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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 2, 2017 8:00am-9:00am BST

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hello this is breakfast, with jon kay and mega munchetty. more rain is battering parts of south asia — 41 million people have already been affected by monsoon downpours, according to the un. more than 1,400 people have died in the storms — the region's worst flooding in a decade. good morning — it's saturday the 2nd of september. a chemical plant in texas explodes after its cooling system is wrecked by floodwater — president trump will visit victims of hurricane harvey later today. could plans to charge utility companies by the hourfor digging up roads when they repair their pipes and cables cut traffic delays? tennis superstar serena williams has given birth to her first child. it's a baby girl. no news on her name so far. in sport...
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world cup qualifier wins for scotland, england and northern ireland. gordon strachan‘s scotland side kept alive their hopes for russia 2018, with a 3—0 win in lithuania. remember that? it was the much—loved soap famous for wobbly scenery and outlandish plotlines, we'll look at the lost crossroads episodes being shown for the first time in over 50 years. and tomasz has the weather. the weekend is looking a little mixed. a nice bright day today, tomorrow, one for the sunday papers, a lot of grey cloud and some rain on the way, but not for everybody. good morning. first, our main story. more heavy rain is falling in south asia where this year's monsoon season has left millions of people displaced. it's now believed more than m00 people have died. parts of india's financial
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centre, mumbai, are under several feet of water. 0ur south asia correspondent justin rowlatt is in the eastern state of bihar, one of the worst affected areas. hejoins us now live on bbc brea kfast. hejoins us now live on bbc breakfast. we have heard reports some of the worst brain has died away, that the level of the water has dropped, but i guess it is exposing the damage that has happened? yes, that's exactly right. it is exposing all sorts of issues that need to be dealt with. homes, schools, the roads need to be rebuilt and of course, floodwater brings with it the threat of disease. we've been talking to the red cross today, we've been at the local hospital, there are people in there with diarrhoea and other waterborne diseases. they are anxious about the effect that will
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have. 12 million people, that is right, 12 million peoplejust in this one indian state have had to leave their home. many of them are living in temporary shelters, some just sticks that some top paulin on top. they are very, very vulnerable top. they are very, very vulnerable to disease. there is very little clea n water to disease. there is very little clean water and no sanitation. the red cross teams are out there to try and provide them with clean water, food and other supplies they need, but it is a huge, huge struggle. as you can see, it isn't raining here in bihar, but that doesn't mean that this crisis is over. that area is used to very heavy monsoon rain. clearly this is exceptionally heavy and prolonged. do you get a sense the authorities there, the agencies, were prepared for it to be this bad, this time? this is exceptional. 0nce for it to be this bad, this time? this is exceptional. once a decade kind of scale of flood. the
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authorities recognise flooding happens often. the problem is, they simply aren't resources to deal with the scale of a crisis like this. as i say, just in this state, 12 million people displaced. across india, 17 million people affected. really a very large number of people affected. hospitals in india are stretched out the best of times, and a huge number of people now suffering from diarrhoea and other diseases added to that, and it is a real problem. the emergency services, they don't have boats or the resources to go out in the floodwater to go and help people. the people themselves are incredibly poon the people themselves are incredibly poor. people in bihar are often subsistence farmers, the poorest people in the entire world. they have very little, their houses are fragile a makeshift den easily destroyed, and when they swept away, as many have been, these people are
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not able to withstand the rigours. they don't have savings or money to rebuild. so it is a huge problem. listen, when you look back over floods, which stretch all the way from bangladesh to pakistan, when you look at the responses to these floods, in previous years big floods, in previous years big floods, and there have been many over the decades, have much higher death tolls. in a sense that is a measure that suggests to us governments are getting better. having said that, a figure of moo people killed by the floods tells us there is still a huge, huge challenge here in south asia. justin, reporting from bihar, thank you for the update. a huge challenge there thatjustin was talking about south asia battles with the floods and flood damage. there is also damage in the us. president trump is to visit texas again today, to assess the flood damage caused by hurricane harvey. he'll fly to houston, accompanied by the first lady, where he'll meet survivors
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and volunteers involved in the relief effort. a chemical plant near to the city has exploded after its cooling system was damaged by floodwaters. our us correspondent barbara plett usher has been out with the emergency services, to assess the damage across houston. the sheriffs of houston are still working 12—hour shifts, even though the floodwaters they battled earlier in the week are mostly gone. like nothing they have ever experienced before, a disaster on a scale rarely seen in the us. the water was over this bridge right here. they remember the ones they were not able to rescue. some of them weren't able to get out in time for them to get help, and they were basically stuck inside their house, you know. and they're crippled, or they can't even get outside of their residence, and they died. the sweep of the storm caught people by surprise. after sitting over houston for days, it continued east, keeping emergency crews busy right through the east. in harvey's wake, there
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is massive disruption. chemical spills started fires at this chemical plant. more are expected, spreading anxiety about toxins. and, in mucky, waterlogged neighbourhoods, now comes the sober reckoning. what can be salvaged, how much is lost, and who will pay the enormous bill? the trump administration got good marks for its early response to this disaster. now, it has to show the staying power needed to help recover and rebuild. this will be the big test. utility companies could be charged by the hourfor digging up busy roads, when they work on improving their infrastructure — this under plans being put forward by the government. ministers hope the policy would force contractors in england to speed up repairs, or carry out work at night to reduce traffic delays caused by their projects. richard main reports.
