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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  September 4, 2017 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11:003m. just a day after north korea carries out a nuclear test, the south claims pyongyang is preparing for another missile launch. kensington palace announces that the duchess of cambridge is expecting her third child. workers at two mcdonald's restaurants are walking out today over pay and job security in the first strike at company in britain. a bbc investigation finds that gangs are offering royal mail staff big sums of money to steal bank cards. also this hour, the queen will formally open the new bridge over the firth of forth today. and cute or creepy? barlas that look
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like children become the latest weapon in the fight against speeding drivers in buckinghamshire. good morning. it's monday the 4th of september. i'm rebecca jones. welcome to bbc newsroom live. south korea says it has seen indications that the north is preparing more missile launches, possibly an intercontinental ballistic missile. it follows pyongyang's sixth and most powerful nuclear test. the us defence secretary, james mattis, warned that any threat would be met with a massive and overwhelming response and the white house said president trump was ready to use america's nuclear capabilities. this morning, the russian deputy foreign minister sergei ryabkov said
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that any clumsy steps could ‘lead to an explosion‘. these are the latest pictures of a live fire missile exercise carried out by south korea in response to pyongyang's nuclear test. our correspondent robin brant reports. after the north exploded a nuclear device below ground, the south responded with this. a series of missile launches above ground. the military said they hit their target in the east sea early on monday. it was designed to replicate an attack on north korea's nuclear testing site. across the border over the weekend, this was how north koreans heard about the "perfect success" that was their nation's sixth nuclear missile test. it was more powerful than any before and came with claims that kim jong—un now has the ability to order a nuclear strike on mainland america.
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a few hours later, in washington, having briefed the president, the us secretary of defence gave this very stark warning. any threat to the united states or its territories including guam or our allies will be met with a massive military response, a response both effective and overwhelming. china has a crucial role to play in this. hosting a handful of world leaders at a summit, president xijinping urged restraint on all sides. the leaders of china and russia promised to deal appropriately with their rogue neighbour. this was a show of strength from south korea as dawn broke this morning. its leader wants to focus on even tougher economic sanctions, as the united nations security council meets later. with me now is dr bayza unal, a nuclear weapons expert from chatham house.
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i want to start by asking you, south korea says it as seen indications that the north is preparing more missile launches, does that sound plausible? yes. north korea has been conducting several tests for the last year. they might be more coming up. but the last hydrogen bomb test was a successful one and the yield of the test was huge as well so with the new test is coming up they will be testing a new part of the nuclear weapons system. south korea was also responding with drills and showing off its capabilities as well. you mention a hydrogen bomb which is believed to have been set off over the weekend. you are convinced it
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was a hydrogen bomb are you? yes. there are two types of explosions that can happen with uranium ore and tony. one is the atomic bomb as the other one is the hydrogen bomb. the hydrogen bomb is more powerful. the earthquake magnitude we saw which was 6.3 has shown that north korea has conducted a hydrogen bomb with an estimated hundred kilohertz on yield which is far beyond what it had done in 2016. experts including myself was better —— sceptical about the capabilities but i think this was a test for a hydrogen bomb. it is seven times stronger than an atomic bomb. if this is a more
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sophisticated bomb, north korea's weapons programme is sophisticated bomb, north korea's weapons programme is more sophisticated bomb, north korea's weapons programme is more advanced than experts had been led to believe? it is advanced but there are things that north korea still cannot do for instance we still don't know whether the nuclear warhead is small enough to put it into the platform and also whether it could actually come back to the earth and their guidance system is not yet there. technology to target the usa is not yet achieved so there are things north korea still has to do but gradually it is expending its weapons programme. can these tests harm human beings in the area or can be spread in the atmosphere and harm
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people further afield? yes, we have done a test on the impacts and we found out that from 1945 onwards the nuclear tests conducted had harmed the soil and environment and radiation was released. it harmed the indigenous population in the areas. north korean tests are underground which limits the radiation exposure but venting is a common problem and if venting a cause they soil and the underground water is contaminated and i are dying can actually come into the soil and go into the earth. so there are consequences we have seen. soil and go into the earth. so there are consequences we have seen. thank you very much for talking to us. we are nowjoined by our china
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correspondent. you have come from a foreign office briefing. what has been said? china says it has made stern representations towards the chief of the north korea mission in the chinese capital because they are complaining this is yet another test which has been carried out. we also asked the foreign ministry spokesperson what he made of the threats from the us president donald trump to impose sanctions on any country which trades with north korea. 80% of north korea's trade is coming through china so that would mean sanctions imposed on china or cutting of trade links with china. there was a bit of frustration from the spokesperson who was saying there we are trying to do our best with north korea and we're getting these threats against our interests
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and it shouldn't be that way. but crucially he was also asked twice very clearly whether not china received prior warning from north korea that it was going to conduct this latest nuclear test and he dodged the question twice. so he didn't answer that 11 way or another. thank you forjoining us. later this afternoon we'll be answering some of your questions about the situation in north korea. if you have any questions send them 61124 on text or use the hashtag bbc ask this. the duke and duchess of cambridge are expecting their third child, kensington palace has announced. the queen and both families are said to be "delighted with the news". as with her previous two pregnancies, the duchess is suffering from hyperemesis
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gravidarum, or severe morning sickness. i'm joined by our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell. can you tell us any more? not really. that is in essence what was released by kensington palace. they have been forced to announce this because the duchess is suffering from acute morning sickness. she has had to cancel an engagement today. that has forced their hand to disclose that she is pregnant with her third child. no idea when it would be due but doing the basic calculation is i think you can expect it is to perhaps in early spring, feathery march. —— february or march. it is a significant week
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for the family because prince george is due to start at a big school later this week so is mother would be keen to take him to that later this week. a school in battersea in south london. whether she is going to be well enough to do that remains to be well enough to do that remains to be well enough to do that remains to be seen. a significant moment for george. he is now four years old. charlotte is now two years old. and the two of them will now expect a third edition and a sibling. one assumes this is probably going to have little impact on succession to the throne but there is huge interest in the royal children. there is. this child will be fifth in line to the throne. charles, william, george, charlotte and then this child. talking of foreign
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travel, it had been expected that you can duchess would be undertaking a foreign visit this autumn but again, whether they will be able to do that or whether the duchess will be well enough to do that means to be well enough to do that means to be seen. she has suffered from this acute morning sickness for both of the devious to pregnancies and she did have to cancel a visit to malta and the duke went ahead without honours on. we will have to wait and see. clearly she is receiving treat and at kensington palace. hydration and at kensington palace. hydration and medication. it is a temporary thing. a phase in the pregnancy. hopefully she will recover and will resume some royal duties. thank you very much. let's talk to the royal
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historian hugo vickers. very exciting for the royal family. yes and it's nice to have some good news. the most interesting part of this is that whatever six the baby is it will not push princess charlotte out of the line of succession. so you will have prince charles, prince william, prince george, princess charlotte and if it's a boy or a girl it will take its place and find princess charlotte. that is quite interesting. the other point is that it is push prince harry to sixth in line which means there is even less chance of him becoming king which makes him —— makes it easier for him to marry whoever he makes him —— makes it easier for him erazwgi;afl tiff? if ii if?
