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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 5, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. south korea's navy holds live—fire drills in a show of force to pyongyang. it comes as the us and china fail to agree on a way to address the escalating crisis in north korea. good morning, it's tuesday the 5th of september. also this morning, the feelgood factor of our coasts. i'm live in cornwall, where researchers have been harnessing the power of the ocean to help people living with anxiety, depression and loneliness. it is back to business for mps at westminster, as david davis faces questions about how his brexit
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negotiations are going. good morning. iwill negotiations are going. good morning. i will be falling —— are we falling out of love with the humble cup of tea? studies show that we are buying fewer teabags and more speciality and organic teas. i am in yorkshire to find out why. and in sport, world cup qualifying wins last night for england, scotland and northern ireland. michael o'neill's side beat the czech republic 2—0 in belfast, which should guarantee them a play—off spot. and sarah has the weather. it isa it is a very mild start to the day, with temperatures as the sunrises in the high teens. lots of cloud and drizzle about, but we should see some sunshine later. i will have the details in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. in the last few hours, south korea's navy has held major live—fire drills, in the latest show of force to north korea. a south korean commander said pyonyang's forces would be "buried at sea" in the event of a further provocation. meanwhile, international pressure continues to build against the north following its largest nuclear bomb test to date. yesterday, the south staged a simulated attack on the north's
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nuclear test site involving land—based missile launchers and aircraft. while in new york, the united states warned the un security council that kim jong—un was "begging for war" and that although washington does not want conflict, its patience was "not unlimited. nuclear powers understand their responsibilities. kim jong—un shows no such understanding. his abusive use of missiles and his nuclear threats show that he is begging for war. robin brandt is in seoul. we we re war. robin brandt is in seoul. we were speaking to you at this time yesterday. what has happened overnight in south korea? more evidence of south korea's reparations to defend this country, oi’ reparations to defend this country, or maybe even to attack north korea if they see fit. —— preparations. yesterday the army and the air force
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drop launched missiles to simulate an attack on north korea's nuclear test site. today we had what officials described as a massive live fire exercise carried out by the navy. this is to reassure people hear about the high state of alert and preparedness that this country is on, and also assigned to those in north korea and beyond about the capabilities that south korea has. —— alsoa capabilities that south korea has. —— also a sign. remember, this country is led by president moon jae—in, who wants to extend an olive branch to the north. it is a bit of a rebuke to comments by donald trump yesterday when he said that appeasement wasn't working. this government has restated its —— its position that it wants to see further sanctions, tougher sanctions, to try to tighten the noose around the neck of the north. but it also wants to hold out for the prospect of some kind of peace talks, certainly made comes to things like reunifying families who we re things like reunifying families who were split so many years ago when these countries went to war. —— certainly when it comes to things.
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later on, we'll be speaking to a leading academic about china's response to the situation. could china hold the key? the brexit secretary, david davis, will face questions in the commons this afternoon as mps return to westminster after the summer break. mr davis will give an update on last week's third round of negotiations with the european union as downing street promises to " i nte nsify" its approach to the talks. our political correspondent iain watson joins us from westminster. will we learn anything new today? is david davis likely to get a grilling? i think he probably will. it is the first opportunity for mps returning from the summer break to ask about the progress, or lack of it, in negotiations with the eu and chief negotiator michel barnier. as you have said, the government has suggested they are willing to increase the pace of talks and intensify the negotiations because they are concerned they will not get on to discussing what they really wa nt to on to discussing what they really want to talk about, wider trade talks with the european union, this
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autumn, as originally anticipated. mps will be concerned about that in particular. there will also be an opportunity on thursday to discuss legislation on brexit, what is known as the great repeal bill, the eu withdrawal bill, and mps will again be pressing the government to say more about their vision for brexit. this morning, the shadow cabinet, underjeremy corbyn, the labour frontbench, will be meeting to discuss what kind of changes they wa nt to discuss what kind of changes they want to push to that legislation. their biggest argument is that they are suggesting the government wants to board power in westminster when they return from brussels after brexit, rather than going on and in devolved to edinburgh, cardiff and belfast. —— hoard powers. so they will be drawing up that the plan this morning and they are likely to oppose the government pretty robustly. nonetheless, they probably don't have the votes to derail the legislation at this stage. i suspect the government will get through it, but it will be a tough first week back. will be speaking to somebody from the snp bit later as well. —— we
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will be speaking. a search is resuming this morning for a man who was swept out to sea near padstow in cornwall yesterday. he was knocked off rocks by a wave while he was fishing at treyarnon bay. another man who also fell into the water was rescued. a report into whether social services failed a young girl who was murdered by her mother will be published today. ayeeshia smith died in 2014, aged 21 months. she had been left in the care of her mother, kathryn smith, despite concerns raised by other relatives. the findings of a serious case review will be published online at midday. islands in the caribbean and the us state of florida are preparing for hurricane irma, which is due to make landfall tomorrow morning. it's a bigger storm, both in size and wind speed, than hurricane harvey, which devastated the states of texas and louisiana last month. the governor of florida has declared a state of emergency to give local government enough time to prepare. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, will set out her government's legislative programme this afternoon,
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pledging a "bold" and "ambitious" plan for the coming year. she is expected to focus on health, the economy and, principally, education, an area where opposition parties say the snp should be "embarrassed" by its record. bangladeshi officials say they are running out of space to accommodate the growing number of rohingya muslims fleeing their homes in myanmar. nearly 90,000 people have left myanmar since the army there began a campaign against extremist groups. many say they were attacked by troops and buddhist mobs. the bbc‘s india correspondent, sanjoy majumder, is in a refugee camp in bangladesh. what exactly is going on there? well, there are two main refugee camps organised by the government and the aid agencies here. they are com pletely and the aid agencies here. they are completely filled to capacity. what
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is happening with the fresh arrivals, the tens of thousands of other rohingya muslims who have been coming over the past few days, if they are simply building new camps. they are either coming into areas where they are just pitching tents on their own, or moving into any kind of eldon, any kind of shelter they can find. —— any kind of holding. —— building. this morning i have seen people trying to take bamboo poles and tarpaulins and plastic sheeting to try to build some kind of shelter to protect them. the other big concern is making sure they have enough food to eat. many of them are exhausted. they have spent several days on the road trying to get to bangladesh from myanmar, which is not farfrom where i am, and aid agencies say that it where i am, and aid agencies say thatitis where i am, and aid agencies say that it is very difficult to provide enough supplies for everybody. sanjoy, thank you for updating us on the situation. a french court is expected to deliver verdicts today in a privacy case involving topless photographs of the duchess of cambridge. the pictures were taken
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while the duchess and her husband were on holiday in provence five years ago, and published in the magazine closer. four people are on trial, along with two photographers who've been charged in connection with separate pictures published in a french newspaper. and completely different photos of the duchess on the front pages. they are expecting their third child. yes, baby number three. because she was feeling unwell. she has an extreme form of morning sickness. that is why they announced it now. they will have to switch to a zonal marking system now. once you have more than two. you run out of hands, right? yes. congratulations to them. large solar storms in space may have played a role in the fatal stranding of sperm whales last year on the coasts of britain, germany, france and the netherlands. scientists say the 29 whales were young, well fed and free of disease, but their navigational abilities may have been disrupted by the storms. 0ur environment correspondent, matt mcgrath, reports. just a warning — you may find some of the pictures
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in this story distressing. crowds gathered at hunstanton on the coast of norfolk in february 2016 to see this ocean giant washed up on a p0p see this ocean giant washed up on a pop your tourist beach. all around the north sea, more than 2000 sperm whales were found stranded in the first two months of last year. scientists were puzzled. the creatures were young, healthy and generally disease—free. now it is thought the northern light might have played a role in their losses. the aurora are the evidences of large solar storms which distort the earth's magnetic field. this can cause species which rely on that field for navigation, like sperm whales, to lose their way. after big solar storms in december 2015, scientists say the confused creatures swam into the shallow north sea and beached themselves trying to find a way out. other researchers say the theory is
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plausible, but argue it is impossible to prove. this time of year, many of us dread coming across a spider that's snuck into the house, but a family in southend had a more exotic unwelcome visitor this week. a 5—year—old boy got a bit of shock when he found a python in the toilet. iam not i am not having this. sorry, if you don't like snakes, we should have given you a warning. his mum laura called in a reptile specialist after using a broom handle to lift the lid and seeing the creature's head pop out of the bowl. according to its rescuer the snake it most likely arrived via the u—bend, and is expected to make a full recovery. what about the five—year—old! what about the five-year-old! that could happen to any of us. honestly, iam could happen to any of us. honestly, i am never going to... well, could happen to any of us. honestly, iam never going to... well, i could happen to any of us. honestly, i am never going to... well, i am, but i never want to go to the toilet again. that is an actual fear of mind. is it! forget snakes on a plane, snakes in the u bend. what if
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you get bitten in the bits and bobs. iam you get bitten in the bits and bobs. i am with you, i understand. just check every time. for ever. with a massive room. —— broom. check every time. for ever. with a massive room. -- broom. we really should put a warning up that if we show it again, people do have phobias. i can't believe they have the presence of mind to take a picture. i would the presence of mind to take a picture. iwould have the presence of mind to take a picture. i would have screamed and rahmat of the house. yes, not been dramatic at all. my favourite thing from last night as the northern ireland fans. a brilliant result. it isjust like watching ireland fans. a brilliant result. it is just like watching brazil. ireland fans. a brilliant result. it isjust like watching brazil. a great result. the home nations last night. the result of the evening came from northern ireland, who will finish second in group c after beating the czech republic 2—0 in belfast. jonny evans and chris brunt scoring the goals for michael 0'neill‘s side that should see them secure a play—off spot. england came from behind to beat slovakia 2—1 at wembley. eric dier and marcus rashford scored as england recovered
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from going a goal down afterjust three minutes. they will reach next year's finals if they beat slovenia next month. it was a good night for scotland at hampden park. they won 2—0 at home to malta, which means if they can win their last two games against slovakia and slovenia they can qualify for the world cup via the play—offs. russia's andrei rublev has become the first teenager since 2001 to reach the quarter—finals of the us open after he beat belgium's ninth seed david goffin. he now faces his childhood hero, rafa nadal. imean, his i mean, his proper hero. 0ne i mean, his proper hero. one of the reasons he wanted to play tennis, one of the people who made him want to start tennis. he has to play him next. just get out there and beat him. that's the way to do it. yes, easy! let's catch up with the weather. sarah, it feels warm, but weather. sarah, it feels warm, but we already have rain?
