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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 3, 2017 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

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north korea's most powerful nuclear weapons test to date sparks worldwide condemnation. the test of a hydrogen bomb — which could be mounted on a long—range missile — is called a perfect success by kim jong—un‘s regime. on a long—range missile — is called a perfect success by kim jong—un‘s regime. is called a perfect success reporter: mr president, will you attack north korea? we'll see. will you attack north korea? "we'll see," says president trump as the us says any threat to its territories will be met with a massive military response. we'll be analysing what, if anything, will deter north korea from pursuing an ever more perilous path. also tonight: more perilous path. the prospect of a parliamentary battle over brexit legislation as the uk hits back at the commission on progress made at the talks. at the commission on progress an exodus of myanmar‘s rohingya muslims — we report from bangladesh, where thousands have fled persecution and violence. where thousands have fled this is the main land route for the rohingyas entering bangladesh. route for the rohingyas on the other side of the mountain is myanmar. a bbc investigation finds
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is recruiters were trying to direct would—be attackers a year before westminster and london bridge. and lewis hamilton wins the italian grand prix, spoiling the ferrari party at their home race. good evening. tensions over north korea's nuclear programme increased dramatically today after it carried out its sixth and most powerful nuclear test to date. and most powerful it claimed to have detonated a hydrogen bomb capable of being mounted on an intercontinental missile. in the last couple of hours, the us defence secretary has said a threat to the united states will be met with a massive military response. will be met with a massive theresa may has called
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for urgent new sanctions to be agreed at the un. for urgent new sanctions the blast detected near the punggye—ri underground test site in northwestern north korea is said by experts to have had more destructive power than the atomic bomb dropped on the japanese city of nagasaki at the end of world war ii. we'll report from beijing and tokyo in a moment — but first yogita limaye in seoul. and tokyo in a moment — it was a perfect success, the newsreader declared, as she announced north korea was close to achieving its nuclear goals. was close to achieving the country says it has detonated a hydrogen bomb small enough to be fitted to an intercontinental missile. this is kim jong—un inspecting what north korea claims is such a device. inspecting what north korea if true, it would mean that pyongyang is now capable of launching a nuclear attack on cities in the united states. this unprecedented threat prompted president trump to say, "south korea's talk of appeasement
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with north korea will not work. "they only understand one thing," he declared. any threat to the united states or its territories, including guam, or our allies, will be met with a massive military response, a response both effective and overwhelming. it's a strong message to south korea's president, who for months has said talking to north korea was the solution. today he expressed outrage and disappointment. translation: north korea has made an absurd tactical mistake by committing a series of provocations such as launching icbm missiles and conducting a nuclear test which has high intentions a nuclear test which on the peninsula and is threatening world peace. it will isolate them further. threatening world peace. south korea is most worried because it has the most to lose. and that's why even though military
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measures like these bombing drills are held in the face of the threat from north korea, it's hard to see what further action can be taken. from north korea, it's hard to see it's certainly our view that none of the military options are good. the distance between north korea and seoul is very, very small. they could basically vaporise large parts of the south korean population even with conventional weapons. parts of the south korean population here in seoul, a city that is home to tens of millions of people, we are only about 50 kilometres from the border with north korea, and at any given time, a mass of weapons is pointing in this direction. a mass of weapons is pointing and that's why rather than take a military route, the international community has been trying to put economic pressure on pyongyang. trying to put economic but that isn't working either. trying to put economic and the impact of every move kim jong—un makes is felt notjust in the korean peninsula, but also across the sea injapan. the pod under the belly of this
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japanese air force jet can sniff the airfor radiation. japanese air force jet can sniff this afternoon, it roared off towards north korea to do just that. it's less than a week since north korea fired this missile across japan. since north korea fired this for prime minister abe, this is becoming an unwelcome routine. translation: together with the us, south korea, china and russia, japan will take determined action against north korea. north korea may now have tested a nuclear device that is small enough to put on top of a ballistic missile that could be fired at the united states, and for the government here injapan, that is very disturbing, because it raises a very troubling question. disturbing, because it raises in future, will the united states be willing to risk one of its own cities, say for example denver, in order to protect seoul and tokyo? denver, in order to this