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princess know gig! is know the j is of the mm 17 7— w
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immune 17 7— w m1? w w him takin: his lace o-fé ,,; —— ww him takin: his lace as $5 ,,; —— ww to see him taking his place as usual. he is 96 and she is 91 and they are the best example of two people who should never what exactly are we expecting to happen with this bill? today is the first day of term for politicians and this week will be dominated by brexit unsurprisingly. tomorrow we
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are going to get david davies in the house of commons giving mps an update on what happened last week. we had brexit negotiations in brussels last week. he will be giving mps his take on that and it will give mps the chance to ask him questions and put pressure on him potentially. later in the week mps are going to be debating the withdrawal bill which you have been talking about and that will transpose all eu law that affects us into british law when we leave the european union. that is going to be debated on thursday. the interesting thing we're going be looking out for which is going to be the dangerous but for theresa may is which amendments are put down because with such a small majority that is where the trouble could come for the government and theresa may. which amendments are put down and how much support each amendment seems to be getting. but they have been
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discussing that it will eventually be voted on the following week. that is what is going to be happening this week to come. it's probably worth recapping what happened over the summer because they have been a few different brexit related things. the government set out a number of its ideas, some informal and some more formal about the different negotiating areas. for example on the border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland and also on the customs union. the customs union allows goods made in the eu to travel around the eu without tariffs and with relatively few checks and it also means that all eu countries oppose the same tariffs on goods imported into the eu from elsewhere. the government about some ideas on that and also we had those brexit negotiations last week and i think the main sticking point seems to be money. the so—called brexit will.
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how much will the uk pay the eu when it leaves the eu. the eu's chief negotiator after the end of those talks last week talked about a lack of progress on the talks and david davies the brexit secretary called on the eu to be more imaginative and more flexible in its approach to the talks. brexit did dominate the summer that and it will certainly be dominating this week. the queen is in scotland to officially open the new queensferry crossing, exactly 53 years after she opened the forth road bridge. our correspondent catriona renton is on the south side of the queensferry crossing. good morning. you can hear the atmosphere and the excite and building for the arrival of the queen and the duke of edinburgh who are well on their way. they will it
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come to cut the ribbon. you can see behind us there are bridge workers who are standing on the bridge with the ribbon ready for it to be kept. over in the crowd you can see the first minister of scotland nicola sturgeon who is accompanied by her husband. and also by the moderator of the general assembly of the church of scotland, doctor derek browning. he is set to bless the bridge. in the next theme in it we are expecting the queen and the duke of edinburgh to arrive here on the bridge and they will be greeted by the first minister of scotland nicola sturgeon. they will then progress up towards the lectin and then the queen will cut the ribbon and the royal party will make its way across the bridge to the other side. there is entertainment all the
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way over there today. there is a flotilla, a gathering under the bridge. we also expect the red arrows to pass overhead. so quite an atmosphere building here. this is a special day, the 4th of september, because on the 4th of september 1964 the queen opened the forth road bridge. it was beset with difficulties which led to the construction and design of this crossing set for the 21st—century. it sits alongside the forth road bridge which was built in the 20th century and behind that the forth bridge, the railway crossing built in the 19th century. all icons and all well—known sites and this new bridge fast becoming something on the skyline here. you can hear the
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children here getting excited. the flags waving. we are waiting for the arrival of the queen and prince philip. this is the first engagement the duke of edinburgh has carried out with the queen since he retired from his solo inducements at the end of the summer. news is starting to ripple through the crowds about the news that the duke and duchess of cambridge are expecting their first baby. so lots and lots of excitement here. there have been many events to mark the opening of the bridge. this is the largest infrastructure project that has happened in scotla nd project that has happened in scotland in a generation. what has been happening, there has been so much to try and involve people to make them feel this is their crossing. these schoolchildren have seen crossing. these schoolchildren have seen this bridge springing up and i
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spoke to some young people on the weekend who were walking over the bridge, something they will never be able to do again because this bridge of course is due to become part of the m 90 motorway. there is no pedestrian access as you can see. it isa pedestrian access as you can see. it is a dual carriageway with a hard shoulder. they hope the hard shoulder. they hope the hard shoulder will be the thing which will keep the route flowing if there are break dance. of humber bridge would be shut because of high winds but this bridge has been designed with barriers to try and keep it as weatherproof as possible and designers and engineers are confident the bridge will be able to stay open through all—weather. i can see in the distance now the flashing lights. you can hear the shouts
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coming from the crowd as the royal party approaches. this is the south of the new queensferry crossing. this is the main artery now that will link 24 million vehicles a year, taking them over this bridge. 60,000 vehicles a day. this is really a n 60,000 vehicles a day. this is really an important part of scotland's infrastructure. it's about collectivity. we will hear the moderator of the general assembly of the church of scotland saying something along those lines. if we can swing the camera around we can see the approach of the queen's carp just coming into vision. here is the queen now coming out of
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the car. she is wearing a beautiful blue outfit, lovely colourful this grey day. the weather here has stayed beautiful and with her is the duke of edinburgh in his first public official danger and with the queen since he retired from solo duties. —— engagement. the queen is approaching the invited guests and the party here to meet her. the guard of honourfrom the party here to meet her. the guard of honour from the royal company of archers. she will allow approach them. you can see her moving along the line as she is
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greeted. excited children from local schools in the crowd. they have been invited along because they have seen this bridge springing up. it has taken six years to build it and over that time these children have seen this bridge which is now an extremely imposing and wonderful site across the river. it fits in with its sister bridges. and here is the national anthem. while we watched those pictures of the lord lieutenant colonel edinburgh escorting the queen to meet some of the schoolchildren who have assembled to watch the opening of this bridge and she will chat to
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a few of them and then she will meet the first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, who we are expecting to present the other vips to the queen. it is worth saying, this has been a huge infrastructure project and publicly funded as well. it's hard to underestimate the importance of this bridge to the infrastructure of scotland. it goes from edinburgh to fife and up to perth so it is a key part of the on the structure which keeps this country going. the forth road bridge has served its purpose and it will
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be used for public transport and cyclists and pedestrians but it was beset with difficulties after corrosion setting to its cables. something had to be done and this is the result. this is the new queensferry crossing which employed 15,000 people. the queen will shortly meet some of them as she progresses. people are so proud to have been involved in a project which designers believe is state of the art. they expect this bridge to be in use quite possibly in 150 yea rs' be in use quite possibly in 150 years' time. it is taking this 21st century crossing well into the 20 second century. it should be a road for all weathers which won't be beset with the problems the old
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bridge had when high winds would see it closed to vehicles. it affected the collectivity of the country. this is some achievement for those who have worked on it. it is 1.7 miles long. it is the tallest bridge in the whole of the uk and it's the longest of its type in the world. so quite an impressive structure. if you get a chance to have a look at it it really does stand out on the skyline. we must leave it there. the queen has been presented with flowers by michael martin's randall to, the man behind the project. we will be back in scotland a little later. in the meantime, let's catch
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up later. in the meantime, let's catch up with the weather. it looked pretty cloudy day and we have ploughed across most of the uk. add bits of rain as well. a sheet of cloud many of us have got. a few holes developing. a few brighter skies this afternoon in southern parts of england and in eastern areas. feeling quite warm. for many of us despite the cloud the misty and murky conditions and the rain across scotland into the afternoon. temperatures between 17 and 22 degrees. brighter skies developing the far north and west but overnight tonight this rain will intensify into the early hours of tuesday morning. some nastier conditions in north—west england and north wales in the morning. it'll clear and break—up and they will be brighter skies developing in the south.