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yes, that's right. a mild start to the day, but it is quite damp out there. lots of cloud about despite there. lots of cloud about despite the muggy field to the weather. through the day, things should improve. look at the temperatures at the moment. 16 or 17 before the sun comes up. the moment. 16 or 17 before the sun comes up. so it should feel pretty warm out there. to compensate, we have quite a bit of rain. at eight o'clock this morning that rain was across the south—west of england, up into wales as well. cloudy and great further east. a few spots of drizzle towards london and sussex. further north, more persistent rain. this is down to a slow—moving weather front crossing northern england. quite a damp day here. and improving picture in northern ireland. drizzly rain this morning, but brighter conditions coming. brighter skies arriving from the north—west in scotland. still grey and murky with outbreaks of rain first thing this morning. through the day, this front producing that rain goes through the
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country. it is slow—moving but is pushing towards the south and the east. we will still see rain in parts of northern england and the odd rumble of thunder. to the north—west, in scotland and northern ireland, clear and fresh with some showers. still mild in the south—east, 22 or 23, and where we see the sunny spells it will be quite pleasant. in the evening hours, that rain eventually clears the east coast and we are all in that cool, fresh regime. first thing tomorrow, temperatures will be cooler than they are outside at the moment. so wednesday should shape up fine. 0nce moment. so wednesday should shape up fine. once the front clears towards the east we have fresher weather moving in from the atlantic, and although it will not be as warm, it will be much sunnier through the day tomorrow. so tomorrow is probably the best day of the week in terms of sunshine. for many of us it will be dry, just a few showers in north—west scotland and north—west england. but with light winds across the south of the country, it should feel pleasant enough, with temperatures around 16— 19 on wednesday. things turn more
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u nsettled wednesday. things turn more unsettled towards the end of the week. by thursday we see the next area of low pressure bringing rain initially to scotland and northern ireland, with quite risk winds. that will slowly sinks south later in the day. further south, still 20 degrees orso, day. further south, still 20 degrees or so, with some sunny spells. we will continue to see low pressure dominating things through to the end of the week. it will really be quite windy in the north. there is a mix of sunshine, but with scattered showers as well, and temperatures more typical of the time of year. around 14— 19. certainly today, despite the muggy and cloudy start to things, many of us will see a bit of sunshine later let's look at the front pages. i
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have plenty of lovely things to tell you. lots of them have got pictures of the duchess of cambridge. she is expecting their third child. lots of discussion in the papers about that. there is a lot of discussion about academics. this is 0xford university. the head of oxford university. the head of oxford university is accusing ministers of behaviour. there is a crackdown on their pay packets. also the pictures on the front page of many pages this morning. the sun are speculating on when the child was conceived. lovely, isn't it? probably best to move away from that. how many more girls are there, wayne? a picture of kim jong—un on the front pages well.
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the north korean leader again for war. that is america talking to the un yesterday. criminals launching hundreds of successful cyber attacks on british universities targeting science, and medical research. research into missiles as well. sally, lovely sally. what have you got for us today? plenty of lovely things. we talk about broadcasting legends. here is one. henry blow felled is due to retire this week at the end of this week. i say retire but he won't retire completely. he is retiring from cricket commentating. there is too many good stories but i want to share this with you for the first time on air. he was terrified. —— came in blofeld. he took over from brian
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johnston and spoke for ten minutes without taking a breath. he looked to his right and there was no one there. just a piece of paper that said keep going until six. —— henry blofeld. they were all outside laughing at him. what an amazing story. a top man. this is not quite lovely. see what he did? he made not a particularly good gesture with his middle finger last night which could potentially get him banned for england. he said it was not targeted at the rapper rebut it was some kind of communication with his friend carl walker. he said it was maybe a joke. it wasn't the wisest thing to do.
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there are cameras everywhere, the world is watching, just be aware of that, maybe. see you a little bit later. whether it's the soothing sound of the waves or the sand between your toes, a trip to the seaside can lift the spirits. now researchers are investigating whether so—called "blue health" could be used to help people living with anxiety, depression and loneliness — even if they can't get to the coast. breakfast‘s graham satchell has been looking into this and he's in cornwall for us this morning. feeling relaxed, graham ? i then to really need to ask that. are you awake? i'm very relaxed in our ostentatiously oversized deckchair. it is a little dark this morning but over there in the estuary, one of the most beautiful places in the country. a trip to the seaside can lift the spirits and has
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a restorative quality. mental health therapists are becoming more interested in what they are calling blue health, the therapeutic power of the sea. we have been looking at one project based down here which is using vr technology to try and ca ptu re using vr technology to try and capture that therapeutic qualities of people that cannot get to the coast themselves. we are off the coast on a vote owned by the —— charity. there are people here who are living with anxiety and depression. something special about being on the water. it's such a calming place. you can leave whatever troubles you have got behind and you can escape. close your eyes. there are group sessions on board and everyone works as part of the crew but the charity says the city itself has a therapeutic
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quality. bello there is something going on that is quite hard to define. it is something to do with space, something to do with challenge, power. ian started feeling depressed and withdrawn after retiring from the fire service. there is something eternal about the sea and water. i'm so lucky to be living in cornwall. to have a pension and to be able to do this. what about people who don't live near the coast? a team of researchers from the university of exeter, a 360 virtual reality camera and a drone. they are tried to ca ptu re and a drone. they are tried to capture the power of the coastal people who can't get that themselves. there is quite a lot of evidence now that suggests that having exposure to natural specs can be helpful in terms of stress reduction, combating depression, psychological well—being, bringing that in four people who cannot access it themselves. in our projects, it is for people who are
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living in care homes who can't get outside easily. the project is part of much larger european research into so—called blue health. will it work? irra i will pop the earphones down. --i will pop the earphones down. --i will pop the earphones down. dicky is trying it on volunteers. it is beautiful, amazing. some of the pictures are calm and relaxing. 0thers amazing. some of the pictures are calm and relaxing. others are more into rap is and stimulating. 0h! the turtle is coming behind me!|j thought it was a really interesting experience. it's not something i had done before. it feels like you are there. where did you come from? anything connected with the sea or rivers or water, it certainly takes away some of the day—to—day drudgery
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of life. what we wanted to do was test whether these environment really were relaxing and stimulating and today we found that actually, where people reacted to them was the way we hoped. we will definitely be taking those videos forward now into our care homes project. nicky will ta ke our care homes project. nicky will take a headset into care homes next year to bring blue health to those who can't access themselves. really interesting thing those people with those headsets. a bit alienating that stuff but i tried one of myself and it's amazing how quickly you immerse yourself in the blue environment. they hope to ta ke the blue environment. they hope to take it into care homes sometime next you. later in the programme, will be talking some people down here who have been through trauma and depression and say that the sea and depression and say that the sea and being on the sea helps them through that experience but that is it from us here in falmouth.
