentally flawed." a man in toronto has caused quite a buzz after attempting to break the world record for the longest time an individual has had their head fully covered in bees. juan carlos 0rtiz sat for 61 minutes in a sealed dome as more than 100 , 000 bees crawled over his face and neck. where is the straw or things for his nose and mouth? i don't know. he is ina nose and mouth? i don't know. he is in a sealed unit. there he is. he broke the current record of 53 minutes and 34 seconds by almost eight minutes. how many bee stings do you think he got? he got only one or two. many working parents in england will have been reading up on the government's new childcare schemes, trying to work out
7:11 am
what they're entitled to. the free 30 hours a week for three and four year olds that are being introduced tomorrow, and maybe tax free childcare which has been around since april. but a left—leaning think tank has expressed concerns that disadvantaged children who may benefit from early education the most will not get it because their parents fail to meet the eligibility criteria. the labour mp and former shadow education secretary, lucy powell, was the author of the report and she's here now. good morning. good morning. tell us about this report with disadvantaged children missing out more. we found that, of the over £9 billion extra money the government is spending over the course of this parliament, just 2.5% of that is going to go to the most disadvantaged. and actually, the poorest families are missing out. three quarters of that money is going on in the most better off families. poorer families are
7:12 am
missing out. we spend money on the early years education for two reasons, yes, supporting working families, but also providing those critical early educational needs that the most disadvantaged families benefit most from. when you look at gcse results, the biggest indicator of how well you will do is how well you were developed by the age of five. those gaps at the age of five are enormous. we should be putting more emphasis and money into making sure we have quality early education for the most disadvantaged so that that social mobility gap does not get more and more wide. what do you want? you want the tax free childcare scrapped ? want? you want the tax free childcare scrapped? that is the initial policy which mainly benefits
7:13 am
people like me, high income families. i cannot see the justification for that, for the government to spend that huge amount of money. you are encouraging pa rents to of money. you are encouraging parents to work? most of the evidence would suggest that certainly for higher income families, they will work anyway, because they will meet those costs themselves to be it is a subsidy for high—income families. it is better to spend that money on the people who would most benefit from quality early education at the earliest yea rs early education at the earliest years so early education at the earliest years so they get the gains through the educational life they have. society and the economy as a whole will get benefits from that. we spend a huge amount of money trying to get people to catch up through their lives. get that money in when they are 1—5 and you can close that before they even start school. that is what these extra 15 hours are.
7:14 am
but the main beneficiaries of the extra 15 hours they are better off... extra 15 hours they are better off. . . the extra 15 hours they are better off... the parents who earn less than £100,000 per year. but the distribution of those funds will more greatly benefit the better off, just because they are more likely to ta ke just because they are more likely to take it up because they are both in work and can both earn up to £100,000 a year each. the analysis we have produced in this report today with the social market foundation shows the most is advantaged missing out almost entirely. the bottom half of earners, they only get a quarter of the money. i don't see how you can really justify that. a the money. i don't see how you can reallyjustify that. a universal offer which would also avoid a lot offer which would also avoid a lot of the chaos and confusion we are seeing today with parents having to apply for the extra 15 hours, that,
7:15 am
apply for the extra 15 hours, that, a process they are going through, it is causing delays to the system. if we had a universal offer with every family qualifying, we would benefit the most disadvantaged with no chaos. thank you very much for your time. the last day of august as we reflect on all the sunshine. you knew about the meteorological end of summer. that's right, carol, the end of summer that's right, carol, the end of summerfor that's right, carol, the end of summer for you? well, no, meteorologically speaking, tomorrow is the first day of autumn but it's only in meteorological terms so we can but it's only in meteorological terms so we can use but it's only in meteorological terms so we can use standards to measure one year against the next but it's different from everyone else's. today's forecast is u nsettled. else's. today's forecast is unsettled. we are looking at sunny spells and heavy showers. some do have heavy showers already, notjust heavy but also thundery. it wouldn't be out of order to call them intense. stretching across
7:16 am
north—west wales, heading particularly through lancashire, where we are seeing a lot of rain in a short amount of time, accompanied by thunder and lightning. if you're travelling this morning, a fair bit of surface water and sprayed on the roads, take extra care. many are starting on a dry and sunny note. a sunny start with temperatures widely in single figures at the moment, the exception is the south coast and 0uter exception is the south coast and outer hebrides but you can see how the showers develop through the day and really anywhere today could catch one and anywhere could see thundery conditions with hail embedded. in between those showers there will be lengthy dry spells with lengthy sunshine and because they are showers some will miss them altogether. if you're in the south—eastern quarter of the uk, what a change in terms of temperatures being much higher, yesterday they struggled to get to 13, today we are looking at 20 or 21. further north temperatures actually very similar to what you
7:17 am
had yesterday and in between the showers there will be some sunshine. heading on through the evening and overnight, slowly the showers will tend to fade inland, still a few clusters around the coastline. the cloud will break and it will be another cool night. these are the kind of temperatures you can expect in towns and cities, much colder than that in the countryside and for some we will see a touch of frost in the countryside. any patch a jo patchy mist and fog that's disperse is that any patchy mist and fog that this comes overnight —— any patchy mist and fog that comes overnight will disperse quickly. in between the showers you will still see sunshine and it will feel pleasant, temperatures 14 to 21. friday into saturday we still have a ridge of high pressure across us so a nippy night once again with some grass frost here and there in the countryside. that what's coming our way on sunday, not all of us will feel the benefit of this, if you
7:18 am
wa nt to feel the benefit of this, if you want to call it a benefit, but it won't be showing its hand just yet on saturday with most of the uk dry, sunny and pleasantly warm. possibly a few showers in the south—east, they will be the exception rather than the rule and later in the day the cloud will thicken across the rest of northern ireland initially and that will held at the arrival of this weather front wringing wet and windy conditions from the west —— will herald. the further east you are, the warmer it will be —— bringing wet and windy conditions. thanks very much, carol! some breaking news. the online gambling company 888 holdings has received a big fine. sean is here to explain. what is this about? a website where if you played roulette or bingo online you might be familiar with it, one of england's biggest gambling sites, they haven't reached the standards
7:19 am
required of them with customers. people having problems with a gambling. there is something called self exclusion where you can tick a box and you can't access your account for a while. 7000 customers self excluded so they couldn't access their account, but they were still able to for more than a year so still able to for more than a year so the gambling commission is find them up to £8 million —— fined. there was a technical problem and the device didn't work and the gambling commission isn't happy they didn't notice. £3.5 million is deposited by people that didn't want to gamble and they betted £50 million over ear, quite big amounts from 888 holdings —— over the year. this comes at a time when the government is looking at the way the gambling industry and people affected a re gambling industry and people affected are being hurt. indeed. and betting shops on the high street.