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maximum temperature is around 21 degrees. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: just one day after north korea carried out a nuclear test, the south claims pyongyang is preparing for another missile launch. the duchess of cambridge is expecting her third child — kensington palace has announced. it's not known when the baby is due, but the duchess is being treated for acute morning sickness. workers at two mcdonald's restaurants are walking out over pay and job security, it's the first strike at the company in britain. the queen — joined by her husband prince philip — has arrived at the new firth of forth bridge in scotland — as she prepares to officialy open the crossing today. workers at two mcdonald's restaurants are walking out today
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in the first strike to affect the company in britain. about 40 staff in cambridge and crayford, in south east london, are demanding higher pay and more secure working hours. mcdonald's said those involved represented one hundredth of 1% of its uk workforce. some of the workers are gathering in parliament square, and our correspondent matt cole is there. fresh from the in cambridge and crayford outside mcdonald's stores, workers are now gathered outside parliament for a rally calling for better improvement in their pay, working conditions. cambridge and crayford stores, the ballot was as much about grievances that had not been dealt with. let it speak to the national president of bakers', food
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and allied workers union and a worker. lewis baker, you are from the crayford store, why are you on strike? because of the work conditions we have to face every day and the fact that mcdonald's have ignored as. they have ignored our grievances. they do not want to know. they don't care what we have to say. the banners talk about wanting more pay, £10 per hour. that is not on the ballot. some of the 16—year—old workers earn £5 and something i am on the £7. we need a higher higher living wage. by the time we have paid our rent and bills, we have nothing left by the end of week or month. people who are homeless because they are not earning enough. people who cannot eat properly. we need more money to afford to live. mcdonald say they
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put their workers at the heart of their business, treat them fairly, when it comes to zero hours contracts, they have put an offer. guaranteed hours which 10—15% of workers took up. are you stores, crayford and the other one, isolated? i have worked at two stores. the problems are sinless. friends who work at other stores have problems. even the union have —— the problems are similar. we at 0.1% of the workforce... —— the problems are similar. we at 0.196 of the workforce... we have to cross back to the studio. the queen is in scotland to open the queensferry crossing 50 years after she opened the forth bridge. our
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reporter is on the of the crossing. it is incredible. the red arrows are going overhead now. the queenjust cut the ribbon. to open the new queensferry crossing. here we go, thatis queensferry crossing. here we go, that is the royal party now moving, driving northwards, northbound across the new queensferry crossing. there is a flotilla under the bridge who are just about to let their klaxons go off as well. it is spectacularly exciting for the people who are here today. so many children who have grown up watching this bridge being built over the past six years, a chance to meet the queen today, some of them. something they had been waiting for, something
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which means a lot to the people who live around here. the main artery road which links edinburgh and five. quite a spectacle. you can hear in the background there, the band of the background there, the band of the royal regiment of scotland and the royal regiment of scotland and the first minister now, she hasjust gone into her car. she and her husband, they are following the hands of the royal party, where they willjoin the queen over on the other side, where the queen will unveil a plaque. and is expected to see if you wait. we heard the moderator of the general assembly of the church of scotland blessed the bridge there, blessing all of those who built the bridge and those who have worked on it over the last six yea rs. have worked on it over the last six years. 15,000 people involved in the construction of this 1.35 million —— one £25 billion bridge. quite a sight to look at, and incredible structure. ——
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the queen opens the old forth bridge exactly 53 years ago today. the 4th of september extremely significant to this part of the world. we should mention the news rippling through the crowd here about the other good news. you can hear the klaxons now. the other good news that the duke and duchess of cambridge... we are looking at pictures of the queen cutting the ribbon. that happened a a few moments ago. that was before she headed over the bridge. it is a significant day, a significant time for the royal family. a significant day, a significant time for the royalfamily. a significant time for the people of this part of scotland, who have waited in anticipation for this day to happen.
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you can hear, of course, the pipe bands behind us now as we carry on the celebrations that are happening here on the queensferry crossing. of course, 1964, it was, when the queen came here to open the old forth road bridge, the one the new queensferry crossing is replacing. you will see in the distance the grandfather, the older sister of them all— the railway crossing, the forth bridge built in the 19th century. you can see here three centuries' worth of engineering. this is a big day for the people who have worked on and have grown up around and lived near this bridge they hope will still be used in up to 150 years' time. south korea says it has seen signs the north is preparing
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new missile launches. defence officials have been briefing seoul's parliament, after pyongyang's most powerful nuclear test to date. the us says any threat to its territory or allies will be met with "a massive and overwhelming military response". with me now is professor steve tsang, who is the director of soas china institute. we are very grateful for your time. i know your area of expertise is to do with china. therefore, my first question is, why is china not doing more tojust use question is, why is china not doing more to just use the situation we find ourselves in? the primary driver behind chinese foreign policy is in fact domestic political considerations. above all, the capacity of the communist party to stay in power. most chinese know that the north korean regime exists
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because of chinese help and subsidy. if the chinese communist party where to allow the korean leninist regimes to allow the korean leninist regimes to collapse, it could be seen with china, with dissidents, the chinese communist party may not still have the political will, determination and capacity to do whatever it takes to stay in power. a message that's china will not take. domestic policies are at the forefront of china's reckoning, but no concern for example if something happens to the north korean regime, refugees would stream over the border into china? that would be an unwelcome burden. in the event of the collapse of the north korean regime, the
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chance we will see the korean peninsula be delighted and refugees going into china will be turned to the united new careerfairly going into china will be turned to the united new career fairly soon. the chinese could expect —— the new korea. why hasn't china done more to curtail the north korea weapons programme? domestic political considerations. also the practical difficulty that, in the few years since kimjong difficulty that, in the few years since kim jong and difficulty that, in the few years since kimjong and became leader of north korea, he had purged some of the most senior people in his government. the capacity of the chinese government to talk to the north korean regime at the very
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senior level has been significantly reduced. the chinese are also not terribly keen to be seen as working with the japanese to protect the japanese against the north koreans. they also cannot afford to see themselves being led by donald trump dudu president trump's giddings. will we see china impose more trade predictions and economic sanctions? china will almost certainly help in terms of more levels of sanctions. whether china will cut of the economic lifelines to north korea, thatis economic lifelines to north korea, that is the question. the answer, not in the foreseeable future unless something dramatic changes which makes it even more important that
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the chinese have to take that action, otherwise the course for china will be even higher. interesting to talk to you. thank you for your time. later this afternoon, we'll be answering some of your questions about the situation in north korea. at 2:30pm. if you have any questions, send them 61124 on text, or use the hashtag bbc ask this. postal workers are being offered £1,000 a week to steal bank cards, according to a bbc investigation. it found online adverts advertising huge sums to tempt royal mail staff to intercept letters containing cards and pins. more than 11,000 people in the uk have been affected by this type of fraud in 2016, where bank cards are stolen in transit activity
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in britain's construction industry slowed unexpectedly to a one—year low last month as new orders fell for the second consecutive month. the recruitment ad with a sinister twist. the gang that pays postman to steal bank out. the gang has asked for my delivery route and then to wait for further instructions. that is to give it time to order bank cards using the names and addresses of people i deliver to. myjob is a simple, to stop them arriving. my my contact claims postman had been recruited in the midlands and
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london. it said more than 11,000 cards have been stolen in transit last year alone. we are trying to get to the people who are organising criminality behind the scenes because once you have taken that pa rt because once you have taken that part of the gang out, things fall apart. it all comes down to partnership. a good relationship with royal mail to help target these types of gangs. the royal mail told the bbc that although its investigation does not include any evidence of its employees being involved in the alleged fraud... but what of the gang save itself? i work for the bbc. why are you trying to recruit postman to commit crime and fraud on your behalf? why? you
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say that you have already recruited two postman was that leave the camera alone, mate. you say you have already recruited two postman to commit fraud. clearly, no answers. to do what he does, he thought he was staying under the radar and he is now firmly on it. it might be enough to stop him doing what she is doing. —— what he is doing. you can see more on inside out. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: it was claimed by north korea they
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have developed a missile that can have developed a missile that can have a hydrogen bomb attacks. kensington palace has announced that the duke and duchess of cambridge are expecting their third child. workers at two mcdonald's restau ra nts workers at two mcdonald's restaurants work—out over pay and conditions in the first strike of its kind in britain. in the business news: many economists do not expect uk interest rates to rise until 2019 despite inflation remaining above target, according to a snapshot conducted by the bbc. they believe that the bank of england's monetary policy committee will be reluctant to raise rates during brexit negotiations. the uk's coastal communities are among the country's worst off for earnings, employment, health and education, according to a report for the bbc. it shows the economic gap between coastal and non—coastal places has grown with average around £3,500 a year lower in these "pockets of deprivation".