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i genuinely missed the sea when i haven't been there. it is the walk there and the expectation that if you go over the dunes and then it is there. it is peaceful, the noise, there. it is peaceful, the noise, the smell. tell us what you think about that idea called blue health. we will talk about it throughout the programme. still to come this morning. are we falling out of love with the humble cuppa? sean's in harrogate this morning to find out why we are trading in builders tea for something a little more fancy. it cannot be true. good morning to you and your hair net. it is controversial to call its builders tea. we are talking tea all morning and particularly what goes inside that. that is a real of teabag paper. not often you get a glimpse of that. they make 5 billion in the
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whole factory here in harrowgate. we will take you to the factory where they are dealing with the statistics. sales of tea are down by 596. statistics. sales of tea are down by 5%. we have 5% fewer tea bag statistics. sales of tea are down by 5%. we have 5% fewer teabag than before. we are seeing more speciality teas, more herbal teas, more decaf, being put in. it is more than the traditional black tea than we are used to. by the time you look at these boxes going off, about one third of the market is made up of speciality teas in some way. we are looking at what the yorkshire owners are doing to adapt to that and why our tastes are changing. but first, before all of that, i will have a cup of tea in a minute, you can have one yourself while you get the news, it travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm claudia—liza armah.
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a man's died after being stabbed, in what's believed to have been a fight between two groups, in hounslow. police were called to roseberry road shortly after 4:00 yesterday afternoon. an air ambulance was also called to treat the 29—year—old, but he was pronounced dead at the scene. a murder investigation has been launched. a 14—year—old boy is fighting for his life and a second teenager is seriously injured after they were shot in east london yesterday. it happened on moore walk in forest gate at around three o clock yesterday afternoon. the 14—year—old's injuries are being treated as life—threatening, while the 17—year—old has suffered "life—changing" injuries. police have put extra officers on the streets over fears of a possible of retaliation. wheel clamping is being reintroduced at several train station car parks in surrey in a move that could affect commuters from dorking, redhill and leatherhead. govia thameslink, the parent company of southern rail, operates several car parks in the south—east, and says it is only "targetting persistent offenders" — but transport groups say the practice is illogical. what southern railway doing is
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really shooting themselves in the foot because if you clamp a vehicle, it means you are blocking back parking space so it is not logical. what they should do is pursue persistent offenders through the courts which they are entitled to do. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube there are severe delays on the district line between earls court and tower hill — due to an earlier signalling problem at earls court. and on the trains — a points failure between waterloo and clapham junction means south—western railway trains may be delayed by up to 20 mins or even cancelled. 0n the roads in rainham — the a13 eastbound entry slip at ferry lane is closed because of a diesel spillage. in barnes cray — the thames road is partially blocked westbound between iron mill lane and howbury road because of a car being on fire. let's have a check on the weather now. after a sticky night, it is a warm
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and humid start of the day. there is and humid start of the day. there is a lot of low cloud around and it will stay mostly cloudy. this humidity stays with us. it will feel quite warm today and with that, we get one of two spots of rain. we have showers around and this afternoon, we could see the cloud finning and braking. as the sun comes out, it will get a bit warmer. —— thinning. it could spark off one of two sharp showers. it will clear away and there was a cold front so behind it, the air is fresh. a little bit cooler than last year, 12 celsius as a minimum. tomorrow, less cloud and more in the way of sunny spells a round. a bit of cloud bubbling up in the afternoon but mostly dry. temperatures getting up to 19 but it will feel that little bit fresher. a similar day on thursday, sunny spells around but then low pressure begins to throw one or two weather fronts at us as we had through friday and into the
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weekend as well. progressively, turning a little bit more unsettled to the end of the week. tomorrow, we are looking at more sunny spells, similar dated thursday and then things freshening up and turning u nsettled things freshening up and turning unsettled for the weekend. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. it's 06:30. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning... get me out of this vote! it is utterly horrible. horrible. he's endured icy waters and being stranded on a remote norwegian island, but double 0lympic gold medallist alex gregory has finally made it home to his family. we'll catch up with the rower, just after 8:00. also this morning, how can a trip to the coast affect your mood? we've sent our deckchair across britain to find out why you like to be beside the seaside. and after 9:00, from cooking the perfect boiled egg to the truth behind being a chocoholic —
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author martyjopson will be revealing the science behind some of our food myths. all that still to come. a p pa re ntly apparently you need quite a bit of time to cook the perfect boiled egg. 0ver time to cook the perfect boiled egg. over half an hour. we don't have time for that! in the last few hours, south korea's navy has held major live—fire drills in the latest show of force to north korea. a south korean commander said the north's forces would be "buried at sea" in the event of a further provocation. meanwhile international pressure continues to build against the regime following its largest nuclear bomb test to date. yesterday the united states warned the un security council that kim jong—un was "begging for war." robin brandt is in seoul. we spoke to you at this time yesterday, and again, more military activity overnight? yeah. what we have today
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is the two tracks that rape resent where this dispute is going. —— represent. we have the south korean navy launching what they described asa navy launching what they described as a massive live exercise drill in the last 12 hours or so. yesterday it was the turn of the air force and the army to carry out what was essentially a dummy on the run. —— bombing run. it was meant to replicate an attack on north korea's nuclear site. this was designed to reassure south koreans and remind them of their high state of alert, and show north korea, as well, the capabilities this country has to defend itself and to attack. at the same time, we are next. at the united nations yesterday, it is clear there were stark divisions between those key players, the us and china, about what to do next. china said yet again it would not allow war to happen on the korean
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peninsula, but nikki haley, the un ambassadorfrom peninsula, but nikki haley, the un ambassador from the united peninsula, but nikki haley, the un ambassadorfrom the united states, says she does not think 0ssetians regime can go much further. i think the us effort in new york is aimed at one last—ditch effort to try to force north korea to change its mind with an even tougher sanctions regime. robin brandt, thank you. later in the programme we will be speaking about china and what role it might play in what is going on at the moment. the brexit secretary, david davis, will face questions in the commons this afternoon as mps return to westminster after the summer break. mr davis will give an update on last week's third round of negotiations with the european union as downing street promises to " i nte nsify" its approach to the talks. a search is resuming this morning for a man who was swept out to sea near padstow in cornwall yesterday. he was knocked off rocks by a wave while he was fishing at treyarnon bay. another man who also fell into the water was rescued. a report into whether social services failed a young girl who was murdered by her mother will be published today. ayeeshia smith died in 2014 aged 21 months. she had been left in the care
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of her mother, kathryn smith, despite concerns raised by other relatives. the findings of a serious case review will be published online at midday. a french court is expected to deliver verdicts today in the percy case involving topless photographs of the duchess of cambridge. the pictures were taken while the duchess and her husband were on holiday in province five years ago and then published in the magazine closer. —— provence. it was five years ago, while the royal couple were staying at this mansion in the south of france, that the secret photographs were taken. the topless images of the duchess of cambridge were published in a french celebrity magazine but they were quickly withdrawn from circulation after the couple obtained an injunction. separately, though, criminal charges were brought against the magazine and, last may, two of the editorial staff and two photographers were tried for invasion of privacy. with the 20th anniversaryjust past on the death of prince william's mother in paris, inevitably it
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evokes memories of the role paparazzi played in pursuing princess diana's limousine. a coroner's court in the uk said photographers were part—responsible for her unlawful death. today, after they announced the good news of their third expected baby, for the duke and duchess, the verdict in paris may bring back memories they'd much ratherforget but by pushing from the start for record damages, they have made their point. the right to privacy is not something the uk royals will give up without a fight. hugh schofield, bbc news, paris. an artist has used 20,000 party balloons to lift herself off the ground as part of a 9—hour art installation at the sydney opera house. noemi lakmaier was suspended from the multi—coloured helium balloons as part of her cherophobia exhibit. the title means a fear of happiness, and the installation explores the vienna—born artist's experience of disability.
