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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 3, 2017 11:00am-11:31am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm julian warricker. the headlines at 11pm. north korea says it has successfully tested a hydrogen bomb that can be fitted to a missile. the test has been strongly criticised by the japanese prime minister. translation: criticised by the japanese prime minister. translatiosz criticised by the japanese prime minister. translation: if north korea forcibly conducted a nuclear test, it is absolutely unacceptable and we have two strongly protest it. hospital bosses are warning the nhs could have its worst winter in history if it doesn't receive a bailout. the prime minister appeals for unity amongst her pro—eu mps ahead of a debate of the government's brexit repeal bill next week. the brexit secretary says the uk will continue to meet its obligations. we have said the era of big payments to the eu will be coming to an end. i suspect we will still be paying something. also in the next hour — tens of thousands have to leave their homes as frankfurt
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undergoes its biggest evacuation since the second world war. a 1.4 tonne british bomb found on a building site will be made safe in a controlled explosion later today. and later this hour — dateline will be discussing theresa may's leadership, brexit talks, and what can be done to defuse the north korea nuclear crisis. good morning and welcome to bbc news. north korea claims it has successfully tested a hydrogen bomb, a device which can be loaded onto a long—range ballistic missile. the international atomic agency has described the test as a regrettable
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act. south korea and japan say it was a nuclear test ten times more powerful than the previous attempt by pyongyang. egg this is how it was announced. translation: this was a perfect success. translation: this was a perfect success. it was a very meaningful step in completing the national nuclear weapons programme. the news came just hours after state media published this photo of kim jong—un apparently inspecting such a device. the test comes against a backdrop of heightened tensions in the region following multiple missile launches by north korea, the last one conducted less than a week ago. earlier seismologists detected a powerful tremor, measuring a 6.3—magnitude, near the north's main testing site at punggye—ri. japanese prime minister shinzo abe said it was "unacceptable" if north korean claims of a successful nuclear test were proven to be correct.
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translation: just now, the weather agency detected a seismic wave centred near north korea. there is a possibility that this is not a natural quake and that north korea forced through a nuclear test. if north korea forcibly conducted a nuclear test, it is absolutely unacceptable and we have two strongly protest it. earlier i spoke to our correspondent yogita limaye, in seoul. i asked her how south korea has reacted to the news. we have just had word from the south korean government, which has said it will ask for stronger sanctions against north korea to further isolate the country. south korea has said it is considering that more us tactical weapons could be deployed in this country. we do not have further details on what us tactical weapons means.
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there is a big us presence here, and last week, joint military drills by us and south korean forces were held here. as far as the nuclear test is concerned, north korea has very significantly claimed it has tested a hydrogen bomb, are very powerful nuclear device. it's saying that this hydrogen bomb is designed to be fitted onto an intercontinental ballistic missile. many will find this worrying, because we know that pyongyang has tested long—range missiles injuly. many experts believe that these rockets have the capability of hitting the us mainline. north korea is effectively saying it can arm these long—range missiles now. is there more concern on the streets of seoul then there has been up to now? people in seoul are quite used to threats from north korea. this is the sixth nuclear test that
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north korea has conducted. it has conducted more than a dozen missile tests this year. many people here believe that these tests, this ramping up of the nuclear programme by pyongyang, is more for political leverage than meaning to start a war. these are tests conducted by north korea. it is a ramping up its missile programme. it says it is a defensive technique. its justification is that this is a defence from invasion. it hasn't made claims that it is going to start a war. it says this a defensive move, particularly against the us and south korea. that's what many people in south korea seem to believe as well, that this is not going to result in an actual war. but certainly it worries them that there are strong words and strong action is coming from north korea. china is watching developments
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on the korean peninsular carefully. stephen mcdonnell is in beijing. we have received a brief written statement from the chinese foreign ministry strongly condemning this latest test. just to give you an idea of how close this is to china, there is a small city not far from the north korean border, and on chinese social media we have seen images of chandeliers shaking and the like from the power of this underground test being felt on chinese territory. what will not be lost on the chinese government is that this is at least the third time that i can count that either a nuclear or missile test has come out of north korea to coincide with a really crucial diplomatic meeting that the chinese government has had. in this case it has just opened
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up the brics summit, a very important meeting with russia, india and brazil, who have all come to china. this test coincides with the opening of the meeting, which will infuriate the government in beijing. it looks like an indication from pyongyang that it is not happy with the imposition of sanctions on that country. the international atomic agency gave its response in the statement. the statement goes on to say: and it concludes:
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we can speak to aid and foster carter, from leeds university. good morning. what is your take on what has emerged from korea overnight? it's depressing but contrary to the glib statement north korea is
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unpredictable, i can't imagine anything more predictable. you could say the other shoe has dropped. nuclear missiles, not quite as nice as love and marriage but they go together. we have seen a lot of testing in the last two years. kim jong—un‘s aim is to marry that with what he can carry. we were due a nuclear test u nfortu nately, what he can carry. we were due a nuclear test unfortunately, there hadn't been one free year. they have claimed a hydrogen bomb before but it seems this time, outside experts, from the scale of the blast, felt in china and russia i gather, that it was one. north korea is marching steadily down this extremely dangerous road. it's very difficult for anyone to know what to do. trump's former director of intelligence strategy steve bannon says, they've got us. there isn't a military response, i hope to