7:20 am
thanks very much. it was just after midnight exactly 20 years ago today that news began to emerge of a car crash, which involved one of the most famous women in the world, princess diana. a short time earlier she had left the ritz hotel in paris pursued by photographers. 0ur royal correspondent, nicholas witchell, looks back at the events of that night and the days that followed. # goodbye, england's rose...#l paris in the early moments of the 3ist paris in the early moments of the 31st of august 1997. the car carrying diana princess of wales has crashed in an underpass. the driver and her companion, dodi al fayed, are dead. diana has suffered serious internal injuries. by the time she reached hospital she had suffered several heart attacks. at 4am paris time diana is declared dead. this is bbc television from london. a short while ago buckingham palace confirmed the death of diana, princess of wales. the princess died following a car accident... the first flowers are placed at the
7:21 am
palace gates. in the hours and days that were to follow, many thousands of people added their tributes. we are today a nation in britain in a state of shock. at balmoral, the royalfamily go state of shock. at balmoral, the royal family go to church. among them are the 15—year—old william and 12—year—old harry. no mention is made at church of the tragedy. late afternoon in paris, prince charles has arrived at the hospital where diana died, accompanied by her two sisters. 7pm at raf northolt in london. the body of diana, princess of wales is born from the aircraft covered with the royal standard. 0n born from the aircraft covered with the royal standard. on this day 20 yea rs the royal standard. on this day 20 years ago a shocked nation was in mourning. nicholas witchell, bbc news. we'rejoined now from kensington palace by former welsh guardsman, phil bartlett, who was a pallbearer at princess diana's funeral. thanks forjoining us. it must bring
7:22 am
back so many memories to you personally and professionally. what's going through your mind as you stand in that place? as you can imagine, 20 years on from today it was an immense moment for all of us, to lose such a wonderful person and to lose such a wonderful person and to be involved in such an amazing thing, likea to be involved in such an amazing thing, like a funeral, was unbelievable. thinking back 20 years now, i was 23 at the time, it was such a big thing for such a young person. how did you come to be chosen to have that important role on the day of the funeral? we were over in northern ireland at the time and we were doing a six—month tour, through that
7:23 am
six—month tour, through that six—month tour, through that six—month tour we were out on patrols around crossmaglen and on sunday we were out on a patrol, we came late at night. we came in and as we came in we were told princess diana was involved in a car crash and from that point we decided to go to bed, we were woken up early in the morning, we were told to go on parade and our company commander came out and he read out that ten of us were going back to london to be pa rt us were going back to london to be part of that bearing party for princess diana. my name was the second person getting called out. we we re second person getting called out. we were all over six foot because we we re were all over six foot because we were in the prince of wales company and it's one of those things where i think it is due to merit. you must consider that to have been a huge honour? the eyes of the world we re a huge honour? the eyes of the world were watching london for the funeral, billions of people watching screens around the world, which must have put tremendous pressure on you but the crowds out on the street
7:24 am
that day... can you sum up for me what it was like to be there in that moment surrounded by it? as you can imagine, we were professional soldiers and the first battalion welsh guards, we were probably the underdogs in the household division but as you can imagine, we strive to achieve a lot of things in the welsh guards and to do something like this and to be involved in something like this was massive for the battalion and as you can imagine the first time we actually met the public was on the morning because we were quite isolated for the whole week when we we re isolated for the whole week when we were rehearsing. as we were coming out of kensington palace, the initial response by the public was... it set the tone for the whole 4.5 miles. that first scream of that lady who screamed," diana, i love you", affected a lot of us, and thinking back now, to be honest, looking at it on tv, it was a
7:25 am
poignant moment that set the tone for the whole march. her sons have spokenin for the whole march. her sons have spoken in the past couple of weeks about the fact they had to follow the coffin, we are seeing pictures of that now, what are you thinking seeing those boys at the time having to do that as well hearing the screams and seeing the crowds? the thing was, when we were going up the thing was, when we were going up the mall and we saw the boys and we passed the boys and theyjoined the back of the procession, it must have been a massive thing for these two young boys. it's one of those things where you could relate to it if you lost a sibling, if you have lost your mother, how much pain they must have been going through to be... to do what they did. you could tell what kind of characters these young lads were and how much they were more like their mother and you can't ask any more for these young lads ——
7:26 am
from these young lads. they strived and they have become people the whole world admires. they were thereby those gates looking at some of the tributes to the their mother yesterday. thanks for joining of the tributes to the their mother yesterday. thanks forjoining us for your memories and tributes 20 years after the death of princess diana. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: 4 billion years from now when our son turns into a red giant, voyager is still going to be trotting out there into the stars, we'll still be out there —— sun. there into the stars, we'll still be out there -- sun. talking about voyager, 12 billion miles out there, this tiny spaceship which has a golden record which we have been fascinated about, it is defining what we are like on earth. 0r fascinated about, it is defining what we are like on earth. or what we we re what we are like on earth. or what we were like in 1977. you wouldn't put a record there now, it would be
7:27 am
a usb stick or an mp3. something like that, hopefully whatever finds it will be able to play it. we will talk about it later. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alice salfield. a man in his 70s was airlifted to hospital after he was shot in the neck with an air rifle in essex. a group of 12 and 13—year—olds were seen running away from the scene, carrying what police believe could have been green air rifle bags. it happened in tilbury early on sunday evening. the man's injuries were not life—threatening. witnesses to acid attacks are being told how they can help victims following a sharp rise in the number of incidents, particularly in east london. new guidance from the nhs urges people to immediately report the attack, carefully remove contaminated clothing and rinse skin in running water. a burns unit in chelmsford serving patients from london and the south—east has treated over 30 people for this type of injury so far. a leading food specialist is warning that we could struggle to find enough for the capital's
7:28 am
growing population to eat. almost half the food we consume comes from abroad, which according to a food futurologist is unsustainable and leaves us vulnerable. one of the things about growing locally and keeping things as close as possible is, of course, there's less of a carbon footprint. but the other thing is we start to eat seasonally, and that makes a really big difference, in terms of cost, as well, because, of course, it's going to be so abundant. if you know anyone who is growing courgettes at the moment, they can't give them away. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes, there are severe delays on the district line between earls court and wimbledon because of a signal failure. more problems on the trains this morning too. southeastern services are not running through lewisham because of signalling problems. some trains have been cancelled and others are being diverted. and great northern trains are suspended between finsbury park and moorgate because of more signalling problems. services are being diverted via king's cross. if we look at the roads,
7:29 am
this is the northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach. it's looking very slow from the woolwich road flyover. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday was wet and chilly, but today, happily, things are looking up. a much nicer day of weather. yes, it's a bit of a cool start but there'll be lots of sunshine around through the morning, and then we'll see more cloud develop, sunny spells and some heavy showers later on this afternoon. a few early mist patches around. they won't last for too long. and we did see single figures last night, so it's a bit of a cool start. lots of sunshine around, then more cloud will develop through the morning and we'll start to see some showers breaking out. some of the showers could be heavy, perhaps a rumble of thunder. they will be widespread. there will be sunny spells around, top temperatures 20 degrees. the showers will rumble on just for a time this evening and then they will fade away. another quite chilly night to come. temperatures will drop back into single figures i think away from the towns, so a few early mist patches into tomorrow morning. and then tomorrow morning a nicer
7:30 am
day in that we'll see more sunshine. again, more showers mostly concentrated to eastern areas, with top temperatures of around 21 degrees. and it's looking mostly dry again at the weekend. the best of the sunshine on saturday. again, highs of 21 or 22 degrees. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to naga and jon. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. we'll bring you the news and sport headlines in a moment. theresa may says she wants to lead the conservatives into the next general election, saying she's in it "for the long—term." the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has given his support but backbench conservative mps have told the bbc they're sceptical she'll be able to stay in the job until the next general election. the prime minister is currently on a three day trip to japan.
