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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 4, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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this is breakfast. donald trump warns north korea the us is ready to use nuclear weapons to defend itself. washington says it will use a massive military response if america is threatened. in the last few hours, south korea carried out a missile drill simulating an attack on the north's nuclear test site. good morning, it is monday four september. also this morning: the uk's coastal communities are among the country's worst off. we are live at the seaside, with exclusive figures. ten yea rs
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ten years ago the government identified a problem, five years ago it set aside money to try and fix it. today we can reveal the gap between coastal and non— coastal communities is getting bigger. why are our beautiful coastlines underperforming? a senior police officer warns that forces in england and wales are facing a perfect storm, because of staff cuts and rising crime. good morning. will interest rates rise this year? when will wages grow faster than prices? i will have some of the answers from our survey of financial forecasters. in sport: lewis hamiltonjumps forjoy, after snatching the formula i championship lead with victory at the italian grand prix. and, as one retailer says it is ditching separate labels for boys‘ and girls‘ clothes, we are asking if the days of his and hers outfits are numbered. we just wejust said we just said boys and girls wejust said boys and girls can we just said boys and girls can wear the same thing. yes, and they can
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like the same things, too. and sarah has the weather. it isa it is a grey, gloomy start to the day. some of us will see some brightness later on. i will bring you all the weather details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: president trump has warned the united states is ready to use its nuclear capabilities in defending itself and its allies against north korea. his comments come as the united nations prepares for an emergency session to discuss pyongyang's claims of a successful nuclear weapons test over the weekend. from seoul, robin brant reports. after the north exploded a nuclear device below ground, the south responded with this. a series of missile launchers above ground. the military said they hit their target in the east sea early on monday. it was designed to replicate an attack on north korea's nuclear testing site. across the border over the
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weekend, this was how north koreans heard about the perfect success that was their nations sixth nuclear missile test. it was more powerful than any before, and came with claims that kim jong—un now has the ability to order a nuclear strike on mainland america. a few hours later, in washington, having briefed the president, the us secretary of defence gave this very stark warning. any threat to the united states or its territories, including guam, or our allies, will states or its territories, including guam, or ourallies, will be states or its territories, including guam, or our allies, will be met with a massive military response, a response both effective and overwhelming. china has a crucial role to play in this, posting a handful of role to play in this, posting a ha ndful of world role to play in this, posting a handful of world leaders at a summit, president xi urged restraint on all sides. the president of
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japan... the leader wants to focus on even tougher economic sanctions, as united nations security council meets later. and we can speak to robin now. what should we read into this missile test by the south? the language here is deeply concerning, isn't it? what do you make of it all? well, i think what is most interesting this morning is that show of force again by south korea's military. it is not the first time they have done this but launching those missiles is designed to reassure south koreans about the permanent state of alert this country finds itself in. they did something similar a few days ago after that missile launch heading towards japan. there was a dummy bombing run with missiles dropped onto the side of a mountain near the border with north korea from south korean air force jets. so that is the military answer this morning. but nonetheless, this country's president, moon, wants to go even further in terms of economic
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sanctions. that will be the focus at united nations security council meeting in new york later today. a reminder, though, of what is at sta ke. reminder, though, of what is at stake. we heard from the white house after president trump spoke with japan's leader, shinzo abe, a few hours ago, and he reminded people the us is prepared to use all the options at its disposal, economic, diplomatic and its nuclear capabilities. and we will speak to a woman who defected from north korea, to find out about life under the regime there. that is at 6:40am. there is a warning that policing in england and wales is facing a perfect storm because of rising crime and staff shortages. the president of the police superintendents‘ association, gavin thomas, will deliver the message in a speech to its annual conference, which begins today. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw reports. is the thin blue line becoming too thin? yes, says the police superintendents‘ association.
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it is the association that represents 1,000 middle—ranking officers, the men and women who make the key operational decisions. the superintendents are concerned that there are fewer police officers working harder and working longer hours, in more a challenging environment. the man who leads the organisation believes that is a model of policing which is fundamentally flawed. i think it‘s the service of first resort, i think it‘s the service of last for many people, understandably, and i think what i‘ve also described — i think we‘re also the service that is everything in between, as well. that puts a lot of pressure on police officers to try and meet that expectation from the public. i‘m not convinced it is a sustainable position in the mid—to—long term. the superintendents‘ association conducted a survey of its members about work pressures. 72% of those who responded said they did not use all the annual
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leave they were entitled to. 50% of superintendents said they had signs of anxiety. and over one quarter, 27%, were experiencing symptoms of depression, linked to the demands of working in policing. the association is known for being the voice of moderation in policing, so its warnings are likely to be taken seriously. the home office says it is piloting a new national service to provide welfare support to police who need it. ministers have also been having discussions with police leaders, amid calls for extra police funding for forces, but no decisions have yet been taken. a rise in interest rates won‘t take place for more than a year, and the squeeze in the cost of living may soon be easing. this is according to a bbc survey of 30 leading economists. sean, what more can the survey tell us about the economy? well, it depends which part of it you take. these are all forecasts.
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you have to remember when economists chat about stuff. these leading economists are listened to buy lots of businesses, government policymakers, and it gives you an idea what the bank of england are thinking about interest rates. most of them think no rate rise until 2019. if you have a mortgage that might be good news. if you are a saver and have been trying to save while interest rates have been so low, the not so great news. it gives you an idea that that might be what the bank of england is thinking. that is a lot to do with brexit, that uncertainty, not leaving until march 2019, until some kind of detail is given in those negotiations, when they giving that might be more confident to raise rates. in half an hour we are speaking to one of these economists, who thinks there might be a little rise later in the year. and on wages and inflation, a lot of economists think prices will not be rising as quickly as they were recently, and that wage rises will start to come through a little bit stronger. that means beginning of next year, good news for workers if it happens. thank you.
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a seven—hour disturbance at one of england‘s largestjails has been bought under control. specialist staff had been called in to birmingham prison to deal with the inmates, who refused to return to their cells. the disorder was confined to one wing of the privately run jail. 0ur correspondent keith doyle has more. the trouble started yesterday afternoon, and went on into the night. it began when inmates on one wing refused to return to their cells following afternoon association. the prison service said... no staff or inmates were injured, although one prisoner was taken to hospitalfor an although one prisoner was taken to hospital for an unrelated medical matter. the rest of the jail was u naffected. matter. the rest of the jail was unaffected. the prison, one of the largest in the uk, is privately run by gas. it said the incident was brought to a safe conclusion shortly before midnight. last december, £2 million worth of damage was done when hundreds of prisoners were
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involved in serious disturbances over conditions in the prison, which holds up to 1a50 category b and c prisoners. a state of emergency has been declared in los angeles, as the city battles the worst wildfires in its history. hundreds of homes have been evacuated. the fires, covering about 5,000 acres, started on friday and have sent plumes of smoke over the city. they are arriving from a galaxy far, far away, and bound to meet with the stamp of approval from star wars fans. just look at these. classic characters c—3p0 and chewbacca will be finding their way onto an envelope near you soon, as part of a special edition set of stamps to mark the release of the new star wars film in december. there will be those old characters loved by fans, and spaceships, too. some of them even have details in fluorescent ink that will only be visible under a uv light. that is very exciting, that. if you
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have got one. do you have uv lights at home? no, buti have got one. do you have uv lights at home? no, but i would be very excited to receive something in the post with one of those. you don't get letters, do you? you get the occasional letter. can you send me one of those? get the energy companies to use them, you get plenty from them! i might go out and purchase one myself. to yuma and my half eaten toast being down there? purchase one myself. to yuma and my half eaten toast being down there ?|j will tell you about the sport —— do you mind my half eaten toast being down there? i will eat that later. i will cover it over with that newspaper. nothing to see here. talking about lewis hamilton, he was booed at the weekend. lewis hamilton won the italian grand prix in dominant style, to take the lead in the drivers‘ championship for the first time this season. a day after breaking the all—time record for pole positions,
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hamilton was in total control at monza, finishing ahead of team—mate valtteri bottas, for a mercedes one—two. maria sharapova is out of the us open. the former world number one and 2006 champion was making her return to grand slam tennis following a 15—month drugs ban, but lost in the fourth round to latvian anastasija sevastova. chris froome has extended his overall lead at the vuelta a espana, after a tough day in the mountains. he now leads his nearest rival by over a minute. there are six stages to go after today‘s rest day. jordan henderson will again captain england against slovakia in tonight‘s crucial world cup qualifier at wembley. elsewhere, scotland host malta, and northern ireland take on the czech republic. iam sure i am sure they can do that, can‘t they? sorry, have you finished your toast? and luxembourg and france drawing 0—0. toast? and luxembourg and france drawing 0-0. and we will have a look
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at the weather. good morning. we have a bit of a grey start to the day to day. this scene was taken yesterday in saint leonards on sea in east sussex. similar skies across many parts of the country today. we have some cloud, some drizzly rain but for some of us it is set to brighten up later in the day. what we have at the moment is this warm front crossing the country during sunday, quite a lot of wet weather and still lingering around. we have quite a lot of low cloud around. more persistent rain sitting to the north—west so for the far west of northern ireland, into scotland. elsewhere, for northern ireland and scotland, it is a cloudy and drizzly picture. there is some hill fog around, quite drizzly first thing. as we had our way south across northern england, down towards the midlands, fairly cloudy here and
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spots of drizzly rain coming out of that cloud, with some low fog and hill cloud. certainly mild, so temperatures wherever you are in the mid—to—high teens first thing. this is sam, some drizzly rain for cornwall but temperatures in plymouth around 17 degrees. you will see some dry weather as we crossed southern england, but down towards the south—east some patchy outbreaks of showery rain through the day. a bit of brightness developing later on once the sunshine start to break holes in the cloud, especially for parts of southern england and the midlands. further north, this cold front sinks its way through parts of northern ireland scotland, bringing more persistent rain, followed by clear refreshing conditions from the north—west later on. for much of the country we keep a mild and murky theme, with temperatures in sunny spot 22 or 23 degrees. into the evening, this cold front in the north starts to pep up and we will see heavier bursts of rain for northern ireland, scotland, into parts of northern england and as well. mild and cloudy conditions to the south—east of that, and we will start to see clearer and fresher weather moving in from the west. this frontal system tomorrow not
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going anywhere in too much of a hurry, we still have our wrecks of rain through the day tomorrow, but it will be an improving picture. quite easy with that rain through central parts of the country. —— outbreaks of rain. with some sunshine in northern and western parts of the country, still quite mild if not humid in the south and south—east, with temperatures of 21 degrees. things will start to improved through the middle part of the week, so there will be a bit more brightness and dry weather for wednesday into thursday, and it looks like things could turn quite wet and windy as we end the week. back to you both. people are sending an lovely photos of coastal areas so thank you for those. yes. we will be set at the coast all week. a look at the front pages. the front page of the times i will begin with, this is our main
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story this morning, the us threat to attack him after bomb threat. and a lovely picture of helen mirren at the venice film festival. she and donald sutherland have a film out. a story about a couple who go on a road trip through america in a campervan. the main story also is about north korea and the escalating situation there, with the us saying it is ready to annihilate north korea. 0n the sun, a story that has been prevalent over the last few days, the rooney marriage. wayne thinks it is all over with a picture of his wife. there is something inside this today about a dell. —— adele. yes, a scoop about adele
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being nancy in the new 0liver! no cap film. being nancy in the new 0liver! no capfilm. —— being nancy in the new 0liver! no cap film. —— film. and we makes the front page on the daily mail as well. and also a story about people overloading their bins and risking a £500 worth of fines. councils are threatening new sanctions under antisocial behaviour laws. and news from the business desk. workers at two outlets of mcdonald‘s in the uk are on strike today, the first time mcdonald‘s workers have been on strike here. partly to do with low wages. they wish to be paid more zero hours contracts as well. it will be to see how that plays out as mcdonald‘s has not had to deal with that in britain before. inside the guardian. maria sharapova, out of the us open, despite the best efforts of the us television networks. she was knocked out yesterday but she had four matches
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ina row yesterday but she had four matches in a row at the us open exclusively on the main court. very interesting. yes. yes. some players are not happy about it. she said she would play in the parking lot but she didn't have to. and this gorgeous picture here. look at this. isn't that beautiful? that is in the times today. the photographer captured this gorgeous... i was watching that on the television yesterday. it is probably a lake, isn‘t it? the television yesterday. it is probably a lake, isn't it? it is the horse trials. yes. there is a bridge, a horse, this is the burleigh horse trials. it isjust a gorgeous photo. are any of you any good at scrabble? not really. it has been well tested that for some reason men are better at scrabble
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than women, according to the experts. do not get annoyed at being. you can work out, they have worked out why that is. men are considerably better than women at scrabble and scientists have established why. not an innate difference in talent it is just that women are far less willing to waste their time honing a largely pointless skill. i was all prepared to disagree... see, you are angry and then... yes, and you win definitely. is a good for your brain, rather than pointless? definitely. is a good for your brain, ratherthan pointless? i have one of those dictionaries with the two letter words. i cheated once at scrabble. you cheated? two letter words. i cheated once at scrabble. you cheated ?|j two letter words. i cheated once at scrabble. you cheated? i was playing with my brother, he had to go to the toilet and i grabbed all the high scores. damn, i will never
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toilet and i grabbed all the high scores. damn, iwill never trust toilet and i grabbed all the high scores. damn, i will never trust you again. —— dana. scores. damn, i will never trust you again. -- dana. idid learn scores. damn, i will never trust you again. -- dana. i did learn my lesson. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning... south korea has carried out a missile drill in response to north korea‘s latest nuclear bomb test, as washington warned the north that any threat to america would be met with an overwhelming military response. a senior police officer is warning that forces in england and wales are heading towards a "perfect storm" because of staff cuts and rising crime. britain‘s coast is home to 11 million people — and it‘s a special part of our heritage and identity. but according to a new report out today, many who live there struggle financially. we‘re starting a series looking at life in coastal communities. brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin is in weston—super—mare for us this morning. good morning, jane. good morning to you. damn, you would be for given for thinking i am in rio.
