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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  September 4, 2017 9:00am-11:00am BST

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hello. it's monday, it's 9 o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to the programme. the united states says it is ready to use its nuclear capabilities to defend itself and its allies against threats from north korea. translation: the test of a hydrogen bomb designed to be mounted on or intercontinental ballistic missile was a success. intercontinental ballistic missile was a success. any threat to our territories, or our allies will be met with a military response. there are signs this morning that north korea is preparing for more ballistic missile launches in wake of that nuclear test. we'll bring you reaction throughout the programme. the murky world of illegal facebook raffles. she took money for a raffle and didn't put my numbers on its
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raffle a nd and didn't put my numbers on its raffle and when it was queried then they started with the nastiness. the page wasn't there anymore and i tried to inbox the girl and she blocked me. we've discovered that a gun, a monkey and a pregnant spaniel are amongst the prizes offered. watch our exclusive investigation in around 15 minutes time. we will talk to the model fired after saying that all white people benefit from racism. hello and welcome to the programme. we're live until iiam. we will bring you the latest breaking news and developing stories. get in touch in the usual ways. i would love to know your advice for coleen rooney this morning — she's reportedly having crisis talks with him after his drink—driving arrest when he was in a car with another woman. what would you do if you were her? perhaps you've been
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in that situation. use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. president trump has warned the united states is ready to use its nuclear capabilities in defending itself, and its allies, against north korea. his comments come as the united nations prepares for an emergency session to discuss the regime's claims of a successful nuclear weapons test over the weekend. from seoul, robin brant reports. south korea staged a live fire missile exercise. the military said it was designed to show the south's capability. from seoul, robin brant reports. after the north exploded a nuclear device below ground, the south responded with this. a series of missile launches above ground. the military said they hit their target in the east sea early on monday. it was designed to replicate an attack on north korea's nuclear testing site.
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across the border over the weekend, this was how north koreans heard about the "perfect success" that was their nation's sixth nuclear missile test. it was more powerful than any before and came with claims that kim jong—un now has the ability to order a nuclear strike on mainland america. a few hours later, in washington, having briefed the president, the us secretary of defence gave this very stark warning. any threat to the united states or its territories including guam or our allies will be met with a massive military response, a response both effective and overwhelming. china has a crucial role to play in this. hosting a handful of world leaders at a summit, president xijinping urged restraint on all sides. the leaders of china and russia promised to deal appropriately with their rogue neighbour.
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this was a show of strength from south korea as dawn broke this morning. its leader wants to focus on even tougher economic sanctions, as the united nations security council meets later. let's talk to our correspondent who is in seoul. things are moving. what's the latest? well, south korea spy what's the latest? well, south korea spy agencies are saying if north korea is preparing for another ballistic missile launch which could be launched towards the northern pacific. so that's what the spy agencies are saying today. the fact that north korea who conduct more missile launches that's not new. on tuesday when they fired a rocket from near pyongyang which flew over japan, that was an intermediate range rocket they had already said that their leader kim jong—un ordered more missile drills that should be targeted at the pacific.
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so, you know, it is quite likely that we will see more missile launches. of course, nobody can say when that will happen. it will be significant though if it is another intercontinental missile. the last time they fired these, there were two tests in july time they fired these, there were two tests injuly and many experts believed they had acquired the capability of launching rockets that could strike the us mainland. thank you. we will bring you more on north korea throughout the programme. rebecca jones is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. good morning. a rise in interest rates won't take place for more than a year according to a bbc survey of 30 leading economists. most are also predicting that pay rises will continue to fall behind inflation until the spring of next year, continuing the renewed squeeze on the average earner‘s living standards. there's a warning that policing in england and wales is facing a "perfect storm" because of rising crime and staff shortages. the president of the police
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superintendents' association, gavin thomas, will tell the group's annual conference today, that the government should review funding and resources. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw reports. is the thin blue line becoming too thin? yes, says the police superintendents' association. it's the organisation which represents 1,000 middle—ranking officers, the men and women who make the key operational decisions. the superintendents are concerned that there are fewer police officers, working harder and working longer hours, in a more challenging environment. the man who leads the organisation believes that's a model of policing which is fundamentally flawed. i think it's the service of first resort. i think it's the service of last resort, for many people, understandably. and i think also, what i've just described — i think we're also the service that is everything in between, as well. that puts a lot of pressure on police officers to try and meet that expectation from the public
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and i'm not convinced it's a sustainable position, in the mid—to—long term. the superintendents' association conducted a survey of its members about work pressures. 72% of those who responded said they did not use all the annual leave they were entitled to. 50% of superintendents said they had signs of anxiety. and over a quarter, 27%, were experiencing symptoms of depression, linked to the demands of working in policing. the association is known for being the voice of moderation in policing, so its warnings are likely to be taken seriously. the home office says it's piloting a new national service to provide welfare support to police who need it. ministers have also been having discussions with police leaders, amid calls for extra police funding forforces. but no decisions have yet been taken. the uk's coastal communities are among the country's worst off for earnings,
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employment, health and education the social market foundation has told the bbc that the economic gap between coastal and non—coastal places has grown. average wages are nearly £4,000 a year lower in these so—called "pockets of deprivation". meanwhile, the minister for coastal communities has announced £40 million in funding to help coastal areas. the gambling commission has told this programme that the number of complaints about raffles taking place on social media has increased hugely in recent years. in the last two years they've had 417, compared to 129 for the previous two. people who've played the games say there are potentially hundreds of illegal draws held on facebook every day and they say they're dangerous and addictive. we will show you our special report on this later on the programme. a disturbance at birmingham prison
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which lasted for seven hours has ended. inmates refused to return to their cells yesterday afternoon and specialist staff had to be called in. the jail is privately run by g4s and was the scene of a large scale disorder in december last year which resulted in around 240 prisoners being moved out of the facility. workers at two mcdonald's restaurant will walk—out today in the first strike to affect the company. about 40 staff are demanding higher pay and more secure working hours. mcdonald's said the dispute related to internal grievance procedures and those involved represented 100th of 196 those involved represented 100th of 1% of its uk workforce. a state of emergency has been declared in los angeles as the city battles the worst wildfires in its history. hundreds of homes have been evacuated. the fires, covering about 5,000 acres, started on friday, and have sent plumes of smoke over the city. talks resume today on trying
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to bring back northern ireland's power—sharing government. the northern ireland secretary, james brokenshire, will hold separate meetings with the five main stormont parties. they will discuss the prospects for restoring devolved government, which collapsed injanuary. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30am. thank you for your comments on the dodgy raffles on facebook. lucy says it is not just dodgy raffles on facebook. lucy says it is notjust the raffle scams it is the pretend free give awas and the farming of data which puts users of suckers lists. the only way to eliminate is by alerting people that it is real. another viewer says "it
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is only when someone posted that it was illegal and i researched and found it was. "i took to warning people myself that they were illegal and got removed from many sites, but i hope i warned enough people before they got into serious money troubles." our they got into serious money troubles. " our investigation they got into serious money troubles." our investigation is coming up in about four minutes time. stay tuned for that. use the hashtag victoria live if you have been involved in one of the illegal raffles, what were the consequences and what did you do about it? you can e—mail me or message me on twitter. lewis hamilton is on top of the formula one standings for the first time this year? yes. that's right. he won the italian grand prix yesterday and that means he takes the outright lead for the very first time this sees on. he is now three points ahead of his nearest rival
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who is sebastian vettel. vettel finished in third place yesterday. it was hamilton started from pole position from the 6th time in his career, 6th time makes him the most successful formula one driver in terms of actually being on pole position. so he has overtaken michael shoemaker. it was his 59th career grand prix victory. we will hear from career grand prix victory. we will hearfrom hamilton career grand prix victory. we will hear from hamilton in career grand prix victory. we will hearfrom hamilton in a moment. ferrari fans in italy like ferrari driver to win, so whoever doesn't come from the ferrari team gets booing and you can hear a bit of it. here is lewis hamilton speaking afterwards. snoot car was fantastic and really a dream to drive. a big thank you to the fans who came out today. you know, i look forward to coming back here next year. i couldn't hear any booing. sorry to let you down there, sorry. tennis,
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us open and the women's draw is wide open? the women's draw last night we had one player who was attacked eight months ago in her own home. attacked by an intruder who came in and severed the tendons on her left—hand which is her racket holding hand. so she hasn't been able to play for a long time, but this is her grand slam where she has gone as far as the quarterfinals because she has beaten the wimbledon champion. so an impressive victory for kvitova. she said she doesn't feel any sensation in that left—hand. she will be playing venus williams in the next round. we have got maria sharapova who went out of the tournament overnight. she was playing in her first the tournament overnight. she was playing in herfirst grand slam since returning from a 15 month
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doping ban. the latvian played an impressive game and really managed to hold on to herfinal set to make sure that she beat sharapova who has been outspoken about the fact that she has been put on show courts all the time she is playing at the grand slam in new york. she was given a wild card into the main draw. some of the other players not happy, but she was happy with her performance having got through to the fourth round, but beaten last night. here is sharapova. there are a lot of positives playing four matches, playing in front of a big crowd and fans and just competing, you know, being in that competitive environment. it is what i miss. you can't replicate that anywhere. and especially at a grand slam. sharapova talking about her grand slam run at the us open. i want to finish by showing you some nice
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pictures. you may remember that neymar went in the transfer window to p56. neymar went in the transfer window to psg. here is him doing keepy uppies. they go all the way round the pitch. getting more and more elaborate, but they are on an international break and brazil about to play columbia. that was an impressive way to get around a pitch and do some warming up before a match. certainly worth £200 million obviously. he can do that! a shot ashot gun, a shot gun, a monkey, a pregnant spaniel, all among the prizes offered in illegal raffles held on facebook last year. the gambling commission has exclusively told this programme that numbers of complaints about drawers and tombolas taking
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place on social media have more than tripled since 2013, with potentially hundreds of illegal raffles held on facebook every single day. those who used them say that they are dangerous and addictive. everyone can picture how a raffle works but what we have investigated is a long way from your village fete. it's all very british. buy a ticket, help a charity, win a prize. but we've entered a murky online world where the language is anything but traditional. some of the language, i'm telling you, it is worse than any army base you will ever see. she's calling us... i don't like this word. effing cs. where gambling problems are rife. people have played their last £50 or £60 on one raffle. and here, like your village fete, what you see isn't necessarily what you get.
