Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 3, 2017 7:00am-8:01am BST

7:00 am
in the last few hours, china and the united states say they have detected tremors that could indicate an underground explosion. earlier, the state news agency released pictures of leader kim jong—un inspecting what it said was a new hydrogen bomb. good morning, it's sunday the third of september. also ahead: nhs bosses in england ask for more money to avoid another winter crisis. theresa may calls for unity to prevent a tory rebellion over brexit, as the commons prepares to debate legislation to leave the european union. a dozen britons are arrested in spain, by police investigating a drug dealing ring in magaluf. in sport, wales have a new wonderkid. teenager ben woodburn scored the winner on his debut to keep their world cup hopes alive.
7:01 am
and tomasz has the weather. we have been forecasting some rain for today. it is on its way but some of us actually may end up with a pretty bright day. good morning. first, our main story. north korea appears to have carried out another nuclear test. china and the united states say they have detected tremors consistent with an underground explosion. hours earlier, north korea's state news agency said the country had built its own hydrogen bomb, capable of being mounted on an inter—continental ballistic missile. there is no independent verification of the claim. our correstpondent yogita limaye is in the south korean capital, seoul. an emergency national security council meeting is under way here in south korea. it is chaired by president moonjae—in. were detected seemed to have been
7:02 am
caused by an explosion and that they are man—made. that is also what the chinese earthquake administration has said. the united states geological survey has also said these tremors have been triggered by an explosion rather than an earthquake. china has said they detected a second set of travellers —— tremors. and here in south korea, they are still analysing what it could be that they have said it could be and other nuclear test. we know they tested these rocket injuly. many experts believe they are capable of hitting the united states mainland. if the claims are true and we don't have independent verification yet, but if they are true it would essentially mean north korea has made a warhead
7:03 am
that can fit onto the long—range missiles so they can weaponised these missiles and could be seen as a very serious threat by america. —— the news of the tremors came hours after the north korean media put out these photographs which they say is kim jong—un inspecting a hydrogen bomb. worryingly, they said this could be fitted onto an intercontinental ballistic missile. we are already in a situation where tensions in the korean peninsular has been at the highest point they have been in recent years. we have seen north korea saying they have made a hydrogen bomb and now we're hearing thoughts of what could be potentially and nuclear test by the country. in about ten minutes, we will speak to an international relations expert for the latest on those developer this morning. —— developments. hospital managers in england have called for an emergency financial bail—out, saying they are bracing themselves for the worst winter in recent years. nhs providers — which represents the vast majority of health trusts — says at least £200m of extra funding is needed to pay for more staff and beds. but the department of health says
7:04 am
the nhs is better prepared for winter this year than ever before, as helena lee reports. winter months can put hospitals under severe pressure. it is a time when there is an increase in demand. more patients needing treatment in an already stretched service. there has been a lot of planning involved in trying to prepare the nhs for this winter but nhs providers, which represents hospital bosses, say more money is needed otherwise this winter could be worse than last year's. current performance in a&e departments at the moment is no better than what it was last year despite huge amounts of effort put in to improve that performance. it is staying stubbornly stuck, quite a long way below the official target. we know that there is a real risk that patients‘ safety could be put at an even greater risk this winter than it was last winter. nhs providers say the health service needs an extra 200—350 million
7:05 am
pounds to help it get through this winter. the government has given councils and extra billion in social care funding to help free up hospital beds and has ring—fenced £100 million to relieve pressure on emergency care. it says the nhs is prepared for winter more this year than ever before. helena lee, bbc news. senior conservatives are warning backbenchers not to rebel against the government's plans for brexit when parliament returns this week. the eu repeal bill is due to be debated on thursday. our political correspondent emma vardyjoins us from our london newsroom. good morning. you would think theresa may would have most of her thoughts occupied by the fact of what is happening on thursday that probably today she is thinking about the possibility of a rebellion. this
7:06 am
is going to be a big challenge for the government. it has always been known that this great repeal bill has some very controversial elements. it is a huge piece of work converting eu legislation into uk law. a significant step in the journey to exiting the european union. now, it is not as simple as cutting and pasting that eu law and transposing it cutting and pasting that eu law and tra nsposing it into cutting and pasting that eu law and transposing it into our own. they need to be lots of amendments made and to do this, government is going to be using special powers which will enable lots of technical adjustments to our laws to be made. critics say this means writing the government blank cheque and say it could lead to an abuse of power. lots of changes to our laws being made without the proper oversight. that is what is leading to fears of a backbench rebellion. labour says it cannot support the bill unless sweeping changes are made. if it leads to a defeat in the government
7:07 am
over this, it could severely weakened theresa may's leadership. key ministers today have been urging that —— conservative mps to get behind the bill saying it is needed to deliver on the result of the referendum. a lot to think about this week. twelve british people have been arrested in spain by police investigating a drug dealing ring — which was targeting the holiday resort of magaluf. officers say they seized three kilograms of cocaine and 100,000 euros in cash. simon clemison reports. dawn and one of a number of armed armed raids, both in majorca and on mainland spain. during 0peration tatum, officers say they seized three kilograms of cocaine, wrapped in cling film and stashed in a shoebox. it is said to be of high purity. law enforcers claim to have come across other drugs as well and about 100,000 pounds in cash. four vehicles have been taken away. a total 01:14 people have been arrested, a dozen from the uk. the others, a spaniard and dominican. some have begun appearing in court.