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mile after mile, hour after hour of delays caused by roadworks. it's thought one in every three of ourjourneys is held up like this. around 2.5 million roadworks are carried out every year in england, costing the economy an estimated £4 billion in lost working hours and delayed deliveries. utility companies aren't responsible for every excavated carriageway or set of temporary traffic lights, but it's hoped this new scheme may persuade them to carry out their work more quickly or at night, so as to cause less disruption. under the proposals, councils could charge utility companies up to £2500 per site to work on roads during the day. when trialled in london back in 2012, this led to a 42% drop in the levels of disruption caused by roadworks. we've been trialling it in london and kent and it's proved extremely successful, and we estimate that there's been about 600 less incursions into the highway surface than would have happened otherwise.
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so now we're on extending the scheme nationwide. the idea has been cautiously welcomed by the aa and the rac, but they've warned that these changes mustn't read the works being rushed or slapdash, simply to hand road as quickly as possible. the local government association has praised the success of the pilot schemes and called for other councils to be given the new powers as soon as possible. the former shadow women's and equalities minister sarah champion has been talking about divisions in the country. we are going to talk to our political correspondent, in our london newsroom. sarah champion caused some controversy about an article that her name was put two and comments about men who groom young women? yes, sarah champion has apologised for the poor choice of words used in that article in last month's the sun
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newspaper, in which it was said britain has a problem with british pakistani men raping and exploiting white girls following a child abuse scandal in newcastle. in herfirst interview since resigning, in today's times, she said her e—mail inbox has gone nuts with members of the police, social workers and health professionals thanking her for raising the issue. she goes into more detail about the issue today. she describes the crime model of the sex gangs, which he says are full of friends and extended family members, trafficking goals to other friends and family members. she reiterates her view that it is mostly pakistani men involved. she says... it's one thing to recognise a cry model, recognising why it has planted such deep root is a different challenge altogether. she accuses the left of being too afraid of being called racist than tackling, and that stopping them
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tackling, and that stopping them tackling this issue head on. she said she would rather be called racist than turn a blind eye to child abuse, perhaps unshackled because she has now left the labour front bench. she accuses maybe labour politicians who live in london not being challenged by reality playing out in the rest of the country. the labour party has responded. jeremy corbyn, who initially accepted her resignation, said effective action is needed to tackle child abuse that stigmatising entire communities is wrong. thank you very much. the investigation into the chemical cloud which affected parts of east sussex last sunday, is looking into the possibility that it may have been caused by emissions from shipwrecks in the channel. sounds bizarre. the beach at birling gap, near eastbourne, was closed until the haze disappeared. the maritime and coastguard agency is now investigating, as adina campbell reports. a mysterious mist which engulfed holidaymakers in east sussex. it led to birling gap beach,
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near beachy head, being evacuated, after people reported having irritated eyes, sore throats, and vomiting. i had a bit of a dry chest. and then, as we came off the beach, then it really kind of hit, and we were all kind of coughing a little bit. and my children were really, really upset, because their eyes were really painful. coastguard rescue teams raced to help clear the area, but by the end of sunday evening, around 150 people had to be treated, with others reporting discomfort. sussex police said those who required treatment experienced mostly minor effects. monitoring equipment was used at the time to try and identify the cause, but the readings were inconclusive. the maritime and coastguard agency now think the gas may have come from one of the many shipwrecks in the english channel. it is also investigating discharges from passing ships or lost cargo
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as a possible cause. tennis star serena williams has given birth to a baby girl at a clinic in florida. there's no name as yet. news of the birth came as auntie venus prepared to go out on court at the us open. congratulations have been pouring in from sports stars and celebrities, including beyonce, rafa nadal, and wimbledon champion garbine mugurutha. crowds at the bournemouth air festival have been wowed by one of the world's first aero—pyrotechnic display teams. these are great pictures from overnight. these are pictures of the ‘twister‘ duo, who have been putting on a spectacular night flying display. look at that! the lights on the plains and coming out of the back as well. they ducked and dived, illuminating the sky, whilst thousands of people watched from below.