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it makes me so angry. they keep changing their names and facebook lets them do it. maggie hughes is disabled but she is well connected online and her friends invited her to join raffle groups on facebook. they don't even ask you to add you to the group. and how many have you been added to? twenty five to 30. it is absolutely ridiculous, it really is. it's so easy to make up a raffle group page. anyone can set up a raffle group. you invite your contacts to join and play the games and sell tickets using paypal or a bank transfer. and from there, it works pretty much like a normal tombola. you pick a ticket. at the end, the winner gets a prize. or do they? it's not as transparent as this online. maggie hughes became
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suspicious of one woman who runs a raffle group. i played her raffle games. i played her tombola. and i have not received any prizes from her at all. so i'm out of pocket between £40 and £50. it's not your life savings but tell me what sort of impact it has on you. well, it is a lot of money to us. me and my husband are disabled. i'm physically disabled. and my husband's got dementia, so you know, it's not very good. it's very hard. itjust upsets me and makes me angry that this girl is getting away with it. maggie says this is the woman she dealt with, lauren brattle, also known as demetria bell.
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she's got about eight or nine different names on facebook. her name's one of many to crop up on a facebook group raising awareness of possible scams. it's moderated by liz hodgson, who deals with problem raffles run all over the country. how much of thing is this? it's huge. it is so big at the moment. everybody‘s creating their own groups. there are daily posts in the tens of people having issues and problems with admin on these raffle groups or the people running the raffles are not drawing them correctly, they are not receiving their prizes. plenty of people on liz's group were only too keen to tell us their stories. there was a woman on the page yesterday who walked away with £400 of other people's money, i think. shejust did a runner? yes, she was boasting
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she was taking her kids on holiday. there's so many nasty, selfish, greedy, money hungry idiots. ijust didn't realise how rotten the world was. you are a victim of a scam as well. what actually happened ? i've been scammed twice, i have, by two different people. the first one it was only a couple of quid but the point being she took money for a raffle and then didn't put my numbers on the raffle and when she was queried, then she started to turn nasty. would get really nasty, the things people say. i tell you, women are the worst. women are the worst. coming from a woman, women are nasty. karen evans says she was ripped off by someone else. i played a page and i paid for the raffles and all of a sudden the page wasn't there any more. i tried to inbox a girl and she had blocked me. ten pounds here, £10 there, it is not a huge amount of money for one individual, but do you think this
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is widespread and they are making a lot of money from it? definitely. there was a page i was watching a few weeks ago. she said she would do one to 100 for £10 and she was sending prizes out of £60 or £70, so she was making £3 or e4 on every single raffle. for me that made a full—time week's wage and one—day. but is it legal in the first place? raffles and tombola that events like this are totally fine. on facebook, it is a different matter. if you look at the facebook terms and conditions, it is against their terms. i suppose it is impossible with the amount of raffle pages and raffle groups that are springing up daily, how do you police that? who should be cracking down on this? i would say the gambling commission, because they are the ones that say you're supposed to have a license to do gambling. a raffle on whatever page, whether it be facebook or anywhere, if you haven't got any backing
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from the gambling commission, then you are not legal and above board, are you? the gambling commission told us complaints about social media raffles have been massively on the rise in recent years. there were 165 last year. the prizes on offer included a shotgun, a monkey, and a pregnant spaniel. facebook says it shuts down illegal raffle pages as soon as they are reported. but there is another problem. so many daily opportunities to gamble. if you are on 50 groups, you could get addicted. you could spend all day doing this, if you wanted to. i was addicted to them. i was 011 six or seven groups at one time. i spent, like, £5 one day. five pounds or e6. that is a lot of money to me. i would absolutely say people
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are becoming addicted. we are getting posts on the scammers group where people have paid their last £50 or £60 on one raffle and they have got children and they are spending their children's money on the raffles. of course there is another reason why somebody might want to hold a raffle on facebook, just like many of the stalls here, to raise money for charity. the rules there are very clear. if you say you are fundraising for a specific charity, then you are legally obliged to give the money to it but you don't need a licence. lauren... the one with all the facebook profiles said her raffles raise money for the sick children's trust. i found she's made about £1600 for this charity. and it's absolutely disgusting that this charity has not received a penny from this girl.
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the sick children's trust confirmed lauren has not given them any money. there are investigating a complaint. we've tried contacting lauren through what we are told is her latest facebook profile, demetria belle. she said she didn't know what we were talking about and she doesn't even know lauren brattle. the thing is, there is more than a passing resemblance. this is lauren's profile picture. this is demetria's. and demetria even boasted on social media that she has legally changed her name from lauren brattle. lauren later got back to us. she said all the allegations against her are false and she hasn't done anything wrong.
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online raffles if unlicensed are often illegal and they are leading to many complaints. but with so many groups popping up daily, the question is how on earth to stop them. studio: we contacted lauren brattle — the woman mentioned in ourfilm. she says our allegations are ‘untrue' and she's done nothing wrong. we asked her if she held a gambling licence but she didn't reply to that question. as for raffles held by other people — we asked facebook how they are dealing with the issue — they told us their global team of reviewers provide 24/7 cover around the world to ensure we can respond to reports as quickly as possible. get in touch with your own experiences. 2011, three reports of them during
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that year, the last two years, more than 300, so this is something increasing as social media becomes more and more popular. explain the rules of when a raffle on facebook, for example, or somewhere like that, is legal or illegal. there is clear specifics, if it is something you pay to enter, if it is a game of chance rather than luck, it should be licensed, whether that is online oi’ be licensed, whether that is online or not. what you are seeing on facebook and other social media platforms, it is not being licensed either by us, the gambling commission, or by local authorities. ifi commission, or by local authorities. if i wanted to run a raffle, i ought to apply to you for a licence. if they are not licensed, they are illegal, plain and simple. people still doing it without a licence,
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many hundreds, how do you clamp down? it is a challenge, it is like playing whack—a—mole, that is the nature of social media. the raffles notified to us, we have closed over 99% of those either by contacting the people in concerned and explaining the rules, and sometimes we find that people are simply unaware that they have to be licensed, or having very strong working relationships with people like facebook and payment providers like facebook and payment providers like paypal, they are able to shut off the flow of money to some of these raffles. is it a reasonable assumption that if the prize is a shot gun... a donkey... a rare chicken... a sex toy... a pregnant spring spaniel... should we presume it is illegal? it should raise alarm bells! some of these are clearly scams, no prize, pay your money, you will never win anything. we need to raise awareness s0 will never win anything. we need to raise awareness so that people do not get conned. are not sure if
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people realise, if you hose one of these raffles, it could be classed as income. —— if you hold one of these raffles. that could affect your benefits and tax. allsorts of legal invocations, in the worst situations, people carrying out these raffles, not licensed, they may well face criminal prosecution. if you employ more people, you could close down more. yes, thousands of people on thousands of computers for thousands of hours but we would still not be able to shut them all down, what is key is that we are working together with the public, with people like your viewers and those we have heard from today, to raise awareness. if people are on facebook and other social media, if they see these lotteries, they can make sure they are licensed, they will know whether they are scams. how do they check? go on to the website, the gambling commission,
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look at whether we have licensed them. check with local councils who also licence them, or, ask the people running them, more often than not, if they are legitimate, they will have licence details upfront. if people have any concerns at all, if they see something that does not look or feel right, don't worry whether they do not know if it is legal or not, contact us, so we can shut it down if necessary. final word on those that fall into addiction, what do you do to help those people? this is really important, research shows that in great britain there is over 2 million people who are either problem gamblers or at risk of becoming problem gamblers. it is something the gambling industry need to ta ke something the gambling industry need to take really seriously. do you think they do? there is need more they need to do, the fact there is too many people in that position shows that they are a long way from solving this. we put clear rules in place but these are legal raffles, they would not have any of those
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protections in place, no age verification, no protection to identify people becoming addicted. that is a big risk for the public from these illegal raffles, that is why we want to shut down these raffles a nd why we want to shut down these raffles and raise awareness. thank you very much forjoining us. coming up: we will meet a 27—year—old woman who has been told she will develop early—onset alzheimer's, her father was diagnosed with it at 42, we will talk to her later. and, after 10:30am, we will talk live to a model who was sacked by l'oreal, after her comments about white people and racism. if you have a question for her, get in touch. here is rebecca with a summary of the news. president trump has warned the united states is ready to use its nuclear capabilities in defending itself, and its allies,
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against north korea. his comments come as the united nations prepares for an emergency session to discuss the regime's claims of a successful nuclear weapons test over the weekend. south korea has responded to pyongyang's nuclear test by staging a live—fire missile exercise. a rise in interest rates won't take place for more than a year according to a bbc survey of thirty leading economists. most are also predicting that pay rises will continue to fall behind inflation until the spring of next year, continuing the renewed squeeze on the average earner‘s living standards. workers at two mcdonald's restaurants will walk out today in the first strike to affect the company in britain. about 40 staff in cambridge and south—east london, are demanding higher pay and more secure working hours. mcdonald's says the dispute relates to internal grievance procedures, and those involved represent just one hundredth of 1% of its uk workforce.