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you. damn, you would be for given forthinking i am in rio. look you. damn, you would be for given for thinking i am in rio. look at, we brought the beach cleaners in. we are here to discuss serious things. it is beautiful here in weston—super—mare but research we have commissioned shows that in terms of the education attainment economic growth and value um too many of these gorgeous coastal communities, not this one, are languishing at the bottom of the table. a big announcement in terms of coastal community funding from the government and just a short while on this programme. bite we went to see the tale of two towns. 0ne it that benefit and one that has yet to benefit from government funding. this used to be one of the best and busiest seaside resorts in the whole of scotland. john tells me the story of scotland. john tells me the story ofa of scotland. john tells me the story of a dress and. boats going there. boats going to belfast it was such a
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vibrant and boats going to belfast it was such a vibra nt and lively boats going to belfast it was such a vibrant and lively place. but today, only one ferry remains. industry which once employed thousands has gone. the beach is beautiful, but empty. how does this make you feel? very angry. a small marina now sits where the busy port once sprawled. superyacht is worth hundreds of thousands but unemployment rates are amongst the very worst in the uk. plenty feel left behind. have you given up? pretty much. do you feel that the powers that be care about the changes that are going on in places like this? no. definitely not. they can‘t experience the problems because they don‘t see it every day. a sense that the coast has been left behind is backed by statistics out today. economic growth is slower here. over 80% of
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people who live in these areas are paid less. the economic gap between coastal and non— coastal communities is growing. the reason probably that other places have done well is because governments have supported city deals. we would like some of that. we need it now. we don‘t have time to weight. but here in the west of scotla nd time to weight. but here in the west of scotland they are still waiting forfunding. in the north—east, the wait is over. so much of whitley bay‘s story was the same as ard ressa n, bay‘s story was the same as ardressan, a result which teamed with holidaymakers, eager to visit the city with their rides, dancing on the white domes. spanish city, yes, this is myjob. on the white domes. spanish city, yes, this is my job. but now he has a new topjob back in spanish city. restoration manager. the famous dome, derelict 17 years, is being ready to rip the reopened with over £10 million of public money.
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ready to rip the reopened with over £10 million of public moneylj ready to rip the reopened with over £10 million of public money. i am honoured to be able to do this. something that is close to my heart. £2 million has come from the government was coastal communities fund. that has invested over £170 million in the last five years in areas like this and has extended today with an extra £a0 million. a new restaurant here is a sign of the private money quick to follow public investment. do you think that the government is doing enough?m investment. do you think that the government is doing enough? it could doa government is doing enough? it could do a lot more. if you look around the country and see how many people are living in these towns um they have almost been left to die, they are as important as the people who live in the big cities, aren‘t they? the coast of britain has an incredible story. 0ften the coast of britain has an incredible story. often a white knuckle ride to the that live there. but proof here as successful as investment. no proof yet there is enough investment to go around. let‘s hear a bit more about how we
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can generate some success. come and meet some of our coastal cheerleaders that we have invited down this morning. mr margate, mr scarborough. mr western supermen and mr boorman is. mr margate. you guys are pictures of the. how he did. learn from you? we had great regeneration through many quarters. it was not a huge amount of funding, just a small...? it was not a huge amount of funding, just a small. . . ? it was a small start at people working together looking to regenerate high—street on the seafront. and from there you go a lot of investment quest to mark with a lot of investment with the turner gallery and arts through kincaid council. so you have done well in that respect. how about you, mr scarborough? the whole community came together to create a fantastic visitor experience. we have 1.4
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million visitors this year, second at the london. second after london. investment, a maze of an —— amazing. investment, a maze of an —— amazing. investment really matters. how about you, mr weston—super—mare? we have the unique visitor attraction history here. visitors come here am ona history here. visitors come here am on a regular basis. wise investment and the changing perception of what and the changing perception of what a seaside town is. it needs to be current. invest in high heritage, but it must be current. sorry, mr bournemouth. we will have more later. we will also be talking to gill from river cottage. he will be cooking up breakfast for a song warning, talking about what would make a success of our underperforming did british amazing coastline is. and i will make a promise to mr bournemouth that he goes first next time. definitely.
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you are first next time. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m claudia—liza armah. police in brazil have arrested a man in connection with the shooting of a tourist from south london. eloise dixon was in a hire car last month, with her husband and three daughters near rio dejaniero when they accidentally drove into an area where drugs gangs operate. she was shot twice in the abdomen and narrowly avoided being killed in front of her family. another suspect was arrested a week after the attack. for the first time ever in the uk, some staff at mcdonalds are going on strike today in a row over pay. workers at the crayford branch in south—east london began the 2a—hour action at midnight. they voted overwhelmingly to walk out over concerns about working conditions and the use of zero—hour contracts. a spokesman for mcdonald‘s said the fast—food company "works hard to ensure teams are treated fairly". a consultation begins today looking
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at increasing fines to motorists by nearly 25%. it would mean charges for anyone in london that breaks road rules including driving in a bus lane or not paying the congestion charge increasing from £130 to £160. the measures will also see discounts for early payments going up as well. tfl says it will reduce congestion and improve road safety, but the rac questions the move. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. the piccadilly line is suspended with no trains because of overrunning engineering works. an issue on the train. rmt union members are on strike. no service on their west london line— clapham junction to milton keynes central and a limited service on some other routes. kidbrooke park road remains closed for roadworks near to the railway station.
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this is the last week of the works — it‘s due to reopen on sunday. let‘s have a check on the weather now with sara thornton. good morning to you. a disappointing start for us this morning. it is miserable out that, isn‘t it? not terribly heavy in the way of rain but certainly grey and damp through the morning. later on it will be brighter and it could spark a few afternoon showers. here is the culprits of the rain this morning and the rain last night. this weather front. we are and the rain last night. this weatherfront. we are in and the rain last night. this weather front. we are in a warm zone of their so it is not terribly chillier there. it is fairly cloudy, we re chillier there. it is fairly cloudy, were used to drizzly skies and murkiness around. through the afternoon drying up the brightness could spark off a stray afternoon shower. there could be some bright spells and feeling warm and that. through the night tonight we will have more aware of how pushing about towards us and again will continue
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towards us and again will continue to feel rather mild and. 15 degrees. tomorrow, another approaching weather front could ring tomorrow, another approaching weatherfront could ring us tomorrow, another approaching weather front could ring us some showers through the morning. there will be some dry interludes and in the afternoon i think a lot of good dry and bright weathered between the showers. it looks dry to the middle pa rt showers. it looks dry to the middle part of the week, perhaps a little cooler and fresher with a westerly wind. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. it is 6:30am on monday four september. coming up on breakfast today: we will be asking if the thin blue line is getting too thin, with warnings of terror threats and fewer police officers creating a perfect storm. we are hoping there is no storm on weston—super—mare seafront, where we are finding out what it takes to make coastal britain great again. and the gripping bbc drama
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doctor foster is back for another series. we will be joined by actor bertie carvel, who plays simon. all that still to come. but now, a summary of this morning‘s main news: the united states says it is ready to use its nuclear capabilities to defend itself and its allies against threats from north korea. the white house issued the statement following a phone conversation between president trump and the japanese prime minister, shinzo abe. it was made in response to north korea‘s sixth and most powerful nuclear test, which happened over the weekend. and, in ten minutes, we will speak to a woman who defected from north korea, to find out about life under the regime there. that is at 6:a0am. a senior police officer is warning that forces in england and wales are facing a perfect storm, because of staff cuts and rising crime. a new report by the police superintendents‘ association of england and wales suggests officers are under so much pressure
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that half are suffering from anxiety and a quarter have symptoms of depression. the government says it is piloting a new scheme to support officers. a disturbance at birmingham prison which lasted for seven hours has ended. inmates had refused to return to their cells yesterday afternoon, and specialist staff had to be called in. the jail is privately run by gas, and was the scene of a large—scale disorder in december last year, which resulted in around 2a0 prisoners being moved out of the facility. figures from last year show more than a50 relatives of organ donors declined permission to donate, because they were unsure of their relatives‘ wishes. nhs blood and transplant says donors should ensure they have told their families what they want. last year, a57 people died while on the active transplant waiting list. a state of emergency has been declared in los angeles, as the city battles the worst
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wildfires in its history. hundreds of homes have been evacuated. the fires, covering about 5,000 acres, started on friday and have sent plumes of smoke over the city. they are arriving from a galaxy far, far away, and bound to meet with the stamp of approval from star wars fans. just look at these. classic characters c—3p0 and chewbacca will be finding their way onto an envelope near you soon, as part of a special edition set of stamps to mark the release of the new star wars film in december. there will be those old characters loved by fans, and spaceships, too. some of them even have details in fluorescent ink that will only be visible under a uv light. so if you haven‘t got one... unlucky. go and find one. and lewis
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hamilton is looking pretty pleased. and i have onlyjust worked out he is taking a selfie. he does love a selfie. i thought you had to go higher to get rid of the chance. not if you are lewis hamilton, he is not like the rest of us. he got booed, actually. he was booed by the italian fans, which i think is fairly normal. they love ferrari. britain‘s lewis hamilton won the italian grand prix in dominant style, to take the lead in the drivers‘ championship for the first time this season. a day after breaking the all—time record for pole positions, hamilton was in total control at monza, finishing ahead of team—mate valtteri bottas, for a mercedes one—two. ferrari‘s sebastian vettel was third, and is now three points behind hamilton. the car was fantastic, and really a dream to drive. but a big thank you to all the fans who have come out today. thank you, and i look forward
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today. thank you, and i look forward to coming back next year. maria sharapova is out of the us open. the former world number one and 2006 champion had been in good form on her return to grand slam tennis, following a 15—month doping ban. but she eventually lost in the fourth round, in three sets, to anastasija sevastova. sharapova says she is proud of her performance. chris froome has extended his overall lead at the vuelta a espana. on a tough day in the mountains, the tour de france winner was able to take advantage, and leads his nearest rival by over a minute. columbia‘s miguel angel lopez took the stage win. with six stages to go after today‘s rest day, froome looks on course to become the third man to complete the tour—vuelta double in the same year. australian caleb ewan sprinted to victory on the opening stage of the tour of britain, a 120—mile pedalfrom edinburgh to kelso in the scottish borders. the eight—stage event finishes in cardiff on 10 september. three of the home nations play world cup qualifiers tonight. scotland host malta, northern ireland take
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on the czech republic, and england play slovakia at wembley. jordan henderson will again captain the england side. fresh from friday‘s flattering a—0 win in malta, the three lions can move five points clear at the top of their group, and virtually secure their place in russia next summer. a win for slovakia will see them move above england. it isa it is a great opportunity for us. a home game, we are playing good opposition, so we have to make sure that we are tactically prepared, which we will be. also we have got to have belief in the team that we have got. we have got some exciting players, and we want to go and show that. bath sealed their first victory at leicester since 2003, as they started their premiership season with a 27—23 win at welford road. semesa rokoduguni scored the pick of bath‘s three tries, running the length of the pitch and just out—sprinting fellow england wingerjonny may. that was one of 50 tries scored on the opening weekend, a record for the first round of
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fixtures in the premiership. great britain‘s 0liver townend won the second burghley horse trials title of his career, just two weeks on from winning european gold with the british team in poland. riding ballaghmor class, townend led after the cross—country phase, and had just one fence down in yesterday‘s show—jumping, to clinch the title. piggy french and gemma tattersall came second and third. six british riders finished in the top ten. 0ne one of the best names i have ever read ina one of the best names i have ever read in a sport bulletin, piggy french. now, we talked yesterday morning about the charity football match being played in memory of young bradley lowery, the sunderland fanatic who suffered from a rare form of cancer, and died last month. well, thousands of people turned up at everton‘s goodison park to watch
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two teams, led by everton legend peter reid and model katie price. the bradley lowery foundation, which was set up to help sick children, and everton in the community, will benefit from the funds raised. i know lots of people were involved yesterday, we had some people who are playing on the sofa yesterday. huge squads for both sides, so everybody got a game. and finally, let‘s take a look at two of football‘s brightest stars showing off their skills. while training in manaus, neymar and gabrieljesus did keepy—uppies for a whole lap of the pitch. we have sped it up a bit. looks easy, doesn‘t it? brazil play colombia tomorrow. that is just ridiculous.
