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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 3, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with ben thompson and sally nugent. north korea appears to have carried out another nuclear test. in the last hour, china and the united states say they have detected tremors that could indicate an underground explosion. earlier, the state news agency released pictures of leader kim jong—un inspecting what it said was a new hydrogen bomb. good morning, it's sunday the third of september. also ahead: nhs bosses in england ask for more money to avoid and other winter crisis. theresa may calls for unity to prevent a tory rebellion over brexit, as the commons prepares to debate legislation to leave the european union. a dozen britons are arrested in spain, by police investigating a drug dealing ring in magaluf. in sport, wales has a new wonderkid. teenager ben woodburn scored the winner on his debut to keep their world cup hopes alive.
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and tomasz has the weather. we have been forecasting rain for today. it is on its way but some of us today. it is on its way but some of us actually may end up with a pretty bright day. good morning. first, our main story. north korea appears to have carried out another nuclear test. china and the united states say they have detected tremors consistent with an underground explosion. hours earlier, north korea's state news agency said the country had built its own hydrogen bomb, capable of being mounted on an inter—continental ballistic missile. there is no independent verification of the claim. our correspondent yogita limaye is in the south korean capital, seoul. what more do we know about the cause of these tremors? and emergency
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national security council meeting is under way here in south korea. it is chaired by president moonjae—in. what the south korean military has said is that the tremor that have been detected seemed to have been caused by an explosion and that they are man—made. that is also what the chinese "administration has said. the united states has also said these tremors have binge —— have been triggered by an explosion rather than an earthquake. china has said they detected a second set of travellers and here in south korea, they are still analysing what it could be that they have said it could be that they have said it could be that they have said it could be and other nuclear test. we know it is in the north—eastern province of the country. this is the region in which north korea's nuclear testing site is. that is the information we have as of now. at this point, unconnected. but we saw these pictures of the north korean leader kimjong these pictures of the north korean leader kim jong or and these pictures of the north korean leader kimjong or and the pictures we see them now, of what they claim isa we see them now, of what they claim
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is a hydrogen bomb capable of being put on the intercontinental ballistic missile. —— kimjong—un. but the pictures are unconnected at this point. yes, the news of the tremors came houi’s this point. yes, the news of the tremors came hours after the north korean media put out these photographs which they say is kim jong—un inspecting a hydrogen bomb —— worryingly, they said this could be fitted onto an intercontinental ballistic missile. we know they tested these rocket injuly. many experts believe they are capable of hitting the united states mainland. if the claims are true and we don't have independent verification yet, but if they are true it would essentially mean north korea has made a warhead that can fit onto the long—range missiles so they can weaponised these missiles and could be seen as a very serious threat by america. we are already in a situation where tensions in the korean peninsular has been at the
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highest point they have been in recent yea rs. highest point they have been in recent years. we have seen north korea saying they have made a hydrogen bomb and now we're hearing thoughts of what could be potentially and nuclear test by the country. thank you, we will be back with you a little later in the programme. hospital managers in england have called for an emergency financial bail—out, saying they are bracing themselves for the worst winter in recent years. nhs providers — which represents the vast majority of health trusts — says at least £200 million of extra funding is needed to pay for more staff and beds. but the department of health says the nhs is better prepared for winter this year than ever before, as helena lee reports. winter months can put hospitals under severe pressure. it is a time when there is an increase in demand. more patients needing treatment in an already stretched service. has been a lot of planning involved in
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trying to prepare the nhs for this winter but nhs providers which represents hospital bosses say more money is needed otherwise this winter could be worse than last year's. current performance in a and e departments is no better than what it was last year despite huge amounts of effort put into improved that performance. it is staying stubbornly stuck, quite a long way below the official target. we know that patients safety could be put in an even greater risk this winter thanit an even greater risk this winter than it was last winter. nhs providers say the health service needs an extra 200— £350 million to help it get through this winter. the government has given councils and extra million in social care funding to help free up hospital beds and has ring—fenced £100 million to relieve pressure on emergency care. it says the nhs is prepared for
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winter more this year than ever before. senior conservatives are warning backbenchers not to rebel against the government's plans for brexit when parliament returns this week. the eu repeal bill is due to be debated on thursday. 0ur political correspondent emma vardyjoins us from our london newsroom. good morning. is this potential tory rebellion because of brexit at the top of theresa may's mind? yes, they have big challenge ahead of them. the great eu repeal bill. this is the bill that will transfer all that existing eu legislation into uk law. it isa existing eu legislation into uk law. it is a really significant step on our journey to exiting it is a really significant step on ourjourney to exiting the european union. but it is not as simple as doing a big cut and pastejob. the uk is going to need to make lots of amendments to make all of this