7:08 am
the civil guard alleges the group was selling to tourists out partying in magaluf. british authorities were also involved in the work leading up to the arrest. the foreign office said it was providing support for those arrested. the operation follows another drug raid lastjuly in which four people, british and spanish, were held after nearly five kilograms of cocaine was seized. simon clemison, bbc news. a pilot project to roll—out ultra—fast broadband is starting in england and scotland. six local schemes will trial ‘full fibre' networks, said to be the most reliable system available. it's the first stage of a 200 million pound government project. frankfurt is preparing to move 65,000 people from their homes to allow authorities space to carry out a controlled explosion of a huge world war two bomb. the evacuation is germany's largest since the war, and officials have warned the financial capital could grind to a halt on monday if people don't leave. laura westbrook reports. inside this tent in the city
7:09 am
of frankfurt, lies a bomber from world war two. nicknamed blockbuster, it weighs nearly 1.4 tons. if it exploded, it would flatten a city block. that's why officials have told tens of thousands of the city's residents to clear the area by sam local time today. they say it could take at least 12 hours to dismantle the british bomb. it was found during work on a construction site close to the goethe university. into the dusk and through the long dark isles. it is a legacy of a war that ended more than 70 years ago. the hc 4000 bomb was dropped by the royal air force on frankfurt in a raid in 19114. it is believed 150,000 bombs lie
7:10 am
unexploded beneath german towns and cities. as time goes on, they grow more unstable. which means evacuations of this scale are becoming more common. in the past few months, thousands of people have been evacuated in hanover and aux burgh in south germany after similar bonds were found. laura westbrook, bbc news. —— similar bombs. now take a look at these impressive images of the soyuz ms—oii spacecraft touching down in the early hours of this morning, after a three—hour journey from the international space station. it entered the earth's atmosphere at a speed of over 500 miles per hour, with temperatures outside the spacecraft reaching a scorching 2,500 degrees celsius. parachutes were deployed to slow it down shortly before it safely landed
7:11 am
in a remote area of kazakhstan, with three nasa astronauts on board. you are watching breakfast. japanese authorities have declared a 6.3 magnitude earthquake in north korea was caused by a nuclear explosion. the earthquake occurred close to a nuclear testing site. it would be north korea's sixth nuclear test to date. joining us now is professor daniel pinkston, who specialises in international relations. he's based in seoul. good morning to you. thank you for joining us. they wonder what this tells us about the capability of north korea's military right now given we've now think this was a nuclear test. well, i'm not a nuclear test. well, i'm not a nuclear engineer or a bomb designer so nuclear engineer or a bomb designer soi nuclear engineer or a bomb designer so i defer to those people who will look at all of the data and look at the capabilities. the sixth nuclear
7:12 am
test, they are mastering this technology. it is 1950s technology. we have to assume they can deliver these weapons with their ballistic missile forces and so now we have to go to the next step and ensure these weapons are not used. what do we make of the time? we know there is a big day coming up for north korea. it is the national holiday on september nine and some are suggesting the timing might be ahead of that and something to celebrate for korea? well, there are always days. it is the national foundation days. it is the national foundation day when dprk was established as a state in 19118. they will make any excuse to have a test. and engineering scientific timeline. and then there had to consider the political implications, the ramifications from abroad, the costs
7:13 am
they have to pay. there were reports yesterday there had been stockpiling 1 million tons of petroleum earlier this year to ride out the sanctions. they expect there to be some costs from the un security council but they are very determined to pay these costs. very early days with this test. certainly the earthquake isa this test. certainly the earthquake is a result of what we believe is a test in the last few hours but already the japanese prime minister already the japanese prime minister already having spoken to the united states. what do we expect the international response to beat this? i think more of the same. —— what do we expect international response to be? it will not make north korea reversed its course and a band arsenal unless you are prepared to disarm north korea by force, they aren't going to stop doing this. i
7:14 am
think we have to go to our default position of deterrence and containment. the good news is the regime is secular and they wish to survive. they don't want to commit suicide. they will test the waters and see how they might be able to use these weapons and other capabilities for col worse if purposes but we have to be united. —— coercive purposes. we need to ensure north korea will not be able to use these capabilities to achieve these objectives. barrow contradiction of the international community's objectives. there are some suggestions that north korea are simply pushing as far as they canjust to are simply pushing as far as they can just to test the international reaction. as you suggest, the sanctions will get tough. 0r whether there will be a more firm at military response. how do world leaders respond? military response. how do world leaders respond ? they military response. how do world leaders respond? they have done all the talking. it is hard to see what
7:15 am