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that isjust ridiculous. towards the end they are starting to turn around. and they were not that aware that anyone was watching, they were just kind of mucking about. very impressive. months of escalating rhetoric between north korea and the united states culminated in claims of a successful nuclear weapons test by pyongyang over the weekend. the announcement of the test was made on state television yesterday morning. translation: the test of a hydrogen bomb designed to be mounted on our intercontinental ballistic missile was a perfect success. it was a very meaningful step in completing the national eclair weapons programme. verifying details from north korea is notoriously difficult. but what is it like living under the regime? we arejoined now byjee—yun park, who defected in 1998. good morning, thank you very much
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indeed forjoining us. you are sort of in indeed forjoining us. you are sort ofina indeed forjoining us. you are sort of in a unique position to tell us what life was like. what was it like living in north korea? what kind of things where you allowed to do, not allowed to do? well, when i leave north korea, my father was a driver and my mother was a housewife. so my father was proud of himself, because he was a work party member in north korea. so he always told us, when you grow up you also join the work party, and start a family. so that education is not only in the home, in school, and every public place everywhere, in the newspaper, tv, and books, also describing everywhere the kim family. so i was brainwashed in north korea, and i believe that north korea was
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stronger than other countries, and also... in early 1990s north korea started a famine and many people died of starvation in the street, and my neighbours. so when we wake up, we heard that today who died of starvation, and which families died in their home. but it happened in 1996 with my family members, my uncle died of starvation in front of me. so when i saw my uncle‘s body, it didn‘t look like a person, it looked like an animal, only bones. and he was small, small. so at that timei and he was small, small. so at that time i looked to my father‘s face, but his face was darkness and he was speechless. and i have got many
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questions at that time in my head, but i couldn‘t have spoken out, because north korea is a dangerous country. and how did you come to leave north korea eventually, than? i never thought about leaving north korea at that time, i continued to believe in the kim family. but in 1997 my brotherjoined the military, and at that time there were problems, and he left the military. soi problems, and he left the military. so i left home immediately, because at that time... i waited to pass away my brother‘s problems. my brother was alone, and died, and i still don‘t know when my brother ‘s
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passed away, and where his body is. 0nce passed away, and where his body is. once in china, i thought that maybe i saved my younger brother, but i was separated from my brother. so my brother was also repatriated to north korea, so it was 17 years since he disappeared. so in 200a i also repatriated in north korea, from china. so i also repatriated in north korea and stayed in a labour camp. thank you very much for coming to talk to us on bbc breakfast. let‘s find out what is happening in the weather. we have a real mix of weather types of the next few days. we start the week with a lot of cloud. it is mild, murky and drizzly. things will improve with some brighter weather developing through the middle of the week and then wet and windy to end the week.
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this is how things look today. this was taken yesterday in saint leonards on sea, but lots of cloud and that cloud is bringing with it some outbreaks of drizzly rain. this warm front has pushed its way from west to east across the country during the weekend. and today it is bringing us quite a damp that certainly a mild theme. for northern ireland, most places rather grey. a few spots of drizzle. the more persistent rain pushing in the western parts of scotland. elsewhere across scotland, at 8am a lot of low cloud. hill fog, some drizzly rain, pretty gloomy as well as we work away south across much of england and wales. so all that low cloud around but temperatures very mild for the time of year, to start the day. already in the mid—to—high teens. coming out of this cloud that we have got, some drizzly spots of rain. it won‘t be raining all the time but a little bit of damp weather across parts of cornwall and devon. dry weather into southern england, and into the south—west of england, and into the south—west of england and east anglia some drizzly showers likely through the course of
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the morning. for some of us the weather improve after that gloomy and grey start. parts of southern england should see a few sunny spells developing. it will feel quite humid and warm, further north this frontal system moving in and bringing some outbreaks of rain to northern ireland and central scotland. clearer conditions pushing into the north—west later on. in the brighter weather towards the south we could see 22 or 23 degrees, and it will feel quite warm and quite humid. into the evening we will start to see this front in the north peppering up once again, that will bring rain quite widely through the night across northern ireland, northern and western england and wales as well. dry towards the south—east of that front, mild and murky, and we will start to see clearer weather heading in from the north—west eventually. through the day tomorrow we will start with this front draped across many parts of the country. so again we will see a lot of cloud, some outbreaks of rain as well, but it will be slowly improving sort of day. the rain and breezy conditions clearing towards
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the east. much of eastern england stay quite damp and drizzly through the day, but we will start to see clearer weather from the north and west. and temperatures a little bit cooler across scotland and northern ireland, down towards wales. still quite murky at 21 in the south—east. some dry weatherfor quite murky at 21 in the south—east. some dry weather for the middle quite murky at 21 in the south—east. some dry weatherfor the middle part of the week before we see wetter and windy weather to end the week. a group of leading economists thinks the rise in the cost of living may soon be easing, and interest rates will stay low for longer. good news for the squeeze on household finances? sean‘s been taking a look. i have one of those leading economists with me so we will find out all this important stuff in a moment. good morning. whether you‘re a saver, a mortgage holder, employer, worker, shopper — this is effectively a survey about what will happen to us all in the coming year or two. we asked 30 top financial forecasters what they think will happen. most think inflation — the measure of the cost of living, how much prices are rising, will peak this autumn at around 3%. it‘s been on the rise since the vote to leave the eu as the weak pound
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has been pushing up prices in the shops. there‘s more good news for households more than half of these economists think that wages will rise faster than prices in the first half of next year, which should help ease the squeeze on people‘s budgets. and on interest rates, if you‘re trying to get a return on your savings, or you‘ve got a mortgage what will happen? well, more than half think there will be no rate rise in the next 12 months. most believe it won‘t be until 2019 at the earliest. interest rates are currently at an historic low of 0.25%. george buckley is chief economist at the japanese bank nomura. he‘s one of the economists surveyed. most economists think that the next rate rise will be in 2019 but you don‘t. you are an outlier in this.
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what do you think will happen? we thought they would raise interest rates last month so you may accuse us rates last month so you may accuse us of crying wolf but i do think the bank of england will be looking at the fact that the unemployment rate is now the lowest it has been since the mid—19 70s and the economy, by most measures, is growing well. inflation is above its target and thatis inflation is above its target and that is what the bank of england is there to do, to control inflation. much of that is because of sterling. for all those reasons i think the bank will be looking to move interest rates up at a very slow and modest pace over the course of the next few months. what do you think the vast majority of economists, and, at the minute, the vast majority of people at the bank of england, don‘t think that now is the time for a rate rise. that will not happen. decade. if you are the rank of england and now that rate
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movements is quite home potent because of the number of people with debt. how about savers? as nobody ca re debt. how about savers? as nobody care about the savers? they keep interest rates low and encourage economic growth which means that people can save more by being employed. that is one of the reasons i have kept interest rates low over the years. you can save more by being employed if your wages are increasing faster than prices that has not happened of late. when do you think there may be a turnaround? think inflation may continue to rise over the next few months. you make peak at around 3%, we are at about 2.5 now. and then will start to drop. the impact of currency takes a long time to pass through sewer could take a long time for inflation to move back down to normal levels. how about us and wages? wages will start to rise than they already are. much evidence is pointing to how
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firms are now offering higher wages and people are demanding. i think by maybe the second quarter of next year we will seek wages match pace with inflation but it will take a lot to make up the difference. so you will say workers get letters from their bosses saying there will be pay rises in the new year. will that happen more often? i think it will. sigley because the unemployment rate is so low. it is not a matter of how tightly labour market is that it is a good one and i think it means that wages will start to rise at the beginning of next year. thank you george. right now we will look at the coastal economy. you may think life‘s a beach living by the sea — but according to a report out today britain‘s seaside communities are among the worst parts of the country for earnings and employment. the government is announcing an additional a0 million to help — but how much difference will it make? as part of a special series
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we‘re looking at life in coastal communities. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has more. good morning. good morning to you both. we have been on the road, the last few weeks, with our big bbc brea kfast last few weeks, with our big bbc breakfast deckchair. we have taken it the length and breadth of the country, right around the coast, to try to find out why our beautiful coastline is underperforming. it is not underperforming here. weston—super—mare is top of the league table in terms of economic growth. but far too many places are at the bottom of table. so we have been out asked people what they think is going wrong. you can
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support coastal areas better if you did not have to rely so much upon ca rs did not have to rely so much upon cars getting to these villages. haps if there was more investment in public transport. i think local areasjust need public transport. i think local areas just need support public transport. i think local areasjust need support from councils. there has been a lot of investment but i think there is still more that could be done. to improve things. some areas still seem rundown but there is a lot more. . . seem rundown but there is a lot more... areas that have been improved over the last few years. more... areas that have been improved over the last few yearsm they want to invest in it they should invest in property that people can afford to live in and work in. as soon as this place goes upmarket, everything gets expensive. you see many places close down on some seafronts and it is a shame because, you know, it is our heritage and it needs to be kept.