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legislation fit together and that is why it is proving controversial because the government is going to need special powers to make all of these tweaks and to do this work. a lot of it will be done without the usual parliamentary scrutiny. some opposition parties and opponents to the government are worried it will give our ministers too much sweeping powers without the usual parliamentary oversight. there are rumours of a bench rebellion. if that happens, it could be a great threat to theresa may's leadership and could really derail the plans for brexit. this will be a real test. ministers are setting up the case for unity today, urging against any sort of rebellion which they say will be tantamount to supporting jeremy corbyn. president trump has been meeting survivors of last week's huge storm in texas and louisiana. he praised the recovery effort on a visit to houston, describing the emergency response to the disaster as very efficient. half—a—million households have asked for help. twelve british people have been
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arrested in spain by police investigating a drug dealing ring — which was targeting the holiday resort of magaluf. officers say they seized three kilograms of cocaine and 100,000 euros in cash. simon clemison reports. dawn and one of a number of armed armed raids. both in majorca and mainland spain. 0fficers armed raids. both in majorca and mainland spain. officers say they seized three kilograms of cocaine, wrapped in clingfilm and snatched in earnest shoebox. it is said to be of high purity. —— stashed in a shoebox. four vehicles have been taken away. a total of 1a people have been arrested, one doesn't from the uk. the other, a spaniard and dominick in. they have started to
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appear in court. the still —— civil guard said tourists were out partying in magaluf. the foreign 0ffice partying in magaluf. the foreign office said they were providing support for those arrested. the operation follows another drug raid lastjuly in which four people, british and spanish, were held after five kilograms of cocaine were seized. a centre—right think tank is calling for a rapid expansion of two year university courses, to help what they call "the mounting time bomb of student debt." the report calls for stronger legislation to break what it calls a "university cartel" in england and wales. universities say there's no evidence they're acting together to block change. a pilot project to roll—out ultra—fast broadband is starting in england and scotland. six local schemes will trial ‘full fibre' networks, said to be the most reliable system available. it's the first stage of a 200 million pound government project. frankfurt is preparing to move 65,000 people from their homes to allow authorities space to carry out a controlled explosion of a huge
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world war two bomb. the evacuation is germany's largest since the war, and officials have warned the financial capital could grind to a halt on monday if people don't leave. laura westbrook reports. inside this tent in the city of frankfurt, lies a bomberfrom world war two. nicknamed blockbuster, frankfurt, lies a bomberfrom world wartwo. nicknamed blockbuster, it weighs nearly 1.4 tons. if it exploded, it would flatten a city block. that is why officials have told tens of thousands of the city's residents to clear the area by sam local time today. they say it could ta ke local time today. they say it could take at least 12 hours to dismantle the british bomb. it was found during work on a construction site close to the goethe university. it
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isa close to the goethe university. it is a legacy of a war that ended more than 70 years ago. the hc 4000 ‘s and bomb was dropped by the royal air force and bomb was dropped by the royal airforce on and bomb was dropped by the royal air force on frankfurt and bomb was dropped by the royal airforce on frankfurt in a raid in 1944. it is believed 150,000 bombs lie unexploded beneath the german towns and cities. as time goes on, they grow more unstable. which means evacuations of this scale are becoming more common. in the past few months, thousands of people have been evacuated in hanover and aux burgh in south germany after similar bonds were found. laura westbrook, bbc news. now take a look at these impressive images of the soyuz ms—04 spacecraft touching down in the early hours of this morning, after a three—hour journey from the international space station. it entered the earth's atmosphere at a speed of over 500
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miles per hour, with temperatures outside the spacecraft reaching a scorching 2,500 degrees celsius. parachutes were deployed to slow it down shortly before it safely landed in a remote area of kazakhstan, with three nasa astronauts on board. a bit ofa a bit of a bumpy landing. a bit ofa bumpy landing. i bet they are glad to be home. did you know there is a special day each year to celebrate facial hair? idid not i did not know that. it would take me about six months to grow anything. the first saturday in september marks world beard day, where people across the globe celebrate the occasion. 0ne event in sweden held the ‘battle of barbers'. this included the country's leading stylists competing in a beard trimming contest. they compete to see who can trim the neatest beard and moustache. that
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little uplift and curl. it looks like too much hard work to do at 5am. the length, texture, colour and thickness of the hair were all taken into account. i always worry that they might be finding a little bit of yesterday's lunch. very trendy, beards, at the moment. for some. ithought lunch. very trendy, beards, at the moment. for some. i thought the fad would disappear but it is still going. is still going. let's look at the front pages. we start with the observer this morning. lots of the front pages talking about theresa may. she is facing the possibility of a tory rebellion ahead of the brexit vote. they are saying that the whip campaign could be damaging for the