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denver, in order to afternoon, the us ambassador rushed this afternoon, the us ambassador rushed to see japan's foreign minister to reassure him. no action taken by the north koreans will in any way deter our commitment. japan and the us may have the military might to deter north korea, but they have few other levers to pressure pyongyang. only one country does, and that is china. china was quite literally shaken by the blast. north korea's nuclear test site is only 60 miles from the border. it will have sent a diplomaticjolt, too, coming just before president xiejin ping opened this international summit. although he made no direct reference, he warned of the challenges to world peace. on state
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tv, the message was more blunt, with an official statement strongly condemning the test. there can be little doubt that the government here in beijing is rattled. once again, it has had to order emerges irradiation monitoring along the border, but despite the frustration, it may be reluctant to punish north korea too hard. china has recently been stopping cargoes of call and seafood in line with toughened un sanctions. but its biggest fear is not nuclear weapons. it's the chaos that would come with the economic colla pse that would come with the economic collapse of the impoverished state is shrouded in darkness on the other side of this river. john sudworth, bbc news, beijing. i'm bbc news, beijing. joined in the studio by our north i'm joined in the studio by our north america editorjon sopel. what has the us reaction been like? was an act of extraordinary defines that we have seen from north korea. the
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other thing worth pointing out is that for all donald trump's talk of fire and fury, of us weapons being locked and loaded, that seems to have had no effect on possibly could have had no effect on possibly could have made things worse, so you have the us looking at some not very good options. we've heard about the military solution not being great. and so you have a situation where everything will still have to go through china. so long as you have got china believing that a nuclear north korea is preferable to a failing state north korea, then it's ha rd to failing state north korea, then it's hard to see any dramatic breakthrough. so not very good options, but what are the most likely one is to be pursued by the us? we have heard the defence secretary, mattis, talking about the decisive response. we have also heard them talking about the possibility of stopping trade with any nation that is trading with north korea. that means china. that would set the global economy back massively if it did happen. maybe it
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isa massively if it did happen. maybe it is a way of saying to china, we are really serious about this and you have got to do something. it may be that there are back channels that are open and the chinese are hurting pressure, but as things stand, we have north korea, whose military capability is accelerated dramatically, and an american president who is saying, the time for talking is over. that's not a happy combination. jon sopel, thank you. here, the brexit secretary david davis has said that the european commission is making itself look "silly" by saying that talks with britain aren't making progress. the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, says british people need to understand the "extremely serious consequences" of leaving. theresa may faces a parliamentary battle this week with the first commons debate on brexit legislation, as chris mason reports. on brexit legislation, still some way apart. on brexit legislation, the uk and the eu. on brexit legislation, david davis and michel barnier at last week's talks. a huge sticking point is money. at last week's talks. the divorce bill. at last week's talks. today, mr davis insisted the uk would not be pressured into paying more than its fair share.
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would not be pressured into paying we are basically going through this very systematically, a very british way, a very pragmatic way of doing it, and of course he's finding it difficult. way of doing it, and of course he's and he wants to put pressure on us, which is why the stance is this week in the press conference. which is why the stance is this week bluntly, i think it looked a bit silly, because they're plainly were things we've achieved. silly, because they're plainly and yes, there were spiky exchanges between the two men at thursday's news conference. exchanges between the two men mr barnier has since spent the weekend on the banks of lake como in italy. the weekend on the banks he told the conference here he does not want to blackmail the uk, but added, "there are extremely serious consequences of leaving the single market, and it hasn't been explained to the british people. and it hasn't been explained "we intend to teach people what leaving the single market means. "the future of europe is more important than brexit. "far more important." important than brexit. meanwhile, the rows about leaving the eu return here this week.