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i have always wondered if you could do that, and it turns out you can, but you need an awful lot of balloons. you can see how many there are there. good morning, sally. good morning. i am slightly amazed by that. i love watching your faces as those words appeared before you and you thought, what's this? is she really? yes, she is. obviously! read that previously. obviously, yes. it was a great night for the home nations in their world cup qualifying. northern ireland secured second place in group c with a 2—0 win over czech republic. chris brunt scored their second. they'll have to wait and see if they'll get a spot in the play—offs but manager michael o'neill is confident they will. with germany coming here it would
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nice to take the extra point. —— it would be nice. if we need something in the final two games we will have to go and get it, simple as that. we are ina to go and get it, simple as that. we are in a very strong position and if you look at this campaign it has almost been flawless, to be honest. seven almost been flawless, to be honest. seve n clea n almost been flawless, to be honest. seven clean sheets, the only defeat away to germany. as a coach or a manager there is very little more you can ask your players —— from your players, and they have just kept the withering. —— delivering. england need just two points from their final two games to qualify after they came from behind to beat slovakia 2—1 at wembley. goals from eric dier and this from marcus rashford gave england the win after the slovaks took the lead with just three minutes gone. england will qualify if they beat slovenia at home next month. he is maturing he is excellent. you don't look at him, well, you look at him and he is never in awe of the occasion. he doesn't have fear of anything. to be fair, i don't think
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the team did, i think they responded well. his impact in taking people on and hitting us up the pitch in counter—attack is not only huge for the team but for the cloud as well. —— getting us up. it was a great night for scotland — they took advantage of the chance to make up some ground on slovakia in second. christophe berra gave them an early lead against malta, leigh griffiths made it two after half time. if they can win their last two games than they can qualify for the play—offs despite a slow start to their campaign. iam all i am all right without. i think when you get to that stage and the tournament is in your hands, that is all you can ask. we can look back on the tournament and say, we could have done better here, here and here. but we try to make up for the bad performances, all the low—key performances, by doing the best we can. juan martin del potro produced an incredible comeback overnight to reach the quarter—finals of the us open. the argentine fought back from two sets down and match point down to beat dominic thiem of austria. that despite saying that he couldn't breathe properly at times during the match.
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his reward is a meeting with roger federer. meanwhile teenager andrei rublev will play rafa nadal in the last eight after the russian beat ninth seed david goffin in straight sets. the 19—year—old is the first teenager since andy roddick in 2001 to reach this stage of the men's draw. he says nadal was one of his childhood idols. who will be the uk's candidate city for the 2022 commonwealth games? well, we should find out in the next week or so. liverpool and birmingham are the two vying for the award, and birmingham's bid team have released a list of 22 reasons why it should be them. they include leaving an athletics legacy by refurishing the alexander stadium, home of the british trials, increasing the capacity to 45,000 for the commonwealth games. 22 is an odd number, isn't it? yes. you would think 20,25... 22 is an odd number, isn't it? yes. you would think 20, 25. .. it is an
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odd number. maybe theyjust had so many. i have been looking, liverpool, if you are watching, i have been looking for your reasons. . . have been looking for your reasons... that is what i was going to ask you. send me some, and i will say them. i was going to say, maybe they went for 20 —— went for 22 is it will be in 2022. exactly, that is why you get paid the big rocks. —— bucks. yes, i love it when we do topical stories. excellent. let's move on. brexit, education and the economy are expected to dominate scotland's first minister nicola stu rgeon's legislative programme for the coming year. she has promised her "most ambitious plan ever" but opposition parties have criticised the snp, saying the party has "delivered little" during its decade in power. shirley—anne somerville, ministerfor further and higher education, and science, joins us now. good morning. thank you forjoining
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us. good morning. thank you forjoining us. we are expect in nicola sturgeon to talk about scrapping the 1% public pay sector cap. is that a u—turn from your party? public pay sector cap. is that a u-turn from your party? well, the scottish government to lead its position out on the cap sometime ago. at this time of continuing austerity given to us by the westminster government, the scottish government does recognise that workers are under increasing strain with inflation, so we have made our position quite clear on the cap, that we would look to review that. we are already speaking to trade unions to ensure that when we deliver our budget later this year that we will be able to work with them to ensure that is workers see some relief from the austerity we are receiving from westminster. so it ita are receiving from westminster. so it it a u—turn, then? are receiving from westminster. so it it a u-turn, then? it is a development in our policy, much to the programme for government we will see today, responding to the
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changing needs of the scottish people and the unprecedented challenges which the scottish economy faces, whether that is through brexit or new technology, our programme for government and our following budget is to deal with that, not just to face up following budget is to deal with that, notjust to face up to it but to respond to those challenges in a positive manner so that we can seize the opportunity wherever possible to work with unions and others to deliver for the people of scotland. we will be speaking with ian watson today in westminster about how david davies will be facing questions today about brexit negotiations. what is your take on what you have heard and seen so far off what he has been doing in brussels?m heard and seen so far off what he has been doing in brussels? it is desperately disappointing that it is now some time since the vote on brexit, a vote which scotland didn't wa nt to brexit, a vote which scotland didn't want to see and which we didn't vote for brexit in, but we are where we are, and by this time we would have expected the uk government to at least have a plan, to be detailing that plan, not just least have a plan, to be detailing that plan, notjust to colleagues in brussels but to the devolved administrations. that is why the first minister here in scotland has
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been working with the welsh first minister to ensure that we are making our case to westminster, to brussels, because scotland cannot afford to wait for the westminster government to come up with a plan. that is what the scottish government is doing, based on our retention in the single market and the customs union. we heard carwyn jones seeing yesterday there is a fundamental disagreement with the government over brexit. you still think you are not getting enough information from westminster about devolved government? devolved nations, sorry. i don't think anybody is getting enough information from the westminster government when it comes to brexit. the concern of the scottish government is that because there is no plan, whether it is behind the scenes, it is not that they are keeping their cards close to their chest, they haven't decided what the plan is yet. that is hugely concerning. in scotland we see a great impact on our economy, whether it is the european union workers who are already concerned about their futures, or whether it is other aspects of brexit. the impact is real at the moment. that is why the
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scottish government is determined to work with other devolved administrations wherever possible to ensure that our voices being heard not just by westminster ensure that our voices being heard notjust by westminster but by brussels, because it is simply unacceptable that so far into the supposed negotiations with simply haven't got anywhere at all. brexit will be high on the agenda. will the first minister ask anything about north korea this afternoon, given the snp‘s stance on trident? what might she say about that?|j the snp‘s stance on trident? what might she say about that? i will not go into detail about what the first minister is going to say in the programme for government. she obviously has to respond to parliament directly. but the scottish government and the scottish national party has a proud record of union antinuclear party. this is something that we hold dear. it is simply unacceptable that we have nuclear weapons based here in scotland. now, whether that will be something that the first minister will mention today will be up to the first minister to discuss directly. thank you, good to talk to you. this is breakfast on bbc news. the
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main stories: following military exercises, south korea's navy holds live fire drills in a show of force to north korea after its latest nuclear tests. evening from what i saw a way to work this morning, it was miserable hours. wasn't it? here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. miserable is the word. it will be an improving picture later on. it is quite damp this morning. muggy out there as well, quite humid. temperatures above what we would expect, around 16 or 17 degrees. a bit fresherfor expect, around 16 or 17 degrees. a bit fresher for scotland and northern ireland. much of the country, we are sitting under a
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front, bringing us cloud and outbreaks of rain. heavier outbreaks across the south—west of england and wales. further west, we are a bit more dry. —— further east. a bit of drizzle but certainly mild, 17 degrees. heavier burst of rain across parts of north wales and england but it will clear out of northern ireland and scotland. clearer conditions are moving into the north—west with a few showers but still damp and drizzly across southern and eastern scotland this morning. the band of rain will slowly edge eastwards through the day. some areas will continue to see wet weather, critically for parts of wales and the midlands. elsewhere, we all likely to see brighter weather developing. temperatures 22 and possibly 23 degrees towards the south—east. the rest chance of a few showers. 0ne south—east. the rest chance of a few showers. one or two showers continuing this evening overnight in the north—west but most of us becoming dry. it will feel different