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scientists developed a camera that can see through the human body. the device has been designed to help doctors track medical tools during internal examinations. until now, medics have had to rely on expensive scans to trace their progress. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10am. back to victoria. here's some sport now with karthi. lewis hamilton says it is an empsowering feeling to finally be the outright leader at the top of formula one's world championship standings for the first time this season. hamilton won the italian grand prix to move three points clear of his rival sebastain vettel. maria sharapova has been knocked out of tennis' us open. she was beaten in the fourth round by anastasia sevastova in three sets. it's sharapova's first grand slam since returning from a drugs ban. petra kvitova is through to the quarter—finals after betaing garbina muguruza. britain's chris froome has
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increased his overall lead at the vuelta a espana to one minute and one second after stage 15 of the race. jordan henderson will captain neglnad for tongiht‘s world cup qualifier against slvakia. a win will leave them on the cusp of qualifying for next year's world cup. northern ireland and scotland play later tonight. north korea has raised the stakes again and the rest of the world is wondering what to do about it. this time it seems to have been a hydrogen bomb that's been tested, massively more powerful than the atomic bombs they've tested in the past and it can fit a long range missile. there are signs this morning that the secretive state is planning yet more ballistic missile tests. the united nations security council is holding an emergency meeting today and america is warning that any threat to the us or its allies by north korea will be met with a "massive military response". so what do we know about the latest nuclear test? in response overnight south korea has conducted a missile drill simulating an attack on the north korean nuclear site. the live fire exercise off the east
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coast saw rockets launched from fighterjets and missiles from the ground. north korea has repeatedly defied un sanctions and international pressure by developing nuclear weapons and testing missiles. in the past couple months it has conducted intercontinental ballistic missile tests, sending one over mainland japan into the pacific ocean. it has also threatened to send missiles towards the us pacific territory of guam. let's talk now to kenomm. he did military service in the north korean army for 10 years but also escaped and now lives in south korea duyeon kim, is a nuclear security expert in the south korean capital seoul. pastor makr burns,
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an african—american pastor and trump surrogate. and geoffrey clifton—brown mp. this is something much more powerful. can you hear me? yes, i can hear you. tell us why this test of north korea is more worrying and potentially dangerous? yes, of course, this is really dangerous for south korea and the united states, but i think, what i feel is that it's not a surprise. excuse me, can
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you hear me? we can hear you loud and clear. yes, you were telling us it wasn't a surprise for you. tell us it wasn't a surprise for you. tell us why. because the regime is always talking about a military option and nuclear tests. they don't have much money, this is a regime who think about, this is really an option to protect the north korean regime. let me bring in a nuclear security expert talking to us from seoul. how do you assess this latest test? thank you for having me on the show. i would agree with ken that this is not surprising. we have been expecting the north to conduct it's sixth nuclear test. we should expect them to conduct more going forward
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because they have a technological objective which is to miniaturise, make a nuclear warhead small enough so make a nuclear warhead small enough so it can mount it on a missile. so in orderto do so it can mount it on a missile. so in order to do that they have to keep testing. the same goes for missiles. they have to keep testing missiles. they have to keep testing missiles in order to perfect this technology and the reason why this is not surprising is because the north has announced, they don't make ita north has announced, they don't make it a secret. their plans are not secret. for example kim jong—un earlier this year during his new year's address said the country will test an icbm. they did it. they did it twice. so in that sense, they don't make their goals, their nuclear missile goals a secret at all. they follow through now. whether we believe their proclaimed announcements like the one yesterday after their nuclear test, whether we believe that, it really was a success or believe that, it really was a success or how big or powerful it was, that needs to be up for
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independent verification, but eventually the north is showing us and telling us where it wants to go. so, we do have clues and hints as to what the north's next milestone is. what do you say that is? well their ultimate goal that they have also is not a secret is they want to be able to mount a nuclear warhead on a missile and have an operational and a reliable missile whether it is an icbm, of course an icbm to reach the us homeland, but also short range missiles that can also, that are targeted at south korea and mid—range missile targeted at japan also mounted with, tipped with nuclear devices and now it isjust also mounted with, tipped with nuclear devices and now it is just a matter of time until they complete their objectives and with every single nuclear missile test the north achieves multiple objectives at once. so again as i mentioned
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technological objective, but there isa technological objective, but there is a political objective. they send a message to the outside world about their announcements and about their achievements, but they are telling their domestic constituents that this is how much more powerful they have gotten. let me bring in pastor mark burns who is a donald trump supporter and travelled with him during donald trump's presidential campaign. you have just during donald trump's presidential campaign. you havejust heard it being said it is a matter of time before they achieve what they want to achieve. is donald trump going to let them achieve that? well, let's be clear. i have spent many hours and days and weeks with the president of the united states of america. having spent countless hours with him, i can tell you and north korea really needs to know this — that the president of the united states, donald j this — that the president of the united states, donaldj trump is man of his word and it is very true that
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north korea truly heed the warnings of our second of defence especially as the president had the conversation with the japanese prime minister that he can rid lie on the support of america with japan and reminding north korea with the prime minister of reminding north korea with the prime ministerofjapan reminding north korea with the prime minister of japan that america reminding north korea with the prime minister ofjapan that america will use minister ofjapan that america will use the full might the united states military to make sure that we protect our allies. we protect our territories. we protect our us interests. so it is important that they know the president is not playing politics when it comes to the safety and the defence of the united states of america and our interests. let me bring in a british politician, geoffrey clifton—brown, do you think that's right about donald trump? what we have got to try and avoid is ratcheting up this whole thing. we need diplomacy here and really what we need is donald
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trump to get together with president xi and say we have got to sort this out because a military option would be disastrous from what kim has said. missiles from north korea to seoul, 26 miles away, a million strong army seoul, 26 miles away, a million strong army over seoul, 26 miles away, a million strong army over the border there, a military option would be disastrous and it is a very much the last resort. so, china is the key to this. yes. you will see donald trump's tweets saying china is trying, but seems to be failing. well, i think the chinese could put more pressure on. i don't know why they're not. they could, if they enforce the un sanctions properly, if they stopped foreign workers working in china for example so they didn't get foreign currency, if they cut off the fuel this would put a lot of pressure on the north korean regime. they don't want to do that because they don't want to provoke a refugee crisis? they don't want the regime in north korea to fall because they don't want a united
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korea. it is that simple, but on the other hand, the world can't be faced with another whole raft of thuke collar devices because nuclear proliferation would extend to south korea, japan, saudi arabia, iran, goodness knows who else would want to get proper thermal nuclear technology. we are at the point of great dangerfor the technology. we are at the point of great danger for the world at the moment. do you think there will be military intervention from the us? well, it is incumbent on the us and donald trump and president xi. i can't believe that president xi of china would want a thermonuclear power on its doorstep particularly an unpredictable one run by someone like kim jong—un. they will want to step in and i think the sooner they step in and i think the sooner they step in and i think the sooner they step in the better. do you think there will be military action?m has got to be on the cards at the moment. let's hope and pray that doesn't happen. pastor mark burns do you think throl be millingtry action? well, the president made it
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very clear that all options are on the table. that includes a military action. again, it would be very bad for north korea to again, these are threats against the free world and again as president trump has made it clear, wanting china to put more pressure. we want president xi to put more pressure, but at the end of the day america is going to protect america's interests and general mat tis along with president trump made it clear that all options are on the table and that will include military action if north korea don't get in check. a diplomatic initiative between president trump and the president of china, to sort this thing, do you ee, china, to sort this thing, do you agree, that would be a much better option than a nuclear option? absolutely, absolutely, again, the ultimate goal is that they will be pleased with that will stop i would love to see a peaceful resolution taking place, iwould
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love to see a peaceful resolution taking place, i would love to see north korea give up this dog and pony north korea give up this dog and pony show, to prove their might to the world, while threatening us interest. i would love for that to ta ke interest. i would love for that to take place but at the end of the day, it is in the hands of china and north korea. donald trump is going to do what donald trump says he will do, protect united states interests and arrow allies. thank you very much, thank you for coming onto the programme. still to come: the police superintendents assocation is warning of the ‘perfect storm' facing england and wales' police forces — we'll hear from them before the end of the programme. more than 90% of us think further terror attacks in the uk are likely, according to a new poll commissioned by bbc inside out. terrorist attacks have rarely been out of the headlines this year with three fatal terror attacks in london, the bombing of a concert in manchester and several atrocities in europe,
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including the recent attacks in spain. let's now talk to our arts correspondent colin paterson who reported from outside the manchester arena bombing in may, and has been looking at the results of this poll. hello, good morning, effectively, most of us think further attacks are likely, and three out of ten of us feel less safe in public places compared to one year ago. this is all for inside out, 7:30pm tonight, 90% is the standout, 90% believe that it 90% is the standout, 90% believe thatitis 90% is the standout, 90% believe that it is likely that there will be more terror attacks. the survey shows the way this has been impacting on people's lives. almost one in five of us says that they are less likely to go to a major arena event or sports stadium event than they were at this time last year, carrying through to public transport, the same figure, one in five of us says they feel less safe
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on public transport than in this time last year because of the terror. this could explain why 52% of people in england say that they are willing for the security services to have more powers to investigate terrorism, even at the expense of privacy to individuals. that is interesting. despite the figures, there are clearly many people attempting to go on living their lives as normally as possible. absolutely, one heartening statistic, 88% of people say they have not actually changed any arrangements they had in place before last yea r‘s arrangements they had in place before last year's —— this year's terror attacks happening, 88% of people, and there are signs that life continues, none more so than the fact manchester arena reopens for the first time since the ariana grande terrorist attack, reopens this saturday, a special all—star concert, we are manchester,