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some of the coastal towns are rundown. i they could work towards keeping a cleaner. and more people as well. keep the people coming. enjoy being at the seaside, even if the weather is not there. improving car parking and restaurants staying open longer. those things would help locally. there you have it. that is your opinion out there, the people who live and love the coast. underinvestment. rundown. do not exploit local assets and resources. and was perfectly equipped to talk about this is ill. good morning. you are cooking up a storm. hopefully
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that will not bring on the rain. and you were head chef at river cottage, an award—winning writer. you would have seen him on television. what do you think is going wrong with britain‘s posts? you think is going wrong with britain's posts? i think every seaside town needs to bring people in. it needs to make the most of what it has. that includes its high—street, it includes its good restau ra nts, high—street, it includes its good restaurants, it‘s watchers, it‘s bakers, you know... local assets? it needs to celebrate everyone and everything that is great about the place. what are you cooking for this morning? well, straightaway, here is a great fish. a local mackle caught just down the coast. beautifully fresh, straight on the barbecue. we have some wild mushrooms, a com pletely have some wild mushrooms, a completely different food source, of course, some wild mushrooms did i picked these just a mile or so from
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my house. and we will try them in a minute with some of our coastal cheerleaders were going to chat to you later. so you say that we need to have come to appreciate our assets more. one is that, for example, that only 15% of international tourists visit our coast when they come to our country? that‘s... it is a staggering statistic. i really don‘t know the answer. i think that we just need to shout a bit more about what beautiful seaside towns we have. where i am from, they are amazing. let‘s chat to you a bit more about this a little later and some of our coastal cheerleaders, the people who are getting it right. but for now, back to the studio. and give very much indeed. looks like breakfast will be lovely there on the beach. yes, ido will be lovely there on the beach. yes, i do fancy a break after that, don‘t you? yes, i do fancy a break after that, don't you? yes. i know there are issues and i will talk to the
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minister about them but they are beautiful places to be. don't forget to let us know what you think. get in touch via the usual channels. for now, time for news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m claudia—liza armah. police in brazil have arrested a man in connection with the shooting of a tourist from south london. eloise dixon was in a hire car last month, with her husband and three daughters near rio dejaniero when they accidentally drove into an area where drugs gangs operate. she was shot twice in the abdomen and narrowly avoided being killed in front of her family. another suspect was arrested a week after the attack. for the first time ever in the uk, some staff at mcdonalds are going on strike today in a row over pay. workers at the crayford branch in south—east london began the 2a—hour action at midnight. they voted overwhelmingly to walk out over concerns about working conditions and the use of zero—hour contracts. a spokesman for mcdonald‘s said the fast—food company "works hard to ensure teams are treated fairly". a consultation begins today looking at increasing fines to motorists
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by nearly 25%. it would mean charges for anyone in london that breaks road rules including driving in a bus lane or not paying the congestion charge increasing from £130 to £160. the measures will also see discounts for early payments going up as well. tfl says it will reduce congestion and improve road safety, but the rac questions the move. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube — the picadilly line is partly suspended with no trains from hammersmith to king‘s cross. there‘s severe delays on the rest of line. rmt union members are on strike. no service on their west london line— clapham junction to milton keynes central and a limited service on some other routes. the piccadilly underpass is closed following a crash earlier this morning. and islington remains closed. let‘s have a check on the weather
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now with sara thornton. good morning to you. a disappointing start for us this morning. it is miserable out there, isn‘t it? not terribly heavy in the way of rain but certainly grey and damp through the morning. later on it will be brighter and it could spark a few afternoon showers. here is the culprit of the rain this morning and the rain last night. this weather front. we are in a warm zone of air, so it is not terribly chilly out there. it is fairly cloudy, we‘re used to drizzly skies and murkiness around. through the afternoon drying up, the brightness could spark off a stray afternoon shower. there could be some bright spells and feeling warm in that. through the night tonight we will have more in the way of cloud pushing about towards us and again will continue to feel rather mild and 15 degrees. tomorrow, another approaching weather front could bring us some showers through the morning.
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there will be some drier interludes and there will be some drier interludes and in the afternoon i think a lot of good dry and bright weather between the showers. it looks dry in the middle part of the week, perhaps a little cooler and fresher with a westerly wind. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. donald trump warns north korea the us is ready to use nuclear weapons to defend itself and its allies. after sunday‘s announcement of the country‘s hydrogen bomb test, washington says it will use a massive military response if america is threatened. in the last few hours, south korea carries out a missile drill simulating an attack on the north‘s nuclear test site. good morning, it is
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monday a september. also this morning: the uk‘s coastal communities are among the country‘s worst—off. we are live at the seaside with exclusive figures. that is a deckchair, jane is somewhere, we will be back there are a little later on. —— back their little later on. a senior police officer warns that forces in england and wales are facing a perfect storm, because of staff cuts and rising crime. good morning. tropical storm harvey has caused a quarter of oil and gas production
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in the united states to shut down, so i will be taking a look at the knock—on effect for fuel prices back here in the uk. in sport: lewis hamiltonjumps forjoy, after snatching the formula 1 championship lead with victory at the italian grand prix. this is how it is looking over the bristol channel this morning. it is not really looking like a beach day. we are talking about what is going on in our coastal communities throughout the morning on bbc breakfast. and sarah has the forecast, for there and the rest of the country. it isa it is a misty and murky start to the day, but it will feel quite warm. 22 or 23 degrees for some of us later on so not too bad for the first week of september. i will have all the details later on. good morning. first, our main story: president trump has warned the united states is ready to use its nuclear capabilities in defending itself and its allies against north korea. his comments come as the united nations prepares for an emergency session to discuss the regime‘s claims of a successful nuclear weapons test over the weekend. from seoul, robin brant reports.
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after the north exploded a nuclear device below ground, the south responded with this. a series of missile launches above ground. the military said they hit their target in the east sea early on monday. it was designed to replicate an attack on north korea‘s nuclear testing site. across the border over the weekend, this was how north koreans heard about the "perfect success" that was their nation‘s sixth nuclear missile test. it was more powerful than any before, and came with claims that kim jong—un now has the ability to order a nuclear strike on mainland america. a few hours later, in washington, having briefed the president, the us secretary of defence gave this very stark warning. any threat to the united states or its territories, including guam, or our allies, will be met with a massive military response, a response both effective and overwhelming.
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china has a crucial role to play in this. hosting a handful of world leaders at a summit, president xijinping urged restraint on all sides. the leaders of china and russia promised to deal appropriately with their rogue neighbour. the leader wants to focus on even tougher economic sanctions, as the united nations security council meets later. and we can speak to robin now. what should we read into this missile test by the south? the us now saying they are willing to use their nuclear capability to try and stop what is going on in north korea. how is that going on where you are, in seoul? well, that is not what the leader of this
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country, president moon wants to hear. this is a man who was elected to extend an olive branch and begin dialogue. clearly that is in tatters for now but nonetheless the president of this country is a man who said just a few weeks ago, he promised, in fact, the guaranteed, there would not be another military conflict on this peninsula. in fact, if there was an attack on north korea, it would need his permission to do so. that does not really tally with what has come out of the united states, and i don‘tjust mean the rhetoric of donald trump, mr mattis, who has talked about the massive military response which may come north korea‘s way. the massive divide is troubling, and despite south korea trying to paper over the cracks, the us is a very important ally to it. it is the most important security guarantor. what donald trump wants to achieve, and how
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south korea can be achieved, as well. there is a warning that policing in england and wales is facing a perfect storm, because of rising crime and staff shortages. the president of the police superintendents‘ association, gavin thomas, will tell the group‘s annual conference, today that the government should review funding and resources. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw reports. is the thin blue line becoming too thin? yes, says the police superintendents‘ association. it is the organisation which represents 1,000 middle—ranking officers, the men and women who make the key operational decisions. the superintendents are concerned that there are fewer police officers, working harder and working longer hours, in a more challenging environment. the man who leads the organisation believes that is a model of policing which is fundamentally flawed. i think it‘s the service of first resort, i think it‘s the service of last resort, for many people, understandably.
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and i think also, what i‘ve just described — i think we‘re also the service that is everything in between, as well. that puts a lot of pressure on police officers to try and meet that expectation from the public. and i‘m not convinced it is a sustainable position in the mid—to—long term. the superintendents‘ association conducted a survey of its members about work pressures. 72% of those who responded said they did not use all the annual leave they were entitled to. 50% of superintendents said they had signs of anxiety. and over a quarter, 27%, were experiencing symptoms of depression, linked to the demands of working in policing. the association is known for being the voice of moderation in policing, so its warnings are likely to be taken seriously. the home office says it is piloting a new national service to provide welfare support to police who need it. ministers have also been having discussions with police leaders, amid calls for extra police funding for forces. but no decisions have yet been taken.
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a disturbance at birmingham prison, which lasted for seven hours, has ended. inmates had refused to return to their cells yesterday afternoon, and specialist staff had to be called in. the jail is privately run by gas, and was the scene of a large—scale disorder in december last year, which resulted in around 2a0 prisoners being moved out of the facility. talks resume today on trying to bring back northern ireland‘s power—sharing government. the northern ireland secretary, james brokenshire, will hold separate meetings with the five main stormont parties. they will discuss the prospects for restoring devolved government, which collapsed injanuary. figures from last year show more than a50 relatives of organ donors declined permission to donate, because they were unsure of their relatives‘ wishes. nhs blood and transplant says donors should ensure they have told their families what they want.
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last year, a57 people died while on the active transplant waiting list. the cost to repair the damage caused by hurricane harvey could be as high as £138 billion. more than a0 people have been killed, and tens of thousands are continuing to be housed in temporary shelters. texas governor greg abbott said the damage was worse than that caused by hurricane katrina, which devastated new orleans in 2005. the landmark queensferry crossing will be officially opened by the queen and the duke of edinburgh later this morning. the ceremony, at 11:00am, will include an address by nicola sturgeon. catriona renton is at the crossing for us now. now, are they ready? good morning. good morning. well, they arejust about ready. you can see what is happening behind us. the finishing touches are being put onto the queensferry crossing, ahead of the
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official opening this morning. we are on the south, edinburgh side of the bridge. this is where the queen will arrive, with the duke of edinburgh. she will be greeted by the first minister of scotland. you can see the lectern, where the moderatorfrom can see the lectern, where the moderator from the church of scotla nd moderator from the church of scotland will address the bridge. —— bless the bridge. there will be pipe bands, plenty of entertainment as well as the ceremony here. it is fitting she is here today on four september, because exactly 53 years ago, on four september 196a, she opened the fourth road bridge. it sits alongside the bridge built on the 19th century and this new crossing is one for the 21st century. it is hoped it will still be operational in at least 120 yea rs‘ be operational in at least 120 years‘ time. so this is quite a day and quitea years‘ time. so this is quite a day and quite a landmark for this new crossing in scotland. and we can see the weather not looking great there,
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and it is not looking great at weston—super—mare, either. and it is not looking great at weston-super-mare, either. keep your comments coming in on that, what it is like to live there, and we will get some memories of holidays from yea rs get some memories of holidays from years gone by. how much have things changed? i think sarah has some coastal action for us now, as well. good morning to you. good morning. we have some great pictures coming in from around the coast. this morning quite a misty, murky and muqqy morning quite a misty, murky and muggy feel. this one was taken on the gower peninsula. a low cloud across many parts of the country, but it is quite warm to start the day. this warm front has moved its way from west to east through the course of yesterday, bringing us all that rain and today it is still hanging around. quite a lot of low cloud and hill fog for northern ireland. a grey morning and mild, temperatures of 16 degrees. more persistent rain to the north—west will be more of a player later in
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the day but certainly affecting the western isles of scotland this morning. the rest of scotland fairly misty, but some fog around as well. it won‘t be raining all the time, but it is fairly cloudy in wales, and so mist and fog. certainly mild, 70 degrees in cardiff first thing this morning. towards the south—west of england a few drizzly showers coming out of that low cloud. so not a fantastic morning visibility light across the coast. there is quite a lot of funkiness here and there are, and some drizzly rain in the south—east of england of england towards east anglia and lincolnshire as well —— fogginess. we should see the skies brightening this afternoon and it will feel quite warm and humid. further north we have a weather front ringing some rain across parts of northern ireland and scotland. followed by eventually some clear conditions with some sunshine heading into the north—west. 22 or 23 degrees for a few spots, could feel warm and humid
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later in the day. into the evening we have this area of rain in northern england and northern ireland, and that peps up overnight. rain pushing across much of scotland, down towards wales and the south—west. to the south—east of that area of rain it is still quite murky and mild. eventually we will start to see those clearer, right conditions heading in from the north—west behind this front. during the day tomorrow we will start with a front sitting right across the country, so cloudy, drizzly startle many of us, with some heavy bursts of rain. through the day tomorrow things will start to improve as we see a return to sunshine parts of scotland, northern ireland, wales and the south—west. central and eastern parts of england fairly cloudy, still a few showers around and it won‘t be quite as warm as it is today, but still temperatures up to around 21 degrees or so. certainly quite mucky and murky over the next few days. looking further ahead this week, through the middle of the week it is looking a bit
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fresher, with a return to some sunny spells. but rings are looking fairly u nsettled, spells. but rings are looking fairly unsettled, and it is set to turn quite wet and quite windy before the end of the week. and we are talking about britain‘s coast all week. do you know how many people live there? ido, you know how many people live there? i do, only because i have looked it up, 11 million. 11 million is correct. according to a new report the bbc breakfast, many who live there really struggle financially, finding the economic gap between coastal and non— coastal places has grown. the government is announcing an additional £a0 million to help. we are looking at life in coastal communities. this used to be one of the best and busiest seaside resorts in the whole of scotland. john tells me the story of ard rossa n. boats going to the isle of man, boats going to belfast...
