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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 3, 2017 8:00am-9:01am BST

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i got it back. that's all we have time for this week. coming up next week... ade travels through sweden to find out about stockholm's plans to become the most futuristic city in the world. he also heads to the far north of the country to experience a chilly night on a block of ice. it's so cold! it's cold, man! don't forget, you can join in our adventures on the road by following us on social media. in the meantime, from me and this melting ice—cream on the japanese island of hokkaido, it's goodbye. hello this is breakfast, with ben thompson and sally nugent. north korea says it has detonated a hydrogen bomb. in the last hour, the state news agency has declared that the test was a perfect success. good morning.
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it's sunday 3rd september. theresa may calls for unity to prevent a tory rebellion over brexit, as the commons prepares to debate legislation to leave the european union. nhs bosses in england ask for more money to avoid another winter crisis. bradley lowery‘s brave battle against cancer touched the hearts of all football fans. celebrities will unite today for a charity match to celebrate his life. in sport — wales‘ world cup hopes are alive thanks to ben woodburn, the teenager made his international debut last night and won the match against austria. and tomasz has the weather. we have been forecasting some rain
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for today. it is on its way, but some of us may end up with a pretty bright day. we are going to bring you the very latest on the situation in north korea in a few moments‘ time. we have had confirmation from a state news agency that a test has been carried out. more on that. senior conservatives are warning backbenchers not to rebel against the government‘s plans for brexit when parliament returns this week. the eu repeal bill is due to be debated on thursday. our political correspondent emma vardy joins us from our london newsroom. theresa may is probably distracted by thoughts of rebellion as well as the eu repeal bill. that's right. the eu repealed beale as the legislation that is needed to convert all of the eu laws into
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british ones. it‘s notjust a cut and pastejob. british ones. it‘s notjust a cut and paste job. the british ones. it‘s notjust a cut and pastejob. the government will need to use a special powers to make it all fits together. that is causing controversy because the government is going to need to use these special powers to make lots of technical changes to legislation, which critics say is essentially handing ministers a blank cheque to make changes to our laws without proper scrutiny. labour says it cannot support this bill unless significant changes are made. if there was to be a tory rebellion, there was to be a tory rebellion, the government is under threat of being defeated in the commons. ministers are urging conservative mps to get behind this bill, saying it is needed to deliver on the result of the referendum. will conservative backbenchers defied theresa may‘s authority on this, or is it political posturing? it is going to be a big test for her as
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prime minister, and the eu repeal bill is a significant step in our journey to leaving the european union. thank you very much. north korea‘s state media says it‘s detonated a hydrogen bomb with "perfect success", adding that the device was capable of being loaded onto its long—range missiles. there is no independent verification of the claim. our correspondent yogita limaye is in the south korean capital, seoul. just looking at some reports coming in from japan. scientists saying it was ten times more powerful than the test that took place year ago. what more do we know about it? north korea‘s state tv made an announcement a while ago. they said they had successfully tested a hydrogen bomb, a very powerful nuclear device. they said it was a hydrogen bomb designed to be fitted
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onto an intercontinental ballistic missile. hours before, the news agency had released photographs of kim jong—un looking at what they claim was a hydrogen bomb. these two announcements are connected. they have said that they are now capable of making a nuclear device that can be fit onto a long—range nuclear missile. japan has confirmed that this is a nuclear test. authorities injapan and this is a nuclear test. authorities in japan and south this is a nuclear test. authorities injapan and south korea are saying that the power that has emanated from this nuclear test appears to be many times more than what we have seenin many times more than what we have seen in previous instances. north korea claimed in january seen in previous instances. north korea claimed injanuary they had successfully tested a hydrogen bomb, but this claim was disputed by many experts, who said they had tested a less powerful device. experts are saying that going by the magnitude of tremors that were released by this explosion, this seems to be the
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most powerful test they have conducted so far. they have now conducted so far. they have now conducted six since 2006. we can see the pictures on north korean television, making those announcements. you have touched on this, but i‘m interested in the international response. the japanese foreign minister condemning the attacks. the south korean president kim meaning that emergency minister. what of the response from the united states ? what of the response from the united states? we are waiting to hear what the us will say. we are hoping the white house will make some sort of statement. here in south korea, the emergency meeting has concluded, and we are likely to hear a statement from there soon. troops in south korea have been put on high alert. this was anticipated, because south korea‘s spy agency had said there
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we re korea‘s spy agency had said there were preparations being made for a nuclear test in north korea. experts had said it was a question of when not if. this was anticipated, but it‘s unlikely there will be any sort of unilateral response from any one country. it will be a united response. i‘m pretty sure the government of japan, the response. i‘m pretty sure the government ofjapan, the us and south korea will be speaking to each other to figure out what they can do next. thank you very much. hospital managers in england have called for an emergency financial bail—out, saying they are bracing themselves for the worst winter in recent years. the department of health says the nhs is better prepared for winter this year than ever before, but nhs providers, which represents the vast majority of health trusts, says more staff and beds are needed — or patient safety could be at risk. we will be speaking to the chief executive of nhs providers in about 12 minutes‘ time.