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blossoms, rick astley, noel gallagher, local acts, the courteeners, that is a sign that things are getting back to normal. manchester arena, only three months since it was the site of a terror attack, mariah carey has announced that she will take her special christmas tour to manchester arena tour, and so it must be said that things are getting back to normal in some ways. lets talk to david mccarthy, on one of the trains attacked by a suicide bomber, on july seven, of the trains attacked by a suicide bomber, onjuly seven, 2005. also with us, keman allen, who was at the ariana grande concert in manchester that was bombed earlier this year, and dr sally leivesley, who advises governments and companies on the protection of the public. thank you for talking to us. keman, how has your behaviour changed, if at all, since you were caught up in the bombings? yeah, i can hear you. i
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was a bit quiet, i wonder if you can tell the audience how your behaviour has changed since you were caught up in the manchester arena bombing? inaudible studio: i'm going to come back to you, the line is not good enough, i really do want to hear what you have got to say, so we will redial. david, hello, can you hear me? yes, ican david, hello, can you hear me? yes, i can you find. thank you for talking to us, i wonder if your behaviour changed at all after 7/7? i'm certainly more conscious of personal safety, one example is i travel a lot by air, for business, andi travel a lot by air, for business, and i kind of make a conscious effort now, when i sit down and, to
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count cumin seeds i am away from exit rose, to pay attention to the safety demonstrations and so on and so safety demonstrations and so on and so forth. —— to count how many seats iam so forth. —— to count how many seats i am away from the exit rows. that maybe many people, notjust those caught up in terror attacks, would you say? yeah, one of the things i experienced in the terror attack, was, when the bombs went off, one of the natural human responses is to freeze... to wait for some the ulster ta ke freeze... to wait for some the ulster take charge, i think now, i'm certainly a lot more proactive, in event of an incident like that. part of that proactivity is before anything happens, trying to keep the conscious thought about escape routes, access to emergency, and so on and so forth. i hope that we can speak with keman again, so sorry about that, can you hear me 0k
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speak with keman again, so sorry about that, can you hear me ok now? looks like not, we will try again in a moment. dr, how surprised are you that one fifth of people say they are now more wary of using public transport, and around the same number of people say that they are less likely to go to a sports concert or stadium. it is not surprised, that survey is probably the best news for british police, it tells them to keep on doing what they are doing, it means people now have a level of awareness, and as we heard, after the bombings on 7/7, the awareness with those victims is staying with them but we need that level of awareness, because the frequency of attacks is changing quite badly. 9096 of people, according to this survey, say that they think that there will be another terror attack in the uk. we know the threat level has been severe for a number of years, raised two critical earlier this year,
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briefly, then dropped down again, in practical terms, remind us what this severe threat level means. it means an attack is probable. and very likely. when it gets to a real critical stage, we know that then, an attack is just about on us. right now, it is a case of once we are told there is a threat, we have to understand that the police may not always know where it is going to happen. years ago, they had good intelligence. we are aware, what that survey is doing is showing that the message of awareness is creating a lot of situational awareness. the leisure situation, such as in manchester, those horrendous attacks, that is keeping people away from leisure activities but i don't think that will keep on, i think people will go back. it might be for a year but then people will go back to normal numbers. as time passes,
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people go back to their normal routines. david, iwonder, mentally, can you tell us a little bit about that side of things, having been caught up in the 7/7 attacks. that side of things, having been caught up in the 7/7 attacksm that side of things, having been caught up in the 7/7 attacks. it was several years ago now, so most caught up in the 7/7 attacks. it was several years ago now, so most of the mental stress of the event has passed, but in the days after the event, i had what i would consider to be some kind of post—traumatic stress disorder, but i was not aware i was going to experience that, i found myself getting angry at odd times and for odd reasons. seven yea rs times and for odd reasons. seven years after the event, whenever the anniversary would come about, i would feel emotional. —— several yea rs. would feel emotional. —— several years. i do not tend to feel too much about it any more, i have moved ona much about it any more, i have moved on a lot, but obviously, it can be very stressful. what would your advice be, to people who might feel anxious about being in public spaces
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in this country? if people are extremely anxious, i won't say, don't use trains... if you are that anxious and it will cause you to have a high level of anxiety, do not, but you can see how it is being managed. if you are getting on the plane and counting trains seats, to the exit, that is a way of managing, you know you can get out. awareness makes us look around, being in confined transport and being aware, as the survey shows, means people will be quicker in reacting, if they see a terrorist attack. generally, it means getting on with your normal life, that is what the survey shows, the terrorists have not created fear. i could not think of a better result. thank you very much. thank you for talking to us. i am sorry that we could not get to talk to keman in the end. you can see more on the result from the terrorism poll on inside out, which returns for a new series tonight at 7:30pm for viewers
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in england. a bbc investigation has unearthed evidence that so—called islamic state agents were trying to recruit people in 2016 for an attack in central london. in online messages, sent to the bbc inside out reporter, a reporterfor is sent to the bbc inside out reporter, a reporter for is suggested attacks on two locations which were both targeted earlier this year. the authorities were fully aware of the reporter's contact with the organisation. inside out, bbc one, tonight, 7:30pm, for viewers in england. now, the weather forecast. quite a lot of clout across many parts of the country to start the day, certainly mild for the time of year, as the sunshine starts to break holes in the cloud, it will warm up break holes in the cloud, it will warm up as we break holes in the cloud, it will warm up as we head into the afternoon. a couple of pictures from weather watchers, similar scenes from many parts of the country. fairly low cloud, grey conditions, and mistand
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fairly low cloud, grey conditions, and mist and fog around this morning. this scene was taken in shropshire by one of the weather watchers. as we had through the morning, this scene will be fairly similar, warm front, moving gradually east across the country, murky air, a lot of low cloud and some drizzly rain and some hill fog around as well. for the north—west, persistent band of rain, cold front, we will see clearer conditions later on, for much of scotland and northern ireland, we will see rain heavy at times, rumble of thunder, into the middle part of the day, and england and wales, fairly cloudy, a few showers. sunny skies pushing through, into the afternoon, but we are still sitting with the cloud and the rain on central scotland into the rain on central scotland into the likes of antrim. further south across england and wales, if you holes in the cloud. brightening up through the afternoon, with the brighter skies, one or two showers threatening. temperatures likely to
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reach 22, 20 three degrees. that is above what we would expect. mild theme continues, we will see the weather front hitting up. theme continues, we will see the weatherfront hitting up. —— 22, 23 degrees. pretty wet nights to come. towards the south—east, dryer, murky, certainly mild, no chance of frost with cloud around and rain as well. looking at tomorrow, weather front sitting across parts of the country, bringing wet weather and breezy conditions to start the day but tuesday will be on improving picture. you can see the rain around during the morning but by the evening, the rain will fizzle to the east. eastern england staying quite cloudy and drizzly, too. a return to sunshine across scotland, northern ireland, wales, southwest as well, not as warm as it would be today, 16 to 21 degrees, feeling fresher as well. that fresher feel continues into the middle of the week,
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certainly for wednesday, westerly breeze bringing a few bright spells, not quite as warm as it is out there today, sunnier and drier weather around. does look like by the end of the week we will see something more autumnal, wet and windy weather eventually on the way full of all in all, a pretty mixed week ahead. —— on the way. all in all, a pretty mixed week ahead. hello, it's monday. it's10am. i'm victoria derbyshire. our top story today — amid signs that north korea is preparing more new missile launches, the united states promises a "massive and overwhelming military response" to defend itself and its allies against pyongyang. mattis along with president trump made it clear that all options are on the table and that will include military action if north korea don't get in check. donald trump is going to do what donald trump is going to do what donald trump is going to do what donald trump says he will do and thatis donald trump says he will do and that is protect united states interests and our allies. we'll bring you more reaction. the 27—year—old woman who's been told she'll develop early on—set alzheimer's. her father was diagnosed with it at 42. my
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my next biggest fear is not to be able to watch him to grow up. for him to know that i might not be there is heartbreaking. we'll see how she's planning her life knowing what lies ahead. and we'll meet the model who was fired by l'oreal after saying that all white people benefit from racism. if you have got a question, get in touch. good morning. rebecca jones is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. good morning. president trump has warned the united states is ready to use its nuclear capabilities in defending itself, and its allies, against north korea. his comments come as the united nations prepares for an emergency session to discuss the regime's claims of a successful nuclear weapons test over the weekend. south korea has responded to pyongyang's nuclear test by staging a live fire missile exercise. a rise in interest rates won't take place for more than a year
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according to a bbc survey of 30 leading economists. most are also predicting that pay rises will continue to fall behind inflation until the spring of next year, continuing the renewed squeeze on the average earner‘s living standards. the gambling commission has told this programme that the number of complaints about raffles taking place on social media has increased hugely in recent years. in the last two years they've had 417, compared to 129 for the previous two. people who've played the games say there are potentially hundreds of illegal draws held on facebook every day and they say they're dangerous and addictive. workers at two mcdonald's restaurants will walk out today in the first strike to affect the company in britain. about 40 staff in cambridge and south—east london, are demanding higher pay and more secure working hours. mcdonald's says the dispute relates to internal grievance procedures
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and those involved representjust one hundredth of 1% of its uk workforce. scientists have developed a camera that can see through the human body. the device has been designed to help doctors track medical tools during internal examinations. until now, medics have had to rely on expensive scans to trace their progress. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30am. back to victoria. here's some sport now with karthi. petra kvitova has reached the quarter—finals of the us open after a stunning straight sets win over wimbledon champion garbine muguruza overnight. kvitova — who only returned to action in may following a knife attack at her home last december — played aggressive attacking tennis to come back from 1—4 down in the first set to win 7—6, 6—3.