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it was such a vibrant, lively place. but today, only one ferry remains. the industry which once employed thousands has gone. the beach is beautiful, but empty. how does this make you feel? very angry. a small marina now sits where the busy port once sprawled. there are superyachts, worth hundreds of thousands, but unemployment rates amongst the very worst in the uk. in the club, plenty feel left behind. have you given up? pretty much. do you feel that the powers—that—be care about the changes that are going on in places like this? no, definitely not. they can‘t experience the problems, because they don‘t see it every day. a sense the coast has been left behind is backed by statistics out today. economic growth is slower here. over 80% of people who live in these areas are paid less. the economic gap between coastal and non—coastal communities is growing.
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the reason, probably, that other places have done really well is because governments have supported city deals. we want some of that. we need it now, we don‘t have time to wait. but here, in the west of scotland, they are still waiting forfunding. in the north—east, the wait is over. so much of whitley bay‘s story was the same as ardrossan, a resort which teemed with holidaymakers, eager to visit the spanish city, with fair rides, and dancing, and the famous white domes. spanish city, yes, this is myjob. but now he has a new top job back in spanish city. restoration manager. the famous dome, derelict for 17 years, is being ready be reopened with over £10 million of public money. i am honoured to be able to do this. something that is close to my heart.
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£2 million has come from the government‘s coastal communities fund. that has invested over £170 million in the last five years, in areas like this, and is extended today with an extra £a0 million. andrew‘s walters are gone, but a new restaurant here is a sign of the private money quick to follow public investment. do you think that the government is doing enough? well, i think they could do a lot more. if you look around the country, and see how many people are living in these towns, they have almost been left to die, and they‘re as important as the people who live in the big cities, aren‘t they? the coast of britain has an incredible story. often a white knuckle ride to those that live there. but proof here for successful investment. no proof yet there is enough investment to go around. joining us as the mp in charge off
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the coast. looking at coastal towns, what has gone wrong? there are many challenges, as highlighted in your report. they are often the end of the line where the train lines and road lines. we need to get back to that heyday by creating a year round visitor economy for them. i visited hastings and blackpool. it has a lot to offer the people. if we look at where we filmed our piece, only 20% has been paid for. the rest they have to pay themselves. can we provide cash to make changes? what
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we are looking at, which is why i am pleased to announce another £a0 million invested in the coastal communities, is a partnership approach. the government puts in money to support the coastal community, including 18, and then the private sector, which is involved in driving forward that economy in that go to town, city, goes to make sure they grow ——a team. —— coastal town. goes to make sure they grow ——a team. -- coastaltown. but it is spread over five years and the entire coast. is very enough money? it is spread over two years in england. it means there will be 131 million plus this new cash. we have to be clear. the problems around the coast are not new. in 2012 we were saying they have there own unique
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problems. you mentioned one of the problems. you mentioned one of the problems about being at the end of the line. transport links to many of these communities are difficult. you mentioned it yourself. £a0 million does not solve it. it is about infrastructure. this money is not about infrastructure. it is about bringing coastal communities together to drive forward. having visited the great british seaside on three occasions, i can say they are great places to visit. in terms of people getting there, the government in the north is investing £12 million to bring infrastructure. look at places like hull, benefited by the m62. they are becoming better connected. this is a long—term problem. what do you say to people in these committees they cannot find jobs? there are big challenges with
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thejob jobs? there are big challenges with the job market. we jobs? there are big challenges with thejob market. we are jobs? there are big challenges with the job market. we are looking at investing money to move away from a seasonal economy to a year round economy. there are big problems for people finding work. places like blackpool where we have invested in a new winter gardens conference centre. extending that season opens up centre. extending that season opens up blackpool again so we can solve these challenges they have. can anything be done? looking at this research, it seems the problems are the same. the young people are leaving these parts of the uk. can something be done to stop that? is that part of the picture we will see? if i didn't think anything could be done, i would not have this job. what we have done is acknowledge the unique problem faced by coastal communities. through this find we are investing to grow the economy to make it attractive for young people to live and have their
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entire career. i know young people with families, if they can get a good job through the year, they would want to live there too, just like all people do. we are discussing that this week. let us know if you have seen a change and what is going wrong and perhaps what is going right. and now for the main stories this morning. south korea has carried out a missile drill in response to north korea‘s latest nuclear bomb test, as washington warned the north that any threat to america would be met with an overwhelming military response. a senior police officer is warning that forces in england and wales are heading towards a "perfect storm" because of staff cuts and rising crime. you raise your finger at me.
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you raise your finger at melj you raise your finger at me. i was saying goodbye. leading economists say the rise in the cost of living may soon be easing. sean‘s here with this and the rest of the business news. have you guys finished? good morning. leading economists say the rise in the cost of living may soon be easing. yes, this is a bbc survey of 30 top economists. most say they don‘t expect interest rates to rise until 2019, meaning cheap borrowing but poor savings rates for longer. they also think inflation, which is running faster than pay growth, will start to peak as soon as this autumm, easing the income squeeze on households. the price of unleaded petrol could overtake diesel in the coming days, according to a warning by the rac. the reason, it says, is the disruption caused by hurricane harvey in the us. the rac thinks the price of a litre of petrol could rise by up to ap, bringing it up to levels last seen three years ago. and the first ever uk strike by mcdonald‘s workers has begun.
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workers at two sites in cambridge and south—east london walked out at midnight in a 2a—hour dispute over zero—hours contracts and conditions. unions say staff want an hourly wage of at least £10 and more secure jobs. mcdonald says it‘s raised pay three times since april last year. the other thing we are looking at is prices at the pumps. the price of unleaded petrol could go up because of the disruption caused by hurricane harvey. prices have been jumpy prices have beenjumpy after a quarter of american production was turned off after the storm. we will talk about the knock—on effect globally of tropical storm harvey later. thank you. we will go back to these live pictures coming in of the coastline this morning. a bit murky. still stunning. any day is a good
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day to go to the beach, but the sun is not out. we are talking about the issues facing people living in coastal communities. thank you for sending in your thoughts and also your seaside memories. yes. we have been asked by the team to send ours. that is me! i was 13. i think we can guess who this is. that is sean somewhere in wales. look at you. these are classics. this is sally on a horse in anglesey. we have a recent one of you, dan. we had none, so we made this for you instead. my
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mother is not at home at the minute, she is visiting members of our family. normally i would get her to send me a picture. apparently that is my face when i was at the beach. send us your pictures and tell us what you love about the coastline. sandro says many uk coastal towns are suffering because of the greed from hoteliers. that isjust are suffering because of the greed from hoteliers. that is just one thought. we have beautiful beaches but yarmouth has been milked of resources no money is going in, only out. get in touch. and now for the news, travel, and weather, wherever are watching. we will be back at
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730. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m claudia—liza armah. police in brazil have arrested a man in connection with the shooting of a tourist from south london. eloise dixon was in a hire car last month, with her husband and three daughters near rio dejaniero when they accidentally drove into an area where drugs gangs operate. she was shot twice in the abdomen and narrowly avoided being killed in front of her family. another suspect was arrested a week after the attack. for the first time ever in the uk, some staff at mcdonalds are going on strike today in a row over pay. workers at the crayford branch in south—east london began the 2a—hour action at midnight. they voted overwhelmingly to walk out over concerns about working conditions and the use of zero—hour contracts. a spokesman for mcdonald‘s said the fast—food company "works hard to ensure teams are treated fairly". a consultation begins today looking at increasing fines to motorists by nearly 25%. it would mean charges for anyone in london that breaks road rules including driving in a bus lane or not paying the congestion charge
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increasing from £130 to £160. the measures will also see discounts for early payments going up as well. tfl says it will reduce congestion and improve road safety, but the rac questions the move. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there are severe delays on the picadilly line. that‘s caused by a signal failure being fixed. a bit of an issue on the trains, though. a strike by rmt staff means there‘s no southern service on their west london line, and a limited service on some other routes. 0n the roads, the piccadilly underpass is closed towards knightsbridge following a crash earlier this morning. and in islington, upper street remains closed between liverpool road and city road for major roadworks. let‘s have a check on the weather now with sara thornton. good morning to you.