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by this time tomorrow morning, temperatures are much lower and a different air mass so it is cool and fresh start of the day. tomorrow will be probably the best day of the week in terms of sunshine amounts. that is because once we get weather of the front to the east, the westerly breeze will bring sunshine. —— once we get rid of the front. the areas of scotland and north—west england will have some showers but lighter winds further south. it will feel quite pleasant and even the north, extend or 17. the fresher feel continues first thing into thursday, too. but you will notice on thursday, the bulk of rain working into the north—west. eventually, northern ireland and scotla nd eventually, northern ireland and scotland will see the wet and windy weather and battle think south of the —— later in the day. parts of wales and england remained dry and bright. the slightly more autumnal scene continues for the end of the
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week. for friday, low pressure is established north of the uk and that will draw in westerly winds and windy conditions. we will see outbreaks of rain and it could be heavy around southern england for a time. elsewhere, sunshine and scattered showers and that sets us up scattered showers and that sets us upfor us —— scattered showers and that sets us up for us —— for a possibly stormy weekend. i noticed that word again, autumnal. most of us need a morning cuppa but what's in your mug today? i have had a tea. sales of traditional black tea are falling but fruit and herbal brands are on the up. we don't do that here at breakfast. sean's at a tea factory in north yorkshire to tell us more. good morning. i have already caused
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some controversy by telling folks here that some people make their tea by putting their tea bag here that some people make their tea by putting their teabag in the milk first. i don't agree with that and they don't hear either, i have to say. i am in harrowgate this morning and that is where the tea is coming in. that is ordinary black tea. we have exclusive figures on breakfast this morning showing that we are buying more speciality and herbal teas, as you were saying. richard is here. a bit of an ongoing story that difficulty that black tea has been having but overall, have things been picking up or are wejust not into our tea. it is a long-term decline that has been going on for a long time. there is no rhyme or reason. it is lots of competition from other drinks, coffee but also soft drinks. i think sales have picked up a bit
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this year. volume sales have picked up this year. volume sales have picked up because prices have gone up due to prices in the currency. —— changes in the currency. all much more have we been willing to pay for our tea? i think the changes have been particularly since the referendum decision last year meaning that prices for buying in ports of tea have gone up by 10— 1596. ports of tea have gone up by 10— 15%. the company is trying not to pass it on to customers as much as they can. some of it has to get passed on. richard, we will talk moreover the morning about what the change is exactly that let's have a look at what yorkshire tea is doing. kevin, if i can grab you. you are in the marketing area. do we need to get the button pressed to get it
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going again? what a relief. kevin, you have a huge factory here and we we re you have a huge factory here and we were just talking from richard about how much tastes have changed, buying less black tea on a whole. what about people who own it?|j less black tea on a whole. what about people who own it? i guess the key growth engine for our business over the last few years has still been yorkshire tea. we are not giving up hope on the black tea market and we are continuing to grow and our volumes have been bucking the trend. we are also acknowledging that consumer tastes have changed changing and we are looking at other areas of tree. meaning —— mainly to leverage our taylor's brand rather than yorkshire. import prices, fall in the pound, have you had to make efficiencies so that you don't pass on the increasing costs to the consumers as much? you are spending a lot of money on this machinery.
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there has been some price inflation within the market but i guess as a business and a brand, we believe in doing things cost —— properly. making sure we don't cut corners, compromise. we have been blending to the same taste profile for 40 years and we believe that it is the consistent quality that sees consumers pay a bit more. on these boxes as they are going through, that blend has not changed for that length of time. but, if your costs are changing, most manufacturers would maybe a just the product. if costs are increased for you, what do you do? it is a debate that it had a lot. do you change the leaf? we really respect the relationships we have got with suppliers and we value those relationships and believe above everything else that maintaining the product quality of yorkshire tea is incredibly important to this business. and
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whatever brand of tea we are using, you teabag in the milk and then pour the water in or water first? never teabag in the milk, i can't believe you mentioned it. i'm sorry. i am sorry. we will be looking at not how you just make a decent cuppa tea but how the changes to people ‘s tastes. how we can spot the difference to the black tea and what they are developing these days. teabag first, milk in, teabag in the milk. i don't think there is any debate about it. for me, there is definitely not milk first. anyway. ifi if i made either of you, one way or the other, i'm not sure you would tell the difference. 0h. let's be calm and relaxed. does go into the sea affect your
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mood? from calm and relaxed to energised and happy, how can a trip to the coast affect your mood? we've sent our deckchair across britain to find out why you like to be beside the seaside. be in by the sea makes me feel happy. be in by the sea makes me feel happy- happy be in by the sea makes me feel happy. happy because i like to swim. being by the sea always makes me feel refreshed, i had a really hard time about 15 years ago and spent a couple of months living on the coast and it really put the wind back into my sales. it makes me feel really happy. being by the sea is, i think it is the best. even on a rainy day, you can come up here with, you know, you're walking boots on or an umbra la and you still have the magnificent view, you can still go and have fish and chips even if it
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is raining. —— umbrella. and have fish and chips even if it is raining. -- umbrella. it takes me back home. it is peaceful and quiet. it is away from my daily routine. i like being bihar —— beside the sea, nice, relaxing family time. about 2000 likes. very relaxed and i love watching him because he loves watching him because he loves watching the waves. being by the sea makes him very happy and makes him smile. it makes me feel like nice and the sand in between our feet makes it feel like it's all, like, lovely. i couldn't agree with him more. it is all, like, lovely. we will be live in falmouth in cornwall all morning, looking at how we can use the way the seaside makes us feel to improve our health.
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it isa it is a bit murky affair at the moment. my favourite days at the sea is when it is not sunny. we would love to hear from you. katie agrees 100% with blue health. she has a photo of the coast when she looks at we —— when she is stressed. jacka says he is one minute walk from the sea as an twice as relaxed. natural therapy. minute walk from the sea as an twice as relaxed. naturaltherapy. getting contact with us. you can e—mail us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk — or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. right now, let's get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will have the headlines back erect seven. —— data here, at seven. good morning from bbc london news. i'm claudia—liza armah. a man's died after being stabbed, in what's believed to have been a fight between two groups, in hounslow. police were called to roseberry road shortly
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after 4:00 yesterday afternoon. an air ambulance was also called to treat the 29—year—old, but he was pronounced dead at the scene. a murder investigation has been launched. a 14—year—old boy is fighting for his life and a second teenager is seriously injured after they were shot in east london yesterday. it happened on moore walk in forest gate at around three o clock yesterday afternoon. the 14—year—old's injuries are being treated as life—threatening, while the 17—year—old has suffered "life—changing" injuries. police have put extra officers on the streets over fears of a possible of retaliation. wheel clamping is being reintroduced at several train station car parks in surrey in a move that could affect commuters from dorking, redhill and leatherhead. govia thameslink, the parent company of southern rail, operates several car parks in the south—east, and says it is only "targetting persistent offenders" — but transport groups say the practice is illogical. what southern rail are doing is really shooting themselves in the foot because if you clamp a vehicle it means you are blocking that parking space so it is not logical. what they should do is pursue persistent offenders through the courts which they are entitled to do. let's have a look at the travel situation now.
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0n the tube — there are severe delays on the circle line anti—clockwise because of an obstruction on the track at gloucester road. meanwhile on the district line — there are severe delays between earls court and tower hill. minor delays on the rest of the line. and on the metropolitan line there's no service between wembley park and aldgate. and there are minor delays on rest of line. and on the trains — a points failure between waterloo and clapham junction means south—western railway trains may be delayed by up to 20 mins or even cancelled. 0n the roads in rainham — the a13 eastbound entry slip at ferry lane is closed because of a diesel spillage. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. well, after quite a sticky night, it is a warm and humid start to the day. there is quite a lot of low cloud around and it will stay mostly cloudy. but this humidity stays with us. it will feel quite warm today and with that, we get one or two spots of rain. we have showers around and this
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afternoon we could see the cloud thinning and braking. if the sun comes out, it will get a bit warmer but in turn, that could spark off one or two sharp showers. 0vernight, the showers will clear away. it was a cold front so behind it, the air is that little bit fresher. the temperature a a little bit cooler than last night, 12 celsius as a minimum. tomorrow, less cloud and more in the way of sunny spells around. a bit of cloud bubbling up in the afternoon but mostly dry. temperatures getting up to 19 but it will feel that little bit fresher. a similar day on thursday, sunny spells around but then low pressure begins to throw one or two weather fronts at us as we head through friday and into the weekend as well. progressively, turning a little bit more unsettled towards the end of the week. tomorrow, we are looking at more sunny spells, similar for thursday and then things freshening up and turning unsettled for the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. south korea's navy holds live—fire drills, in a show of force. it comes as the us and china fail to agree on a way to address the escalating crisis in north korea. good morning, it is tuesday 5 september.