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goodness no one in washington is thinking of that. there is an urgent need for diplomacy. chart that diplomatic course, if you would, how could it work? it's very hard to see it working, i agree. as winston churchill said, it is better than the alternative. it would help, this is where it kim jong—un the alternative. it would help, this is where it kimjong—un is the alternative. it would help, this is where it kim jong—un is different from his father and grandfather. north korea and provocation have gone togetherfor a long north korea and provocation have gone together for a long time. north korea and provocation have gone togetherfor a long time. his father and grandfather were a bit more subtle. kim jong—un is forging ahead on the one side with the military programme and one can make some reasons for that even though it is illegal and not in any way condoning that, he clearly wishes to avoid the fate of saddam hussein in avoid the fate of saddam hussein in a rock or qaddafi in libya. but what he's doing threatening to his neighbours and the united states. we need some sort of proposal. we have
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had diplomatic tracks before. it would involve somebody getting together. i think without preconditions at this stage. to size up preconditions at this stage. to size up the position. i'm not sure i have convinced myself even as i am saying this. it will be very difficult without it looking as if the west and the international community is eating humble pie. thank you. hospital managers in england have called for an emergency financial bail—out, saying they are bracing themselves for the worst winter in recent years. nhs providers — which represents the vast majority of health trusts — says at least £200 million of extra funding is needed to pay for more staff and beds. but the department of health says the nhs is better prepared for winter this year than ever before, as angus crawford reports. winter can put hospitals under severe pressure.
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it's a time when there is an increasing demand, more patients needing treatment in an already stretched service. there's been a lot of planning to prepare the health service this winter, but nhs providers, representing hospital bosses, says more money is needed, otherwise this winter could be worse than last. current performance in a&e departments at the moment is no better than it was last year. despite a huge amount of effort being put in to improve that performance, it's staying stubbornly stuck quite a long way below the official target. so we know that patient safety could be at even greater risk this winter than it was last winter. the organisation says the service needs an extra £200—e350 million to help it get through the winter months. the government has given councils an extra £1 billion in social care funding to free up hospital beds, and there is £100 million to relieve the pressure on a&e.
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nhs england says it will have thousands of extra beds available, and insists that planning is more advanced than ever before. the brexit secretary david davis has said the eu was making itself look silly by insisting negotiations with britain are not making progress. his comments came as theresa may seeks to stop a tory rebellion on voting on the brexit legislation. as mps return to westminster this week, senior ministers have warned potential conservative rebels that they risk putting jeremy corbyn into no ten if they don't back theresa may's plans for brexit. labour say they will only support it if certain changes are made, such as adding protections for workers' rights. the brexit secretary david davis has been speaking on this morning's andrew marr show as has his labour shadow keir starmer, our political reporter emma vardy has been watching. david davies has come straight off
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the back of a week of eu talks with michel barnier in which both sides have looked pretty far apart. disagreements over that divorce bill, michel barnier coming out and saying no decisive progress has been made. david davies has come out today in pretty defiant mood, hitting back at the usain, it is not true to say no progress has been made, actually, progress has been made, actually, progress has been made in certain areas but really the disagreements over the divorce bill seem disagreements over the divorce bill seem to be overshadowing all of that. david davies said today this isa that. david davies said today this is a pressure exercised from the eu and money is the thing that frightens them the most. he says they are trying to use time against us they are trying to use time against us when it comes to the issue of agreeing how much we will have to pay to leave the eu. what we are saying, ok, you are giving us this normal bill, like
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when you leave a hotel and you go through it by line. they are saying, give usa through it by line. they are saying, give us a counter. make an offer. we are not doing that. we are going through it line by line and they are finding it difficult because we have got good lawyers. they complained about our two— hour got good lawyers. they complained about our two—hour presentation. we're basically going through it systematically, pragmatically. he wants to put pressure on us. bluntly, i think he looked a bit silly because the plane you were things we have achieved. i like him, i have known him for 20 years but the commission puts itself in a silly position saying nothing has been done when really important things, we put people before process and they are in danger of putting process before people. while david
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davis is thrashing out the divorce bill, we have another battle ahead because this year, the great repeal bill will be debated on thursday by mps. this will take all that eu legislation and will convert it into uk law. the reason why this is causing some controversy is because critics of this say it will give mps a sweeping power to recalibrate lots of our laws in different ways without proper parliamentary scrutiny. labour is particularly opposing this saying it will vote against the repeal bill unless certain changes are made. keir starmer spoke about this on the andrew marr show and he explained why he is concerned that parliament will be given too much power and not enough oversight. i flagged these points up at the beginning of the summer saying that if you don't address them we will vote against it. we haven't reached that stage yet.