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12 british people have been arrested in spain by police investigating a drug dealing ring — which was targeting the holiday resort of magaluf. officers say they seized 3kg of cocaine and 100,000 euros in cash. simon clemison reports. the spanish civil guard says the group was supplying cocaine to party goers in majorca. the first phase of what‘s known as "ultra —fast" broadband is starting in england and scotland. pilot schemes in six regions will test full—fibre internet services to make it quicker for businesses to handle information. it‘s the first stage of a £200 million government project. vishala sri—pathma reports. with speeds of up to i gigabyte per second, a full fibre broadband is a superfast internet connection the government wants to see made available across the uk. rather than relying on copper wire, this relies on fibre optic cables which run directly into homes and offices, allowing for much faster transfer of information. internet companies like virgin media are already rolling out full fibre across much of the country.
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now the government has announced six pilot projects across the uk where they want to work with industry to identify how full fibre broadband can be brought to more homes and businesses more quickly. in the case of west yorkshire, it is giving vouchers to businesses to help them offset the costs of taking fibre to the network. if you look at manchester, that is using public sector assets such as ducting for cctv cameras so we need to reduce the cost of laying full fibre networks. it is looking at what is going to work best. that is what we are looking to find out. the next stage is implementing that. full fibre is available to around i million premises across the uk. representing about 2% of all internet connections. that contrast with spain where the figure is 80%. instead, most households have a partialfibre broadband which is still fast, superfast in fact, but not quite as ultra fast as full fibre.
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the biggest evacuation in germany since the second world war is taking place in frankfurt. more than 60,000 people have been ordered to leave their homes while an unexploded raf bomb is made safe. 0ur correspondent damian mcguinness is in frankfurt this morning. a big evacuation, and one that the authorities have said they will enforce. people must leave the area. that‘s right. it‘s called a compulsory evacuation, which means that police are searching the area to see if anyone is left in their homes. they are ringing doorbells and using heat sensor technology. if anyone is found and refuses to leave, police have said they can use force or incarceration. this bomb is incredibly dangerous. 1.5 tonnes of
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explosive material, which means that it could flatten an entire city block. it‘s very dangerous for the whole area, and police have said that if local residents do not cooperate, it could really cause chaos in frankfurt, germany‘s financial capital, during the week. the region has to be evacuated at the weekend. the bomb has to be diffused, and by tomorrow, the city hopes to get back to normal working order. we do get a lot of these world war ii bombs in city areas, at nowhere near to the impact of this. this is unusually large, and it‘s affecting an unusually large part of the city. people would usually be evacuated from their homes, but it might bea evacuated from their homes, but it might be a couple of thousand people. this is around 70,000 people
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in the centre of germany‘s financial capital. thank you for that, damian. now take a look at these impressive images of the soyuz ms—oii spacecraft touching down in the early hours of this morning, after a three—hour journey from the international space station. it entered the earth‘s atmosphere at a speed of over 500 miles per hour, with temperatures outside the spacecraft reaching a scorching 2,500 degrees celsius. parachutes were deployed to slow it down shortly before it safely landed in a remote area of kazakhstan, with three nasa astronauts on board. we are we a re really we are really going to bring you back down to earth now! did you know there is a special day each year to celebrate facial hair? the first saturday in september marks world beard day, where people across the globe celebrate the occasion.