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the chief executive of one of the uk's best known public relations firms has stood down amid claims it stirred up racial tensions in south africa. james henderson, the boss of bell pottinger, resigned weeks after the firm was found by a uk body to be in breach of an industry code of conduct. south africa's main opposition party criticised a media campaign the pr firm ran for the wealthy gupta family. no rise in interest rates until 2019, inflation to peak by next month and wages finally outstripping rising prices by 2019. just some of the forecasts from economists asked by the bbc. in the snapshot of the economy — economists said they thought the bank of england's monetary policy committee — which sets rates — will be reluctant to raise them during the uncertainty of brexit negotiations.
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simon french is chief economist at panmure gordon and took part in the research interesting in some respects, these findings. first of all, interest rates, no rise till 2019. not a huge reprise hook surprise? bloody big surprise given where the bank of england has been guiding consumer businesses. to look through this period of acute economic uncertainty, we will wait and see which kind of trading arrangement with the eu the uk will have. in terms of inflation in recent months, largely due to one of the appreciation from currency and a pick—up in oil prices year on year. very little core inflation left for the bank of england to worry about.
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inflation has been outstripping rising wages. paying for stuff in the shops, good news in that respect? we are expecting inflation to have peaked in the last couple of months, or a sting to have peaked in the last couple of months, ora sting in to have peaked in the last couple of months, or a sting in the tail in quarter four. months, or a sting in the tail in quarterfour. in 2018, back down towards the 2% target. quite a robust labour market, unemployment at 841 year low, wages good start to outstrip again and the squeezed household may have a better future in 2018. brexit negotiations could scupper the... white rates won't rise because we sort of need to know what we are doing next before it it goes up? there is still a lot to
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play for. we saw in the negotiations between david davis and barnier that very little is decided and interest rates are sensitive to what economic output will do against... that is the message coming out over the bank of england and economists expect the bank of england to sit on their hands and wait and see. in other business news... postal workers are being offered £1,000 a week to steal bank cards, according to a bbc investigation. it found online adverts advertising huge sums to tempt royal mail staff to intercept letters containing cards and pins. more than 11,000 people in the uk have been affected by this type of fraud in 2016, where bank cards are stolen in transit. activity in britain's construction industry slowed unexpectedly to a one—year
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low last month as new orders fell for the second consecutive month. the study blames a lack of new orders for the slowdown, with house—building doing well, but being offset by the sharpest fall in commercial development since july last year. irish drinks firm c&c, which owns magners cider, is to buy the pub chain admiral taverns in a deal worth £220 million. irish drinks firm c&c, which owns magners cider, is to buy the pub chain admiral taverns in a deal worth £220 million. admiral, is being sold by hedge fund cerberus, operates 845 pubs in britain and raked in £25 million last year. markets and nervous. more later.
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back to the queensferry crossing. let's listen in to the first minister of scotland, nicholas virgin. when you opened at the forth road bridge in 1964, you said it showed scotland's determination to remain among the leaders of all branches of technology. today, this magnificent queensferry crossing takes its own place as a modern marvel. it is with enormous pleasure that i would like to ask your majesty to officially open the queensferry crossing. applause in declaring open the south side of
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the queensferry crossing, and then travelling along the bridge, i was reminded that today's ceremony takes place exactly 53 years since that memorable day when i opened its predecessor, the forth road bridge. which i serve scotland so well during more than half a century. for three magnificent structures we see here, spanning three centuries, they are all feats of modern engineering and a tribute to the talents, vision and a tribute to the talents, vision and remarkable skills of those who designed and built them. the
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queensferry crossing joins its iconic and historic neighbours to create not only a breathtaking sight over the firth of forth, but to provide an important link for so many in this community and the surrounding areas. first minister, the duke of edinburgh and i are delighted to be able to join you and the people of scotland to celebrate this extraordinary achievement. applause ladies and gentlemen and
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distinguished guests, please log the stagejackie distinguished guests, please log the stage jackie kay. that are onto the stage. there she is. she has written a special poem. you are the bridge that will stay. you are the ship that will stay. you are the ship that never leaves, it stays in the sky night and day. queensferry crossing. if your fitters and your elders, yourjoiners and engineers, surveyors and scaffolder 's, concrete finishes and crane operators across scotland had a dream of view, it would be to see you on this opening day, queensferry crossing. the harp, playing your
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strings, every return and going away. back and forth, further and forth, north to south, south to north, queensferry crossing. like a great cormorant, north, queensferry crossing. like a great cormora nt, perfectly north, queensferry crossing. like a great cormorant, perfectly still and lifting your wings out to drive. -- out to dry. there she is reading the specially commissioned:. we saw cutting the queen made a speech, officially unveiled the plaque. 50 yea rs officially unveiled the plaque. 50 years since she opened the firth of forth bridge. the queensferry crossing officially opened by her
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majesty the queen today. here is a look at the weather. this the end murky. rain and drizzle. you can see the extent of the cloud. one or two holes in the cloud. you might see some brightness. where it gets brighter, feeling warm and humid. temperatures up feeling warm and humid. temperatures up to the low 20s. for many, staying quite cloudy, misty, murky round the coast of wales and england. in northern and western scotland, northwest and northern ireland, brighter skies developing. through this evening, this area of rain will intensify into the early hours of tuesday. some problems on the roads. commuting across north—western parts
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of england, north wales. bright skies scotland and northern ireland later in the afternoon. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday. a day after north korea carries out a nuclear test, the south claims pyongyang is preparing for another missile launch. the duchess of cambridge is expecting her third child. she's cancelled engagements as she's suffering acute morning sickness. workers at two mcdonald's restaurants walk out over pay and job security in the first strike at the company in britain. gangs are offering royal mail staff big sums of money to steal bank cards, a bbc investigation finds. also this hour, the red arrows are deployed as the queen opens the new bridge over the firth of forth. the ceremony on the queensferry crossing comes exactly 53 years after the queen opened the forth road bridge.