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a bit of a disappointing start for us this morning. it is pretty miserable out there, isn‘t it, just now? not terribly heavy in the way of rain, but certainly grey and damp through the morning. later on, it will be brighter and it could spark off a few afternoon showers. here is the culprit of the rain this morning and the rain last night. this weather front. we are in a warm zone of air, so it is not terribly chillier there. it is fairly cloudy, we‘re used to drizzly skies and murkiness around. through the afternoon, drying up, the brightness could spark off a stray afternoon shower. but there could be some bright spells and feeling warm in that, 22-23. through the night tonight, we will have more aware of how pushing about towards us and again will continue to feel rather mild and 15 degrees. but tomorrow, another approaching weather front could bring us some showers through the morning. there will be some drier interludes and actually in the afternoon
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i think a lot of good dry and bright weather between the showers. and it looks dry to the middle part of the week, perhaps a little cooler and fresher with a westerly wind. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. the united states says it is ready to use its nuclear capabilities to defend itself and its allies against threats from north korea. the white house issued the statement following a phone conversation between president trump and the japanese prime minister, shinzo abe. it was made in response to north korea‘s sixth and most powerful nuclear test, which happened over the weekend. a senior police officer is warning that forces in england and wales are facing a perfect storm because of staff cuts and rising crime. a new report by the police superintendents‘ association of england and wales suggests
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officers are under so much pressure that half are suffering from anxiety and a quarter have symptoms of depression. the government says it is piloting a new scheme to support officers. a disturbance at birmingham prison, which lasted for seven hours, has ended. inmates had refused to return to their cells yesterday afternoon, and specialist staff had to be called in. the jail is privately run by gas, and was the scene of a large—scale disorder in december last year, which resulted in around 2a0 prisoners being moved out of the facility. a rise in interest rates won‘t take place for more than a year — that is according to a bbc survey of economists. most are also predicting that pay rises will continue to fall behind inflation until the spring of next year, continuing the renewed squeeze on the average earner‘s living standards. figures from last year show more than a50 relatives of organ donors declined permission to donate, because they were unsure of their relatives‘ wishes. nhs blood and transplant says donors
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should ensure they have told their families what they want. last year, a57 people died while on the active transplant waiting list. the cost to repair the damage caused in the united states by hurricane harvey could be as high as $180 billion — that is £138 billion. more than a0 people have been killed, and tens of thousands are continuing to be housed in temporary shelters. texas governor greg abbott said the damage was worse than that caused by hurricane katrina, which devastated new orleans in 2005. a state of emergency has been declared in los angeles, as the city battles the worst wildfires in its history. hundreds of homes have been evacuated. the fires, covering about 5,000 acres, started on friday and have sent plumes of smoke over the city. do you still buy stamps? yes,
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occasionally. and do you combine your need for stamps with a star wa rs your need for stamps with a star wars interest? i could do that, because i do love star wars. they are arriving from a galaxy far, far away, and bound to meet with the stamp of approval from star wars fans. just look at these. classic characters c—3p0 and chewbacca will be finding their way onto an envelope near you soon, as part of a special edition set of stamps to mark the release of the new star wars film in december. there will be those old characters loved by fans, and spaceships, too. some of them even have details in fluorescent ink, that will only be visible under a uv light. it is the stamp that keeps on giving. ijust don't have a spare uv light. it is not that i don‘t have a spare one, i don‘t have a uv light. i don‘t care, it is a star wars
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stamped, that is all i need to know. coming up on the programme, sarah will have the weather. you are going to talk about lewis hamilton. i was actually going to talk about chewbacca. don‘t you think the chewbacca ones will sell out quickly? i love chewbacca. lewis hamilton loves a bit of selfie action. britain‘s lewis hamilton won the italian grand prix in dominant style, to take the lead in the drivers‘ championship for the first time this season. a day after breaking the all—time record for pole positions, hamilton was in total control at monza, finishing ahead of team—mate valtteri bottas, for a mercedes one—two. ferrari‘s sebastian vettel was third, and is now three points behind hamilton. maria sharapova is out of the us open. the former world number one and 2006 champion had been in good form on her return to grand slam tennis, following a 15—month doping ban. but she eventually lost in the fourth round, in three sets, to anastasija sevastova. sharapova says she is proud of her performance. there were a lot of positives, just
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competing in that competitive environment is what i have missed. you can‘t replicate that anywhere, and especially at a grand slam. chris froome has extended his overall lead at the vuelta a espana. on a tough day in the mountains, the tour de france winner was able to take advantage, and leads his nearest rival by over a minute. columbia‘s miguel angel lopez took the stage win. with six stages to go after today‘s rest day, froome looks on course to become the third man to complete the tour—vuelta double in the same year. what do we want in our lives, perhaps a little bit more excitement? three of the home nations play world cup qualifiers tonight. scotland host malta, northern ireland take
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on the czech republic, and england play slovakia at wembley. jordan henderson will again captain the england side. fresh from friday‘s flattering a—0 win in malta, the three lions can move five points clear at the top of their group, and virtually secure their place in russia next summer. a win for slovakia will see them move above england. it‘s a great opportunity for us. a home game, we‘re playing good opposition, so we have to make sure that we‘re tactically prepared, which we will be. also, we‘ve got to have belief in the team that we‘ve got. we‘ve got some exciting players, and we want to go and show that. now, we talked yesterday morning about the charity football match being played in memory of young bradley lowery, the sunderland fanatic who suffered from a rare form of cancer, and died last month. well, thousands of people turned up at everton‘s goodison park to watch two teams, led by everton legend peter reid and model katie price. the bradley lowery foundation, which was set up to help sick children, and everton in the community, will benefit from the funds raised. and finally, let‘s take a look
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at two of football‘s brightest stars showing off their skills. while training in manaus, neymar and gabrieljesus did keepy—uppies for a whole lap of the pitch. we have sped it up a bit. looks easy, doesn‘t it? brazil play colombia tomorrow. we thought of putting the benny hill music in, but we decided against it. there is a great one at the end which dust doesn‘t quite make it. —— just doesn‘t quite make it. which dust doesn‘t quite make it. —— just doesn't quite make it.|j which dust doesn‘t quite make it. —— just doesn't quite make it. i think it was a0. just doesn't quite make it. i think it was 40. did you count? i wondered why you had gone quiet. it was 40. did you count? i wondered why you had gone quietlj it was 40. did you count? i wondered why you had gone quiet. i wasjust concentrating. they are quite good. if you have never experienced a migraine, the symptoms are a throbbing pain on one side of the head, sickness, and sensitivity to light. one in seven people in the uk
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are thought to suffer from migraines, but a recent survey suggests two thirds of people don‘t think employers understand the impact they can have. according to figures from the migraine trust, around nine million people in britain are affected by the condition. migraine is responsible for 25 million lost days at work and school each year. that is a cost of £2.25 billion a year to the economy. it is also estimated to cost the nhs £150 million a year in the uk, mostly due to prescriptions and gp visits. we are joined now by fiona mckenzie, who has suffered migraines since she was 15, and gp dr fari ahmad. people watching this at home thinking have i ever had a migraine? if you have had one, you know about it, don‘t you? the difference between a headache and a full on migraine is really intense, isn‘t it? it is astronomical. a full on migraine will leave me in bed. it
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will leave me with a pillow over my head, unable to do anything, unable to think are unable to cope with life. i tend to live in a darkened on clay of website and smell and light are kept out, because i can‘t cope with any of those things —— darkened on —— enclave where site and smell and light are kept away. the way you tell it, i am sure lots of people out there will have enormous sympathy for you, and you will be echoing some of what they feel. and how common is this, and what can be done? i think you said in your intro, one in seven, one in nine people will have one. i think they are a spectrum, so people can have one migraine a year, the people who are having them every few days. so the treatment very much depends
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on how it is affecting you. and i think establishing the diagnosis and understanding that you have a migraine helps, and it helps work out what kind of direction you will go in. we don‘t have a cure for migraines, and it is about understanding and managing what causes your problems, what causes you to have one and how do you deal with it. what are the triggers for you? my dad used to have them, and it was often costly and chocolate that set it off. is it food related, stress, how does it work to you? there are a combination of triggers, some of them i can manage and handle, and others i can‘t. chocolate and red wine are sadly two of my triggers. that is really bad news, isn‘t it? of my triggers. that is really bad news, isn't it? i can have a little red wine, but not very much, and not very often. but i find a pressure is one of my triggers, as soon as it goes above 1020 mil buys, who knew? i become much more likely to get a
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migraine. —— millibars. a city is quite a challenging environment for me to be in, and there are more studies into these environmental factors. that is quite hard to manage, i can‘t control for that kind of thing. what have your employer ‘s been like, in terms of use managing that, and them understanding where you are coming from? that is an important point to make, some good employers have been willing to talk and listen to how they can best support me. it is fair to say i have also had some pretty rough employment experiences, where people have treated it as if it was just a headache, and they have told me to kind of toughen up a bit, instead of really understanding what it is like for me, and the impact it has on me. i have been very lucky i managed to stay fully employed. at there are a lot of people who suffer from migraines who find it hard to
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hold down full—time employment, or any employment. and what can employers do to help?|j any employment. and what can employers do to help? i think the biggest thing is communication, and i think it is being able to speak to your employer and saying this is my condition, this is how it affects me. these are the things we can try and look at, and these are the things we can‘t. i think if you understand what sets it off and the things they can do to help manage, i think that is probably the biggest step to understanding and managing migraines. and you talk so clearly about how debilitating this can be. that can be echoed amongst many other people, can‘t it? that can be echoed amongst many other people, can't it? exactly, and most employers have a legal responsibility. if you‘re migraines are severe enough to impact on how you work, employers need to make reasonable adjustments at work to help you cope with that. and most good employers take that on—board and try arrange things to get the best for both of you —— try and arrange things. thank you so much
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for talking about this. unless you suffer with them you cannot understand how debilitating they can be. not all disabilities are visible. it should be registered, even though it can be intermittent. and ross says i suffer from migraines, and when it is bad enough i get paralysis and need medical attention, the jute, —— i get paralysis and need medical attention, thejute, —— feed tube, rehabilitation with walking. you can see that in those conditions it is very difficult to walk through that. if you are feeling like you cannot move, there is no way you can be a productive member of society in that setting. so it is about that support from employers, support from professionals, and support from communities. this conversation is so important right now, because this is about everyone coming around people who have migraines, and helping to
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understand what it is like for them, and helping to look after and support them through that. a lot of it is actually the anxiety that goes with letting people down. the internal, i guess, frustration and anxiety and exasperation. can ijust quickly ask, how long does it last for you, and what gets rid of it? it is obviously not just for you, and what gets rid of it? it is obviously notjust paracetamol. mine can last anywhere between four ours ever get it early, and i take the treatment that i take, too i have had ones that last three or four days. and i will be under a pillow for most of that, i will try and sleep as much as i can. i take preventative medicine twice a day, and that helps a lot, and that has helped me get to the point where i am back and able to look after myself. but it is a tough one, and a lot of people are not seeking treatment for it. so people do need to have conversations with their gps about it, it is really, really
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important. thank you very much for sharing your experiences this morning. here is sarah with a look at this morning‘s weather. good morning to you. a mild and murky theme. uninspiring this morning. this is in yorkshire. the reason it is so mild is because of this warm front pushing across the country. it is bringing low cloud. a cold front from the north—west. it will be a player later on. persistent rain in the west of northern ireland in scotland. northern ireland in scotland, a grey day. hill fog around. mist andrews or. mild. temperatures in the mid—teens already. the south—west of england,
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mist and fog and low cloud. we will see some showers around in the west. light winds. fairly mild. muggy and humid. dry weather in central and southern england. a few showers for london and up towards east anglia. through the day, as the sunshine warms things up, improving pictures, especially in east wales, the midlands, southern england. sunny spells breaking through the cloud. the odd shower. further north, this is working across scotland and northern ireland. wetter weather. clear conditions from the north—west. 17— 22 possibly 23. not too bad for the first week of september. this evening and overnight, rain in the north and west. much of northern ireland, scotland, northern england, wales, quite wet overnight. a weather front
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pepping up- quite wet overnight. a weather front pepping up. humid and murky on tuesday. tuesday is dominated by this weather front sitting across most of the country. it will go away towards the east. tuesday, improving. breezy and damp and mild. through the day, this area of rain goes towards the east. sunshine for scotla nd goes towards the east. sunshine for scotland and northern ireland and wales towards the south—west of england as well. temperatures not as muqqy england as well. temperatures not as muggy as today. 16— 21. things will turn more fresh with sunshine and showers during the middle of the week. back to you. think you. we are talking about the ongoing effects of tropical storm harvey. 0il oil prices have beenjumpy. good morning. the consequences of the storm will take some time to play out,
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of course, particularly with the families of those who died, and those made homeless by the storm. but one of the more immediate effects around the world is the impact on oil extraction and refining around the gulf of mexico. a quarter of the production in the us is offline leaving a shortfall of overfour million barrels a day. according to the rac that‘s likely to have a big impact on petrol prices. it reckons the price of a litre of petrol could rise by up to ap per litre, which would take the average price of the fuel above 121p per litre. that‘s a price not seen since december 201a. let‘s talk to our guest from the portland fuel consultancy. he watches these things closely. good morning. how much of a link is there between oil and gas production in america and what we see over here? oil, petrol, and diesel, are global markets. the us is the biggest consume in the world,
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consuming 20% of global oil production. anything they do will impact uk prices and what we pay. when we see a quarter of their production switched off for the time being, what impact do we have? refineries have all shut down on the gold coast largely as a preventative measure. “— gold coast largely as a preventative measure. —— gulf. that is because of the flooding after the storm passed through. that has left a shortfall in the petrol. we have not seen a jump in the petrol. we have not seen a jump in petrol prices yet. we have not. there is normally a lag between what happens in the wholesale markets and what happens at the pumps. that is usually around 2—3 weeks. prices have come back into the bit on friday and this morning.
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0n the bit on friday and this morning. on thursday night, it looks like prices would be a—5p, now it is 2—3. not long ago we were worrying we we re not long ago we were worrying we were going to get 99p. it must have a huge impact when you see a 20% move in the price stability does. the prices we saw at the start of last year were underplayed in terms of how far the market fell with the oil surprise and shale oil production. —— supplies. we have seen it go back up. when you see what petrol companies are doing, do they raise, when prices go up, do they raise, when prices go up, do they go up quicker when the oil price goes down? people feel they don‘t go down as quickly. price goes down? people feel they don't go down as quickly. not at all. we analysed the data going back as far as we can. there is no
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evidence prices rise faster than they fall. they filter through the wholesale market. everyone recognises and knows mentally when prices go up. especially when 1.20 prices go up. especially when 1.20 prices are hit. you don‘t realise when they come back up a bit. the storm in america could make things more volatile? yes. it is out in the atlantic. it is going to be the back end of this week before we know what happens after hurricane harvey has settled down. thank you. petrol prices will be jumpy in the next few weeks. thank you. you may think life‘s a beach living by the sea, but according to a report for bbc breakfast, britain‘s seaside communities are among the worst parts of the country for earnings and employment. that is our programme, isn‘t it?