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it's the first time she's reached the last eight of a grand slam for two years. the former us open champion maria sharapova follows muguruza out of the tournament. it's the russian's first grand slam since returning to tennis following a 15 month doping ban. she lost the fourth round match to anastasija sevastova. there are a lot of positives, you know, playing four matches, playing in front of a big crowd and fans and just competing, you know, being in that competitive environment. it is what i miss. you can't replicate that anywhere. specially at a grand slam. britain's lewis hamilton described taking the outright lead at the top of fromula one's world championship standings for the first time this season as "empowering". the mercedes driver won the italian grand prix in dominant style for a 59th career victory. a day after brekaing the all—time record for pole positions. hamilton was in total control at monza, finishing ahead
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of team—mate valtteri bottas for a mercedes one—two. ferrari's sebastian vettel was third and is now three points behind hamilton in the race for the world title. three of the home nations play world cup qualifiers tonight. scotland host malta. northern ireland take on the czech republic, and england play slovakia at wembley. jordan henderson will again captain the england side fresh from friday's rather flattering 4—0 win in malta. gareth southgate's side could move five points clear at the top of their group and virtually secure their place in russia next summer with a win. if slovakia win they will move above england in their group. it's a great opportunity for us. we have a home game. we are playing good opposition. so we've got to make sure that we are tactically prepared which we will be, but also we have got to have belief in the tea m we have got to have belief in the team that we've got. we've got some exciting players and we want to go and show that. scotland are in the same group as england but are still four points behind slovakia
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in the play—off spot. they host malta tonight and realistically needing three wins from their last three games to claim that second place. we need to win as many games as we possibly can. everyone said it was a must win game against lithuania. we scored three goals and created a lot of chances as well. it shows you that spirit in the lads and we believe that we can keep pushing in every game whether it is 60 minutes, 70 minutes or 80 minutes however long it takes to get the first goal, we believe we'll do it. and chris froome can enjoy his final rest day after further extending his advantage at the vuelta a espana. on a tough day in the mountains, the tour de france winner was able to increase his lead over nearest rival vincenzo nibali to over a minute. columbia's miguel angel lopez took the stage win. froome remains on course to become only the third man to complete the tour and vuelta double in the same year. that's it for now.
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next — meetjayde green — she's 27 and genetic tests suggest she will develop early—onset alzheimer's, as herfather did at the age of 42. over 500,000 people in birtain have alzheimer's. it is the most common form of dementia and usually affects those over the age of 60, but there are a small number of people — fewer than 4% of sufferers — who develop early on—set alzheimers. jayde green has a one—year—old son, and is preparing for the future. our reporter hannah morrison went to visit her at her home in east london. when i was around 12 years old, my dad became ill. we knew it was alzheimer'sment we were told various
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things over the years, but nobody could be sure what it was. all the while his health was deceasing. by the time i was 14 he had almost forgotten who i was. i have got a little book that i have been writing stuff in for freddie because i want him to know, i want him to know how i feel now, right now at this moment and you know i might not be around to tell him. i'm writing things down for him so if one day this does happen he will know how i feel, from the day he was born almost. at 40 yea rs old the day he was born almost. at 40 years old my dad was my dadment at 41 yea rs years old my dad was my dadment at 41 years old, my dad was my dad. it was only around that year that he turned 42, around that year, that things started changing. when i was around 12 i was living with him, it was just around 12 i was living with him, it wasjust me around 12 i was living with him, it was just me and around 12 i was living with him, it wasjust me and him living around 12 i was living with him, it was just me and him living together, and he would just start sort of, we would have a conversation and it would have a conversation and it would seem he would blank out parts of the conversation. you know, he
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would say something to me and then come back and repeat it exactly the same as if we hadn't had the conversation or he wouldn't remember what i had responded to him so he'd ask. by that point, not long after, is when i moved in with my grandparents and he had deteriorated a lot by that point. i went to see him at the care home and he had no idea who i was. no ideament he would smile, but he would look through me. he was happy in his own little world, but he had no idea who i was. i could have been anyone walking in to him. how hard was it for you? every time i would visit him, i couldn't cope with doing it again so soon couldn't cope with doing it again so soon and itjust took more time and more time and then the next thing i heard was that he passed away. your dad was not the only one amongst his siblings who was suffering from early alzheimer's. he started suffering and his twin brother followed about two years later with the early signs.
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but his other two siblings didn't start showing symptoms until he passed away. there was obviously a clear genetic link there. at what point did you start to think about yourself? i suppose it wasn't until i had my son. that's a big bit of responsibility that hits you. you start thinking about every little thing for the future and your health and all of a sudden you need to be here for this child. i knew it was genetic but i've always thought, "it won't happen to me. i'll be fine. i don't want to know. if it happens, it happens. if it doesn't, it doesn't." but then i had him and it completely changed everything. "yes, come on, let's go." i've done the blood tests and they said come back in three weeks. so i sat down. you can even ask my mum. i sat down and i knew straightaway. he said it came back positive for the gene. i couldn't tell you what
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he said or what anyone said for about a minute and a half, two minutes. i completely blacked out. completely blanked out. i don't know what happened in that couple of minutes. ijust remember sitting there and i think i was staring at a part of the room and i was completely dazed. freddie popped into my head and ijust went, "0k, what medical trials are there?" it just went from there. you mentioned your son there. this is about a gene that you now have a 50—50 chance of passing onto him. he's one now. he was one in august, yes. what are your fears for him and how will you tell him what he potentially could face and what is going to happen to his mum? you went through that with your own father. well, my ultimate biggest fear is that he gets the gene. that's my first biggest fear. i couldn't bear to see him going through it, having his life cut short. secondly, my next biggest
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fear is not being able to watch him grow up. for him to know that i might not be there is heartbreaking. so i think i'm going to make him aware of what this is but obviously i don't want to ruin everything too early, especially if he is on borrowed time. you don't show any symptoms at present. no, not right now. do you know when they could start if medical trials don't work? the best they can go by is when my dad started showing early symptoms. that's the best they can do. that's around 42 years old. hence my whole "i've got about 15 years". since your diagnosis, you are only 26 now, but have you found yourself checking your own behaviour? absolutely. i mean every time i forget
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something, the panic sets in instantly. but then i have got to fight it. i have to say, "look, you've got a one—year—old, baby brain does exist!" what does the future hold for you now you have this diagnosis? how do you move forward? day by day, really. i'm living life like i only have 15 years left but not in a negative way, in a positive way. i want to try and do things now. i don't want it to be, "oh, you know, i've got loads of time," because i might not have. so the future for me, i'm going to split my time between fundraising and awareness for this because this is such an important thing in my life. i'm living it as normal as i can at the minute. let's speak to jayde green now and also dr clare walton out research for the alzheimer's
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society. hello. hello. hello. jayde do you know how rare this gene mutation is? it is extremely rare. there is 500 families across the uk... worldwide. that are affected by the three default genes that can cause early onset alzheimer's so it is extremely rare. there is only a couple of families in the uk. really? how do you live your life in terms of knowing as you said in the film, you have got 15 years. well, instead of saying i've only got 15 years, i look at the medical progress, it can come so look at the medical progress, it can come so far in 15 years so i'm looking at i have got 15 years something could happen easily. yes. and 15 years is a long time. it is when you look at it differently like
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my son for example he will only be 15, 15, 16 by my son for example he will only be 15,15,16 by the my son for example he will only be 15, 15, 16 by the time that that hits, but as far as anything else, i feel lucky that i have got this time that my dad didn't have to do something about it. yes. positively. sometimes do you find that you're thinking about waiting for the symptoms or are you just cracking on? at the minute i'mjust symptoms or are you just cracking on? at the minute i'm just cracking on. i thinkjust because i know it's there doesn't mean that all of a sudden this is going to start happening. they specifically said nothing changes, you have had the gene since you were born. you know, and the symptoms aren't going to start to hit until x age like 42. i'm just cracking on and doing what ican. i i'm just cracking on and doing what i can. i get paranoid if i forget something. do you wish you didn't know? no. you did not know? no, absolutely not, i was determined to find out. what about siblings? they we re find out. what about siblings? they were not so find out. what about siblings? they were not so crazy find out. what about siblings? they were not so crazy about finding out but in light of what i'm doing now,
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to raise awareness, that has pushed them to think, actually, i need to know. you could live with not knowing, but it depends upon what you want to do with your life. the nature of your personality, as well. and you are doing fundraising? yes, i'm doing a walk, in october, a memory walk, and i have put together an event that happened last week and i am doing everything i can. let me read you this, from shipley: excellent film about dementia on your programme, your openness, says this viewer, about the future, shows amazing courage and is truly inspirational. well... i'm hoping that whatever happens, even though i have been hit with this, it will not change how i
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live my life with him and my family. hopefully, it will raise awareness on rafael early—onset dementia in young people. claire, let's talk about this, jade knows, the testing suggests, she is going to get early—onset alzheimer's, there is no symptoms, there is no dementia symptoms. there may not be for a while. yeah, dementia is kind of the umbrella term, describing symptoms. memory loss, problems with thinking, potential problems with language, and progressive, gets worse every time. jade has been diagnosed with a gene that mean she will develop alzheimer's at some point but she will not have dementia until she begins to develop the symptoms. understood. this particular gene, it's to do with how the brain produces sticky... explained this... ? produces sticky... explained this...? you get a build-up of amyloid in the brain, and those