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tory party. the picture you are seeing barrett is george and amal clu ny. seeing barrett is george and amal cluny. this suggests theresa may has secretly agreed a bill for the uk to pay £50 billion. they also say 70% of voters do not want theresa may do fund the next election. an interesting story doing the rounds on social media yesterday. there was a female psychologist who was pictured in a magazine and looking forward to seeing coverage of our race and she had taken part in. the picture was there with the caption that called her a" token attractive woman". she is very offended by that. how on earth did that happen? the front page of the telegraph, the two reason may story. damien green
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warning that people need to unite behind the government or risk handing power over to jeremy corbyn. 0n the front of the sun and then there are, both the same story, "how could you do this while i'm pregnant?" more revelations about the revelations of the drink—driving. stay with us. now we will go to the weather. it was called getting in the car this morning for some of us, wasn't it? a little chilly and we have been forecasting for the last few days some rainfall today. it is already reaching western parts of the uk but, actually, for some of us it may end up being perhaps a brighter day than we were anticipating this time
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yesterday, particularly eastern parts of the country. think we need to hang on to the dry weather for a bit longer. this is what we have this morning. basic message with this morning. basic message with this mass of cloud and rain that we have in the west is that it is moving very, very slowly towards the east. that means it is the western half of the uk today stuck under the thickest of the cloud with outbreaks of rain. in south—west and wales the rain may be heavy this morning and you could have some heavier pulses of rain through the north as well. many parts of eastern britain irish we re many parts of eastern britain irish were going to stay dry through the morning and through much of the afternoon. the thinking is that eastern scotland, the north—east of england, much of yorkshire there, lincolnshire and east anglia, it is still dry and quite warm. 20 degrees in london but cooler out south—west and that is where we have the cloud. and we watched the clock, see how slowly it moves, and even by the tummy gets around about we does
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talking about dribs and drabs of rain. nota talking about dribs and drabs of rain. not a lot of rain heading towards the east. a mild night with all of that, 16 degrees is the overnight low in plymouth, 14 in edinburgh. tomorrow morning when you wa ke edinburgh. tomorrow morning when you wake up it will not be chilly. it will be muddy and murky. monday will be the cloudy and murky day to start with and then the clouds will break up with and then the clouds will break up and temperatures will reach 20 degrees. a slightly more humid day on the way tomorrow. the first half of next week means that the weather fronts are coming through bits of rain and overall through tuesday and wednesday there will be a bit of bright weather times there will be rain splashing through as well and temperatures into the 20s there in london. the outlook over the next few days... we're worse, it is not bad. back to you. i like your description of the outlook um meh,. we will be back with a summery of
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the news at 630 but now on breakfast it is time for the film review. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's releases is james king. what have you watched this week? murder in the east end in victorian thriller the limehouse golem. a newjersey girl thinks she is the unlikely saviour of hip—hop in patti cake$ and he said he will be back and now he is — arnie returns in the 3—d rerelease of terminator 2. he did warn us. we will start with limehouse golem. bill nighy, always a big draw, this is set in victorian
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era london in the dank back streets and music halls of the east end. a thriller about a murderer on the loose and the man tasked to track him down. let's have a look at bill in action with the brilliant daniel mays. what are you looking for? i'm just looking. trying to understand. the golem is a madman. what else is there to be understood? even madness has logic. here there is none. at ratcliffe highway he's murdered a household. prior to that, a prostitute. before that, an old man, a scholar. oh, my god. yes. he laid upon the open pages of a book on jewish folklore. like a book mark. the legend of the golem.
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is that how the press got the name? 0ur murderer approved. i remember reading that one. 0ld sooty. her name wasjane quigg. i am a big fan of daniel mays as well. is it over the top? i have read many things that say it is, but that can sometimes a good thing. gothic horror, isn't it? ifind it gripping. it is gory in parts but not overly so. it is a thriller rather than a horror film. for me it was all about the cast. we saw daniel mays and bill nighy. eddie marsan is also in it. i would watch them in anything, three of my favourites. 0liva cooke and douglas booth, a strong cast. what is going on in this film is an undercurrent to that murder story, too that's real element it is a film about performance and about how performance was so important at
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this time in music halls but also just to people in their everyday life. there are people in this movie who put on a mask every day and play a role. and then there is the golem himself, a warped performer who wants recognition. when you have that undercurrent running through the movie, that obviously gives the cast something juicy to sink their teeth into. and the music hall as well. it is a seductive world. reminded me of tipping the velvet. very rich and seductive. that is a great thing to watch at the movies as well. jane goldman adapted the book that this was originally and she has done a good job. there is a lot of plot going on and she has done a good job of streamlining it, drip feeding information, pennies drop atjust the right moment. i'm a big fan. how about patti cake$? was it a hit at sundance?