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good afternoon. it's monday the 4th of september. welcome to bbc newsroom live. south korea says it has seen indications that the north is preparing more missile launches, possibly an intercontinental ballistic missile. it follows pyongyang's sixth and most powerful nuclear test. the us defence secretary, james mattis, warned that any threat would be met with a massive and overwhelming response and the white house said president trump was ready to use america's nuclear capabilities. these are the latest pictures of a live fire missile exercise carried out by south korea
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in response to pyongyang's nuclear test. our correspondent robin brant reports. after the north exploded a nuclear device below ground, the south responded with this. a series of missile launches above ground. the military said they hit their target in the east sea early on monday. it was designed to replicate an attack on north korea's nuclear testing site. across the border over the weekend, this was how north koreans heard about the "perfect success" that was their nation's sixth nuclear missile test. it was more powerful than any before and came with claims that kim jong—un now has the ability to order a nuclear strike on mainland america. a few hours later, in washington, having briefed the president, the us secretary of defence gave this very stark warning. any threat to the united states or its territories including guam or our allies will be met with a massive military
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response, a response both effective and overwhelming. one of the most troubling things is a split between south korea and the united states and it came from a tweet. president trump has attacked not just the tweet. president trump has attacked notjust the north but his counterpart in the south. they criticised what he called south korea's appeasement. calling out your ally is not this as usual but as things heat up their something gets their president who has the right approach. it is our country's business and i hope that resident trump will refrain from making comments like that. this man said
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about the appeasement we need to tracks sanctions and dialogue at the same time. the views of this man unimportant, china's president. north korea's only ally. he and russia's president have promised to deal appropriately with their rogue neighbour. as the us reminds the world the focus at a un meeting will be on sanctions and economic pressure. the talk now in south korea is of beefing up the military options. the north might launch a missile test soon and this is becoming more about missiles than meetings. earlier i becoming more about missiles than meetings. earlierl spoke becoming more about missiles than meetings. earlier i spoke to our china correspondent. china says it has made stern representations towards the chief of the north korean mission in the chinese
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capital and that is because they are complaining about this yet another underground nuclear tests. we also asked the foreign ministry spokesperson what he made of these threats from the us president to impose sanctions on any country which trades with north korea. around 80% of north korea's trade is coming through china so that would mean sanctions imposed on china or cutting of trade links with china. there was a bit of frustration from the spokesperson who said look we are trying to do our best and instead we getting these threats against our interests and it shouldn't be that way. but crucially he was also asked twice very clearly whether or not china received prior warning from north korea that it was going to conduct this latest nuclear test and he dodged the question twice. so he did not answer that one
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way or another. with me now is our security correspondent frank gardner. how did the west miss this? the west finds north korea to be incredibly difficult intelligence targets. it is the most controlled country in the world. it is sealed off from the outside world. north korea is don't have access to the internet. they can access on their phones is a network which is controlled by the government but it's harder for them to find out what's going on outside. it's hard for western intelligence is to insert agents. the people who have got good visibility on what's
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going on are the chinese. do they wa nt going on are the chinese. do they want to share that with the us? probably not. they have played a game of brickman ship because they don't want to help the united states on this but at the same time it's getting to the point where the situation is getting beyond their control. somebody referred to north korea as a rogue nation and that is the way it is viewed in washington but it has not really being viewed like that in moscow and beijing. with chinese help the north koreans have got as far as they have. whether it's in terms of vehicle parts or missile parts. but i don't think china wants to see a nuclear war break out. in your view, what is
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north korea's ultimate aim? their end game is to push it so far but not farenough, to end game is to push it so far but not far enough, to stop short of war so they are taken seriously so that they have normal relations with the united states and that theyjoin the big table. they have got delusions of grandeur because the 1953 war never actually ended and there wasn't a peace deal so it is an artificial country. they want to be taken artificial country. they want to be ta ken seriously. they artificial country. they want to be taken seriously. they want full trade and they want to be invited to meetings and things like that. they wa nt meetings and things like that. they want the threat of military action moved altogether. they would like to see all us forces of the penicillin. they don't want to take over the south but they live in a state of paranoia. the north korean regime
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ruled entirely by oppression and there. there are thousands in camps. it could be argued that some of the actions the united states have taken have been quite provocative. that is something that is concerning china. we are getting news in that britain is looking at always it can put pressure on north korea after pyongyang conducted a nuclear test. but what options are open to us? almost none. britain has got an embassy in pyongyang. there is not much britain can do. the key to all
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of this is china. china is the only country that has got good visibility on what's going on in north korea. it has got a large joint border. there is cross—border trade. the chinese are rattled by these tests. they know a lot more than they are saying about what's going on. the suspicion in western capitals is that beijing had advanced notice of this test. they are not commenting on that. later this afternoon we'll be answering some of your questions about the situation in north korea. if you have any questions send them 61124 on text or use the hashtag bbc ask this. the duke and duchess of cambridge are expecting their third child, kensington palace has announced.
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the queen and both families are said to be "delighted with the news". as with her previous two pregnancies, the duchess is suffering from hyperemesis gravidarum, or severe morning sickness. she is being cared for at kensington palace. earlier the royal historian hugo vickers gave his reaction to the news. the interesting part of this is whatever the six of the baby is it will not push princess charlotte out of the line of succession. so you will have prince charles, prince william, prince george, princess charlotte and then this boy or girl will take its place behind princess charla. the other point is it pushes prince harry back to sixth in line to the throne which of course means there is less chance of him becoming king which possibly makes it easier for them to marry who he wishes. two
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you have some inside intelligence on that? no. ijust thought it was you have some inside intelligence on that? no. i just thought it was a point worth making. it is a significant week for them because prince george is about to start school and of course last week we had the anniversary of the death of princess diana. yes but the nice thing is we can move forward now. we had an awful lot of memories of diana, some good and some less good, and it was a significant anniversary but we would all now wish to move on. this is something exciting to look forward to. always exciting when another law royal baby comes along. i hope the end duchess is not suffering too much at home. the queen is in scotland today to open the firth of forth bridge but they will be delight amongst members of the royal family. yes and prince
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philip who announced his retirement is accompanying the queen today. it is accompanying the queen today. it is good to see him taking his place as usual. he is 96 and she is 91 and they are the best example of two people who should never retire. workers at two mcdonald's restaurants will walk out today in the first strike to affect the company in britain. about forty staff in cambridge and crayford, in south—east london, are demanding higher pay and more secure working hours. mcdonald's said those involved represented one hundredth of one per cent of its uk workforce. our correspondent gave us this update from parliament square where some of the workers are gathering. fresh from pickets in cambridge and crayford there are workers now here gathered outside parliament for a rally calling for better
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improvements in their pay and working conditions although the ballot it has to be said by workers in these two stores was as much about grievances that had not been dealt with. let's talk to one of the workers and the national president of the union. lewis baker, tell us about why you are on strike. we are on strike because of the work conditions we face every day and the fa ct conditions we face every day and the fact mcdonald's have ignored us. we have put ingredients is and they have put ingredients is and they have ignored us. we have tried to reason with them but they don't care. a lot of the banners talking about wanting more pay, £10 an hour. that is not on the ballot. some of the 16—year—old workers are on £5 an hour, i the 16—year—old workers are on £5 an hour, lam the 16—year—old workers are on £5 an hour, i am on £7 an hour. it's not a left to live on, especially in london. we are fighting for £10 an hour. by the time we have paid our
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bills we have nothing at the end of the month. we have people who are homeless. we have people can't afford to eat properly because they are not earning enough. mcdonald's isa are not earning enough. mcdonald's is a victory they work their workers very fairly. they say when it comes toissues very fairly. they say when it comes to issues like zero hours contracts they have put an offer out and i guarantee of hours. only a 15% of workers took that up. everybody else seems happy. i have worked at two stores and the problems are very similar. we have got friends who work at other stores and they have robins. even the union have found stores across the country with similar problems. mcdonald's have segregated us. we have to cross back now to the studio. the headlines on bbc newsroom live.