else they can do without taking military action. you have to be prepared to respond to an number of coercive actions. north korea has our long—term goal. they are a revisionist and dissatisfied state. they are clear about this. people have not paid attention to their political objectives. nuclear weapons themselves are a means and not an weapons themselves are a means and notan end. weapons themselves are a means and not an end. you need to use them for something. now we need to make —— pay more attention to what their political goals are at their objectives. north korea are a revisionist state and they are dissatisfied with the revision of korea, for example. they would like to unify on their terms. they would like to see the sanctions dismantled. they would like to be respected and they would like to maintain the prestige they believe go with nuclear weapons. they would like to be viewed as a peer nuclear weapons state. they would also like to see the security architecture in
7:16 am
east asia dismantled and replaced, the so—called san francisco treaty system where an number of bilateral security alliances in the region with japan, south korea and australia, for example. they would like to see those terminated and the united states pushed out of the region. is good to talk to you. thank you very much. will cover the story throughout the on the programme. now it is time for the weather. good morning. good morning. the weather todayis morning. good morning. the weather today is looking good for the eastern half of the uk, newcastle down to london. but western parts of the country are very cloudy with rain moving in. this big wage of cloud has been moving in over the course of the night and has reached many western part. that means if you live in devon, somerset, wales, cornwall, it is in fact a damp, if not wear it, start the day. and that
7:17 am
will stay for much of the morning in the afternoon as well. clearly, you can see how different it will be across the south—east. east anglia, through northern england into the scottish borders and the east of scotland, they will be waking up to beautiful weather and a stunning sunrise earlier. 0ur blessed in south—western scotland and northern ireland you have the cloud in the rain. the rain will not be desperately heavy and it will wax and wane throughout the morning and the afternoon. it is a slow—moving weather front so yesterday i described it as clawing its way towards the east and that certainly remains the way. a nice afternoon in norwich, and as well is in newcastle. in the evening and overnight all of the market, the hill fog, mist, my dearand murky drizzle will be in place across most of the uk. even bear in scotland. look how murky and drizzly the areas
7:18 am
tomorrow morning. chances are the afternoon that cloud will break up and because it is warm and humid air that means that the temperature will shoot up as soon as the sun comes out. 23 degrees in london. 0ver shoot up as soon as the sun comes out. 23 degrees in london. over the week there will be spells of rain with weather fronts moving through but overall what we can say about most of the week ahead is that there will be some bright weather, not necessarily gloriously sunny. it will not be desperately wait. a bit of rain moving through at night and on the whole the first half of the week is looking fine. thank you very much indeed. we will talk to you again soon. good broadband is something a lot of businesses need — and the government says a reliable connection has a direct link to the success of the economy. today is the first stage of a project which is testing the next generation of broadband — it runs fibre connections straight to homes or businesses. we're joined now by andrew ferguson who's from think broadband.com. so what is the difference between
7:19 am
this and the regular bore a band that we are used to having in our homes? the majority of the broadband we have now is partialfibre. if either runs to a cabinet at the end of the street and it slows down as it comes into your home. this is full fibre, fibre—optic cable straight into the premises. forgive my ignorance but what is the point of having a fast it to the end of the street and then it slows down at the street and then it slows down at the copper wire. it seems pointless if it is going to hit bottleneck when it comes into your house. the advantage is that you can roll out quickly, you don't have to go to as many locations. it is a different scale. we will see many more people working on this project once it
7:20 am
really does kickstart. so if full fibre comes straight to your house, what does that mean in practical terms? what changes need to be made question mark it means someone will come, like when you have a brand—new house, they have to install phone cable. nothing more complicated than that, it is just more cable. nothing more complicated than that, it isjust more modern. you will have another small box on the wall somewhere in the property and the advantage is that whereas now your broadband can drop out and the lights go red, the internet connection goes. with full fibre that part will go away. you still share with everybody else on the internet so it still may be slow on a friday night or during the business day if businesses are busy. you make it sound quite simple but there are still many hurdles in place, not least because it is very difficult to agree who has to put the networking. i know there has been a lot of criticism of the people who look after the wires and
7:21 am
cables. is a common consensus about who needs to do it and when it needs to be done by? there is no common consensus on those particular points. technically it is understood that the hurdles are if it is open rich who gets the price of doing this? other companies, virtual media? they this? other companies, virtual media ? they have this? other companies, virtual media? they have expanded their role and then other companies as well. there is a large number of firms doing this forfibre there is a large number of firms doing this for fibre rollout so we are ata doing this for fibre rollout so we are at a turning point and we are trying to get it to as much of the country as possible since we have started we should be getting world leading speeds. for those at home who don't have broadband at all, would they not prefer to get that fixed first? they will be screaming at the television wondering why we are doing this? that is one of the
7:22 am