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the planned new law that is needed to make it happen will be discussed in the commons, and remember, the prime minister's parliamentary predicament is precarious. she nurses a tiny majority. predicament is precarious. and that's why the debate on repealing this — the act that took us into the eu — matters so much. labour says it will vote against the law as planned, which will eventually be stored here, unless it's changed, including the option of staying in the single market during a transitional period after brexit. i've been very, very clear. period after brexit. whilst we accept the result of the referendum, we're not giving a blank cheque the government to do it in whichever way it wants, because it's not in the public interest. this means any rebellion from just a handful of conservative mps would leave the prime minister in real trouble. discussions on delivering brexit are getting rather blustery. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. thousands of members
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of myanmar‘s rohinga minority are continuing to flee across the border into neighbouring bangladesh. across the border into they're escaping a military crackdown after rohinga militants attacked police positions a week ago. nearly 73,000 have fled, and human rights groups accuse the myanmar army of atrocities and indescriminate violence. the treatment of myanmar‘s muslim minority is the biggest challenge facing leader aung san suu kyi, accused by critics of not speaking out for the persecuted minority. accused by critics of not speaking sanjoy majumder has the latest from the bangladesh—myanmar border. it from the bangladesh—myanmar border. is a long a| freedom. it is a long and torturous flight to freedom. the rohingya who cannot make it on their own are helped along, leaving them behind could get them killed. so they labour on, bringing with them what ever
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possessions they could carry. some far too young to understand what happened. this is the mainland route through which the rohingyas are now entering bangladesh. on the other side of the mountain is myanmar, and they say they can slip in without being detected easily. but it also means that they have a steep climb through the mountains and they have to walk through the forests and wade through the streams before they can get to one of the refugee camps. but at least they're alive. they've lost their homes, their villages have been burned to the ground, and many have seen their relatives murdered. translation: my brother was killed. they shot him in the chest. i couldn't even take him a proper grave. i somehow managed to bury him just buy a house, and then i left. it's hard to verify what is
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happening. no one is being allowed in. but fresh plumes of smoke can be seen from the bangladesh side, presumably from burning villages. bangladesh has now relaxed its borders, and the floodgates have opened. rohingyas are streaming in by the hundreds every hour. thousands of others are waiting to cross over. those who have made it our exhausted and overcome. translation: we've been on the road for four days. our food ran out on the first night, and we haven't eaten since then. but space is running out for the new arrivals. they are squeezed into camps, schools, or just arrivals. they are squeezed into camps, schools, orjust out in the open. theirfirst hurdle camps, schools, orjust out in the open. their first hurdle was to make it here alive. now they have to figure out how to survive. sanjoy majumder, bbc news, on the bangladesh border. hospital managers in england have called for an emergency financial bail—out, saying they are bracing themselves for the worst
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winter in recent years. themselves for the worst nhs providers, which represents the vast majority of health trusts, says at least £200 million of extra funding is needed to pay for more staff and beds. funding is needed to pay but the department of health says the nhs is better prepared for winter this year than ever before. the chief executive of public relations company bell pottinger has resigned ahead of the publication of a report into its activities in south africa. of a report james henderson stood down after complaints that the firm stirred up racial tensions of behalf of president jacob zuma. bell pottinger has accepted that elements of its campaign had been "inappropriate and insensitive". elements of its campaign had been a bbc investigation has found the so—called islamic state were secretly directing would—be extremists to murder people at both london bridge and westminster nearly a year before each attack. recruiters pointed our undercover reporters to terror manuals which showed how best to drive a car at crowds and attack victims with knives. at crowds and attack the government says it's trying to suffocate is's ability to recruit
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and radicalise people in the uk. to suffocate is's ability to recruit nick beake has more. to suffocate is's ability to recruit indiscriminate murder on the streets of london. exactly the kind of attack so—called islamic state had been calling for. our investigation reveals the group were not only inspiring such plots, but issuing directions to target both westminster and london bridge. last summer, our undercover reporter made contact with is recruiters active online. reporter made contact the authorities were fully aware of our communication. after inviting us to talk on a secret messaging site, is agents pinpointed westminster, promising, if you succeed with an attack there, it would be huge and damaging. he said that this was a very good target because it was crowded with disbelievers and civilians. target because it was crowded he told me to just kill ordinary people, and that it wouldn't require a very complicated plan. people, and that it wouldn't require with hindsight, the instructions look like a blueprint for the westminster attack