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south korea says the north appear to be preparing for another long—range missile test. the regime in pyongyang claimed yesterday it had tested an advanced nuclear bomb that could be fitted to a missile. kensington palace has announced the dougan duchess of cambridge are expecting their third child. workers at two mcdonald's restaurants walk—out over pay and job security. the first strike for the company and britain. let's catch up with the sports news now. petra kvitova has reached the quarterfinals of the us open. < petra kvitova has reached
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the quarter finals of the us open after an impressive straight sets win over wimbledon champion garbine muguruza overnight. kvitova — who only returned to action in may following a knife attack at her home last december — played aggressive attacking tennis to come back from 1—4 down in the first set to win 7—6 6—3. it's the first time the former world number 2 has reached the last eight of a grand slam for two yearsa nd she'll play venwuilliwms next former us open champion maria sharapova follows muguruza out of the tournament. it's the russian's first grand slam since returning to tennis following a 15 month doping ban. she lost in the fourth round to 16th seed anastasija sevastova. three of the home nations play world cup qualifiers tonight. scotland host malta, northern ireland take on the czech republic, and england play slovakia at wembley. jordan henderson will again captain the england side fresh from friday's rather flattering 4—nil win in malta. gareth southgate's side could move
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five points clear at the top of their group and virtually secure their place in russia next summer with a win. they only overcame slovakia away with a 95th minute adam lallana goal when the two met last septemnber. we have to assume that slovakia are not going to come here and open up and make it easy for us. it is apparent they have got some good players. who knows the way is —— the game is going to flow. we have to be adapt the ball. we all the way we wa nt adapt the ball. we all the way we want to play. we would all love to score early and be three up by half—time. that doesn't happen very often so you have to be patient. northern ireland need just one point to guarantee second place in group c, and secure a play—off spot for russia next year. michael o'neill‘s men beat san marino 3—nil on friday....and their manager wants them to keep the momentum going. we will approach the game to try and win it. we have to make sure we
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don't be gung ho. we will pick an attacking team with a view to winning the game. the czech republic have good quality in their team. they had a good counter attack threat as well. we have won games late when we have had to and we have stayed in games when we have been under pressure. all of those experiences will help us. five live will keep you up—to—date with all of those matches. that is all for now. the queen is in scotland to officially open the new queensferry crossing, exactly 53 years after she opened the forth road bridge. in declaring open the south side of
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the queensferry crossing and then travelling along the bridge i was reminded that today's ceremony takes place exactly 53 years since that memorable day when i opened its predecessor the forth road bridge which has served scotland so well during more than half a century. the three magnificent structures we see here spanning three centuries are all feats of modern engineering and all feats of modern engineering and a tribute to the talents, vision and remarkable skills of those who designed and built them. the queensferry crossing joins its iconic and historic neighbours to create not only a breathtaking sight over the firth of forth but to provide an important link the so
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many in this community and the surrounding areas. first minister, the duke of edinburgh and i are delighted to be able tojoin the duke of edinburgh and i are delighted to be able to join you the duke of edinburgh and i are delighted to be able tojoin you and the people of scotland to celebrate this extraordinary achievement. our correspondent catriona renton is on the south side of the queensferry crossing. just remind us about what happened this morning. it has been quite a morning. you can hear the sounds of things being dismantled. it's amazing how quickly it emptied after the queen came here this morning. there was a buildable morning. local schoolchildren who have seen this structure that has taken six years to build. they came along to see the queen and some of them are met the queen. the first minister nicola
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sturgeon greeted queen and the duke of edinburgh. some of the 15,000 people who worked on this bridge met the queen. 19 million hours of labour went into making this bridge. that gives you an idea of the scale of the work. the queen then cut the ribbon and the bridge was blessed. the queen then cut the ribbon and that was the carriageway officially opened. she and the duke of edinburgh made their way in the royal car across the carriageway and experienced first—hand what a trip that is. i went over it myself on saturday and it is quite back achill, the views from this new bridge. it is 50 metres taller than its sister which the queen opened on this very day in 1964. a very significant day in this part of
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fife. in the shadow of the forth road bridge we have the railway crossing that was built in the 19th—century. you could see three centuries worth of engineering as the queen passed over the bridge this morning. this bridge is now officially open. it will open fully permanently to traffic on thursday. it has had a number of events because of this is an important part of infrastructure for scotland. the biggest piece of and the structure built in this country in generations. it cost one point three £5 billion. at the weekend it closed to traffic so that 50,000 people who
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we re to traffic so that 50,000 people who were selected from around a quarter ofa were selected from around a quarter of a million of people who wanted to walk across would get to do that. that is the only time that will happen because this bridge is about to become fully part of the motorway. it is hoped this new crossing for the 21st—century is going to be working and used well into the 22nd century. the scottish labour msp and so has announced his candidacy for the position of party leader. he was a glasgow mp from 2010 to 2015 before being elected to holyrood in 2016 and he said he could unite the party and take the fight to the snp and the conservatives. talks resume today on trying to bring back northern ireland power—sharing government. the northern ireland secretary will hold separate things with five main stormont parties and will discuss
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the prospects for restoring devolved government which collapsed in january. that cross to storm on now and talk to our correspondent. what are the chances of success? that is are the chances of success? that is a good question. behind me is the building which is the home of devolved government in northern ireland. there has not been a government here since january. today there are talks about how potentially those talks might be successful because all of this is about negotiations and up to now they have failed. they have been months and months of attempts to get the government back up and running between the dup and sinn fein. there area number of between the dup and sinn fein. there are a number of dividing issues but the big one is on sinn fein's demand foran the big one is on sinn fein's demand for an irish language act. last week the dup tried to come up with some kind of a solution to this saying they would have a parallel process
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where everybody would go back into government together and they would try and sort out those other issues on the sideline. at that stage if they couldn't agree then all of this would cease and the second it would end. sinn fein rejected that and said it was nothing new. it does leave you wondering where these negotiations can go and the pressure is on the northern ireland secretary because he should be under some kind of obligation to call fresh elections or put in place direct rule were effectively westminster ta kes rule were effectively westminster takes over the running of northern ireland. increasingly there is public pressure that something should be done because there are issues as far as public services are concerned, issues with budgets and issues when it comes to the health service. questions are being asked. he will be asking the parties which
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he is meeting individually what the future of these power—sharing negotiations should be. you will be asking each party what he thinks happened next and try to weigh up whether there is a potential deal. postal workers are being offered the thousand pounds a week to steal bank cards a bbc investigation has found. online adverts offer huge sums to tempt royal mail staff to intercept letters containing cards and pin numbers. more than 11,000 people in the uk have been affected by this type of fraud in 2016. it's the recruitment ad with a sinister twist. from a gam which says it is postman to intercept letters. i am pretending to be one.
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the gang has asked for my delivery route and to wait for further instructions. that is to give it time to order bank cards using the names and addresses of people i deliver two. myjob is simple. to stop them arriving. my my contact claims he's already recruited postman in the midlands and london. ukfinance recruited postman in the midlands and london. uk finance recognises the problem. it says more than 11,000 cards were stolen in transit last year alone. we do have our own police unit and betray and get to the people who are all amazing criminality behind—the—scenes. but
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again it all comes down to partnership. we have a good relationship with royal mail. the royal mail told the bbc although its investigation does not include any evidence of its employees being involved in the alleged fraud we ta ke involved in the alleged fraud we take all instances of fraud very seriously. our security team is reviewing the programme ‘s findings asa reviewing the programme ‘s findings as a matter of urgency. but what will the gang safer itself. as a matter of urgency. but what will the gang safer itselflj as a matter of urgency. but what will the gang safer itself. i work with a bbc and i want to know why you are trying to recruit postman to commit crime. why are you doing that? you say you have recruited to postman. leave the camera alone. you say you have recruited to postman to commit fraud. so clearly no answers but to do what he does he relies on
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staying under the radar and he is now firmly on it. and it mightjust be enough to stop him doing what he's doing. if you are in the west midlands you can see more on that story on bbc one at half past seven this evening and everywhere on the bbc i play. pretty cloudy afternoon for most of us. pretty cloudy afternoon for most of us. such an commentary in wales, west midlands, temperatures 23—24. a humid feel to the weather. even without touching, quite on the one side. cloud thick enough for some drizzle. easing off through the
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afternoon. wettest weather easing southwards across scotland. overnight, heavier across northern ireland, pushing back into scotland, northern wales, northern england. humid conditions of the night with these fronts. fresh air across scotla nd these fronts. fresh air across scotland and northern ireland. tomorrow morning, a soggy start with heavy rain, particular across northern england. at taking its time to ease off. not too much rain across south east england, but cloudy from much of the day. temperatures in the low 20s. sunshine coming out later across scotla nd sunshine coming out later across scotland and northern ireland, feeling fresher, 16—17. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: just one day after north korea carried out a nuclear test — south korea claims pyongyang is preparing for another missile launch. the duchess of cambridge