problems. we don't know exactly where it is going to go. if you say aberdeen and aberdeenshire, that is a big area. who will get it in those areas? we don't know yet. we have a bit ofan areas? we don't know yet. we have a bit of an idea in yorkshire so in west yorkshire and looks more like it will be focused on the business side than in homeowners to we need to wait and see. currently in the uk, you are more likely to have full fibre than ever. it certainly has leapfrogged. fibre than ever. it certainly has lea pfrogged. thank you fibre than ever. it certainly has leapfrogged. thank you very much. 22 minutes past seven. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. journalist and broadcaster angela epstein is here to tell us what's caught her eye. good morning. lovely to see you. let's bring through some of the front pages first of all. the sunday telegraph you can see have headlined thereabout tory rebels then told to
7:23 am
back rex. theresa may trying to head offa back rex. theresa may trying to head off a rebellion. a big week as far as those brexit negotiations are concerned but also laying out plans to be debated on the commons on thursday about the repeal bill. the crucial part that will take the uk out of the european union. a picture there of angelina jolie trying to get through the day, she says. she says she is heartbroken after her recent break up with brad pitt. front page of the observer have the same lead. they talk about the brexit campaigns, warning remainders who may be supporting jeremy corbyn in their rebellion. the daily mail on sunday, a lot of controversy at the time about white theresa may hold a snap general election. the mail on sunday says it saw a memo that said the theresa may ignored a warning that the election was a risk that could backfire. they call it a killer memo written by the election
7:24 am
guru sir clinton. sunday times, they also quote theresa may on the front page and polls that say 75% of voters do not want the prime minister to contest the next general election. let's have a look inside the papers. let's talkjohn lewis. i think this is an interesting story as far as clothing is concerned, gender neutral clothing. explain this for as. this is a move byjohn lewis to basically try and confound all those who argue about the idea of gender stereotypes. they will have, if you like, gender neutral clothing. you can see there that are yellow sweater could go on a boy or a girl. i think it is absolutely bonkers. the story started breaking yesterday but the idea now is that john lewis is doing it and because they are a key retailer, a key player in that area of the market
7:25 am
that other stores will feel compelled or it least inclined to follow suit. one of the challenges, as we may know, is when you see someone with a new baby, you tell them what a beautiful...? i don't offered as gold or it didn't you look full pink or blue. is the baby noah thayer in pink or blue? oh. and i have said this before. biology does not make as an equal, itjust makes us different. i have a little girl whoi makes us different. i have a little girl who i had after three boys. she chose, she chooses pink. it is not because i said she must. and she is surrounded by noisy boys and football. there is some being there within the biology that screams towards certain things and i think it is so awful that we are somehow kowtowi ng it is so awful that we are somehow kowtowing and bowing to this idea of gender stereotyping. it is just so beautiful and innocent and lovely. it is not necessarilyjust about colours about boys being able to wear pink girls wearing blue. this is about things like careers and
7:26 am
professions. why wouldn't girls like dinosaurs, for example? that is mainly the issue here, isn't it? traditionally you would have had a boys t—shirt with dinosaurs all machinery. but it is the worst sort of social engineering because if you put children on the floor with a load of staff, they are naturally inquisitive and they go towards the brightest and most colourful. essentially, you often see little girls are still veering towards dolls, little boys veering towards football. it does not mean that there is anything wrong or unequal, i think children need to be allowed to be children and we should abandon the forces of political correctness trying to steer children towards the kind of gender neutral politically correct satisfying territory in order to make it somehow more welcoming to those who have those views. i think it is awful. the point of this is not about moving people towards a certain thing, it is just saying that they can choose. let them choose a way. you can go
7:27 am
into the goal section of the children's clothes shop and there are yellow dresses or sweaters. my husband was wearing a pink shower. it is about choice. butler boys be boys and girls because. let's not make it a political issue. moving on... and grieve. you make it a little more het up about this. harriet harman suggesting there should be a health test for drivers over 75. i don't think it is a terrible thing. many elderly people value their independence and the car is critical to them. what she is suggesting is that rather than being self—regulatory thing at the moment whereby the driver of a certain age is obliged to declare the state of their health but somehow we should formalise in some ways. i know many people, as we get older, including myself, we do not like to acknowledge the passage of time. but if that impacts on driving, and impacts everybody on the road, were
7:28 am
to consider what the ramifications of those things are. will then end up of those things are. will then end up making yourgp of those things are. will then end up making your gp the bad guy? good cop, bad cop. it is about who makes ita cop, bad cop. it is about who makes it a safer place, that is all i can say, really. the clooney is on the front page of many newspapers. 0ut and about after giving birth to weeks ago. on a serious note it's like for every mum watching this who has just been up since three in the morning with a baby dribbling over, i don't understand... george and amal is spending the summer at his home in italy. around every night. i couldn't speak into my kids were six—month—old. if i did go out, i had cereal in my head. she looks gorgeous, 12 weeks after having twins, a massive assault on her body. as much as it is great and glorious to look at these colourful pictures, what this says to young
7:29 am