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i don‘t think i could carry off a beard! especially some of these. 0ne event in sweden held the "battle of barbers". this included the country‘s leading stylists competing in a beard—trimming contest. the length, texture, colour and thickness of the hair were all taken into account. and perhaps also the angle of moustached tilt! far too much hard work. i see that it is an art form, but the time we get up in the morning, i can‘t be doing with any of that! me neither. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. the nhs is facing its worst winter in recent memory unless it receives an emergency cash injection of at least £200 million. that‘s the warning from the organisation representing hospital trusts in england. but the government says the nhs has prepared
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for winter more this year than ever before. chris hopson is chief executive of nhs providers. hejoins us from our london newsroom. good morning. chris, what exactly do you need the extra cash for? what our hospital, community and ambulance chief executives are telling us is that they do not have enough capacity to manage this winter safely. last winter, the nhs was under unprecedented pressure because we had unprecedented demand, and we‘d just about cope. 0ur chief executives are telling asked that they simply don‘t have enough capacity to manage the demand they are expecting. demand is going up by 396 are expecting. demand is going up by 3%a are expecting. demand is going up by 3% a year. at the moment, a&e departments are under real pressure. may and june‘s performance were worse than last year, and july was the same. we are all worried that we are heading into a winter where we
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don‘t have enough capacity to deal with what will happen. so if people require services like an ambulance or mental health services, what do they do? let me reassure viewers that everybody in the nhs will do everything they can. by international standards, we are doing pretty well. but last winter there were far too many people who we re there were far too many people who were having to wait for 12 hours on trolleys, wait in the back of ambulances because the ambulances couldn‘t clear. in a small number of areas, genuinely, patient safety was put at risk. we want to avoid that happening this year. to do that, we know we don‘t have enough capacity at the moment. the government‘s plan was to put £1 billion extra into social care. local authorities were given a choice on how to spend that. they have spent that on a number of pressures , they have spent that on a number of
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pressures, and the reality is that there isn‘t enough capacity in the nhs. we are short of thousands of birds, and we are running a risk that none of us in the nhs want to run. in terms of the nhs, the figure required doesn‘t seem like a vast amount of cash required. what is that for? £200 million out of eight total nhs allocation of £109 billion, it is very small. we know that the nhs should be able to find that the nhs should be able to find that money. if they can‘t, the government has committed in its ma nifesto to government has committed in its manifesto to put an extra eight alien into the nhs, and we are asking for an early drawdown of that. if they get enough notice, they can create enough capacity in they can create enough capacity in the nhs. last year we created eight
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hospitals‘ worth of extra capacity. we need similar amounts this year, and we are currently around two and and we are currently around two and a half thousand beds short. the money can be spent on extra hospital beds, but in lots of places we know it will be better spent on extra gps, social care, mental health facilities and ambulance capacity. it's facilities and ambulance capacity. it‘s up to local leaders in all areas to decide where that money should be spent. it‘s important to recognise some good news. the nhs is planning betterfor recognise some good news. the nhs is planning better for winter this year than ever before. we have identified those places that we think are at greatest risk. what is clear is that u nless we greatest risk. what is clear is that unless we can put in extra capacity quickly, those plans are not going to work as effectively as we need. the government has already put billions of pounds into social care. could the hospitals use the money
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they do have in a better way? clearly n h s they do have in a better way? clearly nhs hospital chief executives and trust executives do everything they can to increase efficiency. we made £20 billion worth of savings in the last parliament. the english nhs is one of the most efficient health services in the world. of course we can services in the world. of course we ca n always services in the world. of course we can always get better. there is a myth that somehow if the nhs could be that bit more efficient or productive, we wouldn‘t need to put this extra money in. the independent 0ffice this extra money in. the independent office for budget responsibility, a government—sponsored body, identified that we are going to have a £15 billion gap in health funding by the end of this parliament. so of course we need to find more efficiency, but that is not going to close that gap. we need to recognise we have big risks this winter, and
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put in not a massive amount of money to make sure we can manage that risk safely. thank you very much indeed. the department of health sent us this statement. it says: "the nhs has prepared for winter more this year than ever before — ensuring patients continue to receive safe and efficient care as demand expectantly increases." here‘s thomasz with a look at this morning‘s weather. a bit ofa a bit of a mixed forecast. absolutely. if you live in the east of the country and you are just waking up, you missed a beautiful sunrise. matt taylor took a time—lapse of that, and it was stunning. beautiful weather in some parts, but not everywhere. look at this cloud. the sun was rising and lighting up the edge of this cloud, and we saw some stunning colours.
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0ut west, a totally different story. you have woken up to those grey, low hanging skies, bit of a breeze and missed in places. temperatures probably will not rise an awful lot more through the course of the day. in the east, it is bright, sunny in places and feels very pleasant. in belfast, the south—west and the western isles of scotland, it is raining there. murray, aberdeenshire and up into the lerwick, there‘s some sunshine. 0ver and up into the lerwick, there‘s some sunshine. over the morning, this cloud and rain will drift east, and many parts of the country, all the way from the far north—east of scotla nd the way from the far north—east of scotland down to kent and sussex will probably remain dry. the rain will probably remain dry. the rain will not reach you until the early hours of monday morning. tonight, a mass of cloud and some on and off