7:31 am
there's been an awful lot of speculation about my future which has no basis in it whatsoever. i'm in this for the long—term. there's a realjob to be done in the united kingdom. it's about getting the brexit deal right, it's about building that deep and special relationship with the eu for the future. but it's also about getting global britain, trading around the world, yes, dealing with injustice within the uk, but also going out and around the world, ensuring we can do those trade deals which bring prosperity to our economy and bring jobs to the united kingdom. the brother of the manchester arena bomber will go on trial in libya in the next two months in connection with the attack which left 22 people dead. hashem abedi was arrested in libya shortly after the bombing in may, carried out by his brother, salman. the prosecutor in the case said their father has been released. from tomorrow, working parents
7:32 am
of three and four years olds in england will be able to get 30 hours of free childcare. the deadline to apply is today, but the run up to the new system hasn't been without problems. a survey from the pre—school learning alliance suggests almost three quarters of childcare providers feel the government has underfunded the scheme. the government says pilots have shown funding was no barrier to nurseries delivering the extra hours. we will talk about that in a few minutes. the first treatment to redesign a patient‘s own immune system so that it attacks cancer has been approved in the united states. that is amazing. the drug is made by extracting white blood cells from the patient, which are then genetically reprogrammed to seek out and kill the disease. the us food and drug administration said the decision was an historic moment and medicine is now "entering a new frontier." in the last few minutes, the on line
7:33 am
gambling firm, 888, has infind in the last few minutes, the on line gambling firm, 888, has in find £7 million. those who were banned from pain was still able to access accounts. —— paying. at least seven people have died and more than 40 are thought to be trapped beneath the rubble of a residential building, which has collapsed in the indian city of mumbai. the four—storey building stood in the densely populated area of the city. it gave way after days of heavy monsoon rains, which have already resulted in at least ten deaths in the area. and now for news from the other side of the world. the governor of texas has warned the amount of federal government aid it will need in the aftermath of hurricane harvey, is likely to be far in excess of the $100 billion made available after the storm that devastated new orleans 12 years ago. at least 25 people have been killed in the aftermath of harvey. pipelines and fuel production have been shut down and overnight,
7:34 am
the owners of a flooded chemical plant warned that it would explode in the coming days. a law banning so—called legal highs in the uk are to be reviewed by the crown prosecution service after the collapse of the first ever tested case under the new legislation. two trials of those looking to supply laughing gas the music festivals were stopped when it was found to be exempt due to being used as a medicinal product. they claim that the new law is flawed. new york's gugenheim museum has been the venue for some provocative works of art over the years, but there has probably never been an exhibit quite like this. i hope you have never seen anything like this. it's called "america" and is a fully functioning toilet made of 18 carat gold. it isa it is a piece of art. the golden throne, designed by an italian artist, has replaced a traditional porcelain version in one
7:35 am
of the museum's restrooms. a fully functioning toilet... no comment. more than 100,000 visitors have queued up to spend a penny or should that be a cent with the million dollar work of art. ijust don't get it. i get the whole idea. they like to provoke ideas about art. but, idea. they like to provoke ideas aboutart. but, how idea. they like to provoke ideas about art. but, how much was it? $1 million! $1 million! to spend that ona million! $1 million! to spend that on a gold toilet. you have heard of panning for gold. well, you have now. and now for the football. that is the kind of money you have seen in the transfer windows. perhaps that toilet could go in a glamorous footballer‘s home. that toilet could go in a glamorous footballer's home. if you had it in one bathroom, you would need to have one bathroom, you would need to have one in all of your 11— 12 bathrooms.
7:36 am
i would put it in my contract on deadline day. we are talking about tra nsfer deadline day. we are talking about transfer deadline day today. even more money will be spent in the next few hours. it closes at 11 tonight and a little bit extra time for scotland. spain as well. we will speak to john smith, scotland. spain as well. we will speak tojohn smith, someone who understands. good morning. good morning. you are putting up your feet and relaxing and watching all of the chaos unfolding in front of you, remembering all of the busy days you had in the past. what is it like foran days you had in the past. what is it like for an agent and a player on a day like today? it is completely mental. the ridiculous thing is you get situations like sanchez, for instance, the arsenal player, there are three of them, three of them
7:37 am
being transferred today. it goes all the way through the transfer window. evidently he might not want to stay at arsenal. that will go down to the wire. you have this three—month lead time finishing in the wee small hours later tonight. it is a bit crazy. the prices are bit crazy. however i heard you talking about the million pound toilet. perhaps it is not that crazy. the prices are higher in england than anywhere else. we are hearing a player is looking to be sold to the sound of 30-40% looking to be sold to the sound of 30—40% more to england. looking to be sold to the sound of 30-40% more to england. that is because the television deals are so large in england. sunderland got
7:38 am
more money for relegation and finishing bottom of the premier league last year than bayern munich, champions of europe. that was 94 million. the prices of a premium u nfortu nately, million. the prices of a premium unfortunately, you pay the price for an £8.3 billion success story. one of the things that has changed in the last two years is fans are more involved. players are being tracked across the world. we saw the airline tracking website crash when liverpool fans were trying to follow van dyche to liverpool. and riyadh mahrez was spotted in an airport in paris. in the last few hours, that was tweeted. mahrez in an airport in paris. it is not like we can keep movements secret any more. we never could. years ago i was transferring
7:39 am
a player who could go to either arsenal or everton. we used to do these deals in motorway stations. i don't know why. i sat in a service station with tony doing a deal with everton with 10—20 football fans around us peering over the table say, "is that what you're getting, that's good." we used to meet in pubs and windy corners at the top of the m1. we have social media today. people try to track players and agents and where they are going. but essentially, these deals are done these days largely behind closed doors using private jets. these days largely behind closed doors using privatejets. it these days largely behind closed doors using private jets. it is these days largely behind closed doors using privatejets. it is not that difficult to keep them, to a degree, ina that difficult to keep them, to a degree, in a place where no one knows what is going on to the very end. how significant is it for
7:40 am
philippe coutinho and liverpool that the spanish window does not close until tomorrow? i thought about that when i was looking through all of the statistics of the past few days. i think you have to believe liverpool, the fenway group, i substantially wealthy. when they say there is no deal, i think there will be no dealfor philippe there is no deal, i think there will be no deal for philippe coutinho, not in this window. watch in january. adjusting to talk to you. it will be interesting for the next few hours. thank you. you can follow all of the deals on the bbc sport website. there will be a live page until the window closes at 11pm in england and 12 at night in scotland. there is a special football focus on bbc one with dan. orjust go to your nearest service station and see a deal. go in a website and see where people are going to be you can follow them through the sky to see where they land. can you? yes!