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the government is announcing an additional £a0 million to help, but how much difference will it make? as part of a special series we‘re looking at life in coastal communities. brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin is in weston—super—mare for us this morning. how far will the money go? will it make a difference? she has a giant deckchair. we are bringing us this week around the coast to look at all of the coastal communities to find out what is happening. today we are talking about investment, money, economic growth. as we have heard this morning, too many of these areas are languishing at the bottom of the table in terms of educational attainment, health, economic growth, in terms of economic value. this place is beautiful this morning. the sun is coming out. it is doing well. it is at the top of the table. we
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can introduce someone from a monetary foundation. you look at what was happening across the uk from the coast to the centre. we have a cocktail of economic and social problems in the coastal communities of the uk. something that comes up in the research is how badly paid people are in working coastal communities. you earn £4000 per year less than someone not in a coastal community. in places like scarborough, it's even worse. that is stark. it is inevitable, isn‘t it, that cities, especially london, will get more investment from government because they are of the economy. we just had the government minister talking about something like that. £40 million isjust a
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drop in the ocean compared to the scale of the problems in the coastal communities of the uk, especially when you compare it to other infrastructure projects taking place. over £60 million being sent to expand. £40 million is not that much in comparison. people say it will trickle down. you think helping lift the coast helps everyone equally. why is that? we have some of the biggest problems because of economic growth concentrated in a small number of cities, causing housing crises and congestion. we need to spread prosperity out a bit so we can need to spread prosperity out a bit so we can take pressure off housing and the transport network in cities. we need more growth by the coast. we will talk to some of the cheerleaders by the coast. what is the problem. the tourists left in
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the problem. the tourists left in the 60s. when that happened, we had pockets of deprivation. it isn't the whole town, but it is a lot. we have this downward spiral with drugs and alcoholism. it is changing. there is investment. £40 million is a catalyst for change. it is a start. it will knock on. is about collaboration with universities and councils and that sort of stuff. tony roberston. tourism is not the a nswer tony roberston. tourism is not the answer for everything? it isn't. in scarborough we want a digital and creative economy. we need more than the rhythm. one of the greatest things is the 2.5 million from the
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community fund. —— tourism. it has created a market hall. 13 new businesses have been putting it, including artisan food and creating businesses that take people on in jobs are growing businesses to be it is about how to use the money. there is about how to use the money. there is so much to talk about this morning. hopefully we will have more time later. tourism is an untapped resource. i wish i could use a hat like that. time now to get the news, travel, and weather where you are. we will see you with the headlines at eight o‘clock. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m claudia—liza armah. police in brazil have arrested a man in connection with the shooting of a tourist from south london. eloise dixon was in a hire car last month, with her husband and three daughters near rio dejaniero
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when they accidentally drove into an area where drugs gangs operate. she was shot twice in the abdomen and narrowly avoided being killed in front of her family. another suspect was arrested a week after the attack. for the first time ever in the uk, some staff at mcdonalds are going on strike today in a row over pay. workers at the crayford branch in south—east london began the 24—hour action at midnight. they voted overwhelmingly to walk out over concerns about working conditions and the use of zero—hour contracts. a spokesman for mcdonald‘s said the fast—food company "works hard to ensure teams are treated fairly". a consultation begins today looking at increasing fines to motorists by nearly 25%. it would mean charges for anyone in london that breaks road rules including driving in a bus lane or not paying the congestion charge increasing from £130 to £160. the measures will also see discounts for early payments going up as well. tfl says it will reduce congestion and improve road safety, but the rac questions the move. let‘s have a look at
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the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there are severe delays on the picadilly line. that‘s caused by a signal failure being fixed. avoid if possible. tickets accepted on buses. a bit of an issue on the trains, though. a strike by rmt staff means there‘s no southern service on their west london line, and a limited service on some other routes. 0n the roads, the piccadilly underpass is closed towards knightsbridge following a crash earlier this morning. and in islington, upper street remains closed between liverpool road and city road for major roadworks. let‘s have a check on the weather now with sara thornton. good morning to you. a bit of a disappointing start for us this morning. it is pretty miserable out there, isn‘t it, just now? not terribly heavy in the way of rain, but certainly grey and damp through the morning. later on, it will be brighter and it could spark off a few afternoon showers.
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here is the culprit of the rain this morning and the rain last night, this weather front. we are in a warm zone of air, so it is not terribly chilly out there. it is fairly cloudy, we‘re used to drizzly skies and murkiness around. through the afternoon, drying up, the brightness could spark off a stray afternoon shower. but there could be some bright spells and feeling warm in that, 22-23. through the night tonight, we will have more aware of how pushing about towards us and again will continue to feel rather mild and 15 degrees. but tomorrow, another approaching weather front could bring us some showers through the morning. there will be some drier interludes and actually in the afternoon i think a lot of good dry and bright weather between the showers. and it looks dry to the middle part of the week, perhaps a little bit cooler and fresher, though, with a westerly wind. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. donald trump warns north korea —
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the us is ready to use nuclear weapons to defend itself and its allies. after sunday‘s announcement of the country‘s hydrogen bomb test, washington says it will use a massive military response if america is threatened. in the last few hours south korea carries out a missile drill simulating an attack on the north‘s nuclear test site. good morning. it‘s monday #abth september. ten yea rs
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september. ten years ago the government identified a problem with britain‘s coast. five years ago, money was set aside to try and fix it. but today, in exclusive research for bbc brea kfast we‘ve in exclusive research for bbc breakfast we‘ve learnt that the gap between britain‘s coastal communities and non coastal communities and non coastal communities is growing. it is getting worse. why are the coastal areas punching so far below their weight? more live from weston—super—mare later. a senior police officer warns that forces in england and wales are facing a "perfect storm" because of staff cuts and rising crime. good morning. will interest rates rise this year? when will wages grow faster than prices? i‘ll have some of the answers from our survey of financial forecasters. in sport, lewis hamiltonjumps for joy after snatching the formula one championship lead, with victory at the italian grand prix. 0ne retailer is ditching separate labels for girls and boys clothes.
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we ask if the days of his and her‘s outfits are numbered. boys and girls can wear the same things. and they can wear the same things. and they can like the same things too. this is how it‘s looking over the bristol channel this morning? and sarah has the forecast for there and the rest of the country. good morning. it is a mild and murky start to the day. we have got a lot of cloud and drizzle around, but some of us will see the sunshine breaking through later on. i will bring you the details in 15 minutes. thank you, sarah. good morning. first, our main story. president trump has warned the united states is ready to use its nuclear capabilities in defending itself, and its allies, against north korea. his comments come as the united nations prepares for an emergency session to discuss the regime‘s claims of a successful nuclear weapons test over the weekend. from seoul, robin brant reports. after the north exploded a nuclear device below ground, the south responded with this. a series of missile launches above ground.
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the military said they hit their target in the east sea early on monday. it was designed to replicate an attack on north korea‘s nuclear testing site. across the border over the weekend, this was how north koreans heard about the "perfect success" that was their nation‘s sixth nuclear missile test. it was more powerful than any before and came with claims that kim jong—un now has the ability to order a nuclear strike on mainland america. a few hours later, in washington, having briefed the president, the us secretary of defence gave this very stark warning. any threat to the united states or its territories, including guam, or our allies, will be met with a massive military response, a response both effective and overwhelming. china has a crucial role to play in this. hosting a handful of world leaders at a summit, president xijinping urged restraint
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on all sides. the leaders of china and russia promised to deal appropriately with their rogue neighbour. the leader wants to focus on even tougher economic sanctions, as the united nations security council meets later. we will be speaking to somebody who is from north korea in the next couple of moments or so. there‘s a warning that policing in england and wales is facing a "perfect storm" because of rising crime and staff shortages. the president of the police superintendents‘ association, gavin thomas, will tell the group‘s annual conference today that the government should review funding and resources. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw reports. is the thin blue line becoming too thin? yes, says the police superintendents‘ association. it‘s the organisation which represents 1,000 middle—ranking officers,
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the men and women who make the key operational decisions. the superintendents are concerned that there are fewer police officers, working harder and working longer hours, in a more challenging environment. the man who leads the organisation believes that is a model of policing which is fundamentally flawed. i think it‘s the service of first resort, i think it‘s the service of last resort, for many people, understandably. and i think also, what i‘ve just described — i think we‘re also the service that is everything in between, as well. that puts a lot of pressure on police officers to try and meet that expectation from the public and i‘m not convinced it‘s a sustainable position, in the mid—to—long term. the superintendents‘ association conducted a survey of its members about work pressures. 72% of those who responded said they did not use all the annual leave they were entitled to. 50% of superintendents said they had signs of anxiety. and over a quarter, 27%, were experiencing symptoms
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of depression, linked to the demands of working in policing. the association is known for being the voice of moderation in policing, so its warnings are likely to be taken seriously. the home office says it is piloting a new national service to provide welfare support to police who need it. ministers have also been having discussions with police leaders, amid calls for extra police funding forforces. but no decisions have yet been taken. a rise in interest rates won‘t take place for more than a year and the squeeze in the cost of living may soon be easing. this is according to a bbc survey of 30 leading economists. sean has been speaking to one. good news? particularly the bit on the big squeeze we have talked about that for months because prices have been rising faster than wages, but
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the economists generally think they work for a lot of banks and do a lot of advising to businesses and to the government. what they say is important. they think that by the beginning of next year we should see wages rising faster than prices which is a good thing for anybody who haven‘t seen the rises and when it comes to interest rates they think that actually a lot of them, the most of these economists think there won‘t be a rise until 2019. so that would make it ten years of very, very low interest rates. if you are a saver you would be banging your head against a brick wall thinking when am i going to get a better return? anyone looking to a fixed term mortgage, first—time buyers will be thinking how long do i fix buyers will be thinking how long do ifix for? no rises until 2019 buyers will be thinking how long do i fix for? no rises until 2019 the economists think and hopefully the squeeze on wages will be lighter in the early part of next year. thank you very much, sean. the thing iadmire about thank you very much, sean. the thing i admire about you more than anything else is your ability to
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sneeze more than anything else! she had four orfive sneeze more than anything else! she had four or five and managed to hold them all in! i thought you were laughing at my story! not even a whisper. incredible. you will have to teach me how to do that later. figures from last year show more than a50 relatives of organ donors declined permission to donate because they were unsure of their relatives‘ wishes. nhs blood and transplant says donors should ensure they have told their families what they want. last year a57 people died while on the active transplant waiting list. a state of emergency has been declared in los angeles as the city battles the worst wildfires in its history. hundreds of homes have been evacuated. the fires, covering about 5,000 acres, started on friday, and have sent plumes of smoke over the city. the landmark queensferry crossing will be officially opened
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by the queen and the duke of edinburgh later this morning. the ceremony at 11 o‘clock will include an address by nicola sturgeon. catriona renton is at the crossing for us now. it has been quite a build up to this, leant it? it certainly has. this is the next landmark in this bridge‘s short history so far. now, you will see the finishing touches are being made. it is very quiet at the moment, but don‘t let that fool you. when the queen arrives she will be greeted by the first minister, nicola sturgeon, the bridge will be blessed by the moderator of the general assembly of the church of scotla nd general assembly of the church of scotland and then the royal party will cut the ribband and make their way across the bridge. there have been a number of events so far to mark the opening of this bridge. not least at the weekend when 50,000 people selected from a ballot were allowed to walks across. that‘s the
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only time that will ever happen and that‘s because this will be a motorway. let me say to you that it is really important and fitting that today has been choosing, ath september because on ath september 196a the september because on ath september 1964 the queen opened the forth road bridge. that was a bridge for the 20th century. it sits alongside the railway crossing and here we have it, the bridge for the 21st century and beyond. thank you very much. i thought sarah was going to give us the weather, but that‘s in five minutes. months of escalating rhetoric between north korea and the united states culminated in claims of a successful nuclear weapons test by pyongyang over the weekend. news of the test was announced on the state‘s tv channel yesterday morning. translation: the test of a hydrogen
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bomb was a perfect success. it was a very meaningful step in completing the national nuclear weapons programme. that was the official announcement on state television. the south korean government said there are signs there could be more missile tests by the north. let‘s speak to our correspondent robin brant, who‘s in seoul. what‘s the latest there this morning? officials saying they have seen evidence of possible preparations for another round of a launch of north korea‘s intercontinental ballistic missiles. if it is the case this will be a repetition of what we saw a few days ago. it would
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be highly provocative, of course and it would come if there were to be any kind of launch just off the back of the country‘s sixth test of its nuclear weapon that we saw just some 2a hours ago. it is interesting the response in south korea has been from the country‘s military. we have seen a live fire drill take place where the air force and the army simulated an attack by targeted an area of the sea that they say was meant to replicate an attack on that nuclear test site in the north. robin, thank you very much. let‘s talk to jihyun park who grew up in north korea and now lives in the uk. she decided to flee north korea when her brother was beaten to almost death for leaving the army. she fled to china before eventually moving here in 2008 with herfamily. good morning. thank you very much for coming back on the programme.