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also this morning: the feel—good factor of our coasts. we have brought the breakfast deckchair to the cornish coast to look at looe health. researchers are using virtual reality technology to harness the therapeutic power of the sea. it is back to business for mps in westminster, as david davis faces questions over how his brexit negotiations are going. are we falling out of love with the humble cup of tea? we are spending less on the bags but more on speciality and herbal teas. i am at harrowgate to find out why. and in sport: world cup qualifying wins last night for england, scotland and northern ireland. michael 0'neill‘s side beat the czech republic 2—0 in belfast, which should guarantee them a play—off spot. and sarah has the weather.
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good morning. good morning. if you are waking up to a bit of a gloomy start to the day, with some rain around, bear with the weather. for many of us there will be a bit of sunshine later on. and it will feel a bit humid today as well. i will have all the details a bit later on. good morning. first, our main story: south korea's navy has held major live—fire drills, in the latest show of force to north korea. a south korean commander said the north's forces would be buried at sea in the event of a further provocation. meanwhile, international pressure continues to build against the regime following its largest nuclear bomb test to date. yesterday the south staged a simulated attack on the north's nuclear test site, involving land—based missile launchers and aircraft, while in new york, the united states warned the un security council that kim jong—un was begging for war, and that although washington does not want conflict, its patience was not unlimited. nuclear powers understand their
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responsibilities. kim jong—un shows no such understanding. his abusive use of missiles and his nuclear threats show that he is begging for war. john sudworth is in dandong, on the border between china and north korea. john, china is still urging caution in dealing with north korea. what can they do about what is going on at the moment? good morning. the chinese city of dandong is a very good place to contemplate china's position in the north korean nuclear crisis. if we pan across the river you can see just how close the two countries are at this point. they are connected by the iron bridge behind me, and almost all of north korea's trade in goods, as well as its vital crude oil supply, flows across this border. you can see an
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antiquated north korean powerstation on the other side, a sign ofjust how dilapidated it energy infrastructure is. donald trump's argument, of course, is that china could, if it wanted to, simply force north korea into submission by turning off this lifeline. but when you look at this proximity, you can see why the chinese leadership see things very differently indeed. their fear things very differently indeed. theirfear is things very differently indeed. their fear is that pushing north korea towards regime collapse will bring chaos and instability, factional infighting, possibly even war, right up against this border. and that is why beijing is insisting that it will not contemplate a total trade embargo. it will not contemplate talk of military options. all it wants to see is a return to dialogue, and that has been its position all along. absolutely fascinating to see the point of view from so close to the border. we will be speaking to a leading academic about china's response
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to the situation. that is in a few minutes. the brexit secretary, david davis, will face questions in the commons this afternoon, as mps return to westminster after the summer break. he will give an update on last week's third round of negotiations with the european union, as downing street promises to intensify its approach to the talks. 0ur political correspondent iain watson joins us from westminster. good morning to you. you will have quite a few questions to answer later. that's right. it is the first opportunity, of course, for mps to question david davis on the progress or lack of it in brexit negotiations with the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier. the government had been hoping to move on to wider talks with the eu. eu negotiators are talks with the eu. eu negotiators a re less talks with the eu. eu negotiators are less keen. mps from right across the house of commons will be keen to getan the house of commons will be keen to get an update on progress on what the government is going to be doing about that. we may even get a major
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speech from the prime minister on that topic later this month. but also this week, of course, it is the eu withdrawal bill, the bill that effectively will take is out of the european community. and again, mps will have an opportunity to push their own particular visions of brexit. we expect strong opposition from the labour party in some areas. the shadow cabinet underjeremy corbyn are meeting this morning to draw up their battle plan for the protection of workers' rights, and for greater parliamentary scrutiny of the whole process. i think the government will initially get the legislation through, and david davis, i am sure, will survive his grilling later today. it will be a tough week backed the government, and it will underline just how much this parliamentary session is going to be dominated by brexit. a report into whether social services failed a young girl who was murdered by her mother will be published today. ayeeshia smith died in 2014, aged 21 months. she had been left in the care of her mother, kathryn smith, despite concerns raised by other relatives. the findings of a serious case review will be published online at midday.
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a search is resuming this morning for a man who was swept out to sea near padstow in cornwall yesterday. he was knocked off rocks by a wave while he was fishing at treyarnon bay. another man who also fell into the water was rescued. islands in the caribbean and the us state of florida are preparing for hurricane irma, which is due to make landfall tomorrow morning. it is a bigger storm, both in size and wind speed, than hurricane harvey, which devastated the states of texas and louisiana last month. the governor of florida has declared a state of emergency, to give local government enough time to prepare. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, will set out her government's legislative programme this afternoon, pledging a bold and ambitious plan for the coming year. she is expected to focus on health, the economy and principally education. 0ur scotland correspondent lorna gordonjoins us from holyrood. lorna, what can we expect from the first minister this afternoon? good morning to you. what can we
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expect to hear today? good morning. it is thought 16 bills will be set out today, to add to the 11 already in progress here at the scottish parliament, and i think they will be policy announcements touching on pretty much every area of public life. but in terms of legislation, expect details of bills in areas like health, in areas like education and finance. some of that has already been heavily trailed. expect perhaps an announcement to lift that 196 perhaps an announcement to lift that 1% cap on public sector pay. in the area of justice there 1% cap on public sector pay. in the area ofjustice there is expected to bea area ofjustice there is expected to be a bill to pardon gay men convicted of same sex offences before laws against homosexuality we re before laws against homosexuality were dropped. and in the area of the environment expect some bold announcements as well. this is being described as the greenest programme for government ever seen. described as the greenest programme for government ever seen. perhaps there will be announcements for investments in what nicola sturgeon
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would like to call the hi—tech economy, perhaps on electric cars. her government the challenge is to be seen, after ten years in power, to govern and govern well, and counter accusations from the opposition that they have neglected the dayjob. opposition that they have neglected the day job. thank you very much, thank you. large solar storms in space... we are not going to do that? we were going to talk about how it did a group of wales, but i think we will return to that later. this time of year, many of us dread coming across a spider that has snuck into the house, but a family in southend had a more exotic unwelcome visitor this week. a five—year—old boy got a bit of shock when he found a python in the toilet. his mum, laura, called in a reptile specialist, after using a broom handle to lift the lid and seeing the creature's head pop out of the bowl. according to its rescuer, the snake most likely arrived
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via the u—bend, and is expected to make a full recovery. i have a big snake issue. 0bviously i don't want the snake to get hurt at all, but i am not that bothered. the body language tells you everything, doesn't it? from now on iam double everything, doesn't it? from now on i am double pre— flushing. it doesn't make any difference! everyone is all right. north korea's nuclear bomb test attracted global condemnation, but notably its closest ally, china, stopped short of calling for tougher sanctions at the un security council. it puts their position at odds with the us, who have accused kim jong—un of begging for war. so what influence could china wield, and why do they seem reticent to act? professor steve tsang is director of the china institute at soas, and joins us from our london newsroom. good morning to you. thank you so
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much forjoining us. we havejust been talking to one of our reporters who is right on the border between china and north korea. how close are their relations? well, historically, their relations? well, historically, the relationship between north korea and china, in terms of the relationship between the teeth and the lips, it is that close, but in the lips, it is that close, but in the last three or four mac years, after kim jong—un came to power, the last three or four mac years, after kimjong—un came to power, he basically purged all those senior advisers who had very close ties with the chinese leaders. so at the moment they are not terribly —— there are not terribly effective channels for communication between the two top leaders. and what is it that you think china would like to see happen? well, the chinese would ideally have preferred the north korean is not to have developed a nuclear weapon. but now that the
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north koreans have done so, i think all that the chinese really want is to contain the problem, and not allow it to spread and destabilise the region. i don't think the chinese are now really working to get rid of the nuclear weapons programme in north korea. you talked about them not wanting to destabilise the region, but it seems to be having a kind of global impact, in some ways, doesn't it? absolutely. but while the chinese do not want to destabilise the region, their first not want to destabilise the region, theirfirst and not want to destabilise the region, their first and foremost consideration is the capacity of the chinese communist party to stay in power in china. for that, they cannot afford to see the communist regime in north korea tallat, —— collapse, because the north korean regime continues to survive by the subsidy and support of the chinese communist party, and if the communist party, and if the
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communist party, and if the communist party in china allows the north koreans to collapse, it could be seen as a signal by dissidents in china that the communist party of china that the communist party of china no longer has the political will, determination, or capacity to do whatever it takes to stay in power. that is something that president xijinping power. that is something that president xi jinping will not tolerate. that is very interesting. i understand as well that kim jong—un was due to go to china to have a visit, and didn't go. what does that tell you? well, that clearly shows that kim jong—un really, deliberately sends a message to the chinese that he is not going to the chinese that he is not going to go to beijing and pay homage to president xijinping, that to go to beijing and pay homage to president xi jinping, that north korea is not a chinese client state, that north korea will do whatever it wa nts. that north korea will do whatever it wants. so what we have seen, in the missile and nuclear test, essentially, is that kim jong—un poked americans on the left eye and
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poked americans on the left eye and poked the chinese in the right, and gets away with it. it is really fascinating, what you are telling us. fascinating, what you are telling us. as we say, we have seen how close their relationship is. their borders are right next to each other. what about the possibility of beijing supporting further un sanctions? might that be a way to deal with the situation, or are they unlikely to do that? well, if the request is to have some very specific increase in the levels of sanctions, i think the chinese government would probably consider that. but what the americans are asking for, and potentially implying, is that the americans might imposea implying, is that the americans might impose a trade war on china, a potential cut off of trade with countries that trade with north korea. this is a very serious matter for the chinese. if that should ever come to pass, it will devastate the chinese economy. and the chinese don't want to encourage the americans to even think about that.