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i don't think i've ever heard one of those displays at night before, a whole new world of possibilities! amazing. it is 8.14. monsoon rains in south asia have caused some of the worst flooding the region has seen in a decade, leaving an area the size of the uk under water. the figures are shocking. with 41 million people affected, the british red cross has launched an emergency appeal. its teams have been on the ground in india, bangladesh and nepal since the flooding began two weeks ago. let's find out what stage the relief effort is out. let's talk to alex ca rle from the charity, who's in our london newsroom. thank you for talking to us this morning. can you tell us what your teams are doing, which areas they are focusing on, wed the devastation is worst? so, there is more than 1800 red
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cross volunteers across the three countries, while working to find the missing and to repatriate people with theirfamilies. missing and to repatriate people with their families. today people to emergency shelters, to provide them with safe, clean drinking water, food, shelter, temporary shelter and then food and clothing. we were talking to our reporter who is in north india. he was saying this time around, we have reported on flooding in the region before, the death toll is lower, still high at 40 million, but the response from the governments has been better. would you say that is what you are witnessing as well? yes, absolutely. flooding does happen in this region, in these regions on a regular basis but this is definitely at a much greater scale than what we have seen recently. you can imagine that in bangladesh more than a third of the
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country is affected and underwater, and how that might feel in the united kingdom if that scale of devastation happened across the country. so who trains are out, roads are blocked, bridges have been damaged. more than 1000 schools are now closed, medical centres are affected by the flooding as well, even though there is increased need for medical services. more than a million homes have been affected by the floods as well. this is an incredible scale of disaster. how are the governments reacting across the region? for bangladesh government is trying to control the water flow. there has government is trying to control the waterflow. there has been a lot government is trying to control the water flow. there has been a lot of preparation. the red cross across the three countries works in these areas, to reduce the risks when flooding happens but this has surpassed the expected levels. the governments are responding, along with the red cross volunteers, to help people in the short—term, to bring them to safety, but also to look in the longer term about how to
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reduce the risks in the future and how to reduce the risk of cholera and further disease outbreaks affecting even more people in the short—term. affecting even more people in the short-term. with so many people displaced, where are they going, what kind of temporary accommodation or permanent accommodation have they been directed to? in the different countries, there are so many people communities affected, it will be different in different places. some people are having to make shift their own accommodation, others will be living in homes. people will be opening their doors. 0n the governments will be clearing some areas, trying to provide accommodation for them in the short—term. tarpaulins are being distributed, to help provide cover from the shelter from red cross volunteers. what you need the most, in terms of aid? the british red cross has launched an appeal. funds would help us to provide, to get food out to people as soon as
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possible. to help the governments to reduce the risk of cholera and other waterborne disease outbreaks, and to help these people to rebuild their lives. there's going to be an impact on the food, because a lot of the food is grown in the most fertile areas on the flood plains, so it will have an impact on food production in these countries for at least the next six months. funds will help to provide food and fill some of these gaps. thank you for your time with us this morning. 8.18am. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning... more heavy rain is battering parts of southern asia, which has been devastated by flooding, leaving millions of people homeless and more than 1400 dead. utility companies could soon be charged by—the—hour for digging up busy roads in england. the government believes the policy would force contractors to speed up repairs. lots of people have plans for that
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last burst of summer over the weekend, maybe going camping or doing some sport. blue skies? just a burst of summer, sort of. it is not going to be that spectacular as far as temperatures go this weekend. but decent enough. a nice bright day. bright rather than sunny, because some of us will see these fair weather clouds developing and maybe a couple of light showers. here is the window of fine weather. here is the window of fine weather. here in the atlantic, a rather large area of cloud that is rolling in our direction and that will bring as a lot of damp weather. initially tomorrow to western areas and then other parts of the country will get it. not in the short term, in the short term we have this fine summer... it is still summer but 1st
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of september is meteorological autumn. we're well into that now. as far as this afternoon is concerned, fine weather in the north of scotla nd fine weather in the north of scotland down to the south coast of england. temperatures are more or less the same wherever you are, weather you are belfast, aberystwyth, nottingham, down into brighten, all around 17—19. london a lwa ys brighten, all around 17—19. london always a little warmer. i mentioned always a little warmer. i mentioned a couple of showers in the south—east, that is pretty much it. here comes the rain, quite heavy at this stage but the thing about this rain band is as it moves from west to east, this weather front will be very slow, but also it is going to start to sort of break up a little bit. the rain will get less and less heavy. i think in the end what we will end up with is overcast skies across many areas. that rain is starting to break up a little bit and become a bit more patchy. it gives us an indication it won't be raining all the time tomorrow, it will be burst of rain and many
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eastern areas will probably stayed right right through the course of the afternoon. places like hull and norwich. even later in the day the sun might come out, for example in belfast. he is a summary for the weekend. today's the day to do it if you are out and about, sunny saturday, and tomorrow the umbrellas out. a bit of both, just like this picture, some sunshine and the umbrellas! thank you very much indeed. it is a 21 am. time for a look at the saturday morning papers. mike barton, the chief constable of durham police is here to tell us what's caught his eye. good morning. we're going to dive straight in. this is a debate we had yesterday or the day before... it all blends into one. the raf opening combat roles to females. we had a debate about if infantrymen would feel safe with women next to them on the front line and whether women were physically