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i've been very, very clear. whilst we accept the result of the referendum, we are not giving a blank cheque to the government to do it in whatever way it wants, because it is not in the public interest. the maths in that made more interesting because of the result of the last election. the tory rebels could be heading for a great defeat over this repeal bill. it will be a test of the leadership of theresa may. they have been urging conservative mps to get behind this bill saying, they do not need division. the argument is by putting through this repeal bill, it is delivering the will of the people, a key step in the brexit process. whether mps will toe the line, we will see. a crucial week for brexit. the headlines on bbc news — north korea says it has successfully tested a hydrogen bomb that could be loaded onto a long—range missile.
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the regime said its test of the bomb — which is many times more powerful than an atomic bomb — was a "perfect success". hospital chiefs warn that the nhs in england may suffer its worst winter in recent history if it does not receive an emergency bailout. they want up to £350 million to pay for extra staff and more hospital beds to reduce waiting times. the prime minister appeals for unity amongst her pro—eu backbench mps ahead of a debate of the government's brexit repeal bill next week. david davis said the era of big payments to the eu is coming to end but the uk will honour its international obligations. sport now, and a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. wales manager chris coleman says ben woodburn has all the attributes to go on and be a great player. the
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17—year—old made his international debut coming off the bench last night in the world cup qualifier. he scored the winner against austria with less than half an hour to go. it was goalless but after a few minutes of coming on, the teenager who became liverpool's youngest goal—scorer last season and scored the only goal of the game. keeping their world cup hopes alive. we had him with us for years and he has been a pleasure. no doubt he will go from strength to strength. a fantastic night for him and his family and we are very proud. he has contributed in a magnificent way. wales' match against the bottom team moldova is on tuesday night. republic of ireland are two points ahead of wales in second, that's after their 1—1 draw against georgia. they started really well, taking the lead afterjust
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four minutes in tblisi, thanks to shane duffy's header. butjust before half time, georgia equalised to secure a point. ireland face the group leaders serbia next tuesday, a victory would see them top of the group. group winners qualify for russia, second place should ensure a play—off spot. the italian grand prix will be underway soon, lewis hamilton looking to top the championship for the first time this season. he has got a great chance at monza because he was on pole position for ace records 69th time. the williams driver long stroll at the age of 18 will be alongside him and the youngest driver to start from the front row. championship leader sebastian vettel will start from six in his ferrari. chris froome is
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still wearing the leader's jersey. the 14th stage was won by a rider from poland. chris froome finished fourth, losing a few seconds to his nearest rival. another mountain stage today. chris froome is going for the rare grand tour double having already won the tour de france this year. a much easier day for roger federer at the us open after being pushed to five sets twice. he breezed past spain's feliciano lopez in straight sets to reach the lith round — next up for him is phillip kohlschreiber. i had good energy. i thought i would feel a little slow after so many sets. but i would have
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to force myself so much i would get tired from that but it didn't happen andi tired from that but it didn't happen and i think i really got off to a good start. federer is on a collision course with rafa nadal for a meeting in the semifinals. the world number one lost the first set on tie—break but is also through. he will face alexandr dolgopolov next. i know i cannot play very well always. the most important thing is i give my best, and play it with the right intensity and all the time with motivation to win the match. in the women's draw, world number1 karolina pliskova saved a match point to beat china's shau zhang and reach the fourth round. the top seed will face jennifer brady in the last 16. nottingham outlaws are the t20 blast
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champions for the first time. they beat the birmingham bears by 22 runs. notts lost the wicket of alex hales early on, half centuries from brendan taylor and samit patel helped. birmingham couldn't get close to that on their home ground, that meant notts completed the double after also winning this season's 50—over competition. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. a huge wildfire raging in los angeles has forced hundreds of homes to be evacuated in what the mayor has called the ‘largest fire' in the city's history. an area spanning 5,000 hectares has already burnt, and so far one home has been destroyed. around 500 homes have been evacuated in various parts of the city and neighbouring glendale. hundreds of firefighters are battling the fire which broke out on friday during the us