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sticky plaques kill brain cells, it is the death of brain cells that cause dementia, the mutation in jade's family, christina lynn won, thatis jade's family, christina lynn won, that is the gene, that means her brain produces more of that amyloid, so brain produces more of that amyloid, so it builds up quicker than it would normally and that is why the symptoms come on earlier. where would you say we are up to, in terms of finding ameliorating the symptoms, a cure for dementia? research is vital, we have lagged behind for a long time, lots of drug failures, but we are turning a corner. raising money for research is vital, there is lots of studies going on, especially in families like's jade going on, especially in families like'sjade —— going on, especially in families like's jade —— especially going on, especially in families like'sjade —— especially in families like jade's, if we can treat people with drugs before they develop symptoms, we have the best
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chance of preventing the disease, so it is families like as taking part that really open up the avenue for us that really open up the avenue for us to be able to say, what is going on in these really early stages and is there a way that we can remove this amyloid pact or slow them down, so we can this amyloid pact or slow them down, so we can slow the disease and stop the dementia symptoms. —— presenilin—i. the dementia symptoms. —— presenilin-1. thank you very much for coming onto the programme. very nice to meet you. thank you. this news just this newsjust in, the duchess of cambridge is expecting her third child, hooray! kensington palace have just announced that, kate, as you may know her, is expecting her third child. that's just you may know her, is expecting her third child. that'sjust in from kensington palace. this statement in a little more detail, the royal highness is the duke and duchess of cambridge are very pleased to announce their third child, the queen and members of both families are delighted with the news, as with previous two pregnancies, the duchessis previous two pregnancies, the duchess is suffering from, i don't
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how to pronounce this, and i should do, it is really bad morning sickness anyway, her royal highness will no longer carry out planned engagements at the hornsey road centre in london today, the duchess is being looked after at kensington palace. pretty severe morning sickness again, just like with george and charlotte. that is the little girl's name, charlotte? yeah. william and kate having another baby. hooray! everybody is very happy. kensington palace and the queen, members of both families are also really delighted. coming up: a model who sparked a row after saying that all white people benefit from racism. she is here to talk about her comments and to talk about the horrific online abuse, including death threats, that she has received over the last week. we will speak live with her before 11am. united states says it is ready to
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use united states says it is ready to use its nuclear capabilities to defend itself and its allies against threats from north korea. the white house issued the statement following a phone conversation between president trump and the japanese prime minister, shinzo abe. it was made in response to north korea's sixth, and most powerful, nuclear test. this is what we know about the test so far. we are going to speak with our war correspondent, about the news that the duchess of cambridge is expecting her third baby. hello. third child on the way, kate has the same serious morning sickness against yellow and i suspect the
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announcement today was not as they would have planned, in the same way they were not able to plan the announcement of the first or second, the fact she once again has acute morning sickness has meant that she has had to cancel an event she was at today, and with that cancellation they have had to explain it is hyperemesis gravidarum once again and so they are announcing that she is pregnant with their third child and she will not be seen in public for a period of time. she will be recovering from hyperemesis gravidarum. what is striking about this pregnancy, with the first, she went into hospital, now, they will be very much hoping they can treat her with the privacy of being behind palace walls, at home. studio: remind us of the age gap between the two children she has so far, george hasjust started primary school. that was another event where we we re school. that was another event where we were meant to be seeing the duchess of cambridge, kate, on
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thursday, at prince george's first day at school, she would be keen to do that, depends upon how well she is or is not. big day in his life, and also, the other key thing, third child, even if under changes in recent law, even if he was or is a boy, he will not overtake princess charlotte in the line of succession, now she will remain where she is stop the birth of their third child will push prince harry further down the order of succession, i don't think that is something that overly worries prince harry(!) laughter indeed. and everybody is really happy, the queen is delighted, and the middle film family as well. the palace are put out a short statement. -- middleton family. everyone delighted with the news. south korea and japan have agreed to push for more powerful
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united nations sanctions against pyongyang at an emergency meeting of the security council on monday. earlier south korea said its forces had carried out a live—fire ballistic missile exercise in response to the north's nuclear test. let's talk tojihyun park, a north korean who escaped the regime. professor hazel smith from the centre of korean studies at the school of oriental and african studies and here in the studio. john everard, former british ambassador to north korea between 2006 and 2008. how do you assess the situation now? yesterday, we heard the news, i was shocked at that moment. worried for
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the people inside north korea and south korea. inside north korea, there is no electricity since the early 1990s, many north korean people did not hear any news. outside the country... they do not know what has happened outside the country. and so i think about my relatives and the people in north korea. professor, how dangerous a situation are we in now, do you think? well, there is a number of different areas of risk and one which hardly ever gets mentioned, you have a developing nuclear programme with very few checks and balances over safety and quality is oren 's. a very serious nuclear accident in japan, one oren 's. a very serious nuclear accident injapan, one of the most developed countries in the world, so it is difficult to see how north korea's safety record, which is not
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goodin korea's safety record, which is not good in the rest of its economy!... could be better in the nuclear industry. it is not improve matters. they continue to defy international law, the un security council has insisted that this is unacceptable, and as the un security council is the primate of international law, the primate of international law, the dprk, north korea, is simply ignoring it. and it is dangerous as well because even if none of the parties want to go to war, you only have to have a conflict and a dispute in maritime border between south korea, which we have seen before, or an incident on the border, between north and south korea, and in this rather see bright atmosphere, where the rhetoric is very high, where nobody seems to wa nt very high, where nobody seems to want to engage and to give anything, the real worry is escalation. —— this rather febrile atmosphere. this
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e—mailfrom john: this rather febrile atmosphere. this e—mail from john: please do ask, what is their endgame, i don't understand their behaviour. they have said very clearly what the endgame is, we always say that north korea is secretive, sometimes it is but very often the problem is it says clearly what it wants to do and the world has tried not to listen. the endgame is, a usable and credible nuclear deterrent that they can threaten to other to rate the united states city, which they believe will keep the united states off their back. and, they can use this also as a sword as well as a shield, in their words, this also as a sword as well as a shield, in theirwords, in this also as a sword as well as a shield, in their words, in their efforts, eventually, to liberate, as they put it, south korea. how should they put it, south korea. how should the west approach this? this is the question, and frankly there are no good answers. more sanctions will only work if china can be brought fully on board, which is frankly
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unlikely, china has made clear that it is much more worried about a collapse of north korea refugee flooding across the board, and a peninsular rear reunited under a pro american government than it is about the nuclear programme. military option is not good, risk of wider conflict, conflict involving nuclear weapons perhaps, which most people will shudder at. diplomacy? we are all in favour of talks but the north koreans have repeatedly said at the highest level, they are not prepared to negotiate the nuclear programme. it takes two to tango, if north korea will not talk, diplomacy will probably not get very far. well... if china, and america, if they got together, could they together fashion some sort of pressure upon north korea? washington has been trying to do this for a very long time, beijing has made clear it has no intention of them in along with that. statements from china and even
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the statement that was made when the united nations agouti council passed its leash latest sanctions, made clear they think the sanctions are not a means to an end, and they are deeply unhappy about the pressure. —— when the united nations security council passed its latest sanctions. just to remind you of the breaking news. william and kate are having a third child. the queen and members of both families are delighted with the news. as with her previous two pregnancies the duchess is suffering from serious morning sickness. her royal highness will no longer carry out her planned engagement in london today and the duchess is being cared for at kensington palace. do all white people benefit from racism? that's what this model thinks. she has been sacked by
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l'oreal as a result. we will speak to her live shortly. the police superintendents' association is warning of the perfect storm facing england and wales' police forces. we will hear from them before 11am. here is rebecca with a summary of the news. thank you. as victoria was saying the duchess of cambridge is expecting her third child. the announcement came from ken sing toll palace in the last few minutes. it said the queen and members of both families are delighted with the news. the statement says that as with her previous two pregnancies the duchess is suffering from a severe form of morning sickness. president trump has warned the united states is ready to use its nuclear capabilities in defending itself, and its allies, against north korea. his comments come as the united nations prepares for an emergency session to discuss the regime's claims of a successful nuclear weapons test over the weekend. south korea has responded to pyongyang's nuclear test by staging
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a live fire missile exercise. workers at two mcdonald's restaurants are walking out today in the first strike to affect the company in britain. about 40 staff in cambridge and south—east london, are demanding higher pay and more secure working hours. mcdonald's says the dispute relates to internal grievance procedures, and those involved represent just one hundredth of 1% of its uk workforce. scientists have developed a camera that can see through the human body. the device has been designed to help doctors track medical tools, known as endoscopes, during internal examinations. until now, medics have had to rely on expensive scans, such as x—rays, to trace their progress. that's a summary of the latest news, join me for bbc newsroom live at 11 o'clock. here's some sport now with karthi. maria sharapova has been knocked out