7:41 am
kyle edmund is the last british hope at the us open. he beat american stevejohnson in straight sets to get into the third round. aljaz bedene and cameron norrie both went out though. rain meant they were still completing the first round in new york yesterday. nick kyrios was a casualty. he injured his shoulder losing to fellow australian john millman. it didn't seem to hamper him though when he smashed his racket beyond repair after losing the third set. kyrios is one of a number of players to have suffered injury trouble recently, with five top players having withdrawn from this year's us 0pen. i think the leaders we have today in the sport are open in these conversations. they are concerned about the health of the players and the success of tennis. i think next week as we have these meetings together, i know this is on the document to be discussed. i am sure we will have some robust conversations. again, ithink we will have some robust conversations. again, i think all seven governing bodies are
7:42 am
stakeholders in this conversation. caroline wozniacki is out but another former world number one maria sharapova is through to the third round. the russian, playing herfirst grand slam since a 15—month doping ban, came from a set down to beat timea babos. i know i can do this. i have done it before. i want to have that feeling again. there is also the realistic understanding that, 0k, i have been in this situation for a while, it will take some time. of course, managing expectations is part of it and learning during the match is something that i haven't done. it may be possible to do a pitchside saliva test for concussion in the next few years if a new study is successful. scientists at the university of birmingham want to make a hand—held test which could provide instant results so they're taking saliva samples from players in the top two tiers of english rugby union this season. it's the biggest study of its kind and could revolutionise the way head injuries are treated. what we want is to have a portable pitch—side test which can be used by doctors, if you want, in a professional game,
7:43 am
or potentially the parent, if they work as well as we hope, to see whether their son or daughter has had a concussion, or a school nurse potentially to assess whether someone has had a concussion or not. chris froome has taken a big step towards winning the vuelta a espana title as he opened up a big lead on the field after yesterday's stage. froome is aiming to become the first rider to win the tour de france and vuelta in the same year since frenchman bernard ee—no in 1978. i mentioned riyadh mahrez in the airport in paris. you might expect him to go to italy or the transfer. the fan who took the picture said he was flying to spain, to barcelona, in fact. i thought he was going to a service station. clearly not. we
7:44 am
will find out this time tomorrow. thank you. in the past hour the betting company lad broves in the past hour the betting company ladbroves coral has... there is a government review due the sector operates. gambling has traditionally been big business in britain. in the last year 63% of adults have had a bet either online or on the high street. it gave the sector a gross yield of £13.8 billion, that's the money retained after winnings are paid out. it went on to pay more than 100,000 people in the uk directly employed within the industry. there has been criticism of the sector, it's reported more than 2 million people in the uk are addicted to or at risk of a gambling addiction. we arejoined by addicted to or at risk of a gambling addiction. we are joined by the ceo of ladbrokes coral, jim molan. good morning. talk us through this
7:45 am
figures, are you satisfied that these figures. we are in courage by them —— these figures. ten months ago —— we them —— these figures. ten months ago “ we are them —— these figures. ten months ago —— we are in encouraged by them. there was a merger and we were concerned whether that would affect operations but i'm delighted with the team. i think we need to be encouraged. i've been having a look at the initialfigures, haven't encouraged. i've been having a look at the initial figures, haven't had at the initial figures, haven't had a chance to examine them closely, but it looks like most of the increase is from online betting through your phone rather than on the high street. it's interesting, i wouldn't separate the retail and digital side, bearing in wouldn't separate the retail and digitalside, bearing in mind 1.3 million digital customers, which is why we've got these encouraging digital numbers, actually came from a retail estate. the old way of looking at it with retail and digital is the wrong way, we should look at it as a whole, which is why
7:46 am
the numbers are so encouraging. you are being looked at closely as an industry and we expect that report in the next few weeks into the future of gambling and the use of these fixed odds betting machines in shops has been particularly controversial. you are facing a clampdown on those surely, are you expecting that? all we really want is certainty. from a business planning perspective we want certainty. ladbrokes coral employ 25,000 people and they need certainty, as does the sector, because we are a significant contributor to the revenues, we support the racing industry and i think all those parties are involved in that so certainty is an important thing for us. you can understand certainty as a business but there are certainty as a business but there a re lots of certainty as a business but there are lots of support groups and families who have told us on brea kfast families who have told us on breakfast they are worried about the addictive, allegedly addictive nature of these machines and that it has a devastating effect on people's
7:47 am
lives. i have to say i'm very encouraged by the bbc‘s introduction of this when you spoke about the act risk two million and not the problem gamblers, for the first time a really balanced view on it. we take it seriously and what we want to do is make sure that we don't become the black dog in the debate with these fixed odds terminals. we have to look at in the round. ladbrokes coral are doing that. we need a sensible debate about the facts, which is important. we've reported in the last hour or so that one of your rivals, 888, are being fined for apparently not protecting customers enough, vulnerable customers. it suggests there is a serious intention to crack down on what all of you do and i'm noting that in your report this morning, in your results, the competition and markets authority are investigating something that you have been up to as well. do you think you're being
7:48 am
scrutinised extremely closely right now? i don't, i think scrutinised extremely closely right now? i don't, ithink the scrutinised extremely closely right now? i don't, i think the gambling commission are right in their approach and we support that. we are ona approach and we support that. we are on a journey and we have our own complaints with regard to the cma, thy report, which was some time ago —— their report. it's a continuing process. i welcome the forensics. we ta ke process. i welcome the forensics. we take responsible gambling seriously but also from a business perspective, irresponsible gambling behaviour and problem gambling isn't good for business. we are working closely with the gc on this journey where you can come and it can be a pastime. jim molan from ladbrokes coral, thanks for joining pastime. jim molan from ladbrokes coral, thanks forjoining us on brea kfast. it is always a good time to talk to carol to find out what's happening with the weather. sunshine and showers so i'm not going to be upset by that picture, even though it's remarkable. it's beautiful, isn't it crazy good morning. sunshine and
7:49 am
showers is right, that's the forecast today —— isn't it crazy good morning. some have been heavy overnight and some have thunder and lightning embedded —— isn't it? . the heaviest showers have been in parts of lancashire. they have been coming in through the night, torrential, intense downpours and it's the same too, heavy ones in parts of north—west wales so if you're travelling then bear that in mind, you could run into surface water issues. a largely dry start for most of the uk, a chilly one, the sun is out but through the date showers will develop more widely and some could be heavy, thundery with hail -- some could be heavy, thundery with hail —— day. in between there will be sunshine. in the south—eastern quarter, parts of it didn't get above 13 celsius yesterday. today we're back up to 20 or 21. if you're out of the showers in the sunshine, wherever you are it won't feel too bad at all and there will be
7:50 am