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drizzle. very mild tonight. 16 degrees in plymouth, 1a in eastern parts of scotland. monday starts on a great note. additional rain moving into north—western parts of the country, but some sunshine poking through that layer of grey we will have tomorrow. quite humid, so those temperatures will rise to the low 20s. some weather fronts temperatures will rise to the low 20s. some weatherfronts moving through for the first part of the week, then quieter running down for wednesday. a mixed start to the week, but the weather should be mostly bright, with temperatures getting up to the low 20s in the south and the mid or upper teens in the north. that‘s it. south and the mid or upper teens in the north. that's it. thank you. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. angela
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at the newspapers. epstein is here to tell us what angela epstein is here to tell us what has caught her eye this morning. there is a story in the sunday times about the nature of the marks that have been given to pupils that had just taken their a—levels and gcses. there is a suggestion that those who took the reformed a—levels had a better chance of getting and a r.n. a star. and that those who took the gcses had less chance of getting a a or a a‘. the exam system is in a catastrophic state of meltdown. in my day, we had a 0—levels. but now it's like we need to keep moving the goalposts. a a: need to keep moving the goalposts. a a‘ is not enough, so they have introduced the one to nine markings of the gcses. in one particular
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subject, a headmistress said that lots of girls got a*s this year, but —— last year, but very few this year. to me it should be first past the post. and it's the issue of comparative ability. 0ne headteacher said there is a crisis in trust and that there is no transparency over how the grades were achieved. there was also always going to be a difficulty in differences in schooling opportunities, whether your parents can afford tutors after school, but at least expect the exams themselves to have some sort of level playing field so that we understand them. i have seen with my own children, the messing around of
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the system between them seems absolutely appalling to me. nobody really knows what the credibility of aa* really knows what the credibility of aa‘is really knows what the credibility of a a‘ is any more, which short—changes a generation of children. in the sunday express this morning, people at home might recognise this person. this is the former prime minister david cameron who is now booked to speak in front ofan who is now booked to speak in front of an audience of students who are going to pay £5 a head. normally ex—prime ministers get a lot more than that! that caught my eye. allegedly he gave a talk about brexit recently and got £120,000. this is in rapid city in south da kota. this is in rapid city in south dakota. sounds like real wild west territory! they attract fairly prestigious speakers. it's £5 a
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head, which caught my eye, so is this what happens to our former prime minister 's! the post—political life of our leaders, and what it says about their integrity and credibility. these are the people who lead our country, and as soon as the people who lead our country, and as soon as they are out of office, their credibility is somehow diluted by what they do post office. can be a very lucrative second career. we don‘t know how true these numbers are, but mr cameron apparently earned £120,000 an hourfor that speak about brexit, but apparently tony blair got £4.6 million that was for the memoirs. he is only getting £800,000 for the memoirs he is working on at the moment. you can just do one chapter — your referendum got it wrong! £4.6
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million for blair says something. how do we assess the value of our former prime minister 's? speaking of sales and commercial things, we are expecting to see another number one single in the chart from the x factor! it started last night. one single in the chart from the x factor! it started last nightlj imagine, forgive me simon cowell, do we need a new ed sheeran or a new spice girls? i watched x factor last night, and there were two extraordinary young ladies. 0ne night, and there were two extraordinary young ladies. one was a chip shop worker from liverpool. she was absolutely extraordinary, like the new cilla black. she was so funny. she said she had simon cowell tattooed on her back. sang like a bird, absolutely beautiful. and a
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warehouse worker who sang a composition of her own. there is a case that there is a lot of untapped tale nt case that there is a lot of untapped talent out there who wouldn't get an opportunity without it. but they jump opportunity without it. but they jump straightaway on the labelling. they get our attention by saying, is this the new adele? i am quite happy with the old dell! i watched as well last night, for research purposes! there were lots of really good performances. don‘t we expect a lot of bad performances at this point?|j was watching for research purposes as well, and simon cowell has spoken about wanting to freshen up the series. there's only so many vaudeville acts they can do. you're right, the quality was very high, given that it is early in the series. i'm nervous about doing
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this. this is george michael‘s dog, apparently, at the grave that has turned into a bit of a shrine. a sad face. yes. the first thing that caught my eye, and the tabloids are particularly good at this. that headline is fantastic. it was about george michael's dog, abby, who has lost his appetite, has been hanging around the shrine, and the fact is that it plays to something a little more soulful, which is, george michael, it was such a terrible loss, a terrible waste. he had lots of broken and difficult relationships, and the one key person who seems to be mourning him in public view is his dog. a lot of dog owners have this very close relationship with their pets. ijust thought there was something terribly mournful and sad about that. nice to
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see you. thank you so much. do stay with us. the headlines are coming right up. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and sally nugent. coming up before nine tomasz will have the weather. but first, a summary of this morning‘s main news. it is exactly 830 gmt. north korea‘s state media says it‘s detonated a hydrogen bomb with "perfect success", adding that the device was capable of being loaded onto its long—range missiles. there is no independent verification of the claim. it would be the sixth underground nuclear test by north korea injust over a decade. japanese scientists say it was 10—times more powerful than the last one, a year ago. u nless unless you‘re prepared to disarm north korea by they are not going to stop doing this so i think we have to go to our default position of deterrence and containment. the good