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labor day long—weekend. authorities are concerned that winds will whip up the flames and cause it to spread quickly in unpredictable directions. frankfurt is moving 65,000 people from their homes this morning to allow for a controlled explosion of allow for a controlled explosion of a world war ii bomb. the financial capital has been warned it could grind toa capital has been warned it could grind to a halt tomorrow if people don't leave. we have this update. thousands of police officers are trawling the streets of frankfurt, loudspeakers warning people to leave the city centre. they have said if anyone refuses to leave, they would use force. that's because this unexploded bomb contains almost 1.5 tonnes of explosive material so it is very dangerous if it were to go off accidentally. it could flatten
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an entire city block. it was only discovered because of building work near frankfurt university. police are now clearing the area and in an hour's time, if all goes well, they will start work on diffusing the bomb and that should last about four hours. if that goes well, residents should be up to go back to their homes later this evening. this is quite a common occurrence in germany because we have got so many unexploded bombs from the second world war throughout the country but we have never seen world war throughout the country but we have never seen something from this scale. you mentioned the importance of that timetable, in the introduction, frankfurt, a key financial city in europe. you can't take disruption beyond today ideally. that's right and because this isjimmy‘s financial capital, this is why they are doing this work on a sunday. they have to do all this were today said the city can get back into action tomorrow. it is also a hub
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forflights, action tomorrow. it is also a hub for flights, frankfurt airport one of the biggest in the world. major hub for international travellers and so hub for international travellers and so there might be some flight disruption. if there is any delay, this could tip into tomorrow. so far, things have gone peacefully. police are also saying that this really is an indicator of the wider situation in germany because it is estimated there are 250,000 unexploded bombs from the second world war, many of them were released by british bombers including this one in frankfurt today. experts say it could take decades before those bonds are diffused or detonated safely. it is an ongoing story in germany over the next few years to see how many more bombs will be unearthed, usually, as i say, it is quite a local activity so i say, it is quite a local activity so it might be a street or city block blocked off but here, it is
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pretty much a large section of the city centre of frankfurt. 14 people, 12 of them british, have been arrested by police investigating a drug dealing ring targeted in the resort of magaluf. officers say they seized 3 kgs of cocaine and 100,000 euros in cash. simon clemison reports. this is the spacecraft arriving back to earth this morning. it entered the atmosphere at a speed of more than 1700 miles an hour with temperatures outside the spacecraft reaching 2500 celsius. parachutes we re reaching 2500 celsius. parachutes were deployed to slow it down shortly before it safely landed in a remote shortly before it safely landed in a re m ote area shortly before it safely landed in a remote area of kazakhstan. two nasser astronauts and one russian on—board. peggy whitson now holds
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the us record for time spent in space, she has been there for 665 days. so it is warm above the years, how about on the ground? in london and eastern parts, it will be relatively warm and dry so you won't need to borrow that umbrella this afternoon. for many others, across western parts of the uk, it has turned very cloudy and there are outbreaks of rain and that is how it will stay through this afternoon. it is split in half, the picture across the country, cloudy in the west, outbreaks of rain. in the east, dry weather. the damp weather with the cloud and humid air will reach eastern areas as well but not until after dark for places like hull and norwich. lots of cloud and missed overnight, very drizzly and muggy picture. 16 degrees, the overnight
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low in some areas. tomorrow, fresh rain band coming in the northern ireland and western scotland and for most of us, it is cloudy and gloomy. quite warm tomorrow. 20 degrees widely across the country. could even get up to 23 in the south—east. good morning, this is bbc news. the headlines. the headlines at 11.30pm: north korea says it has successfully tested a hydrogen bomb that could be loaded onto a long—range missile. the regime said its test of the bomb — which is many times more powerful than an atomic bomb — was a "perfect success." the international atomic energy agency called the test "matter of grave concern." the nhs in england may suffer its worst winter in recent history if it does not receive an emergency bailout, hospital chiefs are warning. they want up to £350 million to pay for extra staff and more
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hospital beds to reduce waiting times. the prime minister appeals for unity amongst her pro—eu mps ahead of a debate over the government's brexit repeal bill next week. if passed, the bill would transfer eu law into uk legislation. david davis said the uk will continue to meet its international obligations. we have said in terms the era of big payments to the eu will be coming to an end. we will still be paying something, i suspect. tens of thousands have to leave their homes in germany as frankfurt undergoes its biggest evacuation since the second world war. a 1.4 tonne british bomb found on a building site on wednesday will be made safe in a controlled explosion today. now on bbc news, dateline london, and this programme was recorded before today's news of north korea's latest hydrogen bomb test.

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