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and just very briefly, how serious and dangerous do you think the situation is right now? well, it is serious, it is dangerous, as we have a leader in north korea who is doing it almost by playing a game and seeing how far he can get away with it. and on the other side, in the united states, you have president trump, who does not always follow the best professional advice that he receives. but in fact, nobody actually wants war. absolutely fascinating to talk to you on brea kfast. fascinating to talk to you on breakfast. thank you very much indeed for your time. 0n the way to work this morning, i had to go for a double handed umbrella. those words grim and miserable sums it upfor those words grim and miserable sums
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it up for some of us but not everywhere. it is mild outside. we have cloud a round but it is dry for some parts of the country. a lot of cloud around and some places, it is producing rain. a quite a muggy, humid feel. for some lucky places some sunshine. some heavier birth across western wales and the south—west of england. further east, some dry weather —— heavier birth. look at the temperatures. 17 degrees or so. look at the temperatures. 17 degrees or so. further north, look at the temperatures. 17 degrees orso. further north, heavier look at the temperatures. 17 degrees or so. further north, heavier bursts across north—west england in particular. the rain is clearing and some brighter weather heading in. sunshine and showers for north—western scotland but further south and east, the cloud and drizzly rain. fairly slow—moving weather front will bring some
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breezes along the south—west. later on, some sunny and dry weather. particular for scotland and northern ireland. across the country, some sunshine and the odd shower around. 22 or 23 degrees in the brighter spells. eventually, we lose the front from the east and the wet weather so it is clear and dry tonight and it will feel fresher. a much different feel to the weather tomorrow morning. temperatures being in double figures that it will be colder in the countryside. it will feel different tomorrow with the fresh air that starts to pile in from the atlantic. also bringing with it, lots of sunshine. different to today, losing the cloud. a few showers for the west of scotland, north—west england, too, will be quite breezy in the north. lighter winds and in the sunny spells, temperatures 16— 19 and less muddy
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and humid. we hold onto the fresh field to start the day on thursday but further north, the rain works in and the winds pick up. that is low pressure dominating the weather through the latter part of the week but still, further south, not a bad day. heading through into friday, that pressure stays with us. it will sit to the north of the uk, tightly packed isobars so it will be windy and it will be more showery. an u nsettled and it will be more showery. an unsettled and to the week. 14— 19 degrees and that sets us up for a showery weekend but more on matters we had through the week. today, muqqy we had through the week. today, muggy start, brighter later. whether it's the soothing sound of the waves or the sand between your toes, a trip to the seaside can lift the spirits. now researchers are investigating
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whether so—called "blue health" could be used to help people living with anxiety, depression and loneliness — even if they can't get to the coast. breakfast‘s graham satchell has been looking into this and he's in cornwall for us this morning. feeling relaxed, graham ? good morning, graham. good morning, grahamlj good morning, graham. i am feeling extraordinarily relaxed. we are in falmouth on the cornish coast and the estuary with here is grey but it is one of the most beautiful spots in the whole country. we have aerial pictures of this morning and it is a stunning view. mental health experts have long known that visits to the coast ca n have long known that visits to the coast can lift the spirits and they have become more interested in so—called blue health. what is it
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about the sea that can help people suffering with anxiety, depression and loneliness? we are looking at one technique which looks to use virtual reality technology to bring the seaside to people that can't get here themselves. 0k, suse? happy? we're off the coast of falmouth on a boat owned by the charity, sea sanctuary. on board, a skipper, a therapist and two people, susie and ian, who are living with anxiety and depression. it's something very special about being on the water. it's such a calming place, you can leave whatever troubles you've got behind, and you can escape. gently, close your eyes. there are group sessions on board and everyone works as part of the crew. but the charity says the sea itself has a therapeutic quality. there's something going on, it's quite hard to define. but it's something to do with space, something to do with challenge, power. ian started feeling depressed and withdrawn after retiring
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from the fire service. there is something eternal about the sea, isn't there, about water. i'm so lucky to be living in cornwall, to have a pension and to be able to do this, you know. so what about people who don't live near the coast? a team of researchers from the university of exeter, a 360 virtual reality camera and a drone. they're trying to capture the power of the coast for people who can't get there themselves. there's quite a lot of evidence now to suggest that accessing and having exposure to natural spaces can be really beneficial for psychological well—being in terms of stress reduction, in terms of combating depression. we're particularly trying to bring that therapeutic blue space in for people who can't access it themselves. so particularly, in our project, it's for people who are living in care homes who can't perhaps get outside so easily. nicky's project is part of much larger european research into so—called "blue health". will it work? bring it over your glasses.