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news is the regime is secular, they wish to survive, they are hyper rational, do not wish to commit suicide, they will test the waters and see how they might be able to use these weapons and other capabilities for course of purposes. hospital managers in england have called for an emergency financial bail—out, saying they are bracing themselves for the worst winter in recent years. the department of health says the nhs is better prepared for winter this year than ever before, but nhs providers, which represents the vast majority of health trusts, says more staff and beds are needed — or patient safety could be at risk. what happened last winter, there we re what happened last winter, there were four to many people waiting for 12 hours on trolleys, waiting in the back of ambulances because they couldn‘t clear. we know in a small number of areas, genuinely patient safety was put at risk. what we are saying is we want to avoid that happening this year, and in order to do that we know we don‘t have enough
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capacity at the moment. senior conservatives are warning backbenchers not to rebel against the government‘s plans for brexit, when parliament returns after the summer break this week. the eu repeal bill — which transfers eu law into uk legislation — is due to be debated in the commons on thursday. theresa may says it will give certainty to people and businesses once we leave the union. twelve british people have been arrested in spain by police investigating a drug dealing ring — which was targeting the holiday resort of magaluf. officers say they seized three kilograms of cocaine and a hundred thousand euros in cash. the spanish civil guard said the group was supplying cocaine to partygoers on majorca. a pilot project to roll—out ultra—fast broadband is starting in england and scotland. six local schemes will trial ‘full fibre‘ networks, said to be the most reliable system available. it‘s the first stage of a 200 million pound government project. now take a look at these impressive images of the soyuz ms—oii
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spacecraft touching down in the early hours of this morning, after a 3—hourjourney from the international space station. it entered the earth‘s atmosphere at a speed of over 500 miles per hour, with temperatures outside the spacecraft reaching a scorching 2,500 degrees celsius. parachutes were deployed to slow it down shortly before it safely landed in a remote area of kazakhstan, with three nasa astronauts on board. going from the skies to underground now. . . a toddler has been pulled free from a well in china after a 10 hour rescue mission. the boy was out playing with his grandparents when he disappeared 12—metres into the ground in the north west province of xinagji. firefighters used heavy machinery and ropes to pull him free. the toddler was taken to hospital and reported to be in a good condition. he looks not in the best of shape at
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that point but thankfully is said to be in that point but thankfully is said to beina that point but thankfully is said to be in a good condition now. per child, pro—grandparents. they will be more kirtzel when they taken up next time. they are not baby—sitting again, are they? good morning. good morning. it was a happy ending. another happy ending in cardiff, this was no friendly. it was a big game for wales, they have drawn five and a role in world cup qualifier, heading for another draw against austria, chris coleman, masterstroke, that man be 3g, then woodburn. he is 17. 18 next month. still 17! ben woodburn says it‘s a dream come true. wales really had to beat austria last night to have a realistic chance of qualifying
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for the world cup next year with less then half an hour to play it was goaless in cardiff, but within a couple of minutes of coming off the bench to make his international debut, the 17 year old had scored the winner. patrick gearey reports. perhaps ben woodburn will wonder if he dreamt it. yesterday evening, within five minutes of becoming a welsh international, he became a welsh hero. this was a match wales really needed to win. this had been a qualification campaign of too many draws. close was no longer good enough. austria‘s situation was similarly stark. two sides separated by little. all very close, all very tense. for a while, the pressure drove wales forward. just the time and place for gareth bale. austria‘s keeper had seen him do that before. unlike bale, ben woodburn still has the power of surprise. after all, he is only 17. these were his first moments as an international footballer and this was his first shot. a teenager, born in england who chose to play for wales, scoring the goal which keeps alive his nation‘s chances of reaching the world cup. where on earth are you go from there? wales will hope to russia. it‘s a dream come true and i‘m happy i got the three points and now
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on to moldova. what did chris say to you as you came on? he said enjoy yourself and help the team as best you can and hopefully i did that. let‘s see if he gets a start on tuesday night. that match against the bottom team moldova is on tuesday night. republic of ireland are two points ahead of wales in second, that‘s after their 1—1 draw against georgia. they started really well , taking the lead afterjust four minutes in tblisi, thanks to shane duffy‘s header. butjust before half time georgia equalised to secure a point. ireland face the group leaders serbia next tuesday, so that will give wales a chance to make up some ground. all teams have three matches left to play, group winners qualify for russia, second place should secure a play—off spot. there was some brilliant cricket on finals day at a sold out edgbaston yesterday, nottingham 0utlaws came out on top
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and are the t20 blast champions. they beat the birmingham bears by 22 runs. more than a thousand runs were scored across the two semi—finals and final. notts recovered from losing the wicket of alex hales early on to post a total of 190, thanks to 64 from samit patel. birmingham couldn‘t get close to that on their home ground, notts becoming champions for the first time and completing the double after also winning this season‘s 50—over competition. we‘ve had lots of tries on the opening weekend of the rugby union premiership, there was a double header at twickenham yesterday london irish beat harlequins and the european champions saracens are up and running after a thumping win over northampton saints. sarries scored nine tries — three of them by scotland winger sean maitland. 55—24 the final score. there was also a big win for wasps against sale. defending pro12 champions scarlets got their pro 1a campaign off to a winning start. debutant leigh halfpenny scored one of their 8 tries
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against south african side southern kings. 57—10 the final score. there were also pro14 wins for 0spreys, leinster and glasgow. chris froome is still wearing the leaders red jersey at the vuelta espana, he has a 55 second lead the 14th stage was won by poland‘s rafal maj ka. froome finished in fourth a few seconds behind vincenzo nibali — who is second in the overall standings. there‘s another mountain stage today. remember froome is going for a rare grand tour double, having already won the tour de france this year. it was a much easier day for roger federer at the us open, after two five—setters, he breezed past spain‘s feliciano lopez in straight sets to reach the 11th round. the world number one rafa nadal beat argentina‘s leonardo mayer in the third round despite losing the first set. he looked a bit ropey in places.