sunshine in between those showers but if you catch a shower you will know all about it. only slowly through the evening and overnight we start to lose those showers but there will still be clusters close to the coast and under clearing skies we'll have patchy mist and fog forming, but also a cool night. these temperatures, eight to 13, they what you can expect in towns and cities. these temperatures, one to four, really represent the countryside, so there will be a touch of frost in some sheltered areas tonight. that means tomorrow morning it's a cold start but a beautiful one under clear skies, there will be a lot of sunshine around. through the day we'll see further showers develop especially from south—east scotland to south—east england but they are showers, not all of us will catch one, and you can see a lot of dry weather, fewer showers in the west and temperatures, 14 to 21. we still have a ridge of high pressure across our shores through the night and into saturday, which means once
7:51 am
again it's going to be a chilly night with some local grass frost and it's not until sunday that we see the arrival of some weather fronts. 0n see the arrival of some weather fronts. on saturday, don't forget that chilly start, a touch of frost here and there but mostly in rural areas. a lot of sunshine, a log of dry weather on saturday. you could catch the odd shower in the south—east but that will be the exception rather than the rule —— a lot of. late in the day the cloud thickens into the west, heralding the arrival of weather fronts bearing cloud, rain and strengthening winds. the further east you travel during the course of sunday, the drier and sunnier it's going to be and the further south east you travel, the warmer it's going to be as well. there will be a lot of dry weather around if you skip the showers. naga and on, i don't know if you noticed on the chart, torrential rain in blackpool and nothing in liverpool over the last few hours —— naga and jon.
7:52 am
strangely isolated! i was in milton keynes yesterday, showers north and showers south, it skirted the golf course i was on. that's the nature of showers, some of us miss them all together. thanks very much, carol. there are yet more signs of a slowing housing market this morning. sean's taking a look. what have you seen if you're looking to buy you might be happy with a slowing market but if you're looking to sell it could be trickier, this morning we are looking at fewer sellers with the day we've got. there've been quite a few indications coming through showing that the housing market has started to slow sharply since the middle of the year. this latest data is from the body that represents britain's estate agents. it says the number of houses being put on the market fell to its lowest level injuly since it started keeping records in 2002. this is on the back of data from one of our biggest mortgage providers. according to nationwide, house prices fell a smidgen between july and august. 0n the whole, house price growth
7:53 am
over a year has been slowing as well house prices now at around 2%. so what does all this mean? lucian cook, head of research at property group savills joins me now. good morning. do you guys see a slowing down? i think undoubtedly there is a slowdown in the housing market and i think there's quite a few things behind that. since the credit current people are moving less often, especially people trading up the ladder, we have mortgage regulation which restricts them —— credit crunch. buy to let have been —— by the let investors have been —— by the let investors have been —— by the let investors have been affected by taxation and mortgage regulation so their numbers are down that buy to let. and in london, long period of house price growth and people are beginning to hit up the limits of what they can borrow —— by the let. it affect how
7:54 am
many people can move and who can move ‘— many people can move and who can move —— buy to let. then you have economic and political uncertainty asa economic and political uncertainty as a result of brexit making people more cautious. with the statistics injuly, fewer more cautious. with the statistics in july, fewer people more cautious. with the statistics injuly, fewer people putting their houses on the market, white? all of those reasons before and people have become that much more cautious.“ ita become that much more cautious.“ it a good thing? if it means house price growth isn't as much as it was before, how often we talk about first time buyers getting on the market is amazing, good for them? low—level first house price growth is good, difficulties for house —— first—time house buyers getting on the market. the average in london for a first house is pushing up £100,000. i suppose what is different is. transactions is about the vibrancy of the market and people's ability to move.“
7:55 am
the vibrancy of the market and people's ability to move. if you have fewer houses to choose from when you're hunting around, could that mean you end up with more buyers for that one warehouse you really like? do you see pockets of different things happening to house prices? there's different things happening in different markets but one of the things we know from some of the lead indicators, take it from the rc is, buyer enquiries are muted so the rc is, buyer enquiries are muted so the two are largely moving in unison. countrywide, the strongest markets at the moment, all markets have levels of house price growth that have weakened in all markets but generally the strongest market tends to be that market of middle england. it used to be london, london has slowed significantly to the point where london house price growth is around 1.2%, the same as north—east england where there are clearly different things going on. buyer's market or a seller's? in a
7:56 am
lot of the country it has moved to bea lot of the country it has moved to be a buyer's. thanks very much. we will keep an eye on this in the coming months. 0ften will keep an eye on this in the coming months. often used as a bellwether to the economy, how we feel about house prices. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alice salfield. a man in his 70s was airlifted to hospital after he was shot in the neck with an air rifle in essex. a group of 12 and 13—year—olds were seen running away from the scene, carrying what police believe could have been green air rifle bags. the man's injuries were not life—threatening. people living on a road in reading
7:57 am
where a series of huge holes opened up nine months ago say repairs have taken too long. residents of sandcroft road have been told the problem will be fixed by the end of autumn. thames water, which is responsible for the repairs, says it's "finalising plans with specialist contractors". if this was a main roads one would naturally expect it would be tackled immediately but because we are sort ofa immediately but because we are sort of a quieter through road here we are starting to feel now we are getting left. patients with coeliac disease could be forced to pay for gluten—free food as hertfordshire nhs is consulting on whether to stop issuing it on prescription. the clinical commissioning group is hoping to plug a 550 million pound shortfall in their budget over the next four years. but a leading coeliac charity says it's expensive and that many sufferers can't afford it. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes there are minor delays on the baklerloo line and minor delays on the district line between earls court and wimbledon because of a signal failure.
7:58 am
southeastern services are not running through lewisham because of signalling problems. some trains have been cancelled and others are being diverted. and great northern trains are suspended between finsbury park and moorgate because of more signalling problems. services are being diverted via king's cross. if we look at the roads, this is the northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach. it's looking very slow from the woolwich road flyover. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday was wet and chilly, but today, happily, things are looking up. a much nicer day of weather. yes, it's a bit of a cool start but there'll be lots of sunshine around through the morning, and then we'll see more cloud develop, sunny spells and some heavy showers later on this afternoon. a few early mist patches around. they won't last for too long. and we did see single figures last night, so it's a bit of a cool start. lots of sunshine around, then more cloud will develop through the morning and we'll start to see some showers breaking out. some of the showers could be heavy, perhaps a rumble of thunder. they will be widespread. there will be sunny spells around, top temperatures 20 degrees.