mothers if you do not have to snap back into shape. she seems to be a superwoman. back into shape. she seems to be a superwoman. it is astonishing. and also, we will not mention the word staff. there must be fleets of them behind the scenes. 20 of help. plenty of new mums would like that. thank you very much. the andrew marr programme is on bbc one this morning at nine. what you have coming up for us? back after the august rate, thank goodness, and, as you have seen from the front pages of the newspapers, it is still brexit, brexit, brexit. an important vote coming up in the house of commons, difficult to interpret negotiations going on in brussels. we will shed some light because i have the two crucial british ministers with men, so kia starmer and david davis who
7:30 am
is responsible for brexit. that much and more including eva perron, well, not quite either, live in the studio are busy hour at nine o'clock. that would be a story. thank you very much indeed. stay tuned for that. headlines are up next. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and sally nugent. coming up before seven tomasz will have the weather. but first, a summary of this
7:31 am
morning's main news. north korea appears to have carried out another nuclear test. china and the united states say they have detected tremors consistent with an underground explosion. hours earlier, north korea's state news agency said the country had built its own hydrogen bomb, capable of being mounted on an inter—continental ballistic missile. there is no independent verification of the claim. hospital managers in england have called for an emergency financial bail—out, saying they are bracing themselves for the worst winter in recent years. the department of health says the nhs is better prepared for winter this year than ever before, but nhs providers, which represents the vast majority of health trusts, says more staff and beds are needed — or patient safety could be at risk. the a and e department at the moment is no better than it was last year despite huge amounts of effort being put into improved that performance, it is staying stubbornly stuck a long way below the official target. current performance in a&e departments at the moment is no better than what it was last year despite huge amounts of effort
7:32 am
put in to improve that performance. it is staying stubbornly stuck, quite a long way below the official target. we know that there is a real risk that patients' safety could be put at an even greater risk this winter than it was last winter. senior conservatives are warning backbenchers not to rebel against the government's plans for brexit, when parliament returns after the summer break this week. the eu repeal bill — which transfers eu law into uk legislation — is due to be debated in the commons on thursday. theresa may says it will give certainty to people and businesses once we leave the union. twelve british people have been arrested in spain by police investigating a drug dealing ring — which was targeting the holiday resort of magaluf. officers say they seized 3kg of cocaine and 100,000 euros in cash. the spanish civil guard said the group was supplying cocaine to party—goers on the island. the first phase of what's known as "ultra —fast" broadband is starting in england and scotland. pilots schemes in six regions will test full—fibre internet services to make it
7:33 am
quicker for businesses to handle information. it's the first stage of a 200 million pound government project. —— it's the first stage of a 200 million pound government project. frankfurt is preparing to move 65,000 people from their homes to allow authorities to carry out a controlled explosion of a huge world war two bomb. the evacuation is germany's largest since the war, and officials have warned the financial capital could grind to a halt on monday if people don't leave. 0ne one of the last survivors of world war two's famous prison breaks is celebrating his birthday. he was involved in a bid for freedom from a german prisoner of war camp in 19114. i probably wouldn't be talking to you if i hadn't got out. my chances of getting home were virtually mill.
7:34 am
i was under no illusions about that. had i been recaptured, i had nothing really to persuade the germans not to go ahead with their threats. certainly a lot of optimism in welsh football. they have drawn five and zero and they needed to win last night. they are thinking about the next golden generation. here he is. not quite as young as gareth bale when he made his debut. a stunning introduction for ben woodburn. ben woodburn says it's a dream come true. wales really had to beat austria last night to have a realistic chance of qualifying for the world cup next year with less then half an hour to play
7:35 am
it was goaless in cardiff, but within a couple of minutes of coming off the bench to make his international debut, the 17—year—old had scored the winner. patrick gearey reports. perhaps ben woodburn will wonder if he dreamt it. yesterday evening, within five minutes of becoming a welsh international, he became a welsh hero. this was a match wales really needed to win. this had been a qualification campaign of too many draws. close was no longer good enough. austria's situation was similarly stark. two sides separated by little. all very close, all very tense. for a while, the pressure drove wales forward. just the time and place for gareth bale. austria's keeper had seen him do that before. unlike bale, ben woodburn still has the power of surprise. after all, he is only 17. these were his first moments an international footballer and this was his first shot. a teenager, born in england who chose to play for wales, scoring the goal which keeps alive his nation's chances of reaching the world cup. where on earth are
7:36 am
you go from there? wales will hope to russia. it's a dream come true and i'm happy i got the three points and now on to moldova. what did chris say to you as you came on? he said enjoy yourself and help the team as best you can and hopefully i did that. they now face the group's bottom team moldova on tuesday night. republic of ireland are two points ahead of wales in second, that's after their 1—1 draw against georgia. they started really well, taking the lead afterjust four minutes in tblisi, thanks to shane duffy's header. but just before half time georgia drew level, and held on for a point. ireland face the group leaders serbia next tuesday, so that will give wales a chance to make up some ground. somebody is going to drop points. all teams, second placed should secure a play—off spot.