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he could meet federer in the semi—finals of the tournament. i know i cannot play very well always, the whole match, but for me the most important thing is i give my best and i play it with the right intensity and all the time with motivation to win the match. in the women‘s draw, world number1 karolina pliskova saved a match point to beat china‘s shau zhang and reach the fourth round. the top seed will now face either jennifer brady or monica niculescu. lewis hamilton can take the lead in the formula one championship this afternoon. it‘s the italian grand prix at monza and hamilton is on pole for a record breaking 69th time. he was quickest in qualifying by over a second despite treacherous conditions . the williams driver lance stroll has become the youngest driver to secure a place on the front row. the canadian is 18. championship leader sebastien vettel will start from sixth. eight races left to go, bubbling up
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nicely, the formula one championship. lewis hamilton looking to upset ferrari, obviously, on home turf. and sounding so confident in his interviews. happy with his car, happy with himself. anguisse much. —— thank you so much. it‘s not often that a six—year—old steals the show at a premier league football match but bradley lowery broke the hearts of hardened football fans across the country. a sunderland fanatic, he suffered from a rare form of cancer and sadly died last month. a fundraising match in his memory kicks off this afternoon, and we‘ll talk about that in a moment, but first let‘s remind ourselves of the nation‘s favourite football fan. let‘s talk now to kevin cooper, who‘s helped organise today‘s charity football match and adam woodyatt, better known as ian beale from eastenders, who‘ll be playing in it. good morning to you both. thank you
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both so watch for coming. adam, you area both so watch for coming. adam, you are a huge football fan, how did you get involved with this plan for the game today? i've been playing for the team, i stopped playing for the tea m the team, i stopped playing for the team two years ago because i got too old to play. co—ops phoned me up and said, do you want to play in this? bradley captured everyone‘s hearts and if we can do something to help raise money, for the foundation, then yes. kevin, tell us what is planned. a big game today, former legends from everton and sunderland, 4-5 legends from everton and sunderland, 4—5 players from each club. so close with the family. we have 20 odd, 25 celebrities playing the game. he's been worried about how he‘s going to rotate everybody! a lot of
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substitutes today. but i like that, that means i can go and do 15 minutes, go and have a rest. everyone i asked, no hesitation, adam hasn't played for two years, asked him to play, dusted his boots off specially. a lot of interest from fans, i know you sold all the tickets already, you are except in people on the day though? we are accepting people behind one of the goals now, if you want to come come turn up at the turnstiles, you will be fine to come. we would love the support. what was it in particular about radley, do you think... that got everybody? so involved? he had such a great smile. and the way he was with jermain such a great smile. and the way he was withjermain defoe. the bond they had, and it was a story we followed. it touched people. —— bradley. that friendship was wonderful to see. the sad thing,
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jermain defoe won‘t be able to be there today because he ended up having to go and play for england but i believe he will be involved in some way. he has done a video for the game today which he said, a few days ago, so emotional, wanted to be pa rt of days ago, so emotional, wanted to be part of the game today, but it is a really nice touch for the fans to see on screen and really nice touch for the fans to see on screen and be really appreciated. the money you are raising, what will that do? the family have set up a new foundation, it will help children with equipment, treatment going forward, the family are going to use the money for the right reasons. families that are in a similar situation, it will help them. and it‘s about raising awareness of what bradley went through and for the disease means. and how people can, not only the families but for people facing it themselves, what help can get and where they can go to and whether there is an answer. good question... i think everyone would
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like to find an answer to cancer but i think this is more about the care and trying to get through the process. what about bradley's family? have you had a lot of contact with them? willa day like today help them in anyway? will be emotional. we've been in touch. 0ver the last few months. we just felt, again, to honour his memory is the right thing to do today. it's the first time they will come out today in public, it will be emotional. there is also another charity involved, which is evident‘s are in the community, they get some of the proceeds from today. everton, we know, bradley was her image associated with sunderland but everton stepped up to the plate. amazing. as soon as we spoke to the club, they could see there was a gap to use the stadium, everyone at the