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capable or as strong to be able to have close combat and take an an enemy, a man, biggerthan themselves. iam themselves. i am having some difficulty because i have never been in the army. i was an raf cadet. but policewomen, women police officers, have been in the front line for decades and they've proven themselves over decades to be as equipped as men. and they have violent situations to deal with. so i have difficulty with this. all i would do is reassure the doubters, to say try it, because i think you'd be surprised just how effective women can be. i'm going to play devils advocate. 0ne women can be. i'm going to play devils advocate. one of the many arguments that comes are that if you area arguments that comes are that if you are a male serving officer, let's say a police officer, and you can tell us from your experience, and you are with a female police officer and ina you are with a female police officer and in a violent situation, your
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instinct is to protect the smaller, weaker, physically weaker female. therefore it distracts you from doing yourjob. that is one of the arguments. has anyone ever said that to you? it is really interesting, this. most of our officers are assaulted when there are more than one of them. so if you actually look at the injuries... if an officer is on their rome, they are less likely to be solved it. our analysis says thatis to be solved it. our analysis says that is because they adopt a slightly different approach to that. so the more aggressively that you attend situation, the more likely you are afterwards to be assaulted. so what we finding is it is communication skills that are the key when it comes to policing. that is why i had that caveat at the start, that i have never been in the army, and clearly there are some army, and clearly there are some army situations where you can't talk your way out of it, you have to shoot your way out of it. we have armed officers who are female as
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well. i have absolutely never come across any situation where i have had any doubt about the effectiveness of policewomen. i do know people say that. all i am saying is, my experience, it'sjust not the case. i think there are gender stereotypes just underneath, and people are saying, people have different bodies and all that sort of thing. i'm not buying it, frankly, absolutely not. interesting. let's to this story from the times. utility companies, gas, electricity and phone companies eating up the road than it can take weeks and causes trafficjams. the government are talking about charging them, £2500 an hour in some cases to try and give them a bit of an incentive. i am going for the popular vote here and hoping eve ryo ne popular vote here and hoping everyone is cheering at home that i have picked this story. it is just really, it makes you cross, doesn't it? when the roads are blocked and
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it's all empty. i remember whenjohn major, the prime minister, talked about traffic cones. seriously, this is burning up the roads. of course, when you have stationery traffic you also increase pollution. the one thing i have always questioned is why are these pipes under the road? why can't they be under the side of the road? i'm sure there is a perfectly reasonable explanation, but i would like somebody to think about putting the gas pipes... that would be a big job, about putting the gas pipes... that would be a bigjob, moving about putting the gas pipes... that would be a big job, moving the pipes. you would only have to do it one. lots of people getting in touch saying you charge the utility companies £2500, it is the customers of them that end up paying it because the bills go up and stop kerry you are probably right. this isa kerry you are probably right. this is a favourite of ours, it has made me quite sad. end of the line for yellow pages imprint. tell us what you have picked this out. yellow pages imprint. tell us what you have picked this outlj
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yellow pages imprint. tell us what you have picked this out. i didn't realise that the yellow pages only started in 1966 but has been with us over 50 yea rs. started in 1966 but has been with us over 50 years. it is just something that everybody has in their home, don't make? i have to say, i do miss if something goes wrong at home and you need a plumber, and electrician or anything like that, it was just really helpful to go to that page in the book. i know people are saying they are going online and things like that, but ijust sometimes have a worry when you are online that you are being pushed to people who may have paid for the advert. where as you just at that time to settle on people who you might have wanted locally. we will talk to you again in an hour. a random question, do you like mushrooms? i'm allergic to mushrooms, i'm so sorry! 0h you like mushrooms? i'm allergic to mushrooms, i'm so sorry! oh no, you're so not the right person to talk to about this next item! i will tell you why. matt is with us. he is in charge of saturday morning
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kitchen. 0ur newspaper reviewer is allergic to mushrooms! a great start. you couldn't make it up! we area bit start. you couldn't make it up! we are a bit upset because this is the best we have for our breakfast. we like mushrooms. i don't know if you can see that... mushrooms on toast for breakfast. it is pretty glamorous. you are mushroom overloading! you are mushroom overloading! you are mushroom overloading! you are a fun guy... you will be doing mushrooms all day! yes, we are, they are bang in season. we have a little rick stein treaty coming up later on. mushrooms are in season so we are going to do something with that. you have caught as in mid—flow, here about an hour earlier than usual! we just had a lovely grouse recipe from tom, delicious. we had the madness earlier, drinking beer. we have michaela with her nice lipstick on
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in the background! we are setting up to rip dill hearse heaven and hell. this is what we're up to whilst you're the sofa reading out the news. we do more than that! can you do better... with all due respect to the bbc canteen in salford, it's excellent. what could you do with mushrooms for us question i can reset your challenge? something a bit more exciting than that? that is why we are here and have a live tv show to do that. we have some great shots here and lots of ideas. 0ne up the anti? why not ask the viewers for their recipe ideas, how about that? they could send it into hashtag saturday kitchen. we can pick one to cook live later on in the what do you think?|j can pick one to cook live later on in the what do you think? i think that's a copout, you couldn't think ofa that's a copout, you couldn't think of a decent enough recipe so you have asked the viewers! it is great,
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we can go down the shops. have asked the viewers! it is great, we can go down the shopslj have asked the viewers! it is great, we can go down the shops. i have a ferrari! send him off and get some ingredients and come back and we can cook one of the viewer's recipes. and you can deliver it to us for lunch? well, if you like. manchester isa lunch? well, if you like. manchester is a long way, it might be cold! let's make sure they send the recipes into hashtag saturday kitchen. 0k, we will see you in an hour. hope you have tidied the place up hour. hope you have tidied the place up by hour. hope you have tidied the place up by then and are out of the civvies. fine. this is only come from upstairs and it's cold. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty.