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eight months later. khalid masood used a car to mow down pedestrians and then stabbed policeman to death. pedestrians and then injuly 2016, we were also in conversation with another is handler, who had another target. in conversation with another london bridge, he wrote. in conversation with another use truck, axe, anything. in conversation with another we were directed to terrorist guides on the so—called dark web. one of them showed how to use a vehicle to kill people. the other showed how to use knives and home—made bombs for maximum impact. knives and home—made there was a description of how to create a fake suicide vest, and how it can be used to stop the police from attacking you if you are standing next to civilians. the police from attacking you if you the instructions bear all the hallmarks of the carnage nearly a year later at london bridge. a van, knives, fake suicide belts and a stash of improvised bombs. hanif kadir, a former
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al-qaeda fighter, now tackling radicalisation, is alarmed at how quickly encrypted communication can radicalise young britons. at that time in 2002, it still took me six to seven months. if they'd have had this kind of technology, i would... i would put my hand on my heart and i would say guaranteed within a few weeks you could have somebody so enraged with revenge, that's how they see it, that they would become a suicide bomber or a terrorist. that they would become a suicide the government has vowed to close down what it calls safe space where terrorists can both plot and recruit. i think the authorities have an unbelievably difficult task now. have an unbelievably encrypted apps or anonymous web browsers or the dark net, these places online that are very, very difficult to properly monitor, are proliferating very quickly. very difficult to properly monitor, and as their self—declared caliphate crumbles in the middle east, is are still making the most of secret communications,
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determined to inspire but also direct atrocities here in the uk. nick beake, bbc news. direct atrocities here in the uk. and you see the full investigation — terror by text — on the bbc iplayer from tomorrow and in the london region on bbc one on inside out at 7.30. region on bbc one on the german chancellor angela merkel says she believes turkey will never become a member of the european union. mrs merkel, who's trying to win a fourth term in office, was taking speaking in a televised debate with her rival martin schulz ahead of next month's election. debate with her rival martin schulz she said she will suggest calling off talks over turkey's accession to the eu. off talks over turkey's the most devastating floods to hit south asia in a decade have killed more than 1,400 people and focused attention on lack of preparedness for annual monsoon rains, as authorities struggle to get aid to millions of destitute. as authorities struggle to get aid justin rowlatt is in bihar, one of the poorest states in india
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and the worst affected by the floods. they're mixing up huge pots of vegetable curry and dhal. food for those left destitute by the floods. and there is no shortage of demand. destitute by the floods. i'm helpless, raju tells me. destitute by the floods. the floods took everything we own. destitute by the floods. it was terrifying, says kavita. destitute by the floods. there was just so much water. destitute by the floods. we were lucky to survive. destitute by the floods. but you can rebuild a house or replant a field. there are some things you never recover from. so they came down here to get provisions, and the water was just up to their knees, and then when they turned to go back, suddenly there was this great surge of water came down, and it dragged them away, dragged the father and the women away, and the women managed to grab hold of the trees down here.
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she said she watched as her father was swept away. translation: now he's gone. as her father was swept away. what do i do? as her father was swept away. sometimes i wish i had been washed away with him. this was the worst flood in the region for decades. almost a metre of rain fell in just two days across a vast area of nepal and north india. two days across a vast area it came down the river as a great pulse of water. just look at this enormous embankment, and just imagine for a moment the force needed to punch this hole into it. and the fear is that climate scientists say extreme weather events like this and the destruction they bring with them are only going to get more common. they bring with them are only and that is a terrifying prospect for vulnerable communities like these. prospect for vulnerable justin rowlatt, bbc news, bihar. prospect for vulnerable with all the sport,
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here's karthi gna nasegaram at the bbc sport centre. here's karthi gna nasegaram thank here's karthi gnanasegaram you. good evening. here's karthi gna nasegaram lewis hamilton has won today's italian grand prix, which gives him the outright lead in formula i's world championship for the first time this season. in formula i's world championship the mercedes driver started from a record 69th pole position in monza. started from a record 69th patrick gearey reports. started from a record 69th lewis started from a record 69th hamilton didn't need th roll. lewis hamilton didn't need the drum roll. he knew monza was his moment. starting in front for a record 60 night—time, hisjob starting in front for a record 60 night—time, his job was to stay there. his biggest test was the start, just stay clear and everything else would sort itself out. races can deflate in second in the scramble. watch out for the championship leader sebastian vettel in his ferrari, up from sixth on the grid to third in the race. the more