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it was at sundance and you get independent films from there crossing over into the mainstream. fox would love this to be a crossover hit. it is about a girl from newjersey, patti, who leads a downbeat life. she dreams of making it big in hip—hop. danielle macdonald, there she is, an australian actress, a relative newcomer. the problem is that it is very funny and charming but it does not quite know what it wants to be. sometimes it is quite kitsch and camp, reminding me of hairspray. a great film. quite over the top. sometimes this film then gets serious and wants to make a political and social point and it goes sort of eight mile with eminem. the problem is that it is six of one and half a dozen of the other. having said that,
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the music is great and it is subversive, an overweight white girl in the world of hip—hop which is traditionally far more glamorous and macho. i'm just not certain whether or not it knows if it is a full on comedy orfull on seriousness. it is an unsettled mix of the two. but she is one to watch? so she is a good performer, quite charismatic. look out for her. i said we were going to save the best till last. terminator 2, so good they have brought it back decades later. 26 years later in 3—d. some would say that arnold schwarzenegger's acting was barely in 2 dimensions, let alone three, and now james cameron, who had 3—d success with titanic, has gotten the same team to do the same thing with terminator 2. let's have a look at a classic scene. keep it under 65.
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we do not want to be pulled over. affirmative. no, no, no. you've gotta listen to the way people talk. you don't say affirmative. you say no problemo. and if someone comes up to you with an attitude, you say eat me. and if you want to tell them to go away, it's hasta la vista, baby. hasta la vista, baby. and if someone is upset you could say chill out. or do combinations. chill out. i had almost forgotten that phrase but now it is back to haunt us all. is a point to this? i appreciate you say that it has been reworked and in 3—d. the 3—d is fine. a good job.
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i'd only seen it when it came out on the big screen. awesome set pieces and action scenes. there are some there. sarah connor, the linda hamilton character, is one of the great action heroes of all—time. it is wonderful seeing her on the big screen. seeing it as big as you can, perhaps you have never seen it on the big screen, this is a great opportunity to catch up. it is old but it still works. some special effects do look creepy, james cameron admits that, but it is so gutsy with such power and bravado that it still packs a punch. and you may be very young and not even born when this was first released. maybe there is a whole new audience. or will they look and think it is all a bit dated?
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in 1991 this was the most expensive film of all time. even though it is old now it still holds up because they put so much into it when it first came out. it is worth looking up if you have never seen it before. yes. you do forget how much it cost at the time. the best out? detroit. a difficult movie to watch, based on true events in detroit 50 years ago, the fateful events of one night in the city. it is doing 0k business in the uk at the moment but i would like to see it do better. perhaps we have had ourfill of intensity with dunkirk and people can not handle another intense story. it is worth seeing. look out for the great actors and the director, kathryn bigelow, she was married to james cameron when he made terminator, so there's a connection there. i hope it does better
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at the cinema, it deserves to. and dvd, something to lift us? if you do not want something dark and bleak, something funny and silly? this is mindhorn. an out—of—work actor who was big in the 19805 but has been down on his luck ever since. then he gets a call from the police saying that there is a criminal on the loose obsessed with the old tv show and they need him to get back into character to help them solve the crime. that is what he does. some funny gags in this about acting and tv detectives, plenty of jokes about the isle of man. done with affection. julian barrett stars, as does steve coogan. even though you laugh, it is done with affection and respect for the genres
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it is making fun of. i know some people felt it was almost a series of tv sketches sewn together. and stay for the end titles. the end credits are a joy. that is a good tip. excellent. thank you very much, lovely to see you again. james king there with all of your pointers as to what you might like to see this week. that is it for this week. thank you for being with us and enjoy whatever you may see over the next few days. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and sally nugent. coming up before seven tomasz will have the weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. north korea appears to have carried out another nuclear test. china and the united states say they have detected tremors consistent with an underground explosion. hours earlier, north korea's state
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news agency said the country had built its own hydrogen bomb, capable of being mounted on an inter—continental ballistic missile. there is no independent verification of the claim. hospital managers in england have called for an emergency financial bail—out, saying they are bracing themselves for the worst winter in recent years. the department of health says the nhs is better prepared for winter this year than ever before, but nhs providers, which represents the vast majority of health trusts, says more staff and beds are needed — or patient safety could be at risk. the a and e department at the moment is no better than it was last year despite huge amounts of effort being put into improved that performance, it is staying stubbornly stuck a long way below the official target. we know that therefore there is a
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real risk that patients safety can be put at an even greater risk this winter than it was last winter. senior conservatives are warning backbenchers not to rebel against the government's plans for brexit, when parliament returns after the summer break this week. the eu repeal bill — which transfers eu law into uk legislation — is due to be debated in the commons on thursday. theresa may says it will give certainty to people and businesses once we leave the union. twelve british people have been arrested in spain by police investigating a drug dealing ring — which was targeting the holiday resort of magaluf. officers say they seized 3kg of cocaine and 100,000 euros in cash. the spanish civil guard said the group was supplying cocaine to party—goers on the island. the first phase of what's known as "ultra —fast" broadband is starting in england and scotland. pilots schemes in six regions will test full—fibre internet services to make it quicker for businesses to handle information. it's the first stage of a 200 million pound government project. vishala sri—pathma reports.