7:37 am
there was some brilliant cricket on finals day at a sold out edgbaston yesterday, nottingham 0utlaws came out on top and are the t20 blast champions. they beat the birmingham bears by 22 runs. more than a thousand runs were scored across the two semi—finals and final. notts recovered from losing the wicket of alex hales early on to post a total of 190, thanks to 64 from samit patel. birmingham couldn't get close to that on their home ground, notts becoming champions for the first time and completing the double after also winning this season's 50—over competition. lewis hamilton can take the lead in the formula 1 championship this afternoon. it's the italian grand prix at monza and hamilton is on pole for a record breaking 69th time, the british driver was quickest in qualifying by over a second despite treacherous conditions. championship leader sebastien vettel will start from sixth..the williams driver lance stroll has become the youngest driver to secure a place on the front row. the canadian isn't as young as ben woodburn though, he's 18. but it was hamilton's day with that record breaking pole position. it's the opening weekend
7:38 am
in the rugby union premiership, we've had lots of tries, there was a double header at twickenham yesterday and the european champions saracens are up and running after a thumping win over northampton saints. sarries scored nine tries — three of them by scotland winger sean maitland. 55—24 the final score. saracens are looking to regain their title after losing in the play—off semi—finals last season. and the high scoring at twickenham didn't stop there. that match was followed by 39—29 win for london irish over harlequins. brendan mckibben taking advantage of a mistake in the quinns backline to score the decisive try. defending pro12 champions scarlets got their pro 14 campaign off to a winning start, beating league debuta nts southern kings from south africa 57—10. leigh halfpenny joined them in the summer and wasted no time in scoring his first points for the club.
7:39 am
chris froome is still wearing the leaders red jersey at the vuelta espana, he has a 55 second lead the 14th stage was won by poland's rafal maj ka. froome finished in fourth a few seconds behind vincenzo nibali — who is second in the overall standings. remmebr froome is going for a rare grand tour double, having already won the tour de france this year. it was a much easier day for roger federer at the us open, after two five—setters, he breezed past spain's feliciano lopez in straight sets to reach the fourth round — the world number one rafa nadal beat argentina's leonardo mayer in the third round despite losing the first set. he could meet federer in the semi—finals of the tournament. i know i can't always play very well for the whole match but the most important in is a give my best and a players with the right intensity and all the time with the motivation to win the match. in the women's draw, world number one karolina pliskova saved a match point to beat china's shau zhang and reach the fourth round.
7:40 am
the top seed will now face either jennifer brady or monica niculescu. back to football — and a match more important than many others played yesterday. the game for grenfell at loftus road, a huge charity game arranged by queens park rangers to raise money for those affected by the grenfell tower disaster. loftus road is less than a miles from grenfell — and qpr's owner tony fernandes along with marcus mumford from mumford & sons, arranged this special match. celebrities, members of the emergency services and sportstars past and present all taking part, including sir mo farah, who scored the opening goal of the game afterjust 90 seconds. rita 0ra, emile sande and others entertained the crowds at half—time. it finished 2—all and the manchester united managerjose mourinho making a surprise appearance in goal for thew shoot—out! he finished on the losing side though, conceding the winning penalty to 0lly murs. that was a satisfying to watch. and
7:41 am
the dab. i wonder whetherjose mourinho was being a bit generous. he said he didn't have the legs. lots of money raised. an incredible cause. lots of money raised. an incredible cause. you are watching that my brea kfast cause. you are watching that my breakfast from bbc news. —— expressed. —— breakfast. the average student debt now stands at 50,000 pounds. but a new report claims two—year degrees could be the answer to tackling what they call "the mounting time bomb of student debt." a report by a centre—right think tank is calling for stronger legislation to break what it calls a "university cartel" in england and wales.