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is expecting her third child. it's not known when the baby is due, but the duchess is being treated for acute morning sickness. workers at two mcdonald's restaurants are walking out over pay and job security — it's the first strike at the company in britain the queen — joined by her husband prince philip — has officially opened the new firth of forth bridge in scotland. the ceremony‘s been held 53 years on from the day when the monarch opened the neighbouring forth road bridge. south korea says it has seen signs the north is preparing new missile launches. defence officials have been briefing seoul's parliament, after pyongyang's most powerful nuclear test to date. the us says any threat to its territory or allies will be met with "a massive and overwhelming military response". let's talk to emil dall, a research fellow who specialises
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in nuclear policy and proliferation at the royal united services institute... thanks for your time. how alarmed as you buy what we are seeing in the region? the recent provocations are pa rt region? the recent provocations are part of a long string of provocations by north korea. they have been progressing on their missile capabilities of the last few months. in particular, this nuclear testis months. in particular, this nuclear test is really just months. in particular, this nuclear test is reallyjust the showery on top. they have been developing missiles that can go further and further, be more precise. now, they have a nuclear device that is perhaps small enough to fit onto that missile and can cause hugely devastating effects. should we be worried? nuclear war is still a better way but we should be worried going forward. we have a lot of
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options to manage these situations. talk of sanctions. i think there are more things we can sanction north korea on. one is the oil supply to the country. it is also important that we first get the sanctions we currently have in place. the implementation of the sanctions have been lax so far, depending on china and russia. there is military option. deployment of more us assets to south korea and perhaps japan. i do not see how that will de—escalate the situation. if anything, it will escalate it further. i think we have reached a point now where negotiation and actually stepping back from this escalate a situation is perhaps the best option. what diplomatic channels are you suggesting, because we have heard today that switzerland has offered today that switzerland has offered to act as an honest and independent broker between north korea and the united states— might that?|j
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broker between north korea and the united states- might that? i am not sure if the can help. what we need to look at first is, what does north korea want and what would we accept a return? accepting that north korea has a nuclear capability and engaging on that premise does not mean legitimising the regime ought kim jong—un. i think we mean legitimising the regime ought kimjong—un. i think we can engage on various levels, and one is to see what north korea is concerned about. one of those things is us exercises in the region. when the us secretary —— defence secretary dr bout a massive military response by the us, i wonder what you think that could involve ? i wonder what you think that could involve? military responses have a lwa ys involve? military responses have always been an option. it was an option during the barack obama administration. in any donald trump administration, those options have come to the front. there are
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military option is the administration is willing to pursue. i think we should keep it in mind, but what is crucial is that our response does not do more to escalate the situation even further. it is absolutely crucial that our reaction to everything north korea does is not worse and does not cause more damage than the actions that north korea is doing. thank you. at 2:30, we'll be answering some of your questions about the situation in north korea. paul adams will be answering your questions. a couple who were only yards from the manchester arena, when he blew himself up killing 22 people say they believe the security services
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need more powers to stop potential terrorists. more than half a people who took part in a all england survey for the bbc agreed, even if that means west received for individuals. —— less busy. —— less privacy. terror strikes the heart of london. before the night was over, the police knew they were dealing with an attack by a suicide bomber. this is manchester arena. i live just down the road. as the bbc‘s entertainment correspondent, i have been here a lot. on may 22, i ended up having to report on a very, very different type of story. there are literally thousands of stories from that night in manchester. this isjust one. kim and phil dick from bradford were in the foyer to collect their daughter and granddaughter from the ariana grande concert.
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i saw the flash, was knocked backwards and jumped up through the pain. i thought it had gone off in the arena. amid the gruesome scene, they learned their loved ones were safe. but knowing their family survived uninjured, when others did not, has been hard to deal with. there are guilt feelings, really, isuppose, because, yeah, the only reason we are here is because those people in front of us, they took it. tonight, inside out has the results of a major opinion survey taken across england following this year's terror attacks. just under one in five said... at a concert hall or sports stadium. we asked if security services should be given more powers to tackle terrorism even if that means our privacy suffers. phil believes we should support the security services
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to catch the terrorists, even if that means mistakes are made. from my perspective, if half a dozen innocent people are locked up and, as a result of that, and other related activities, one innocent child's life is saved, i think that is a price we have got to pay as a society. this person caught up in the 7—7 attacks doesn't believe we should rely solely on the authorities to be able to stop further terror attacks. the police play a part in this. to defeat this we need to have that bottom—up approach. we need to understand that those who are being radicalised are brainwashed so we need to change those hearts and minds. and you can see more on this story on inside out, tonight at 7.30 on bbc one. workers at two mcdonald's restaurants are walking out today in the first strike to affect the company in britain.
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about 40 staff in cambridge and crayford, in south east london, are demanding higher pay and more secure working hours. mcdonald's said those involved represented one hundredth of 1% of its uk workforce. with me now is ronnie draper, the general secretary of the bakers food and allied workers union. why are you supporting this action? because they are our members. we support all of our members. they have got to struggle on and we are there to defend them. what is the exact grievance? about bullying and harassment in the workplace. lack of health and safety standards. and of course the powers being cut by the company. to be clear, the action relates to effectively internal grievance procedures, this is not about pay and working conditions?”
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would argue that it is about working conditions because hours of work are working conditions and when our members are threatened with having their hours cut, that has a detrimental effect on their lives. why have staff at the league 2 mcdonald's what's out? they are league 2 that are the best organised at the moment. —— two that are the best organised at the moment.” at the moment. —— two that are the best organised at the moment. i am confused. everyone else seems relatively happy. in april, mcdonald's announced workers with the offered flexible or fixed contracts with a minimum guarantee ofa number of contracts with a minimum guarantee of a number of hours. 86% chose to stay on flexible contracts, which would suggest 10—15% are not happy
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but the majority are? there seems to be no regulation of how those shifts are done. we want people to give things in writing to our members, not just things in writing to our members, notjust in a whim cutting their hours when it pleases. can you give us hours when it pleases. can you give usa hours when it pleases. can you give us a sense hours when it pleases. can you give us a sense about the terms and conditions workers sign up for? the hours, they had them cut when there was a disagreement on site. this is pa rt was a disagreement on site. this is part of the bullying and harassment culture that has been in place across the business. notjust within the uk, it is a global thing. what about pay? day is terrible. if you look at ebay, some people are on for pounds 5p —— £4.05 per hour. the donald ‘s employs a lot of people under 25, where the minimum wage that the government has put in does not count. it has been said there
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have been three pay rises since april 2016 but you say they are not enough? they are not enough. we have members in —— a member in crayford who sleeps on the floor of someone else's has because they cannot afford the rent. they do not get enough money to survive. a seven hour disturbance at one of england's largestjails has been bought under control. specialist staff had been called in to birmingham prison to deal with the inmates who refused to return to their cells. the disorder was confined to one wing of the privately run jail. our correspondent keith doyle has more. the trouble started yesterday afternoon, and went on into the night. it began when inmates on one wing refused to return to their cells following afternoon association. the prison service said... no staff or inmates were injured, although one prisoner
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was taken to hospital for an unrelated medical matter. the rest of the jail was unaffected. the prison, one of the largest in the uk, is privately run by g4s. it said the incident was brought to a safe conclusion shortly before midnight. last december, £2 million worth of damage was done when hundreds of prisoners were involved in serious disturbances over conditions in the prison, which holds up to 1,450 category b and c prisoners. a state of emergency has been declared in los angeles as the city battles the worst wildfires in its history. hundreds of homes have been evacuated. the fires, covering about 5,000 acres, started on friday, and have sent plumes of smoke over the city. our correspondent sarah corker has more. driving into an inferno. the hills surrounding los angeles have been burning for three days. the wildfire started
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in la tuna canyon on friday. and is slowly creeping down the hillside towards people's homes. look closely, you see a man using a towel to beat back the flames. he only escapes at the last minute. california has been in the grip of a heatwave with temperatures hitting 38 celsius. the fires covering an area of 6000 acres being fanned by shifting winds. and at night, the sky turns a menacing red. more than 1000 firefighters have been deployed on the ground and in the air. hundreds of people and their pets have already left their homes. some roads to the yosemite national park have been closed, as have hiking trails. major fires are also affecting other areas of the western united states. states of emergency have been declared not just in la but in montana and washington state, too.