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with speeds of up to 1 gigabyte per second, a full fibre broadband is a superfast internet connection the government wants to see made available across the uk. rather than relying on copper wire, this relies on fibre optic cables which runs directly into homes and offices, allowing for much faster transfer of information. internet companies like virgin media are already rolling out full fibre across much of the country. now, the government has announced six pilot projects across the uk and they want to work with industry to identify how full fibre broadband can be brought to more homes and businesses more quickly. cilla mac in the case of west yorkshire, it is giving vouchers. —— indicator of west yorkshire. yorkshire, it is giving vouchers. —— indicator of west yorkshirem yorkshire, it is giving vouchers. —— indicator of west yorkshire. it is using public sector assets so we
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need to reduce the cost of laying the networks. it is what is going to work. that is what we are looking to find out. the next stage is implementing that. full fibre is available to around 1 million premises across the uk. representing about 2% of all internet connections. that contrast with spain where the figure is 80%. instead, most households have a partial fibre broadband which instead, most households have a partialfibre broadband which is still fast, superfast in fact, but not quite as alter fast as full fibre. —— ultra fast. frankfurt is preparing to move 65,000 people from their homes to allow authorities to carry out a controlled explosion of a huge world war two bomb. the evacuation is germany's largest since the war, and officials have warned the financial capital could grind to a halt on monday if people don't leave. a toddler has been pulled free from a well in china after a ten hour rescue mission. the boy was out playing with his grandparents when he disappeared 12—metres
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into the ground in the north—west province of shaanxi. firefighters used heavy machinery and ropes to pull him free. the toddler was taken to hospital and reported to be in a good condition. those grandparents aren't going to be all out to do that again. you have news of someone very young, a little bit older than a toddler, though. he was thrown into the deep end as well. very good. if there are any liverpool fans, they will tell you, we told you so.
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he was the biggest goalscorer last season he was the biggest goalscorer last season and he made all the difference. ben woodburn says it's a dream come true. wales really had to beat austria last night to have a realistic chance of qualifying for the world cup next year with less then half an hour to play it was goaless in cardiff, but within a couple of minutes of coming off the bench to make his international debut, the 17—year—old had scored the winner. patrick gearey reports. perhaps ben woodburn will wonder if he dreamt it. yesterday evening, within five minutes of becoming a welsh international, he became a hero. this was a match wales really needed to win. it had been a qualification campaign of too many draws." no many good enough —— no longer good enough. —— close. all very close, all very tense. for a while, the pressure drove wales forward. just the time and place for gareth bale. austria's keeper had
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seen gareth bale. austria's keeper had seen him do that before. unlike bail, would burn still has the power of surprise. after all, he is only 17. these were his first moment is an international wall and this was his first shot. teenager, born in england who chose to play for wales, scoring a goal which keeps alive his nation's chances of winning the world cup. where on earth are you go from there? wales will hope to russia. it is a dream come true and iam happy russia. it is a dream come true and i am happy i got the three points. what did crusade you mr mark he said injoy what did crusade you mr mark he said in joy yourself and help the team as best you can and hopefully i did that. -- what did chris say to you? he said. they now face the group's bottom team moldova on tuesday night. republic of ireland are two points ahead of wales in second, that's after their 1—1 draw against georgia. they started really well , taking the lead afterjust four minutes in tblisi, thanks
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to shane duffy's header. but just before half time georgia drew level, and held on for a point. ireland face the group leaders serbia next tuesday, so that will give wales a chance to make up some ground. there was some brilliant cricket on finals day at a sold out edgbaston yesterday, nottingham 0utlaws came out on top and are the t20 blast champions. they beat the birmingham bears by 22 runs. more than a thousand runs were scored across the two semi—finals and final. notts recovered from losing the wicket of alex hales early on to post a total of 190, thanks to 64 from samit patel. birmingham couldn't get close to that on their home ground, notts becoming champions for the first time and completing the double after also winning this season's 50—over competition. lewis hamilton can take the lead in the formula 1 championship this afternoon.