7:42 am
universities say there's no evidence they're acting together to block change. joining us now from our 0xford studio is sir anthony seldon, vice—chancellor at university of buckingham. good morning to you. let's talk about this two year proposals. speak to my students and we see why they could be a good team. —— thing. is there a risk you lose out on other advantages at university, social skills, life skills, that you gain outside the classroom. yes, varies. just to say that in fact it is the university of barking hams that i am the vice chancellor of. —— —— yes, there is. obviously, we are fitting a three—year programme into two yea rs a three—year programme into two years so you lose it certain things, as you say. it is much more compressed. but, there are great benefits. a lot of students find the
7:43 am
long summer is that you have in the three years and in general, the amount of time when they are not studying, is quite considerable. that suits some students but not others. what i think is that there isa others. what i think is that there is a real scope in britain to have many more two—year degrees that offer an alternative. what universities clearly need to do as we move forward is to give our stu d e nts we move forward is to give our students a greater choice over what they have rather than a pretty standard three—year option which is what most of them have. you are absolutely right. let me correct myself, vice chancellor at the university of buckingham. it is a sunday morning, apologies. let's talk about universities offering two—year courses. you might say they
7:44 am
stand to gain a lot of money from the three—year courses. do they stand to lose out? certainly, two use his better financially for students. they are only paying two yea rs students. they are only paying two years accommodation, two years living. it also means they can start working in a full—time job one year earlier. of course, many students do part—time work but they are earning less and not building their career in the same way than coming in. what does that mean in practical terms? it means that you do 78 weeks of working two years rather than three so you are going to have 39 weeks of work a year. 13 weeks off, quite a lot actually. rather than 26 weeks of work per year. it is more intense but it does mean there are real
7:45 am
significant financial savings for students. perhaps not so easy for universities to handle. the report accuses universities of acting like accuses universities of acting like a cartel to keep the prices that stu d e nts a cartel to keep the prices that students are paying high. it means they are in greater depth when they leave. the universities say they deny this and that there is no evidence. what do you make of that? a strong claim, that universities are acting as a cartel. that is not my belief. i believe universities did allow fees to go up too much too fast but it is not my belief there isa fast but it is not my belief there is a cartel, that i know of. i think most universities do a greatjob. i don't agree with those head teachers that are saying we should be discouraging our six formers from
7:46 am
going on to university. i think university is a great place to go when you are 18. also, in life. we need to diversify what we are offering students. many more to degrees —— two—year degrees like at my university but also offering even better teaching and even better welfare and looking after the mental health of students better. still, a fantastic option for young people. thank you very much for your time. time now for the weather. good morning to you both. the weather is a little mixed this weekend. some of us will be stuck underneath the cloud but others will have a fine sunday with some sunshine and it is eastern areas of the uk that clinic
7:47 am
this is the scene around about nine o'clock. it is raining in cornwall, moving into devon, somerset, merging into wiltshire as well and then clearly reining across wales. look at the south—east. the midlands, east anglia, the north of england. almost all of it here in the clear. the sky is hazy at this stage of the reining in belfast. you get a sense that most of that rain has gone through belfast by the time it gets the second half of the morning rains at glasgow but not necessarily edinburgh. some sunshine there so what will happen with this band of rain, it will move very slowly and thenit then it will fall apart a little bit. by the time we get tonight we are bit. by the time we get tonight we a re left over with a blob of murk around the
7:48 am
country. this humid air comes out of the south—west, 16 overnight there in cardiff, even in the north around 15 degrees. this cloudy, drizzly and muqqy 15 degrees. this cloudy, drizzly and muggy will weather is with us into tomorrow with a lot of cloud out their. weather clouds break tomorrow it will warm up to around 20, in fa ct, it will warm up to around 20, in fact, widely 20 degrees also. the weather early in the week, until about wednesday, the weather front is moving through and it is out of the way. summarising, there will be sunshine around. thank you and we will see you again soon. i will bring you an update on our lead story here on breakfast this morning. this is a translation in the official north korean state media that has come to us in the last few moments. north korea has detonated a bomb with perfect success hours after its sixth at
7:49 am
nuclear detonation. that was announced on the central korean television. it was a perfect success. much more on that coming up in the next few minutes. yes, now on brea kfast, in the next few minutes. yes, now on breakfast, time to the channel so. this week on the show, we're in a medieval city in belgium for our whacky race, where bathtubs rule. one that looks like a shed on a bathtub. it is unbelievable. and i'm having a cracking time in northern japan. that really doesn't look appetising. now we're off to dinant in belgium. the town's an hour's drive south
7:50 am
of the capital, brussels, and is known as the birthplace of the saxophone. but in more recent years it's become famous for its very unusual summer festival. we sentjoe along to take part in one of the world's wackiest races. the river meuse flows for nearly 1000km through france, belgium and the netherlands and has been an important trading route since medieval times. but in more recent decades, a stretch of the river here in dinant in southern belgium has become better known for its epic water fights that happen each year as part of la regate de baignoires — the bathtub regatta. alberto came up with the idea for the regatta 35 years ago. he shows me the one kilometre route where the boats will race. the race was intended to be a one—off.