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the headlines on bbc newsroom live: south korea says the north appears to be preparing for another long range missile test. the regime in pyongyang claimed yesterday it had tested an advanced nuclear bomb that could be fitted to a missile. kensington palace has announced that the duke and duchess of cambridge are expecting their third child. workers at two mcdonald's restaurants walk out over pay and job security, in the first strike at the company in britain. a shotgun, a monkey and a pregnant spaniel — all among the prizes offered in illegal raffles held on facebook last year. the gambling commission has exclusively told the victoria derbyshire programme that the number of complaints about draws and tombolas taking place on social media have more than tripled since 2013 — with potentially hundreds of illegal raffles held on facebook every day.
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and those who use them say they're dangerous and addictive. here's our reporter andy smythe. it's all very british. buy a ticket, win a prize. but we've entered a murky online world where the language is anything but traditional. it makes me so angry. i played the raffle game, i played the tombola but i have not received any prizes soiam as but i have not received any prizes soiamasa but i have not received any prizes so i am as a pocket 40—50 pounds. it isa so i am as a pocket 40—50 pounds. it is a lot of money to us. the and my
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husband are disabled. i am physically disabled. my husband has dementia, early signs of dementia. it is not very good. people set up a facebook group, invite contacts to join, and people buy raffle tickets using paypal or a bank transfer. there is a facebook group raising awareness of online scams. it is so huge at the moment. everyone is creating their own groups. there are daily posts. tens of people having issues and having problems with admin on the raffle groups. they are running then but not destroying them correctly, not receiving their prices. i have been scammed by spike two different people. some woman on the page yesterday walked away with
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£400 of people's money. she did a runner? she said she was taking her kids on holiday, she was posting. raffles a nd kids on holiday, she was posting. raffles and tom bowlers are above board like this. on facebook, most are illegal, operating without a gambling license. complaints have been massively on the rise in recent yea rs, been massively on the rise in recent years, 165 last year. facebook says it shuts down illegal raffle pages as soon as they are reported. of course, there is another reason why someone might want to hold a raffle on facebook. just like many of the stores here, to raise money for charity. maggie hughes said the person she dealt with on facebook claims to be raising money for the sik children ayes trust. she has made £1600 i understand for the charity. it is absolutely disgusting that this charity has not received a
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penny. the trust confirmed the woman has not paid them anything. with so many raffle groups popping up daily and many illegal, how on earth can they be stopped? britain's coast is home to 11 million people — and it's a special part of our heritage and identity. but many people who live there struggle financially. a report has found that the economic gap between coastal and non—coastal places has grown. the bbc is beginning a series looking at life in coastal communities. jayne mccubbin reports. this used to be one of the best and busiest seaside resorts in the whole of scotland. john tells me the story of ard rossa n. boats going to the isle of man, boats going to belfast. it was such a vibrant, lively place. but today only one ferry remains.
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the industry which once employed thousands has gone. the beach is beautiful, but empty. how does this make you feel? very angry. a small marina now sits where the busy port once sprawled. there are super yachts, worth hundreds of thousands, but unemployment rates amongst the very worst in the uk. in the job club, plenty feel left behind. have you given up? pretty much. do you feel that the powers—that—be care about the changes that go on in places like this? no, definitely not. they don't know what the problems are. they can't experience the problems, because they don't see it every day. a sense the coast has been left behind is backed by statistics out today. economic growth is slower here. over 80% of people who live in these areas are paid less. the economic gap between coastal and non—coastal communities is growing.
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the reason probably that other places have done really well is because governments have supported city deals. we want some of that. we need help and we need it now. we don't have time to wait. but here, in the west of scotland, they are still waiting for funding. but in the north—east, the wait is over. so much of whitley bay's story was the same as ardrossan, a resort which teemed with holidaymakers, eager to visit the spanish city, with fair rides and dancing and famous white dome. hello, mr spanish city, this is your history. yes, i worked my way up to the waltzer, which was probably the prime job in the spanish city at the time! but now andrew has a new top job back in spanish city. restoration manager. the famous dome, derelict for 17 years, is getting ready to reopen, with almost £10 million of public money. i am very honoured to be able to do it. something that is close to my heart. able to bring some good times back to whitley bay. £2 million has come
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from the government's coastal communities fund. that has invested over £170 million in the last five years in areas like this, and is extended today with an extra £40 million. andrew's waltzers are gone, but a new restaurant here is a sign of the private money quick to follow public investment. do you think the government, while it is doing something and you have benefited from it, do you think it is doing enough? oh, we have. well, i think they could do a lot more. if you look around the country, and see how many people are living in these towns, they have almost been left to die. and they're as important as the people who live in the big cities, aren't they? the coast of britain has an incredible story, often a white—knuckle ride for the communities that live there. but proof here success follows investment. no proof yet there is enough investment to go around. the duke and duchess of cambridge
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have announced they are expecting their third child. it is still not yet known when the baby is due but prince harry, the duke's brother, has been giving his reaction to the news. sorry to bother you, how are you feeling about the news you will be an uncle again? fantastic. great. very happy. how is your sister in law doing? i have not seen her for a while but i think she is ok. there are just three weeks to go until the general election in germany. chancellor angela merkel is seeking a fourth term — and has been facing her main rival martin schulz in a live tv debate. a lot of the sparring focussed on immigration — but another topic raised was the talks on turkey's future as part of the european union. our correspondent, jenny hill reports from berlin. it was supposed to be the highlight of an otherwise lacklustre campaign. at those hoping for a rich oratory bloody nose were disappointed, as were viewers hoping that martin schulz could at least taste victory on national television,
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although unlikely to win. he approached relations on turkey, pledging to cease talks with turkey and the eu. translation: if i become chancellor i will call off turkey's succession talks with the eu. we have come to a point where we must end the financial and economic ties. we can't do that alone. we must talk to our european partners about it. i think the next chancellor has a duty to protect germany. he attacked mrs merkel‘s refugee policy. she insisted she was right to open germany's doors to hundreds of thousands of migrants. translation: what could i have done? i am familiar with these scenarios that were being discussed at the end of 2014. honestly, using water cannons against thousands of people, you think things can be solved that way? i don't. we have a 3000 kilometre border and so we had to address the causes of migration.
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polls suggest viewers found her more convincing and credible. tonight, perhaps, a foretaste of victory to come. in a moment the news at one with jane. first the weather. a mixture of weather, starting off ona a mixture of weather, starting off on a cloudy note. showers return, temperature drop a little, some showers heavy. the satellite pictures showing the extent of today's live. in between the weather fronts in the warm sector, the club is prone to breaking up at times to give some sunny spells. where the sunshine comes out, temperatures rocketed up to 23—24. if you spot of
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drizzle easing of, dry weather here. the wettest weather across scotland, sinking southwards as we go through the course of the day. back to the atla ntic the course of the day. back to the atlantic and the satellite picture. we have got the bulge. the packet of energy boosting the rainfall this evening and overnight. fairly heavy rain forced the ball moving into northern ireland and spent the extra heavy rain works into scotland, northern england and parts of wales through the night. southeast, humid. temperature 16—17. north—west of our front, scotland and northern ireland, turning it little fresher by the end of the night. tuesday is dawning of —— off. cloudy skies but still into the low 20s. pressure conditions with more sunshine moving
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into scotland and northern ireland as the afternoon goes by. wednesday is looking like a pretty decent day. most of us dry with spells ascension. showers are, increasingly widespread across the uk thursday and friday. some showers heavy, temperatures easing back. feeling cool at times across the north—west with blustery winds. the atlantic again. a major hurricane brewing. hurricane erma. barbuda is anyway. it makes landfall 160 mph through the first part of tuesday evening. more missile launches, after it tested a nuclear bomb at the weekend. the south says in response, it's strengthening its defence systems — and has carried out live—fire exercises. president trump tells north korea any threat will be met with a massive response — and the us is ready to use
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its nuclear capabilities. we'll be live in seoul for the latest. we will look at what the world's options are to stop the nuclear crisis spiralling out of control. also this lunchtime: the duke and duchess of cambridge are expecting their third child; the duchess has pulled out of an engagment this afternoon because of morning sickness. sorry to bother you, how do you feel about the
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