7:59 am
the showers will rumble on just for a time this evening and then they will fade away. another quite chilly night to come. temperatures will drop back into single figures i think away from the towns, so a few early mist patches into tomorrow morning. and then tomorrow morning a nicer day in that we'll see more sunshine. again, more showers mostly concentrated to eastern areas, with top temperatures of around 21 degrees. and it's looking mostly dry again at the weekend. the best of the sunshine on saturday. again, highs of 21 or 22 degrees. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to naga and jon. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. theresa may insists she's not a quitter, and vows to fight the next general election. the prime minister dismissed reports that she will stand down in two years' time. good morning.
8:00 am
it's thursday 31st of august. also this morning: remembering princess diana — 20 years after her death, flowers are again being laid outside kensington palace. parents in england have until midnight to register for 30 hours of free childcare, but some nurseries warn that they'll struggle to cope. good morning. the online gambling firm 888 has been fined £7.8 million this morning forfailing to protect vulnerable customers. i'll have all the details shortly. good morning. in sport, it's transfer deadline day, and an early deal should see confirmation of alex 0xlade—chamberlain's move from arsenal to liverpool. and carol has the weather. good morning. it is a chilly start to the day for most of us, but a dry
8:01 am
one with a fair bit of sunshine. however, there are some showers in the west, some are harmed us, and some of those in other areas could also be thundery, with hail. more on that in 15 minutes. carol, thank you. good morning. theresa may says she wants to lead the conservatives into the next general election, saying she's in it "for the long term". the foreign secretary borisjohnson has given his support, but backbench conservative mps have told the bbc they're sceptical she'll be able to stay in the job until the next general election. the prime minister is currently on a three—day trip to japan. there's been an awful lot of speculation about my future which has no basis in it whatsoever. i'm in this for the long term. there's a realjob to be done in the united kingdom. it's about getting the brexit deal right. it's about building that deep and special partnership with the european union for the future, but it's also about building global britain, trading around the world, yes, dealing with injustices that
8:02 am
remain inside the united kingdom, but also going out around the world, ensuring that we can do those trade deals which bring prosperity to our economy and bring jobs to the united kingdom. 0ur political correspondent, ben wright, is with the pm injapan. he gave us an update about an hour ago. she is here on the second day of her three—day visit to japan, a visit is sensible all about trade, she is here trumpeting the possibilities for britain after brexit, but she has clearly decided to use this moment, back from her summer to use this moment, back from her summer holidays, three months on from the botched general election to try to settle for good, for now at least, this issue around her leadership. it is quite a change of tone from the prime minister. just after the election she went sheepishly to tory mps and said that sheepishly to tory mps and said that she was prepared to continue as prime minister as long as they
8:03 am
wa nted prime minister as long as they wanted to. now she is saying she is in itfor wanted to. now she is saying she is in it for the long—term, and she is going to fight the next election for the tories. to be honest, when asked the tories. to be honest, when asked the question, she couldn't really say anything but that. to say that she wouldn't continue for the long term would have made her a lame duck prime minister, and i don't think there is an immediate leadership challenge brewing in the undergrowth against the prime minister at the moment. i think many tory mps will welcome this and be happy that she is going to be their leading them through brexit at least, but there are those including former education secretary nicky morgan who says she is very doubtful if in reality theresa may will still be there in 2022. but certainly a punchy change of tone from the prime minister. ben wright talking to us earlier there. in other news this morning: the brother of the manchester arena bomber will go on trial in libya in the next two months in connection with the attack which left 22 people dead. hashem abedi was arrested in libya shortly after the bombing in may,
8:04 am
carried out by his brother salman. the prosecutor in the case said their father has been released. the online gambling firm 888 has been fined £7.8 million for failing to protect vulnerable customers. the gambling commission found more than 7000 customers who'd opted out of playing were still able to access their accounts. the governor of texas has warned that the amount of federal government aid it needs to repair the damage from hurricane harvey is likely to be far more than the $100 billion spent after the storm which devastated new orleans 12 years ago. at least 25 people have been killed in texas. pipelines and fuel production have been shut down. overnight, the owners of a flooded chemical plant warned that it would explode in the coming days. 0ur north america correspondent, james cook, has more from houston. we are now in the skies above houston. and lots of these floodwaters
8:05 am
have receded, really, very rapidly, particularly in the downtown area. but other parts of the city are still very badly affected. tens of thousands of homes have been damaged, possibly around 50,000 homes damaged by this flooding. and we've seen these two reservoirs, the water has been spilling over those reservoirs. we watched as thousands of people were evacuated from that place alone. that was a very well co—ordinated rescue operation. and a lot of the rescues have been taking place up here in the sky, with helicopters flying what are dangerous and daring missions to get people to safety. at least five people have died and more than 40 are thought to be trapped beneath the rubble of a residential building, which has collapsed in the indian
8:06 am
city of mumbai. the four—storey building stood in a densely populated area of the city. it gave way after days of heavy monsoon rains, which have already resulted in at least ten deaths in the area. the first treatment to redesign a patient‘s own immune system so that it attacks cancer has been approved in the united states. the drug is made by extracting white blood cells from the patient, which are then genetically reprogrammed to seek out and kill the disease. the us food and drug administration said the decision was a historic moment and medicine is now "entering a new frontier". the nhs in england has issued new guidance for the victims of acid attacks, after the number of patients needing specialist care doubled in two years. the advice is to report the attack, remove contaminated clothing and rinse the skin immediately. surgeons say quick treatment is vital in minimising the extent of injuries. a law banning so—called legal highs in the uk is to be reviewed by the crown prosecution service,
8:07 am
after the collapse of the first ever contested cases under the new legislation. two trials of people accused of intending to supply nitrous oxide — more commonly known as laughing gas — at music festivals were stopped. the courts heard that the drug is exempt because it's used as a medicinal product. the drug charity release claims the new law is "fundamentally flawed". if you don't like bees and wasps, and you try to swap them as soon as you hear the buzzing, you won't like what this next man has tried to do. he has welcomed into his life. a man in toronto has caused quite a buzz after attempting to break the world record for the longest time an individual has had their head fully covered in bees. juan carlos 0rtiz sat for 61 minutes in a sealed dome as more than 100 , 000 bees crawled over his face and neck. he did what he set out to do.