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places hamilton could put between himself and sebastian vettel, the war he could lead the standings by. just when you think it looks easy, the circuit reminds you didn't. for the circuit reminds you didn't. for the most part, you would have to look up to see dramatic manoeuvring, then daniel ricciardo took off. he never caught vettel, and no one was catching hamilton, who crashed the party in ferrari country. today the car was fantastic, and really a dream to drive, and a big thank you to all of the fans that came out today, and i look forward to coming back here next year. the love wasn't mutual from ferrari fans, but hamilton can only without the love. he now leads the drivers standings by three points. patrick geary, bbc news. bath have won a fascinating encounter against leicester on the first weekend of rugby union's premiership season. manu tuilangi opened the scoring for leicester in his first competitive game since january. for leicester in his first but bath responded with three quick tries before the break, including semesa rokoduguni almost running the full length of the pitch. running the full bath won by 27 points to 23. running the full
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britain's chris froome increased his overall lead at the vuelta a espana as he continues his attempt to win the tour de france and the spanish race in the same year. froome, in the leader's red jersey, finished ahead of his nearest rival, vincenzo nibali, and has a minute and one second advantage at the end of week two. and one second advantage the vuelta finishes next sunday. and one second advantage details of the rest of the day's sport are on the bbc sport website, including day one of cycling's tour of britain and the latest from tennis's us open. of britain and the latest karthi of britain and the latest, thank you. finally, the music world has been paying tribute to the co—founder of the american band steely dan, guitarist walter becker, who's died at the age of 67. guitarist walter becker, steely dan had string of hits in the 1970s, including fm, reelin‘ in the years
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and rikki don't lose that number. becker, along with donald fagan, created a brand ofjazz—influenced rock that became a defining sound of west coast america in the ‘70s, selling more than a0 million albums worldwide. that's all from me. million albums worldwide. stay with us on bbc one, it's time for the news where you are. just a lucky few across eastern parts of the uk seeing some sunshine, much more hazy compare to yesterday, for many of us are cloudy story for some of us are wet story, in fact story for some of us are wet story, infacta story for some of us are wet story, in fact a very wet story for a time across parts of wales in south—west england, but this weather system has shunted the rain further east and will do so overnight, turning increasingly like an patchy, drizzle, plenty low cloud, coast untilfork, drizzle, plenty low cloud, coast until fork, rather humid, temperatures not going down too far overnight, monday morning, what's in store, plenty of cloud, still some
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of that coast until fork around, misty and murky, sunshine to begin with hard to come by, from the cloud light drizzle, the old weather front so quite active, parts of northern england and scotland, another weather system poised to come in, there will be rain coming east in there will be rain coming east in the morning and it will move east across scotland during the day, going to be heaviest into the north and west of scotland rather than the east, another spell of fairly brisk wind, still some deals around the northern isles especially shetland, elsewhere later winds than the course of today and it will brighten up course of today and it will brighten up across course of today and it will brighten up across parts of england and wales, chance to catch the odd shower, given any prolonged sunshine you could see temperatures as high as 23, 2a but most of us will fall short of that. but it's quite muddy and humid. this weather system as it moves out of scotland and northern ireland picks up again to parts of
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wales and northern england and then during tuesday sweeps south east and behind that there is cooler and fresher air moving in, behind that there is cooler and fresherair moving in, quick behind that there is cooler and fresher air moving in, quick moving band of rain pushing south—east, going through tuesday morning, following on behind one or two showers coming in, bright and breezy, a sunnier picture, cooler and fresher picture with temperatures down to the mid to upper teens. cooler, fresher for wednesday and thursday as well, variable cloud, sunny spells, pleasa nt variable cloud, sunny spells, pleasant in the sunshine, cool overnight and the chance for a few sours especially in the north and west. the story of this week ‘s weather, humid start, coolerand fresher, potentially quite wet and windy by friday. fresher, potentially quite wet and windy by friday. hello, this is bbc news. in a moment we will be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers with my guests.
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first, let's take you through the headlines at 10:30pm. there has been international condemnation of north korea's claim it has tested its most powerful nuclear device to date, a hydrogen bomb that could be loaded onto a long—range missile. mr president, will you attack north korea? we'll see. donald trump met with his national security team. speaking afterwards james matters said america had many military options and was committed to defending itself and its allies. any threat to the united
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