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of tennis's us open. she was beaten in the fourth round by anastasia sevastova in three sets. it's sharapova's first grand slam since returning from a drugs ban. petra kvitova is through to the quarter—finals after betaing garbina muguruza. a fourth world title is lewis hamilton's aim after he took the outright lead at the top of formula one's world championship standings for the first time this season. hamilton won the italian grand prix to move three points clear of his rival sebastain vettel. britain's chris froome has a rest day today after increasing his overall lead to one minute and one second after stage 15 of the race. jordan henderson will captain england for tonight's world cup qualifier against slovakia. a win will leave them on the verge of qualifying for next year's world cup. northern ireland and scotland play tonight. policing in england and wales is facing a "perfect storm"
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due to staff shortages and gradually rising crime. the president of the police superintendents' association of england and wales is warning that policing services are routinely based on fewer people working more hours and days and that such a model is "fundamentally flawed". since 2010 police have seen budget cuts of almost 20%, but the growth of cyber—crime and fraud has seen criminal offences rise. we can speak to gavin thomas, president of the police superintendents' association, who is making these stark warnings today. calum macleod from the police federation which represents rank and leroy logan who is himself a retired superintendent and still works with officers in london. gavin thomas tell us why it is a perfect storm? the reason why i'm saying it is a perfect storm and what you have just articulated is not new. the service has been saying this for a number of years. but my
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association has just done a resilience survey and the results are quite stark. 50% of my collea g u es are quite stark. 50% of my colleagues that took part in the survey show signs of anxiety and over a quarter signs of depression. now that in itself is worrying. bear in mind over70% now that in itself is worrying. bear in mind over 70% of my colleagues across england and wales took part in the survey. so exactly the point you made, if we continue with the model we have at the moment and we don't look after the people within the service itself something is going to give. that's the reason why i'm saying we have a perfect storm. right. but we know that gradually crime has been falling and it has been for a number of years. there was, there is a spike in fraud and cybercrime which started to be included in the british crime survey. i mean, do you accept that? let me challenge that and let me
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describe the context around this is. traditional conventional crime which we understand, you're right has gone down in many of the crime types are ata30 down in many of the crime types are at a 30 year low, but we have seen spikes in violent crime up 18%, sexual offences have increased. on the other side we are seeing now a huge rise in what i would term crime of the 21st century and the office of the 21st century and the office of national statistics are recording, i think, of national statistics are recording, ithink, what of national statistics are recording, i think, what is the new volume in crime which policing is having to face now with limited resources . having to face now with limited resources. and then in the middle, is what i would term the vulnerability. right, calum mcleod, do you agree about this perfect storm scenario? not exactly. i agree with the sentiment behind it, but we have been saying since 2010 that the cuts that are unsustainable, we are not in... that's not true, is it? we're seven in... that's not true, is it? we're seve n yea rs in... that's not true, is it? we're seven years in and it is sustainable. crime is falling.“ you look at the individuals that are
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fulfilling the service to the public, you are seeing spikes in crime now of the traditional crime we we re crime now of the traditional crime we were talking about a minute ago. we are seeing crimes of greatest public concern on the rise. you have got victims of crime that are not receiving a great service because of the numberof receiving a great service because of the number of cuts we have had. individuals from policing are suffering. their mental health is suffering. their mental health is suffering. we have got data has said that eight out of ten of our colleagues, who we represent are suffering from stress, anxiety and 90% of that put it done to the circumstances they face just now in policing. leroy logan, do you come across superintendents who are anxious, who are depressed because they don't feel they have got the resources to do theirjob properly?” feel they have got the resources to do theirjob properly? i am doing a lot of work with officers, not so many superintendents, but a lot of personal friends who are superintendents and we have lost a
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couple of really star officers because of the pressure of work because of the pressure of work because in 20091 because of the pressure of work because in 2009 i don't normally, this i don't normally come with props. this is a questionnaire. i do not want to be seen as weak and calling out for help would be seen asa calling out for help would be seen as a weakness and i wouldn't be selected for further ranks or specialism. before, people wouldn't talk about it and we lose people who, unfortunately, have broken down or become ill or have haven't become the leaders they should be because they are not functioning. we asked someone they are not functioning. we asked someone from the home office to take pa rt someone from the home office to take part and gave us a statement. "crimes traditionally measured by the independent crime survey for england and wales have fallen by well over a third since 2010
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and overall police funding has been protected in real terms since the spending review in 2015." that maybe the case, but what i'm saying is and i am sure the federation will say the same, we are dealing with human volumes of demand. notjust on crime as i mentioned earlier, vulnerability, missing persons, missing children, child sexual exploitation, child sexual abuse. something which we are having to manage and deal with now. and one of the things i have been calling for today is i want to a constructive, open and transparent debate, a review of what we want from our police service in the 21st century and what policing should not be doing and how we structure and resource the service going into the future. i don't think it is sustainable in terms of our approach of the lex con of different approaches and different collaborations we have got, over 43
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different organisations and forces. there are some aspects of policing that don't respect boundaries and don't respectjurisdictions. thank you. breaking news which we brought you about 15 minutes ago that the duchess of cambridge is having another baby. she is pregnant again and everybody is really happy. it is their third child. william and kate's third child. like with her previous two pregnancies, kate has really bad morning sickness. cp tweets, "wonderful news. i hope the duchess will be doing well and not played with this illness too long." adam says, "congratulations. " another viewer says "this sickness is awful." sandra, "best news ever." an e—mailfrom is awful." sandra, "best news ever." an e—mail from john, "congratulations to kate and will qam. "once white people begin to admit that their race is the most violent and oppressive force of nature on earth, then we can talk"
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the words which saw model munroe bergdorf sacked by l'oreal. after the events in charlottesville in the united states, the make—up brand's first trans model, took to facebook model, took to facebook to address what she sees as systemic racism in society. but l'oreal — who had just hired her — said what she posted was at odds with their policies of tolerance and diversity and they sacked her. munroe bergdorf is here and we can speak to her now. hello. hello. this is what you wrote on facebook. i will read the words so our on facebook. i will read the words so our viewers know. "honestly i don't have the energy to talk about racial violence of white people anymore. yes, all white people because most of you don't even realise or refuse to acknowledge that your existence, privilege and success as a race is that your existence, privilege and success as a race is built on the backs, blood and death of people of colour. your entire existence is drenched in racism." and do you mean all white people because that's what has wound people
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7 because that's what has wound people up? i because that's what has wound people am because that's what has wound people speaking because that's what has wound people up? i am speaking about socialisation, i'm speaking about how society conditions us to believe certain things. so, to a certain extent we are socialised to believe that men are dominant and women are submissive and we live in a homophobic society that's only started to change. there are these things that aren't necessarily what we should believe, but they are in society. but do you believe all white people... i believe there is a structure. sorry, i was white people... i believe there is a structure. sorry, iwas going white people... i believe there is a structure. sorry, i was going to finish. do you believe all white people have taken part in racial violence which is what you wrote? people have taken part in racial violence which is what you wrote ?|j violence which is what you wrote?” believe that society is built on the foundation, it is not what i believe, it is a fact that society is built on the foundations of colonialism and slavery. in terms of what you wrote, are you standing by all white people and racial violence... by racial violence,
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that's a nuanced thing. i have microaggressions that people will experience every day. everything from moving from a black person on a bus to... from moving from a black person on a busto... i from moving from a black person on a bus to... i understand that. but are you saying all white people are guilty of that? i'm not saying all white people are guilty of it, but all white people benefit from racism with white privilege if you are not dismantling racism and not going to pull people up from the bottom of the pyramid to the top then you are participating and benefiting from racism. you didn't write that, but what you wrote... i did write that, but it was taken out of context. these are the sentences you that you wrote, "i don't have the energy to talk about racial violence of white people a all white people." the text had two book ends. this screen shot was sent to the daily mail by somebody that i know and it was in response to sharl lots vil. it was
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in response to this white supremacist rally. could you have worded it better? it is a passionate thing and it is a very emotional thing and it is a very emotional thing and it is a very emotional thing and i'm not going to sensor myself for my feelings... no one would want you to sensor yourself. this is the problem that white people are thinking about how it makes them feel when racism doesn't affect them. it affects people of colour. the system is not in place to affect white people and white people need to get over the fact, yes it is a really uncomfortable truth, it is a really inconvenient truth. get over that, and get over that discomfort. think about how it makes us feel... if a white person made a sweeping generalalisation about a black person... white people, celebrities said the same thing i said and no one came after