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coming up before 9am, we'll get the weather with tomasz. it is nice in most places today. it isa it is nice in most places today. it is a bit rubbish tomorrow. that's technical, rubbish. but first a summary of this morning's main news. more heavy rain is falling in the parts of south asia which were worst affected by this yea r's monsoon season. it's now believed more than 1,400 people have died and millions of people have lost their homes. parts of india's financial centre, mumbai, are under several feet of water. president trump is to visit texas again today, to assess the flood damage caused by hurricane harvey. he'll fly to houston where he'll meet survivors and volunteers involved in the relief effort.
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a chemical plant near the city has exploded after its cooling system was damaged by floodwaters. utility companies could be charged by the hourfor digging up busy roads in england under plans being put forward by the government. ministers hope the policy would force contractors to speed up repairs or carry out work at night to reduce delays. trials in london and kent have indicated that firms avoided working at peak time on the busiest roads. the investigation into the chemical cloud which affected parts of east sussex last sunday is looking into the possibility that it may have been caused by emissions from known shipwrecks in the channel. the beach at birling gap, near eastbourne, was closed until the haze disappeared. around 150 people had to be treated with others reporting discomfort. the maritime and coastguard agency is now investigating. tennis star serena williams has given birth to a baby girl at a clinic in florida.
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there's no name as yet. news of the birth came as her sister venus prepared to go out on court at the us open. congratulations have been pouring in from sports stars and celebrities including beyonce, rafa nadal and ladies wimbledon champion garbine mugurutha. the yellow pages telephone directory will be printed for the last time in 2019. remember this? i don't suppose you have a copy of life fishing byjr hartley. it is rather old. it is by jr hartley. well—known for its 19805 advertising campaign featuring the fictional authorj. r hartley, who managed to find an out—of—print book, the yellow pages has been
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in production for 51 years. it will continue online. can you keep it for me? my name? oh, yes, it isjr hartley. i love it. we've upset someone in morning? who? just the one. this is david hartley. good morning mike, good morning dan. good morning mike, good morning dan. good morning mike, good morning dan. good morning david. this is david hartley. he says he spent many years having to put up with cracks about that advert even one from the sa embassy in scotland in 1990 during an inquiry. just as people were starting to forget, he says, you have to drag it up again this morning! should i get of the person responsible for that i could happily throttle he or she. cheesed off dhh.
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every time he picks up the phone he says, "i'm dh hartley." it goes back to america. 1883. it was printed in america. they didn't have enough white paper and they did it on yellow paper. they had so many uses. you used to see how many pages you could tear through! tracey said she used to take them outside and make a stage and she and her friend would perform dances on them. 101 uses for the yellow pages. let's talk about the football, dan. scotla nd let's talk about the football, dan. scotland get the award for the best performance. i was flicking between
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the games last night. england was a desperate performance. scotland defensively they shored up in their game against leut yan and it is really important they maintain that momentum and try and stay in with a shout of trying to get through qualifying for russia next year. a big game against malta in a few days' time. a 3—0 win. relief for gordon strachan who has been under britishure. they may still live to regret the points they dropped. britishure. they may still live to regret the points they droppedm could be too little, too late because they have to rely on england beating slovakia. we can hearfrom gordon strachan who is pleased. do you think we can win? yes, i think we can win. do you think you are improving? yes, i think we are improving. did i think we would have that many attempts at goals? no, i didn't think so.
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it was a game where our attack came from different angles, which was good for us, as well. if you looked at the score, you would have thoughtjob done. if you looked at the score, you would have thoughtjob donem could have been 2—0 up within four or five minutes. it could have been 2—0 up within four orfive minutes. it is one could have been 2—0 up within four or five minutes. it is one of those games where they are really strong at the back. they are not a particularly good side malta, we know that. that should be an easy game and the goals came really late in the match. at the end you think 4-0, in the match. at the end you think 4—0, that's fine, but it is the fact that malta managed to frustrate england for so long in that game and you can see why fans are getting miffed after last night's performance. what about the fact that england could turn around its frustration and score four goals? that's the positive that gareth southgate will put on it. i heard him speaking. i'll shut up and you listen to gareth southgate because he has been in this position before. of course, we would like to have scored our goals earlier. if we had scored our goals earlier
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tonight, it would have helped make things different. for me, that is the benefit of having played for england, because i have been involved in nights like this before. i have seen other managers go through it. i have been on the pitch when we haven't scored loads of goals, against teams who are supposedly minnows, because they're so well organised. so it goes with the territory. northern ireland won in san marino. they only need a point to guarantee the play—offs. that's a great performance. it is another amazing campaign and carrying on from what we have seen in recent seasons. this is charlton. i'm hijacking your sports bulletin. josh mcguinness got two and stephen davis got a penalty as well. we need to talk about wales and austria tonight. we will have insight into how important wales'
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campaign is considering how well they did in the euros. when was that now? last year. you were there! i know! we had the olympics in between that as well. we we have gotjohn walters talking about the republic of ireland who take on georgia today and probably the moves that didn't go through as well as those that did. we have got an update on the game for grenfell. so we will feature that today and forest green rovers, now, they are a team that brea ks rovers, now, they are a team that breaks the mould. can i ask where forest green rovers is from? forest of dean. i don't want e-mails about me not knowing! it is unconventional because they were taken over by the owner who is in green energy. they
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don't have any meat at the ground. it is ve began food. they travel in an economically friendly way. they are trying to build a new stadium made out of wood. they don't want concrete in the stadium. they are in league football for the first time. mark has been to see them and it is a really interesting insight into how to do football differently. you like your golf, dan. we have got professional crazy golf coming up. it is just putting ought the time. professional crazy golf coming up. it isjust putting ought the timelj ta ke it isjust putting ought the timelj take it you have been out and about. there'll be no british interest in the second week of the us open after kyle edmund was forced to retire in his third round clash with denis shapovalov. the match was evenly poised at a set all with both players getting into the rhythm. butjust as the contest was heating up, edmund called for the physio, citing a neck problem. he returned to the court briefly, losing the third set, before reluctantly retiring at the start of the fourth.