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clu b to use the stadium, everyone at the club has been amazing, they wanted to support the game, amazing support from the club. we've seen a huge sponsor around the world, notjust in the uk, particularly with footballers but elsewhere. that response, has taken me by surprise? he touched everyone's hearts, didn't he? across the uk and the world, thatjust shows the he? across the uk and the world, that just shows the power, he? across the uk and the world, thatjust shows the power, you know, thatjust shows the power, you know, that he had, how brave he was, and that's why we do the game today, to make it a success. we are at the moment seen the power of football, ina way moment seen the power of football, in a way we had the game for the victims of grenfell tower. ollie moore played in that yesterday. whose side is he on? this is why you need all the subs. they have a lot of pace in their team. i am deceptively slow. —— 0lly murs.m
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sure she had football can turn its hand to this and do something good for the community. it can. the other thing is, it's not an expensive day out, the money is going to a good cause. £10 for adults, £5 for children, they will have fun. it‘s not like going to a normal football match, it might be goalless. there is not a hope in hell of this being goalless, it will be... penalties? sounds too much like hard work. there will be lots of goals, lots of fun. the total fundraising, 400,000 for the fun so far, clearly today will add to that? for sure, we are going to make as much as we can, highlight for the family have done, the foundation has been set up in the foundation has been set up in the last week, what we can help of
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today, and make this so amazing. good luck to you both. it's difficult for me, i have got to go across stanley park, i am a liverpool supporter.|j across stanley park, i am a liverpool supporter. i know you are coming you will be fine. good luck, guys, coming you will be fine. good luck, guys, thank you. the bradley lowery charity match kicks off at 3 o‘clock this afternoon at goodison park, and will raise money for the ‘bradley lowery foundation‘ and ‘everton in the community‘. it's it‘s approaching 8:50am. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning... north korea‘s state media says it has detonated a hydrogen bomb with "perfect success". there is no independent verification of the claim. nhs bosses in england say they need emergency financial help, as they brace themselves for the worst winter in recent years. it‘s at this point we say goodbye to ben, he‘s going to read the news for andrew marr. iam not i am not going far! but yes, i am off! but now, here‘s thomasz with a last look
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at this morning‘s weather. here i am! goodbye, ben. we have cloud sweeping in, i say sweeping, but it is moving very slowly. not making much progress today, for folks living in the west of the uk, a cloudy one, outbreaks of rain, most of it not too heavy, this is the scene at 10am. from the south coast across the midlands, into yorkshire and eastern scotland, enjoying some fine weather, not necessarily sunny because the of rain, clouds thicken, bright weather, in the west, underneath the cloud and rain. what‘s going to happen later in the morning and afternoon? the rain slowly pushing towards the east, by the time we get towards the east, by the time we get to 4pm, nudging into birmingham but
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not heavy come up most of eastern england still try, as is eastern scotland. through the night, the cloud and rain toppling over the uk, left with a cloudy, dreary, drizzly night, quite warm, 16 degrees in the south, 14 in london, matching those values in glasgow and edinburgh. tomorrow morning starts off on a grey note, drizzly, rain may be heavy moving through scotland and northern ireland. if the clouds break temperatures could shoot up to 22-23. the break temperatures could shoot up to 22—23. the start of the week, weather fronts moving through, 22—23. the start of the week, weatherfronts moving through, rain early in the week, quiet mink down a little. as far as the beginning of the week is concerned, a little on the week is concerned, a little on the changeable side, some sunshine around, temperatures reaching 22 in london, 17 in belfast. not too bad. before i go, for anyone heading to the caribbean for a late holiday, we
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area the caribbean for a late holiday, we are a little concerned that a hurricane is heading towards the far east of the caribbean, if you are heading said tomorrow, british virgin islands, take note, there could be some trouble from this storm but no guarantee it will hit, just a threat at this stage. back to you. thank you. two teenagers from two very different backgrounds have stepped into each other‘s worlds for a new documentary. it features one of britain‘s most segregated towns — dewsbury in west yorkshire. let‘s take a look. will you show me how to wear a scarf, please? yes. right, but nervous. you‘ll be able to just see my fat face! god! ithink... ifeel weird!