8:08 am
he broke the current record of 53 minutes and 34 seconds by almost eight minutes. how many stings did he have? just one or two. you wouldn't want to break on record, would you? 61 minutes doing that, just imagine. it is eight minutes past eight. it was just after midnight exactly 20 years ago today that news began to emerge of a car crash which involved one of the most famous women in the world. a short time earlier, princess diana had left the ritz hotel in paris with the man she was rumoured to be in a relationship with. we're joined now from kensington palace by the former bbc royal correspondentjennie bond. jennie cover the events of that night. take us back, will you, to when the news was filtering through to you, not to the public, that there had been an accident. yes, i was on holiday, i was 250 miles away
8:09 am
in devon, and i had promised our little girl, who was seven, that you have your mum now for the next couple of weeks, which was foolishly to say. the phone went somewhere between half past 12 and one o'clock, and at first the report suggested that diana had survived the crash and it wasn't too serious from her point of view, but very quickly it became apparent as i flew up quickly it became apparent as i flew up to london in a taxi that it was much more serious. in fact the news came from the far east via the then foreign secretary, robin cook, that she was dead, but we couldn't reveal that until it was officially confirmed, so the tone of the coverage i was listening to on the radio changed, and i knew why it had changed. i got to the television centre at the bbcjust before six, and started broadcasting on this terrible tragedy, obviously, for the boys and for the nation, and the beginning of the worst week of the queen's rain. —— reign.
8:10 am
beginning of the worst week of the queen's rain. -- reign. and it became clear how much princess diana's death affected the country asa diana's death affected the country as a whole, and the reactions we saw from senior members of state. yes, it was extraordinary. you can see now 20 years on that some people are still coming to remember her. but on those days afterwards, it was extraordinary. looking back, i do think it was a kind of mass hysteria. there was real grief, though, and! hysteria. there was real grief, though, and i saw that for myself having been almost trapped at the bbc where they wanted me in the studio nonstop talking for about 24 hours. i said, i am a reporter, studio nonstop talking for about 24 hours. isaid, iam a reporter, i studio nonstop talking for about 24 hours. i said, i am a reporter, i do need to go down and see the atmosphere and see it for myself, and when i got to stjames's palace, i got out of the taxi and spoke to a man, i remember he had a beard, i said good evening, and he burst into tea rs. said good evening, and he burst into tears. and i thought, my goodness, this is real, what is happening. and
8:11 am
that spread throughout the week until we had this ocean of flowers buckingham palace. you mentioned that it was the worst week of the queen's reign. what diana's death did to the image of the monarchy, that was a real turning point, wasn't it? it was. it wasn't helped by the fact that the palace got everything wrong that week in terms of planning the funeral. i know from speaking to people close to the queen that week that by wednesday, when the queen was up at balmoral, quite rightly comforting her grandsons, there was a feeling among the senior courtiers that they had lost it, they had got it so wrong, and there might be some kind of mutiny or at leastjeering when and if she came back to london. it transpired rather differently, she came down and she made peace with her people on the eve of the funeral. but it has had a profound effect, and i think the lasting
8:12 am
legacy of diana is a little more compassion, and of course her boys, and carry on her work, looking after vulnerable people. that is what the charity is about and that is what diana was about. with the funeral of course we saw the outpouring of grief, in the nation as well, but this from many people, most people who had never met princess diana. you had, in interviews, and spent time with her. what did you garner from your many meetings with her? she was a very complex woman. i met her here at the palace, one—to—one in her drawing room there, on a number of occasions, we would chat forever, it was usually mean who would say, i think i ought to go now. after the break—up of her marriage, she was quite lonely, and solo here. she was mischievous,
8:13 am
funny, much more intelligent than she made out. she said she was as thick as two short planks, but she wasn't. she was shrewd, she could be manipulative and annoying, one minute you would be sitting whether having coughing, and the next day we would be at some way she would blank me, you never knew where you were. i riven by got a call when i was cleaning the kitchen floor, when the phone went and it was someone from kensington palace saying that the princess wants to give you a message, do carry on wearing red, because it suits you. what i thought, what a weird world i live jennie, thank you for giving us your memories. a dramatic time in terms of royal history. jennie bond, former bbc world correspondent, thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: theresa may has pledged to lead the conservatives into the next general election and has rejected reports she'll step down in two years' time. today marks 20 years since the death
8:14 am
of diana, princess of wales. her legacy will be celebrated later by many of the charities she supported during her lifetime. last day of august, which means it is the last day of meteorological summer. is the last day of meteorological summer. hopefully some will broadly continue, but for carol, it is nearly over. yes, and that is so we can measure like for like. today, the weather is in particularly some—like, although it will be better for some than yesterday. we are looking at a mixture of sunshine and showers. first thing this morning, we start ona dry first thing this morning, we start on a dry and brain note across many areas ‘— on a dry and brain note across many areas “ a on a dry and brain note across many areas —— a dry and bright note.
8:15 am
showers across lancashire have been heavy and intense. a similar story across parts of north—west wales. after a chilly start, the showers develop more widely through the day and anywhere could catch one. in between them all, there will be some sunshine and in the sunshine, it will still pleasant. in the south—east, we are back to where we should be, into the high teens and low 20s. for wales, should be, into the high teens and low 20s. forwales, england should be, into the high teens and low 20s. for wales, england and scotland, there are still the potential for some of the showers to be heavy and thundery, with hail. through the evening and overnight, we slowly lose most of the showers. a few clusters remain closed to the coast. we will see patently is done fog forming, but under clear skies, it will be a cool night. in the
8:16 am
countryside, we could see temperatures low enough for a touch of grass frost. whatever way you look at it, tomorrow will be a chilly start, but a beautiful one with a lot of sunshine. not all of us will catch a shower. as we move from friday to saturday, we have this ridge of high pressure across us. another cool night in prospect. it is not until later saturday and sunday, we see this weather front coming in from the atlantic. the wind will strengthen. a lot of dry weather. you could see the odd rogue showers somewhere in the south—east,
8:17 am
but it will be the exception rather than the rule. and it will feel pleasa nt than the rule. and it will feel pleasant in light breezes. later in the day, the cloud will thicken, heralding the arrival of that weather front. that will introduce more rain and a strengthening wind. through sunday, it will push eastwards. the further east you are, the drier and warmer it is likely to be. the rain has crept over more than it did on sunday. but it could still retreat. use the power, carol! we know you have it, you just use it sparingly sometimes. wouldn't that bea sparingly sometimes. wouldn't that be a fabulous power to have? amazing! thanks very much. today's the deadline for working parents of three and four—year—olds in england to apply for 30 hours of free childcare a week. but there are worries it may lead to higher costs for parents and nursery closures,
8:18 am
according to an education charity. the survey by the pre—school learning alliance suggests three—quarters of childcare providers think the scheme has been underfunded and they may struggle to deliver the hours. but the government says pilot schemes have shown it is possible. we can speak to the minister for children and families, robert goodwill, who joins us from a nursery in york which has been part of the pilot scheme, and the owner lesley calvert is with us too. you have been involved in this pilot, trying to provide 30 of hours a week. how has it gone for you? it's gone very well. parents have accepted it well and they have been able to go back to work for longer as well as take up employment. so if the government came to you and said, it is working, but what else can we do to make it betterfor it is working, but what else can we do to make it better for the country, what would you recommend?