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ijust feel a bit helpless, really. what can i do, you know? do you carry on to the end, but you just go through the motions in a sorry state? and you don't want to pull out straightaway. you want to see is this going to get better? but ultimately, i thought, i'm not going to win two more sets like this. you know, iwas... i knew that i wasn't going to win two more sets feeling like that. maria sharapova has made it through to the fourth round, in herfirst grand slam event since returning to the game, following a 15—month drugs ban. the 2006 champion, beat teenage american, sofia kenin, on the main show court so the arthur ashe court where she's plyed all three of her matches, in the tournament so far. and afterwards she hit back at caroline wozniacki's complaints, that sharapova gets favourable treatment, when it comes to the show courts. with regards to scheduling as you
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know i don't make the schedule and you know i'm a pretty big competitor and if you put me out in the parking lot of queen's in new york city i'm happy to play there. that's not what matters to me. all that matters to me is i'm in the fourth round and i'm not sure where she is. such a stinging comment from sharapova. the domestic rugby union season got off to a pulsating start last night '{ (£5"i;st;£2;;e£:.1::§£¢57>~:—?§=4:73 e—z. when gloucester full back jason woodward popped up in the 82nd minute, of the game, to snatch an opening day victory. in the nights other premiership game, newcastle beat worcester 35—8. the expanded pro 14 also got underway last night and it was an impressive start for ulster. they beat league debuta nts the south african side the cheetahs 42—19. all black, charles pee—a—tow, scoring one of ulster‘s six tries. there were also wins,
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for edinburgh and munster. iam sure i am sure all of us would have played crazy golf at some point. but did you know if you're good enough, you can turn professional. the world championships took place in hastings, earlier this summer and the british team, leave for croatia this week for the world adventure golf masters. earlier this summer they came flocking to the home of crazy golf at hastings which has hosted the world championship for the last 15 yea rs. world championship for the last 15 years. it may not be st andrew's, but attention to detail is just the same. they do have some of the most challenging including the water mill. while for most of us it is just a bit of fun on holiday, some like three time champion chris here ta ke like three time champion chris here take it very seriously indeed. a lot of people say crazy golf, but when they come and try it and see how
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skilful it can be. you can go around the country opening courses and advertising crazy golf video games i've done in the past. so you get to play internationally as well. at least in miniature golf you don't have to worry about big tee shots and the power of your shot and it is about the putting, isn't it? and the power of your shot and it is about the putting, isn't mm and the power of your shot and it is about the putting, isn't it? it is about the putting, isn't it? it is about the putting, isn't it? it is about the putting. he has got past the blades or the arms of the windmill. it is a risk. it is a blustery day so the windmill is apt today. has it gone through? 0h, blustery day so the windmill is apt today. has it gone through? oh, it went through, but too long. mini golf started in the usa in the 1920s when rooftop courses popped up everywhere in new york. it was an easy way for inner city golfers to improve their putting. they come from over the world to compete including 0livia from the czech republic who won in 2013 and turned professional when she was aged seven and perhaps why 0livia was crowned world champion again this summer. and perhaps why 0livia was crowned world champion again this summerlj world champion again this summer.” started playing when i was three yea rs started playing when i was three years old. i like it. it is myjob.
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and my life. it is part of a world scene now in crazy golf. our great britain team are going over to croatia to play in the world golf masters. we play against people across the world. america have a team. there is this whole domestic and international scene, but the world crazy golf championship, there is nothing like it. it is so unique. the world championship which offers a £1,000 prize is open to amateurs too using whatever they can find, but it is the professionals who go on to represent great britain at the masters in croatia. for all of us, crazy golf can be oh so frustrating. all the holes are par two, include the helter—skelter. could it go? no! cani the helter—skelter. could it go? no! can i have that? it bubbled out. so close to a hole in one!
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i love the idea that you can putt with anything. so you could putt with anything. so you could putt with anything. so you could putt with a stick of celery? i don't think you'd find the professionals doing that with a guitar. you need 11 hole in ones. the courses are so random and different. itjust takes practise. i think i'd go mad. you'd go crazy! i have had 11 in my entire life in crazy golf. i love golf. you love golf. you enjoy golf.” life in crazy golf. i love golf. you love golf. you enjoy golf. i do. it's all right. how much do you love golf? i prefer other things! i'm not a big golfer. i know you love golf.