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god! i can‘t imagine walking round every day like this! i don‘t know! i can‘t stop laughing at myself exploration work i don‘t know. i just think i look weird. my hair is what i classed as my best feature, without my hair, i don't know. but yours, is your eyes. this, isjust like a ball, can i take this off? i look well weird. do you take selfies in itand look well weird. do you take selfies in it and stuff? yes. isn't that wouldn‘t? —— isn‘t that brilliant? joining us now are farhan, siobhan and documentary filmmaker luned tonderai. would you have ever met, which lives have crossed, which he had met anywhere? we are going to the same
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college, maybe, but probably not, no. we would see each other but not know each other, what past each other. what made you decide to take pa rt other. what made you decide to take part in the film? ijust other. what made you decide to take part in the film? i just thought it will be a good opportunity to step out of my comfort zone and ask questions that i don‘t know the a nswe rs questions that i don‘t know the a nswers to questions that i don‘t know the answers to and i never would get a chance to ask. what about you? the same, i thought i would get out and see if i could get to know someone from a different community, get to know what their views are. you made this film, it‘s incredible, how to girls who listen closely to each other can be so different but actually, have such a lot in common? yes, it's lovely, the girls did know one another before they met, they didn't know anything about one another but it was really heart—warming to see quite quickly,
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the girls could connect because at the girls could connect because at the end of the day, they are teenagers. what made you choose juice brew? i was really interested to make a film that looked at integration and race. —— dewsbury. i thought dewsbury was a fascinating town, you had that division, i warmed to it. yes. we are seeing you chatting here, girls, what did you learn about each other?” chatting here, girls, what did you learn about each other? i learnt that she is very family orientated, she prefers spending time with her, like... with her family. is that true? yes. and what did you learn about siobhan? that she spends time
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with her family and friends, she spends more time with her friends and family. yes. but looking at you both when you walked in here, you both when you walked in here, you both looked very glamorous and you default, and that‘s something you bonded over a little bit? you actually both have that interest in common, how did you find that out?” think when we first met we had make—up on, we were talking about it and then it led onto other things like what we were studying, stuff like what we were studying, stuff like that. is that something that struck you? when you met them both, did you think, actually, these two will get on, they will find common ground? i wasn't sure, will get on, they will find common ground? iwasn't sure, no, because actually they have very different kind of lives, to be honest and they had been raised in very different ways. they didn't really know that much about one another so i wasn't sure. but, you know, it was kind of
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heart—warming to find they could connect, they could find common ground and! connect, they could find common ground and i think the really lovely thing was that it was an opportunity for them to ask questions, big or small, they could ask anything and i think that's quite importantly or able to do that, able to ask big and small questions. what surprised you the most? what surprised me the most... was how difficult it was probably in the first instance to get people on board to take part. it was hard because i think people initially thought i was going to do something that will be very negative. and how did you persuade them? i'd been really open and transparent and saying i know tevez like to have had a lot of negativity andl like to have had a lot of negativity and i know the focus on the past has been on terrorism but i am not making that kind of film and just dry to be transparent from the start, really, about what we were dry to do, that i didn't have an agenda. what made you gravitate towards this, wasn‘t something you personally feel strongly about?
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well... i personally feel strongly about? well... lam personally feel strongly about? well... i am in personally feel strongly about? well... lam in a relationship, my husband is black and we have mixed—race kids, i suppose it's something that i'm naturally interested in. and i was fascinated either fact that there are parts of the uk that maybe you don't see that much, those kind of mixed—race relationships. and i wanted to find out fight that was, why people were not managing to come together more and actually what i discovered, it's not cause there is... there are not the opportunities and you have to create those opportunities, it takes a bit of hard work. girls, have you changed your attitudes at all, what have you learned having taken part in the film? i think i'm more open to lie, dry to make friends with different people rather than just staying with my own friends. and you? the same, it's like... it's all
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right to make friends with other people, white people, they are just the same as us. interesting when siobhan dry on one of your headscarves, how was that?” siobhan dry on one of your headscarves, how was that? i didn't like the feeling on myself but that was just... like the feeling on myself but that wasjust... i think ijust like the feeling on myself but that was just... i think ijust weren‘t used to it. at one point in the film you take your headscarves off, we don‘t see that, but it‘s an interesting moment for you. yes. seeing how nice her hair is, if i had her hair, i wouldn‘t cover it up but obviously it‘s her own choice. thank you both so much. thank you all for coming in. white kid, brown kid is on channel 4 tomorrow evening at 9 o‘clock. that‘s it from us today. dan and louise will be back tomorrow morning from 6 o‘clock. have a lovely weekend. goodbye. this is bbc news.
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the headlines at 9.00. i‘mjulian i‘m julian warrick are. north korea says it has successfully tested a hydrogen bomb that can be fitted to a missile. the nhs in england may suffer its worst winter in recent history if it does not receive an emergency bailout, hospital chiefs are warning. the prime minister appeals for unity amongst her pro—eu mps ahead of a debate of the government‘s brexit repeal bill next week. also in the next hour — tens of thousands have to leave their homes as frankfurt undergoes its biggest evacuation since the second world war. a 1.4 tonne british bomb found on a building site on wednesday will be made safe in a controlled explosion today. and our sunday morning edition of the papers is at 9.35 — this morning‘s reviewers are the sun on sunday‘s political editor, dave wooding, and political commentatorjames millar.
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