8:19 am
working in partnership with the local authority as well as other providers was a big push for us during the trial period. we were able to help each other work through the problems we faced, which has made it betterfor us the problems we faced, which has made it better for us to start next week with the roll—out. some nurseries are saying they will struggle to provide these 30 hours. they are worried about increased costs a nd they are worried about increased costs and they think the whole thing might end up costing parents more. it has worked for you, but can you understand the concerns? can you hear me? i wasjust understand the concerns? can you hear me? i was just saying that some nurseries think they will struggle to pay for it. can you understand those concerns? i think we have lost them. the line to york has failed us. we will try to get them back. let's get more on that record fine for online
8:20 am
gambling company 888 holdings now. sean's here... this is about gambling companies which are under an obligation to protect vulnerable customers. particularly in an area called self exclusion where if you are coming online in poker, roulette, bingo, that kind of stuff, if you don't wa nt to that kind of stuff, if you don't want to access your account for a certain period of time, maybe because you feel like you have been doing it too much, you tick a box to say you don't want to do that and the account will be frozen. gambling companies have to offer this. but the gambling commission found that 7000 customers at eight a date had done that, but were still able to access their account over a year, where 888 did not pick up on the fa ct where 888 did not pick up on the fact that they were still accessing their account. they were depositing £3.5 million, and they were letting
8:21 am
it, winning or losing it and then betting against, £50 million worth of bets were placed. just for 7000 customers? yes. and at some point, they have said, i don't want access to my account. so the gambling commission understandably say that 888 haven't reached the standards they should reach by not recognising that it was a technical fault that meant it happened, but they didn't pick up on the fact that lots of customers who didn't want to gamble with gambling. and this is a sensitive time for the industry, because the way they look after people who might have a gambling problem is under great scrutiny. completely. we spoke to the boss of ladbrokes earlier and they were one of many gambling firms who are being looked at at the minute for various ways they are treating their customers. the competition and markets authority are looking at those offers you see" gamble with us, we will double your money if you get a certain amount", but they hold
8:22 am
onto your money for a certain amount of time. so there are various different authorities. they are looking at the gambling industry closely. it has been a busy morning. you can always bet on that. we have heard a lot in the last week of those terrible floods on the other side of the atlantic in the southern united states, but we are now go to talk about some potentially even more disastrous weather conditions on the other side of the world in india, nepal and bangladesh on the other side of the world in india, nepaland bangladesh in on the other side of the world in india, nepal and bangladesh in the last month. heavy monsoon rains have forced hundreds of thousands from their homes. more than 1000 people have died and the red cross has described the situation is one of the worst regional humanitarian crises in years. we spoke to hannah butler from the red cross, crises in years. we spoke to hannah butlerfrom the red cross, who is at a campfor butlerfrom the red cross, who is at a camp for displaced people in northern india. she brought us up to date. iam in iamina i am in a north—eastern state of
8:23 am
india. prior to that i was in bihar, which is the worst affected state by the floods and also one of the poorer states in india. the flooding hit a couple of months ago in bihar, and there are still a lot of water and there are still a lot of water and a lot of damage and a lot of people still out of their homes. the last surviving and getting on with things as well as they can, but there has been a lot of damage. the numbers are huge. across india, bangladesh and nepal, 41 people —— 41 million people are affected. and the damage is such that while people are looking after each other and surviving initially, they're coping mechanisms are going to be stretched and they will soon start needing help with shelter with water, with food, with helping them get back onto their feet because these floods have washed away homes and everything in them in bihar a couple
8:24 am
of days ago, it looked like a river. and then someone would come up and tell me, this is where my house was. we have seen pictures of the flooding and water washing down streets, carrying people and positions with it. we have seen a lot of pictures out of the united states with tropical storm harvey and the american response to that disaster. but i suppose responding toa disaster. but i suppose responding to a disaster where you are is much more difficult. is it possible to compare the way they have been able to deal with things where you are in northern india? what is going on in the united states is terrible as well, like what is going on here. here in india, bangladesh and nepal, the numbers are significant and the infrastructure is such that it is ha rd to infrastructure is such that it is hard to respond and get the people. a community i met a couple of days
8:25 am
ago were flooded two weeks ago and they only got access by road two or three days ago. and that time, they we re three days ago. and that time, they were provided by a from the indian government. it's a very different landscape, different to rain, different way of working. but like in the states, flooding is happening and it is important that we caff star eye over this side of the world to see what is going on. do you feel like you are getting to grips with it? there is a long way to go, because the need is a huge and needs will grow. the disaster is not over when the floodwaters recede. at this stage, assessments are still being carried out and as the waters are receding, we are getting a clearer idea of the extent of the damage. let's try to get the children's
8:26 am
minister robert goodwill back to talk about the free health care. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. some of us got woken up good morning. some of us got woken up by good morning. some of us got woken up by some pretty heavy showers and thunderstorms across the north west of england and the west of wales this morning. as we go through today, many of us at some point will probably see the odd shower or two. but for many, it is a drive —— dry
8:27 am
and chilly start. but you can see how these showers will spread across most parts. so, through the afternoon, showers spreading across the south—west with sunny spells in between. after a disappointingly cool day yesterday across the south—east with temperatures of only 13 degrees, today those temperatures up 13 degrees, today those temperatures up to 19 or20. 13 degrees, today those temperatures up to 19 or 20. scattered showers across wales, england, northern ireland and scotland as well, and maximum temperatures across scotland 14-16dc. maximum temperatures across scotland 14—16dc. through this evening, those showers will continue for a time, and gradually as night sets in we will see the showers fading away, and for many with clear skies it is once again going to be quite chilly. in the countryside, temperatures could be as low as two or three celsius, so a chilly start to friday
8:28 am
morning. a few showers developing, but they won't be as widespread as today, so on friday it is confined towards the pennines, towards eastern parts of england into the afternoon. for most of us it is dry with highs of 15—21dc. going into the weekend, high pressure squeezing infor the weekend, high pressure squeezing in for saturday, but this area of low pressure will move in for sunday. but for saturday, a largely dry day for most of us, fairly light winds as well, maximum temperatures into the high teens, low 20s, and it will feel quite pleasant. goodbye. this little vessel alone has rescued 30 people so far, and the situation is developing quite quickly. get the. ray. hello.
8:29 am
this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. slashing taxes? president trump promises to reform america's tax code — but will it be enough to stop us firms stashing cash overseas? live from london, that's our top story on thursday 31st august. top us companies are keeping $2.5 trillion in profits abroad, so can president trump persuade them to bring it back to
8:30 am
the states by cutting taxes? also in the programme, india's illegal cash crackdown fails — we're live in mumbai to find out why.

261 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on