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i know i'm in the minority. i'm not good with aiming. i can't even play pool to be honest. good with aiming. i can't even play poolto be honest. you're good good with aiming. i can't even play pool to be honest. you're good at the weather! yeah, i'm good at other things as well, you know! like what? are you sure? laughter we're saving you. you can do the weather and we'll shut up with our nonsense. i bet these are straw bales, i have been corrected before. 0h, wasi bales, i have been corrected before. 0h, was i corrected! you're not good at that either. these are straw bales, they tweeted me last time. ways in trouble. she is giggling. they all are in fact. let's move on with the weather. that's what i'm here to do. we have got fine weather. the clouds are rolling in. so tomorrow not such a great day because the cloud will be over us. if you can get out there today,
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enjoy the fine, sunny weather because it will be a good day. a bright day because there will be clouds building through the day. let's look at the afternoon. this is 4pm. 17 celsius in belfast, 18 celsius in glasgow. we will get 18 celsius in glasgow. we will get 18 celsius in glasgow. we will get 18 celsius in newcastle. the winds are light. this time of the year the sun is strong so it should feel pleasant. notice in the south east, it is off the edge of the screen. this is fine here. but off the edge of the screen you can see a couple of the screen you can see a couple of light showers developing here. these are brief ones. most of us won't catch them. here comes the rain. the rain could be heavy towards the end of the night or early on sunday morning in some western areas particularly ascot hills of wales. it could be heavy for a time hills of wales. it could be heavy fora time in hills of wales. it could be heavy for a time in northern ireland and south—western scotland, but this front slows down a little bit as it rides up this high pressure. that basically means once it starts
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slowing down it will also start raining itself out so the clouds will start breaking up a little bit so there will be damp weather, but i don't want to give an impression of a wash out tomorrow because it is not going to be a wash out. it is overall a cloudy day with rain on and off, and at times it could be wet, but not all the time. later in the afternoon and evening the rain pushes further east. i have taken enough of your time. let's look at the weekend summary, saturday is the sunniest day and tomorrow most of us will need our brollies. back to you and your golfing discussions! i stepped on my lead and it has been pulled out. i can't hear you. anyway, back to you. thank you. you were right, he's no good. he's brilliant. you've probably heard
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of campaigns like dry—january, or go soberfor 0ctober, setup to encourage people to quit drinking for a month. and new figures suggest that the number of people who are cutting back on the booze is rising. we'll chat more about this in a moment but first, katie silver reports. there is a difference. there is no booze in them. it is because these women are all going alcohol—free.” was a binge drinker. it wouldn't be that i would want to drink every night. but when i did i had no stop button. i always wanted more. night. but when i did i had no stop button. ialways wanted more. no limit. i was like a different person when i was drinking. i had black—outs because i would drink so much. if i went away for a weekend, it was 30 pointst pints. they signed up it was 30 pointst pints. they signed upfora programme, it was 30 pointst pints. they signed up for a programme, one year, it was 30 pointst pints. they signed upfora programme, one year, no beer. it is the brainchild of ray
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fairbanks. it was causing trouble. it wasn't that acceptable to be hung over or coming up it wasn't that acceptable to be hung over or coming up at 4am. it has seen a ten fold increase in membership this year alone. its aim is to change the peer pressure around giving up drinking and to give you tactics for being in the pub. you go to the pub, you tip the barman, you puts a non alcoholic beer with lemonade into a pint glass and nobody knows. you have fake looking gin and tonics. with more brits banishing the booze, sales of non alcoholic drinks are booming. in five years the amount of low or alcohol—free beer sold in the uk has risen by nearly 50%. for these women, getting off the booze is already providing them with many rewards. things like clarity of thought and quickness of thought.” lost four stone. i train six days a
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week. i run around like a nutterand everything i want to do, i can go and do. and that's something we can all raise a mocktail to. joining us now is gp, dr amrit ryatt and david barnicle, who set up the uk's first dry bar. a dry bar sounds like a contradiction in terms. explains how it works. what's it like if i go there? if you go there, you wouldn't know it is the place that's trying to do what it does which is provide refuge because it is slap—bang in the middle of the city centre. it is a vibrant place and looks really good. we serve lovely food and we have a massive array of different non alcoholic drinks and loads of events going on. you would just think it is an ordinary social space
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but it works because it is not only nor people in recovery, people are starting to frequent places like that because people are choosing a different way of socialising. so no wine, no gin, nothing at the bar? no. 0k. that's fine. dr, why do you think places like this are becoming more popular? we often report on how alcohol intake is a problem and people are lying when they go to their gps people are lying when they go to theirgps and people are lying when they go to their gps and say how much they're taking. 0ryou are their gps and say how much they're taking. or you are seeing more diseases or more effects of drinking? i think despite people having a better relationship with alcohol on the whole there are still alcohol on the whole there are still a lot of people who have had struggles with alcohol either through dependence or problematic drinking and the same with drugs and to set up a space where they can get together, support each other, access other services as well, either psychological services we discussed