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how will the news be reflected in north korea today? will people be hearing what the reaction is? there is one channel tv and one newspaper and one channel radio. at the start of the early 1990s we do not watch the tv and the newspaper not allowed and we can‘t listen to the radio. now days many people don‘t know what is happening outside the country. how much knowledge, when you were living there, did you have about outside countries, about the united states, about great britain for example? we learned about the united states, it was a hate country including south korea and i never learned about the united kingdom,
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just only england. the man is wearing the hat and the woman is wearing the hat and the woman is wearing the hat and the woman is wearing the dress, the gentlemen and ladies, but when i arrived in the uk ididn‘tfind ladies, but when i arrived in the uk i didn‘t find any gentlemen... ladies, but when i arrived in the uk i didn't find any gentlemen... very different to what you were taught. things have changed a bit. you have still got family back in north korea, is that right? do you ever think you will see them again? do you have any correspondence with those members of your family or friends from back home? no, i separated from my brother in the 19905 separated from my brother in the 1990s so after six years after i also repatriate to north korea and i asked many people about my brother, but nobody knows about my brother. so my brother has it is appeared. sorry to hear that. do you think
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that people who are living in north korea now, how will they feel about the escalating tension? will they be concerned about what is happening outside the country? do you think it is, we‘re doing the right thing and we will be victorious? 0nce once a week we talk about nuclear weapons. i believe that north korea isa weapons. i believe that north korea is a strong country, but in the late 19905, is a strong country, but in the late 1990s, there was famine, many people escaped north korea and went to thailand, and so they are different countries, this is not like the 19805. there are 30,000 people
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living outside of north korea, who are contacting family in north korea. people are changing their minds about the north korea system, but they know it is still dangerous. there are systems so they cannot speak out. how concerned are you by what is going on, and do you think the north koreans, the regime is considering war, and firing nuclear missiles? a few weeks ago, north korea said that they would be launching missiles, and then they did exactly that. many people are worried about this. the american arming our lives in south korea, so... —— the american
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army now lives in south korea. really interesting insight, often we speak to people who have never been to north korea, the report to us from seoul, people talking about what they think may be happening inside the country, so thank you for telling us so much about what it is like to live there and what people may be going through. sarah is here right on time! a lot of cloud to start the day, some drizzle, mild out there, due mid—late on today. here is a scene from one of our weather watchers, hornsea, in the east riding, similar pictures up and down the country, low cloud, bringing missed and hill
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fog, the cheekily around coastal hills in the west, this warm front thatis hills in the west, this warm front that is the culprit, bringing low cloud and murky field to the weather, heavy rain as it moves east, and today, we have the remnants of that cloud and outbreaks of grisly rain. more persistent rain for northern ireland and for scotland. much of england and wales will have quite a lot of dry weather but there will be a few showers coming. sunshine returning for enniskillen, londonderry as well, and some sunshine towards the north we st of and some sunshine towards the north west of scotland. elsewhere for scotland and northern ireland, a lot of cloud bringing outbreaks of rain on the frontal system, low cloud means hill fog and drizzle, too, mild for this time of year. in the sunnier spots, 22, 20 three degrees. feeling quite warm. also the chance of catching a few showers, particularly across parts of wales and down towards the south—west of england. relatively light wind,
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relatively warm, some outbreaks of drizzle and shower room rain. sunny spells through parts of central and southern england, brightening up towards the london region. a chance ofa towards the london region. a chance of a few showers through the afternoon. into the evening, rain pepping up, afternoon. into the evening, rain pepping up, particularly in parts of northern england, scotland, northern ireland, wales as well. overnight, that will bring outbreaks of rain. towards the south—east of the frontal system, drier tonight, mild and murky. clearer conditions eventually working into the far north—west of the country. through the day, we have still got this frontal system lingering around. that will bring outbreaks of rain, cloudy conditions through the day, but it will be an improving sort of day. rain for northern ireland, scotland, england and wales, but these in the way towards the east. eastern england staying cloudy. for scotland, northern ireland, down towards wales and the south—west, a
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return to brightness tomorrow. temperatures not quite as warm as today, still 16 to 21 degrees, feeling quite pleasant where we do see the sunshine coming through. after a mild see the sunshine coming through. aftera mild and see the sunshine coming through. after a mild and humid feel to the weather, turning fresh, by wednesday, cooler conditions, with a mix of sunshine and showers, and in the true autumnal style, the weather is going downhill to end the week and we will see some wet and windy weather, returning back to you both. autumnal, cannot believe you have mentioned it. there we have, the a—bomb... (!) mentioned it. there we have, the a-bomb... (!) laughter dresses with dinosaurs and a tutus labelled for "girls and boys" — gender neutral clothing is a subject we‘re hearing more and more about. now it‘s emerged john lewis is getting rid of gender specific sections in its stores. we went to find out what some children what they think about girls and boys clothes. boys and girls can wear the same
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things. and they could ride the same things. and they could ride the same things as well. like a boy could wear pink and a girl could wear blue. like me. he can wear pink and carry it off, i like blue, i am not saying there should be certain colours or anything, that should be discouraged, whatever you feel comfortable wearing, that should be it. to me, unisex is a bit bland. comfortable wearing, that should be it. to me, unisex is a bit blandm would be good if t—shirts that have pirates and stuff like that were for girls also. would be nice to see a girls also. would be nice to see a girls t—shirt that is pink that says, adventurer, more active, this, that and the other, does not need to be tied to a colour or style. william likes stuff like cars and dinosaurs and! william likes stuff like cars and dinosaurs and i don't like stuff like that. cheryl rickman is co—founder of
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campaign group let clothes be clothes. she joins us from central london. thanks for joining clothes. she joins us from central london. thanks forjoining us, i don‘t want to be overly negative but for many it seems that this is adult putting their politically correct attitude onto children, many of whom do not care. it is not politically correct to want the best for your child, this isjust about removing labels, not about removing gender but removing labels, instead of saying, this is for boys, this is for girls saying, this is for boys, this is forgirls and saying, this is for boys, this is for girls and you will fit into these boxes, it is actually saying, this is for girls and boys, which is whatjohn lewis are putting on labels. it is giving them more choice. you are right, my child does not care, she will buy things from the boys while, but there is lots of children who do care, and have stopped buying the things they like
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because they have been told that is not for you. the knock—on effect can be very negative, some of the girls are showing lower self—esteem and boys are showing lower emotional intelligence. i think that has kind of started from this gender stereotyping in clothing and toys.|j can understand that, as some people we re can understand that, as some people were mentioning before we came to you, there is a difference between, you, there is a difference between, you know, being annoyed at the pink t—shirt that says, i am a princess, and a blue t—shirt that says, i want to bea and a blue t—shirt that says, i want to be a builder, and the step from that to unisex clothing. you can understand, i‘m sure, many people saying, why are you ignoring biological differences between boys and girls when it comes to clothing. there are biological differences between boys and girls, but gender is basically the social constructs that we read them and say, girls are meant to be pretty and passive and
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pink and boys are meant to be tough and here comes trouble and so on. and so i think that is being put in thing, we are trying to enable clothing to be sold without putting them into boxes. gender neutral, the problem is, people think it is beige, but it is not, it is hoping it up to the whole spectrum of colour. —— opening it up. so if you area colour. —— opening it up. so if you are a boy or girl, go to thejump a while, swap the entire spectrum, you are removing, this is for boys, this is forgirls, are removing, this is for boys, this is for girls, from the equation, thatis is for girls, from the equation, that is all that it is, it is not flooding the aisles with the colour beige, it is about colour and letting girls have pirates tops. vice versa. you choose, you be yourself, let kids be kids, let clothes be close. some of the comments coming in. blender, both my girls prefer the colour blue, the old est girls prefer the colour blue, the oldest especially would not pay pink if you paid her. well donejohn
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lewis, says kate, company making modern changes. there is nothing to stop kids being dressed however they like. years ago, boys were dressed in pink, fashion changes. ridiculous, ourjohn lewis going to eliminate men‘s and women‘s. —— are. jim says, this is a gimmick, there are gender differences, removing tags will not alter that at all. what is your reaction to some of those comments? i think thatjust shows... good to hear there is lots of support, and thejohn lewis website, for example has got lots of support there, but i think that the key thing there is we do not... we do not want to... it is not about... the last comment, it is not about removing gender. yes, there are differences between boys and girls, actually very small, they found out, in their brains, and the differences
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tend to be from the experiences they have and the messages they say. we are not getting rid of gender, we are not getting rid of gender, we are only getting rid of labels to enable them to be all that they are. so that they can choose from the wide spectrum of toys and clothes, and be proud to be all that they are rather than put into these categories, which can be damaging. it isa categories, which can be damaging. it is a very good step forward and hopefully other retailers will take on the bat on and run with it. because it is a very positive step and very important to communicate it is not about getting rid of gender, it is about taking it out of the equation, to give choice. —— baton. thank you very much for your time, we would love to know what you think about that, get in touch. and thank you for getting in touch about our series on coastal britain, we are on weston—super—mare seafront, we will be finding out what it takes to make coastal britain great again. good morning.
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it is an autumnal feel this morning. lots of cloud around and misty, murky conditions and outbreaks of rain and drizzle today. as we go through today, it will stay cloudy. some outbreaks of rain particularly towards the north and the west. you can see where the rain is persistent across scotland and northern ireland. elsewhere, a little bit drier towards eastern areas as we go into this afternoon and there might be brighter skies developing as well. across the far north—west of scotla nd well. across the far north—west of scotland as the rain clears away to the east, there will be sunnier spells coming through here. but
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staying cloudy and misty and murky with outbreaks of rain. but in the north—west of northern ireland, some improvements. quite cloudy again for much of north—west england, wales and the south—west of england as well. a bit of coastal mist and mist and fog and some patchy rain and drizzle too. but i think for central and southern england, the midlands and southern england, the midlands and eastern and south—east england there will be a few holes developing in the cloud to give us brightness and it will feel warm and humid where you get the sunshine coming through as well. overnight tonight the area of rain continues to move further south. it is linked in with this cold front which is going to rea ctvate this cold front which is going to reactvate really or intensify as we go through tuesday morning. you can see that heavier rain as it starts to move its way further south and east ward into wales and northern areas of england. temperatures really for many overnight about 16, 17 celsius, but a little bit fresher further north and west. we start off on tuesday morning with a lot of rain around across particularly
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north—west england and across wales. that rain moves away to the east. it will become patchy as it spreads into the south east of england. there will be sunnier spells developing here, but more so towards scotla nd developing here, but more so towards scotland and northern ireland where maximum temperatures are 16 celsius to 18 celsius, 20 or 21 celsius across the south east. more available online. but that‘s it from me. bye—bye. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. rising north korea tensions following the nation‘s most powerful nuclear test to date and fears pyongyang may be preparing more missile launches. live from london, that‘s our top
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story on monday, ath september 2017. donald trump warns he could sever ties with the nation‘s trading partners in response to the missile threat. we will have all you need to know about that. also in the programme: counting the cost of hurricane harvey. as the deadly storm dents the us oil industry, we find out what it mean for the world‘s largest economy?
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