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it's the italian grand prix at monza and hamilton is on pole for a record breaking 69th time, the british driver was quickest in qualifying by over a second despite treacherous conditions. championship leader sebastien vettel will start from sixth..the williams driver lance stroll has become the youngest driver to secure a place on the front row. the canadian isn't as young as ben woodburn though, he's 18. but it was hamilton's day with that record breaking pole position. italy, i love you. i am so happy to be here. even though we are in a ferrari's homeland, we have a lot of support here for mercedes. i am so glad to do this here in such a historic circuit, a beautiful country. i will have some past are tonight to celebrate. —— pasta. it's the opening weekend in the rugby union premiership, we've had lots of tries, there was a double header at twickenham yesterday
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and the european champions saracens are up and running after a thumping win over northampton saints. sarries scored nine tries — three of them by scotland winger sean maitland. 55—24 the final score. saracens are looking to regain their title after losing in the play—off semi—finals last season. and the high scoring at twickenham didn't stop there. that match was followed by 39—29 win for london irish over harlequins. brendan mckibben taking advantage of a mistake in the quinns backline to score the decisive try. defending pro12 champions scarlets got their pro 14 campaign off to a winning start, beating league debuta nts southern kings from south africa 57—10. leigh halfpenny joined them in the summer and wasted no time in scoring his first points for the club. leinster ran in five tries against dragons for their 39 points to 16 victory. replacement winger ca—hal marsh completing the scoring to secure the bonus point win. chris froome is still wearing
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the leaders red jersey at the vuelta espana, he has a 55 second lead the 14th stage was won by poland's rafal maj ka. froome finished in fourth a few seconds behind vincenzo nibali — who is second in the overall standings. remmebr froome is going for a rare grand tour double, having already won the tour de france this year. it was a much easier day for roger federer at the us open, after two five—setters, he breezed past spain's feliciano lopez in straight sets to reach the fourth round — the world number one rafa nadal beat argentina's leonardo mayer in the third round despite losing the first set. he could meet federer in the semi—finals of the tournament. into women's draw, karolina pliskova
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saved a match point. —— in the women's draw. back to football — and a match more important than many others played yesterday. the game for grenfell at loftus road, a huge charity game arranged by queens park rangers to raise money for those affected by the grenfell tower disaster. loftus road is less than a miles from grenfell — and qpr's owner tony fernandes along with marcus mumford from mumford & sons, arranged this special match. celebrities, members of the emergency services and sportstars past and present all taking part, including sir mo farah, who scored the opening goal of the game afterjust 90 seconds. rita 0ra, emile sande and others entertained the crowds at half—time. it finished 2—all and the manchester united managerjose mourinho making a surprise appearance in goal for thew shoot—out! he finished on the losing side
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though, conceding the winning penalty to 0lly murs. stick to the dayjob. there were some volunteers there who were helping to rebuild the community. a great charity event and hopefully six figures were raised, apparently. angela merkel‘s been called the most powerful woman in europe by several newspapers — and now she's hoping to secure a fourth term as german chancellor in the general election later this month. tonight she faces her main electoral rival, martin schulz, in a live debate on german tv. so is mrs merkel likely to prevail? 0ur correspondent jenny hill has more. it is 12 years since she debated her
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way into the chancellery. and it looks as though angela merkel is about to do it again. her political longevity, no surprise for this cartoonist who has been drawing her since the start of her career. what a concentrated on was her eyes. half closed eyes. i still drawing her with half closed eyes but now i know it's a sign for rationality and you can't look into her mind but still my problem and situation after 12 yea rs of my problem and situation after 12 years of merkel, i still don't know what the woman is thinking. but we do know that she is unrivalled. martin schulz, her social democrat opponent, trails behind in the polls. he could win tonight's debate that he almost certainly won't beat her at the ballot box. but, on the
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campaign trail, the real story of this election. angela merkel‘s refugee policy is still a source of discontent. these are a fd supporters. the anti— migrant party is likely to enter parliament and it will be the first time the far right has been represented here since the second world war. —— afd. afd is unlikely to wield real political power you. germany is traditionally governed by a coalition and the major parties refuse to do business with them. it may be months before we know what the new german government looks like but you can be pretty sure about one thing. this country's future direction, its relationship with donald trump, it approached the brexit negotiations, will most likely still lie at the hands of one woman. translation: there is an old
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advertising slogan here which everybody knows and it applies to angela merkel. it is better to stick with what you have got. she is not extreme. people are impressed by her personal conduct. i remember when there was a president photographed on his scooter going to his mistress. nobody can imagine angela merkel on mopeds at night going to see her love. stability, security. angela merkel, it is often said, is the boring candidate but in a shifting world, what appeals best to the german voters, is a safe bet. i think it is a safe bet there is rain in the forecast. ido i do have rain in the forecast. rain and sunshine. across some parts of the country there is currently a beautiful sunrise so it is not all