7:51 am
but 35 years later, it's still going. 0riginally, each competitor had their own bathtub. but now people create huge, elaborate floats. the only rule is that somewhere the design must incorporate a bathtub. people spend months secretly constructing their boats. i'm heading to meet one crew who are putting the finishing touches to the raft i'll be racing on. bonjour. hello. 0h, these are amazing! yes, thank you. nice to meet you, i'm jo.
7:52 am
nice to meet you. emmeline. they're enormous. yes, but it's not the biggest. come with me. 0k. wow! ready for you. you are very prepared. is this our boat? yes. the theme this year is famous people in dinant. emmeline has chosen to represent the town's doctors. the sign is like gray's anatomy. yes, it's my name. that's very clever. i can see a bathtub there. people sit in here? yes, me. just here! where will i go? you can go here. emmeline and herfamily have been taking part in the regatta for the past 20 years. it's all hands on deck to finish their fleet of three boats. you must have a fancy dress. 0k. here are my scrubs. very nice. fully kitted out in my doctor's
7:53 am
scrubs, all that's left to do now is launch the bathtubs. just making it nice for the trip! iget in? and we're off. in what i think is the wrong direction. which way are we going? further down the river, we join the rest of the tubs on the start line. it's absolute chaos. there's a lot of shouting, a lot of chanting. have we started now? yes, i think.
7:54 am
this is the race? i start rowing as hard as i can. but i get the impression it's more about showcasing the bathtub designs than how quickly you can complete the race. there is some seriously impressive contraptions on this river. one guy over there is barbequing on his bathtub. further down the river, there's something that looks like a shed. i don't know. i'm just going to keep rowing. soon, it becomes clear that splashing the opposition is the aim of the game. you aren't allowed to try and sink other boats. but it seems that anything else goes. i'm obviously soaking wet! and the thousands of people who've come to watch aren't safe either. the town's bridge marks the end of the race. but no—one seems to be too bothered about hurrying towards it. for us, the regatta ends in the same chaotic way it started
7:55 am
as we haphazardly paddle past the finish line. what a day. i'm not sure there were any winners or losers there. but it was so much fun. they've told me this is the only way to finish the race. most people knew to to end this week, japan's food can be justjaw dropping and most people new to the country make a bee line for the yakitori joints or sushiers that you'll find everywhere. i've lived here in tokyo for over three years now and i love japanese food.
7:56 am
but there's still some ifind quite intimidating. with a little help from my translator, yoko, i'm taking my tastebuds on a trip through this country to try and understand what i'm missing out on. hokkaido is japan's northern island. it's wild and craggy. in the winter, it's a snowy wonderland. after the thaw, the islanders are left with alpine meadows and crystal clear seas. we're in the port city of 0taru. i'm told this is one of the best places in all of japan to find the best uni. this is japanese sea urchin, or to be more exact, its reproductive glands. it's a fairly pricey delicacy, which you normally eat with soy sauce on top of a bed of rice. carmen... uni — you found it. yes. this is quite a big pack of uni. how expensive is this? 4,500 yen.
7:57 am
wow! that's just less than $45, around 30 quid. so this is the best uni injapan, is that correct? collecting them is hit—and—miss. the sea has to be perfectly still for the fishermen here to head out onto the water. either they all go or none do. luckily, i'm here at exactly the right time of year. we can reallyjust try uni out here? you don't have to cook it or anything? sterilise it? no. open it. put it in your mouth. this man has been fishing here for years. if anyone's ever earned the title mr uni, it's him. what's that black container do?
7:58 am
it's a goggle. to look under the sea. wow! wow, that's a lot! so you scoop it out like this. here we go. a bit like an oyster, really salty, but the consistency of eurgh! another thing people eat when they come here to hokkaido is ice—cream. this is a seven—tower rainbow ice—cream. check it out. my goodness, it's grape,
7:59 am
strawberry, green tea, melon, chocolate, milk and lavender. i can't wait. this is your ice—cream. right, let me guess, this is uni ice—cream, right? well, i love ice—cream. maybe this is one way i might actually enjoy uni. it's not so bad. it does taste a little salty and a little bit seafoody. but i think this is the best way to enjoy uni, really. for me, anyway. you're sure i can't have that one back? i want to keep this, so no! i got it back.
8:00 am
that's all we have time for this week. coming up next week... ade travels through sweden to find out about stockholm's plans to become the most futuristic city in the world. he also heads to the far north of the country to experience a chilly night on a block of ice. it's so cold! it's cold, man! don't forget, you can join in our adventures on the road by following us on social media. in the meantime, from me and this melting ice—cream on the japanese island of hokkaido, it's goodbye. hello this is breakfast, with ben thompson and sally nugent. north korea says it has detonated a hydrogen bomb. in the last hour, the state news agency has declared that the test was a perfect success.

12 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on