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her... ifa thing i said and no one came after her... if a white person... there is not a system in place to oppress white people. that doesn't exist. not a system in place to oppress white people, it does not exist. that white person would be criticised. it would be an individual instance, there is not a system in place to affect white people's chances of gaining credit, housing, gaining equal pay, all of these things that are in place to affect people of colour from being equal, we do not live in an equal society. if people accept your premise, that white people benefit from racism, what should all of those white people do? start listening, which is the problem i have come across, and i have done some other interviews, and it is co nsta ntly, some other interviews, and it is constantly, over some other interviews, and it is co nsta ntly, over a nd some other interviews, and it is constantly, over and over, well, i have, i have, i do not have, i do not have, people need to stop thinking about it on an individual basis, we are talking about everyone. just because you do not
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feel privileged, does not mean that if you are a black person or a south asians person, exactly the same as who you are now, you would have less chances of getting out of the situation you do not feel privileged in. what should white people do? listen to people of colour and our experiences and ask how we can help. when something happens, check in with people, when you see people being killed by police in america, checkin being killed by police in america, check in with people, see what you can do, donate time to charities. you made bat me away when i talk about this individual, because they are an individual, heather hayer, the woman killed in charlottesville, are you saying that she benefited from racism? no, she gave her life. this is the racial violence i'm talking about, when people try to combat racism, it brings out
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violence, you have seen it from the response i have had on the internet. you cannot bring up racism without causing a rock is, because it brings up causing a rock is, because it brings up violence. you have had death threats... rape threats, people threatening to find me and beat me up, people have called my phone and breathing heavily, i have heard numerous e—mails to say, urging me to kill myself. to be honest, it is getting worse and worse all the time but there is no way i can do anything about it, i should not have to deal with that for basically speaking about basic racial theory and feminism. are you going to the police? i don't think there is anything i can do... if someone is threatening to kill you... if anything i can do... if someone is threatening to kill you. .. if you saw the sheer amount, it has been every five seconds, every five seconds, this has been world news,
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it is not something that should be world news, ishould it is not something that should be world news, i should not be sacked for calling out racism when i was in a campaign that was meant to be championing diversity. especially when i was speaking about the violence of white people but then they have got the face, they have got cheryl cole, on the campaign, she was convicted for actively punching a black woman in the face, i don't understand how i am not in line with their values but they will hire cheryl cole, over and over again, give her more chances, she has been convicted for punching a black woman in the face. though she deserve a second chance?“ black woman in the face. though she deserve a second chance? if you are going to put a woman who punched a black woman in the face forward as the face of diversity, that says a lot about white privilege. john says: we are correct, we do not live in an equal society, we never have, we never will. see how this news reporter is trying to twist what munro is saying, according to one
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viewer, you cannot sit here and act like she's not telling the truth. viewer, you cannot sit here and act like she's not telling the truthm is an inconvenient truth, and god knows i wish racism did not exist. white people, all of us, allow racism to continue. kezia says, i am so racism to continue. kezia says, i am so glad that we are talking about this, munro bergdorf is 100% right. i know that other people are saying other stuff, i'm not the first person to say it, i think maybe, this is a blessing in disguise, if we can have a conversation, i am not going to shut up and give into people threatening me with things. this proves my point, proves exactly what i am saying to be true. it cannot have a go at me for saying the violence of all white people... the only people that are insulting me and coming on my page and trolling me are white people. it is not people of colour. how do you know they are all white? from the
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pictures. thank you the having me, thank you for coming on the programme. more now on the news that the duke and duchess of cambridge are having their third baby, we can speak with a royal biographer, from her home in wiltshire. hello. your reaction first of all? i'm not entirely surprised, both william and kate come from large families... kate is one of three. i think it is not surprising that she should want a third baby, and maybe even a fourth. we are told she has the same serious morning sickness she had in her previous two pregnancies, remind us how debilitating that is, and it was for her. it was devastating for her,
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and the circumstances i am surprised she has done it again, but it is a really good thing, it may go one rung down the order, but it does mean in the future there will be more members of the family who will be actively working for the family, for the family firm, and they are a bit thin on the ground at the moment, but with the work that they do, the charitable causes, it is usually important. so i think it is a good thing she is having a third and putting up with the morning sickness. thank you very much. more comments about munro bergdorf, this tweet: stop trying to lead her on questions about racism, it exists, end of, if you are not addressing it you are part of the problem. jim says, if you do not protest about racism in society, you
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are complicit and part of the problem. i don't know the context in which this was said but it is logically on point in the same way that conversely, all black people benefit from antiracism, it may seem provocative, a cursory air will hear that all white people are racist but munroe bergdorf has highlighted practices which are entrenched. we have lived in a radicalised system denied only by supporters and beneficiaries. from a position of racial dominance, any self—imposed detraction from that may to some at a very visceral level prove an anathema. we'll clea n we'll clean rooney stand by her husband? we'll clean rooney stand by her husband ? police we'll clean rooney stand by her husband? police have called drink—driving, another woman was in the car. —— will colleen rooney. wayne rooney has had other indiscretions in his marriage. she is pregnant with herfourth indiscretions in his marriage. she is pregnant with her fourth child. we can speak with caroline frost, a
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showbiz reporter. and a divorce barrister is also joining us. john oxley, as a divorce lawyer, what would you suggest? coleen rooney needs to think about what you want to happen, always very much up to a client, to think about whether they wa nt to client, to think about whether they want to initiate divorce proceedings or whether there is something in this marriage that can be salvaged, and if it will be salvaged, on what terms, what do she need to see, what commitments that she needed see from wayne rooney to make that work for both of them. how messy can a divorce be, when one party is very wealthy, or does that make it rather simple? it makes it complicated, you have to assess their wealth, but the big thing that defines it is, how much they cooperate. a lot of the time, people will be open with disclosure, saying, this is what i have, this is what it is worth, it
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comes down to looking at the law and looking how to divide that. other people try to be more devious, they move money abroad, they hide their assets, famously, if you years ago, the case of scott young, who spent a decade hiding assets from his wife, sentenced to prison, passport removed. and still, the wife had to pursue him through the courts. where are you on this? what happens is, we watch these players, these gladiatorial amazonian warriors on the pitch and then we are horrified/ secretly delighted when they prove incapable of parking their volvo on their drive incapable of parking their volvo on theirdrive and incapable of parking their volvo on their drive and walking their labrador in their downtime, it should not come as any surprise that wayne rooney has proven once again have i have lapses? w--- ”77 we know?” 7 time for him. dana's emotional time for him. people have leakages, they revert to type. his
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wife was away on holiday, he has hit the bars, this is the inevitable outcome. what should coleen rooney do? not even the most diligent show business reporter can get under the kitchen table at the moment, however, i would say to any woman, ignore well—meaning advisers, ignore trolls... for every one person saying it is hurtful for being away, we have outgrown that, there is a huge wealth of sympathy for her on social media. i would say, to ignore it, follow your instincts, and take advice from people whose interests you know are in your corner of the ring. coleen rooney has tweeted asking photographers to give her some privacy. to back off. how likely is that to happen? as i say, a certain amount of sympathy for her, clearly a victim in this love triangle that has been presented to the waiting british press. however, i think she and her husband have
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benefited from over a decade of press attention. she has had dvds, all sorts of things come her way i virtue of her position as one of the premier wives and girlfriends but i think the press are a little more attentive to their own brand, how they are perceived, in the wake of they are perceived, in the wake of the 20th anniversary of the death of diana, princess of wales, so nobody, no editor wants to declare open season on coleen rooney. final thought, is it a trend away from divorce barristers, divorce lawyers, these days, for people doing it themselves? that for a lot of people has become trend because of the reduction of legal aid. for a couple like this they will need expert advice, absolutely essential, this is not the sort of thing you can really do yourself. what i imagine they will be considering is, rather than going to court, going to arbitration, which is the thing that
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is in trend for high—value cases now, where you pay a retired judge to come up with legal, come up with a legal binding settlement. arbitration means excluding the press, excluding everyone, getting it done behind closed doors, it is not the big court showdown which i think both of these people, if they go to divorce, will want to avoid. more comments from you about munroe bergdorf's comments, "so more comments from you about munroe bergdorf's comments, " so glad she got to speak the truth". beth says, eloquent and educated. highlighting real issues in a non—aggressive way, and l'oreal should reconsider. on the programme tomorrow, sex workers tell us that current legislation is putting their lives at risk. that is tomorrow, 9am. have a good day. further rain spreading its way into scotland, there will eventually be brighter skies developing in the far
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north—west of scotland, northern ireland, tonight, this area of rain will re—intensified, so going into tuesday morning, some very wet weather in the morning, in north—west england, north wales initially, that rain gradually eases as it goes east, not much rain to talk about across southern areas, brighter skies, sunny weather for scotla nd brighter skies, sunny weather for scotland and northern ireland into the afternoon and fairly warm for some of us, temperatures up to the low 20s. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11:00am. just a day after north korea carries out a nuclear test, the south claims pyongyang is preparing for another missile launch. kensington palace announces that the duchess of cambridge
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is expecting her third child. workers at two mcdonald's restaurants are walking out today over pay and job security in the first strike at company in britain. a bbc investigation finds that gangs are offering royal mail staff big sums of money to steal bank cards. also this hour, the queen will formally open the new bridge over the firth of forth today.
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