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alternative therapy to support them through the next stage of their journey, that's a brilliant idea. so it is good to have the option. it's good to be in a place where you don't feel you have to drink and if you want to have a drink, its good to be able to go for a drink without, welling knowing what your limits are and perhaps drinking in a more responsible way. does it have to be so specific not drinking? when is it going to get to the point as in you need help or you need to recover? you need guidance as to how not to drink? is there going to be a point where not drinking is fine? people here say that it is almost embarrassing saying you have given up embarrassing saying you have given up alcohol because it is like you say you have given up alcohol because you have had a problem? say you have given up alcohol because you have had a problem7m depends on the experience thaw want when you're going out socially. we are not trying to compete with the night life and what people are hoping to get from those nights. it is offering an alternative and
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making people see that you can still bond with people and enjoy things without having a drink, but that's not to say that people can't enjoy themselves. it is not a replacement and it doesn't have to go to the extreme. someone and it doesn't have to go to the extreme . someone has and it doesn't have to go to the extreme. someone has been in touch on twitter saying having seen the film that the ladies sitting around drinking the mocktails, but how much do they cost? it can be just as expensive and sometimes more expensive and sometimes more expensive to go for the non alcoholic alternative especially when they are full of fut juice? there is cheaper alternatives for healthy things as well. soft drinks like lemonade and things like that, they are probably cheaper than a mocktail, but there is no alcohol. i think cost is an implication we mentioned before about university
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freshers not spending as much on alcohol and seeing different age groups spending less on alcohol because their budgets are tighter. so the positive effect of that is they are healthier i guess, but for me as they are healthier i guess, but for measa they are healthier i guess, but for me asa gp they are healthier i guess, but for measagpi they are healthier i guess, but for me as a gp i would be keen for people to be doing it for other reasons for health motivated reasons rather than be stuck with no option andl rather than be stuck with no option and i would encourage people to try and i would encourage people to try and find a more moderate path. i don't think people should be forced to drink nothing, but if that works for them, great or to be, the other extreme we don't want that either because that's got health implications, everyone could learn from moderating things better. you included? me included. it is good to hear that the doctors are human. graham says he has given up alcoholment he didn't need a support group and has lost weight. are disease and january busy times? they
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are. it isjust disease and january busy times? they are. it is just as busy as any other. there is a rise with people trying to do it for the first time. it is changing habits, isn't it? trying to do it for the first time. it is changing habits, isn't mm is changing habits. yeah, it isjust about trying something and i mean i think the difference is as well with the alcohol, that's the centre of your evening when you are going out for a drink. when you're on the mocktails you are not going out for them, they might be a back—up to something different. thank you very much indeed. thank you for your chents and for getting in touch. we will try and read out more in the next hour. famous for its wobbly sets and slightly shaky story lines, crossroads was one of the country's favourite tv shows, running for almost 5,000 episodes. but most of the programmes were never kept. but a team of archive hunters has unearthed some lost
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clips from the 19605 and they'll be shown to fans later today. ben sidwell has had an exclusive preview. hello david. good grief is that the time? from the 19605 through to the 19805 crossroads was something of a national treasure. filmed in birmingham, the soap opera regularly drew audiences of up to 15 million people. it's jill chance. for fans of the programme jane ro55ington is a very familiar face having played the character jill throughout almost all of cro55roads 4,928 epi5ode5. so who better to bring to birmingham city university to watch part of the programme not seen for more than 50 years. i can't believe it all.
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i'm still not convinced that i wasn't at that wedding. i seem to remember quite a lot about it. i think it was the first wedding we'd ever done. de5pite recording five epi5ode5 a week, the majority of the early programmes were destroyed. it was too expensive the tape. so they used to wipe the tape and just reuse it which is probably why these odd bit5 ju5t get left behind. but now a team of birmingham archive hunter5 led by chris perry have managed to track down some of the earliest 5urviving programmes, believed to have been lost forever. in many ways this is a quite a holy grail for cro55roads fans. some of the footage was very mixed up. some cans would have footage from the 19705 in it and in the same can something from 1965 so there was no real method to how it had been stored. you're not supposed to be here. outside if you please. the characters that were in it were not really bizarre. they were people you knew and i think that was the magic of it. later today, fans of cro55roads will get their own chance to watch this rediscovered piece of soap
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opera history for the first time in more than half a century. it is it the classic tune, tea—time, cro55 road5. it is it the classic tune, tea—time, cross roads. i remember the characters as well. i hope you enjoyed that. the headlines are next. we will see you soon. hello this is breakfast, withjon kay and naga munchetty. yet more rain is battering parts of south asia. 41 million people have already been affected by monsoon downpours,
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according to the un. more than 1400 people have died in the storms — the region's wor5t flooding in a decade. good morning. it's saturday the 2nd of september. al5o also on the programmed... a chemical plant in texas explodes, after its cooling system i5 wrecked by floodwater. president trump will visit victim5 of hurricane harvey later today. could plans to charge utility companies by the hourfor digging up road5 when they repair their pipes and cables cut traffic delays?

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