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bad today. yes there is rain on the way but there will be fine weather as well. the reason for the rain is this large area of cloud, a weather front moving out of the atlantic we have been forecasting for a few days. that will come over the uk today, tonight and into tomorrow. today, through this morning, the heaviest of the rain for a time, it will not be very long, it will fall across south—western parts of england and wales, just about flirting with the irish sea coast by around ten o'clock. even by this stage the heavy rain will be moving through, or have gone through belfast and in south—western parts of scotland. clearly a big split across the country. some of its wake across the country. some of its wake a look at the sky and think it is not a grey start to the day, others wa ke not a grey start to the day, others wake up and think it is absolutely beautiful. many eastern areas, from eastern scotland, shetland, 0rkney, all along the spine of the country down towards suffered from the greater london area will have a dry afternoon. a breeze out of the south
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and cloudy with spots of rain. a damp weather will hang around for the course of the night and it will bea the course of the night and it will be a murky drizzly sort of night. with this murky drizzly weather comes quite warm air off the atla ntic to comes quite warm air off the atlantic to 16 degrees the overnight low there in cardiff, for example. cloudy start tomorrow for many of us. cloudy start tomorrow for many of us. these pieces of rain and in these clouds will probably break up. this warm humid air will be warmed up this warm humid air will be warmed up by this warm humid air will be warmed up by the sun in the morning and temperatures will shoot up. in the first half of the week, monday, tuesday, wednesday, we have weather fronts moving through and they are out of the way by wednesday. basically this translates to a mix of weather in the first half of the week. on balance, actually, it is not look bad at all, with plenty of bright weather around. that is good to hear. thank you. it is ten minutes to seven and we will be back at seven with the headlines. but
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first, time for click. believe it or not, modern nursing as we know it only dates back to the 1800s, to the time of florence nightingale and other pioneers. the royal college of nursing, here in london, is now in its 101st year. for all the life—saving technology that we've seen, the actual act of nursing itself is one relationship that so far has remained uniquely human. but our population is ageing. 20% ofjapan is over the age of 60. and in the uk, a quarter will be over 65 by 2045. this all means that the pressures on nursing are increasing, and looking after elderly people is becoming a pressing issue around the world.
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kat hawkins travelled to helsinki, in finland, to discover whether one of these could become the new one of these. i'm here in helsinki, visiting the home of marja roth sopanen. hello! hello, how are you? nice to meet you! nice meeting you! she is an ex—air hostess, who likes to keep active at the age of 73. look at the hat as well. that was ages ago! but, after a skiing accident a few years ago, she developed epilepsy. ifell down, backwards, hit my head. i was unconscious for a little while, then got up and skied, and that's when it started. her epilepsy means she needs daily medication and that her family, who live in new york, want to make sure she's 0k. they get this reassurance from her daily nursing visit,
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over on the living room table. do you think that this is as good as a nursing visit? it's better because they see, actually physical, see me, and then i don't have to wait for somebody to come. they want to check basically that i — ask if i took my pill, and... and just see how you are? howi... yeah. face, actually, to see the picture, to see that i'm 0k. at the other end of the line is tuomo kuivamaki. he is one of the nurses here in helsinki's first virtual nursing centre. here, teams of trained nurses each make up to 50 video calls per day to people around the city who need support. so you've still got that kind of real human... yeah, yeah. and especially some of the older customers, that's like a highlight of the day for them, to have sort of a small chat with a friendly nurse. the hope is that this will cut down on the number of home visits that
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nurses have to do to people who don't need physical support, freeing up more time for those that do. the software itself, called video visit, works much like any video call. so, while the tech isn't that new, helsinki is unique in how wisely the government is using it, and that can mean big savings for them. an in—person nursing visit can cost around 40 euros, but this new type of checkup costs as little as five. and what really comes across, watching this call, is that they do have a relationship. they're chatting away. and itjust shows that that nursing element, that real human connection, is still there, even though it's a video call. people do hesitate at technology, and especially in nursing. we have virtual home care. we are actually taking care of people. it's scary that the robots are coming and taking ourjobs. actually, the robots are in here already, but they are easing ourjob, and actually giving us the freedom to focus on people who actually need our physical help.
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that was kat. now, medical technologies, of course, are improving across—the—board. one example is the use of wearable technology for tracking facial muscles. now, this can be transformative for people with conditions like facial palsy, parkinson's and autism, allowing them to control devices remotely, or even just smile naturally. my name is bethan robertson—smith, and i'm doing my daily routine. it's a series of exercises to flex the muscles in my face. in 2008, when i was at university studying to be a veterinary nurse, i had a serious car accident. i had a fractured skull, an acquired brain injury, and i was left with facial palsy, also known as facial paralysis. it meant that every one of the 40 muscles that gave expression in my face had been paralysed. years later, i had an operation
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that allowed me to smile like a mona lisa, using just two of the chewing muscles that were unaffected by the accident. it's very hard to know exactly what muscles i need to move to help me smile. i came down to brighton today to try out a new piece of technology that's going to help people like myself, who have got facial palsy. one of the surgeons who operated on me is part of a team of experts developing technologies with sensors to read the muscle activities of people with facial paralysis. so, when you were first diagnosed, you had an examination called the needle emg, where the needle is put into the skin, into the muscles, to read the tiny electrical signals that the muscles emanate. with this technology, what we're using is these sensors that are noninvasive.
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so the same kind of reading, but without the pain, like none of the...? that's right. you have some degree of crossover between the muscles, and that's why you need the machine learning and the artificial intelligence, to interpret which muscle is activating. i'm sarah healey, and 30 years ago, i had a brain tumour. try to raise both eyebrows symmetrically. raise them both together. together, and relax. the operation to take it out left me with paralysis on the right—hand side of my face. ok, now smile with lips together. i am certainly not alone, as there are about 100,000 people in the uk who have had facial paralysis for years. so each one of these dots represents the position on your face. ok. and so, for example, if you were to try and do a left—sided smile... just smile. and relax. and the darker the red, the bigger the signal. so because my left side is better and stronger... that's right. ..it‘s showing up as stronger on the screen.
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that's right. this is great because for the first time, i'm getting accurate information about what is going on with my face. i tend to overwork this side of my face, so this really is giving me feedback that i have to dampen down the movements i don't want, and this isjust so good at doing that. i sort of try and practise in front of a mirror. it's not quite as subtle as this, is it? and also, i'm not that keen on looking in mirrors, to be quite honest. but it doesn't end there. this headset takes all the information from sensors, just like in the goggles, but now translates it into real—time expressions on a 3—d cartoon. yeah, so i'm trying really hard to make her do a full smile... yes. but it feels funny on my face. yes. doing it to a mirror, you kind of tell yourself what it looks like. that's right. whereas she is like, oh, no, that's not what it looks like. it might sound strange to say,
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but for the first time since my accident, i'm able to see what my smile actually looks like. not to make it sound like, i dunno, a strange way, but you're kind of doing it with somebody else. yes. and it's not such a lonely thing. my biggest aim for this would be to be able to help me smile symmetrically. that's been one of my aims for the last 30 years. huh... hey, how you doing? you all right? yeah, man, i'lljoin you in a bit. have you heard the one about the alien who walks into a bar and says... mmm, i'll have a blue milk. hmm... put it in a dirty glass... now, as impressive as this bizarre setup looks, these motion—capture suits and stages are actually the standard way that industrial light & magic
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uses actors to give realistic movements to computer—generated principal characters. thank you very much. no worries! you were very frightening. ah, good. i mean, he's a nice dad, i think, jalien. even the fact that jalien here is being rendered in real time for the director to see during the performance is not in itself new. what is brand—new here is the live rendering ofjethro's facial expressions. you know, our big focus was around the face and being able to capture the face at the same time as the body. and we can determine what expressions are happening each frame, and then directors can see that live and make decisions on if the character is working as a character, whether his expressions need to change in terms of the model. in order to process an actor's expressions quickly enough, only one face cam and a few mo—cap dots are used. this simplified live data is then compared to a higher—resolution 3—d
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capture of the actor's face that's ta ken beforehand on a rig called... ..the medusa. now, unlike other facial—ca ptu re systems we've seen, which take still images of the actor's face, here they're shooting video of my face moving into and out of each emotion. that means that the facial recreation and the animations will look a lot more natural. the live, high—quality rendering of both face and body can also become a magic mirror on sets, to help the actor to get into the part. and i guess it really does make you move differently when you're on set, if you're playing a half—tonne alien, to you being a svelte young man. it totally does, as long as i engage my imagination. because if you can see, i'm totally beautifully... he laughs. you know, in a way that jalien can't, my wetsuit moves in a way that maybe that arm and that outfit doesn't move.
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it's good showing you my, er, my stuff. well, that's it for this week. don't forget, we live on facebook and on twitter... thanks for watching. thanks for having us at your place, jalien. hey, no worries, man. hmm... now, get out of here! yeah. hmm... out! move, scoot, mm! huh... jackass, huh? yeah. i've gotta go, bye. huh. hello, this is breakfast, with ben thompson and sally nugent.
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north korea appears to have carried out another nuclear test. in the last few hours, china and the united states say they have detected tremors that could indicate an underground explosion. earlier, the state news agency released pictures of leader kim jong—un inspecting what it said was a new hydrogen bomb. good morning, it's sunday the third of september. also ahead: nhs bosses in england ask for more money to avoid another winter crisis. theresa may calls for unity to prevent a tory rebellion over brexit, as the commons prepares to debate legislation to leave the european union. a dozen britons are arrested in spain, by police investigating a drug dealing ring in magaluf.
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