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now, pop the earphones down. it's on my nose. nicky is trying out her videos on a group of volunteers. oh, that's amazing. oh, it's beautiful. some of the pictures are calm and relaxing. one could definitely fall asleep. others, more interactive, stimulating. oh, the turtle's coming behind me! oh, no! well, i thought it was a really interesting experience. it's not something i've done before. it feels like you're there. hey! where did you come from? anything, ithink, connected with the sea or rivers, water, it certainly takes away some of the day—to—day drudgery of life. what we wanted to do was test whether these environments really were relaxing and stimulating, and today we found that actually, the way people reacted to them
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was the way wed hope that they would, and so we will definitely take those videos forward now into our care. nicky will take her headsets into care homes next year to bring blue health to those who can't access it themselves. it was amazing thing those people with those headsets on and i tried it myself. it is incredible how quickly you immerse yourself in the blue environment. nicky will take those into care homes next year and see how they get on. with me this morning isjoe see how they get on. with me this morning is joe from see how they get on. with me this morning isjoe from the charity. see how they get on. with me this morning is joe from the charity. for four days in total, starting on monday and finishing on thursday. four days in total, starting on monday and finishing on thursdaym
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is about being part of a team and accrue as well as being out on the water, isn't it? some of it is the attraction of sailing being at one with the sea and on the sailboat but a lot of it is around the education. a lot of it is about how we, as therapists, are saying it is about therapists, are saying it is about the relationship that develops over the relationship that develops over the four days and encourages people to open up and explore things that they haven't perhaps for many years. do you think the sea in and of itself has a therapeutic quality?m you think about poetry and films and people willjust you think about poetry and films and people will just stand you think about poetry and films and people willjust stand and stare at the sea without question and without understanding why. there is real magic and we can't fully understand it. we know there are negative ions at some of it remains a mystery and thatis at some of it remains a mystery and that is some of the other work to the programme as well. people here
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at exeter university are trying to ca ptu re at exeter university are trying to capture that power in the virtual reality way. that is another step removed. what you think about it?|j can see the benefit for people who cannot get to the sea although you are missing a lot of the vital ingredients. i think there is a formula. a sensory awareness, dealing with emotion, the smell of the sea and being at one with nature. i think the environment is incredibly powerful. i didn't think it will fully capture it that it is some start. there you go, blue health and its future here on a windy, starting to rain, falmouth but still beautiful and calming as we sit in this massive breakfast deckchair. looking at those pictures, graham, any day by the seaside is a good day. enjoy it. thank you to everybody getting in touch. you said that during graham's piece that you
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are going to go and live by the sea. have you spoken to your family about it? they are away. delia says being by the sea is the best medicine in the world. we are all vikings and long for the freedom of the waves. sao has moved to morcombe. wish i was there. it is the sound of the sea, isn't it? get in touch with us. you can e—mail us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning. are we falling out of love with the humble cuppa? sean's in harrogate this morning to find out why we are trading in builders tea for something a little more fancy. there what kind of fancy stuff would
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you fancy? raspberry and cranberry tea ? you fancy? raspberry and cranberry tea? i'm not sure how that works but companies like this one here, tailors in harrogate, they make yorkshire tea and they are having to adapt. this is their —— original tea they make. a lot of kenyan tea leaves have rising cost. we are consuming a lot less black tea. the ingredients, the leaves they blend, more of that these days will be fruity or herbal. we are spending more in that area. and when you look at the date over the past year or so, that is alternative tea. these companies need to expand their manufacturing base in some way to account for those tastes. 0ver manufacturing base in some way to account for those tastes. over the morning, we will be looking at what type of herbal tea, how are our tastes changing exactly and moving away from this traditional blend in
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the old breakfast mug. but before that, we have news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm claudia—liza armah. a man's died after being stabbed, in what's believed to have been a fight between two groups, in hounslow. police were called to roseberry road shortly after 4:00 yesterday afternoon. an air ambulance was also called to treat the 29—year—old, but he was pronounced dead at the scene. a murder investigation has been launched. a 14—year—old boy is fighting for his life and a second teenager is seriously injured after they were shot in east london yesterday. it happened on moore walk in forest gate at around three o clock yesterday afternoon. the 14—year—old's injuries are being treated as life—threatening, while the 17—year—old has suffered "life—changing" injuries. police have put extra officers on the streets over fears of a possible of retaliation. wheel clamping is being reintroduced at several train station car parks in surrey in a move that could affect commuters from dorking, redhill and leatherhead. govia thameslink, the parent
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company of southern rail, operates several car parks in the south—east, and says it is only "targetting persistent offenders" — but transport groups say the practice is illogical. what southern rail are doing is really shooting themselves in the foot because if you clamp a vehicle it means you are blocking that parking space so it is not logical. what they should do is pursue persistent offenders through the courts which they are entitled to do. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube — there are minor delays on the circle line anti—clockwise. 0n the district line — there are severe delays between earls court and eailing broadway westbound. and minor delays between barking and upminster. and on the metropolitan line there are severe delays. and on the trains. a points failure between waterloo and clapham junction means there are delays and cancellations on south—western trains. and on the trains. a points failure between waterloo and clapham junction means there are delays and cancellations on south—western trains. 0n the roads in nine elms. battersea park road is partially blocked northbound at kirtling drive due to accident. 0n the roads in rainham. there's slow traffic on a13 westbound from wennington, due to earlier accident at ferry lane. and eastbound the entry slip
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at ferry lane is closed due to diesel spillage. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. well, after quite a sticky night, it is a warm and humid start to the day. there is quite a lot of low cloud around and it will stay mostly cloudy. but this humidity stays with us. it will feel quite warm today and with that, we get one or two spots of rain. we have showers around and this afternoon we could see the cloud thinning and braking. if the sun comes out, it will get a bit warmer but in turn, that could spark off one or two sharp showers. 0vernight, the showers will clear away. it was a cold front so behind it, the air is that little bit fresher. the temperature a a little bit cooler than last night, 12 celsius as a minimum. tomorrow, less cloud and more in the way of sunny spells around. a bit of cloud bubbling up in the afternoon but mostly dry. temperatures getting up to 19 but it will feel that little bit fresher. a similar day on thursday, sunny spells around but then low pressure begins to throw one or two weather fronts at us as we head through friday and into the weekend as well. progressively, turning
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a little bit more unsettled towards the end of the week. tomorrow, we are looking at more sunny spells, similar for thursday and then things freshening up and turning unsettled for the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. in the last few hours, south korea's navy has held major live—fire drills in the latest show of force to north korea. a south korean commander said the north's forces would be buried at sea in the event of a further provocation. meanwhile, international pressure continues to build against the regime, following its largest nuclear bomb test to date. yesterday, the united states warned the un security council that kim jong—un was begging for war. the brexit secretary, david davis,
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will face questions in the commons this afternoon, as mps return to westminster after the summer break. mr davis will give an update on last week's third round of negotiations with the european union, as downing street promises to intensify its approach to the talks. a man who was swept to see yesterday has died, police have confirmed. he was knocked off rocks by a wave while he was fishing at treyarnon bay. another man who also fell into the water was rescued. a report into whether social services failed a young girl who was murdered by her mother will be published today. ayeeshia smith died in 2014, aged 21 months. she had been left in the care of her mother, kathryn smith, despite concerns raised by other relatives. the findings of a serious case review will be published online at midday. islands in the caribbean and the us
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state of florida are preparing for hurricane irma, which is due to make landfall tomorrow morning. it is a bigger storm both in size and wind speed than hurricane harvey, which devastated the states of texas and louisiana last month. the governor of florida has declared a state of emergency, to give local government enough time to prepare. bangladeshi officials say they are running out of space to accommodate the growing number of rohingya muslims fleeing their homes in myanmar. nearly 90,000 people have left myanmar since the army there began a campaign against extremist groups. many say they were attacked by troops and buddhist mobs. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, will set out her government's legislative programme this afternoon, pledging a bold and ambitious plan for the coming year. she is expected to focus on health and education, and is also planning to scrap the 1% cap on public—sector pay rises, despite voting against this in may. speaking earlier on breakfast, shirley—anne somerville, ministerfor further and higher education and science, insisted this isn't a u—turn.
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well, it is a development in our policy, much like the programme for government which we will see today, responding to the changing needs of the scottish people, to the unprecedented challenges the scottish economy is facing, whether thatis scottish economy is facing, whether that is through brexit or new technology. the programme for our government and our following technology. the programme for our government and ourfollowing budget is to deal with that, to respond to those challenges in a positive manner and seize the opportunities wherever possible to work with trade unions and others to deliver for the people. solar storms may have played a role in the fatal stranding of sperm whales last year on the coasts of britain, germany, france and the netherlands. scientists say the 29 whales were young and free of disease, but their navigational abilities may have been disrupted by the storms, which distort the earth's
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magnetic field. other researchers say the theory is plausible, you were saying earlier you have often wondered how many balloons it would take to make you float. an artist has used 20,000 party balloons to lift herself off the ground, as part of a nine—hour art installation at the sydney opera house. noemi lakmaier was suspended from the multi—coloured helium balloons as part of her cherophobia exhibit. the title means a fear of happiness, and the installation explores the vienna—born artist's experience of disability. it is really rather lovely. at least she didn't have to blow all of those up, since they are helium. a lot of work. coming up on the programme: sarah has the weather.
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i think it is pretty miserable out, thatis i think it is pretty miserable out, that is a fair summary. not at all miserable in northern ireland, but i don't mean the weather. they are not quite guaranteed a place in russia next summer, not quite guaranteed their play—off place just yet, but they are so nearly there. it was a great night for the home nations in their world cup qualifying matches. news of england and scotland in a moment, but the result of the night came from northern ireland, who secured second place in group c with a 2—0 win over the czech republic. jonny evans scored the first, his first goal for his country in eight years. evans's west brom team—mate chris brunt scored the second. northern ireland aren't quite certain yet of a spot in the play—offs, but manager michael o'neill is confident they will qualify. with germany coming here it would be nice to take the extra point. if we need something in the final two games we will have to go and get it, simple as that. we are in a very strong position and if you look at this campaign it has almost been flawless, to be honest.
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seven clean sheets, the only defeat away to germany. as a coach or a manager there is very little more you can ask of your players, and they have just kept delivering. england need just two points from their final two games to qualify, after they came from behind to beat slovakia 2—1 at wembley. goals from eric dier and marcus rashford gave england the win, after the slovaks took the lead with just three minutes gone. england will qualify if they beat slovenia at home next month, but it was rashford who was the match—winner last night. his maturity is excellent. you don't look at him — well, you look at him and he's never in awe of the occasion. he doesn't have fear of anything. to be fair, i don't think the team did, i think they responded well. his impact in taking people on and getting us up the pitch in counter—attack is not only huge for the team but for the crowd as well. scotland took advantage of the chance to make up some ground on slovakia, in second. christophe berra gave them an early lead against malta. leigh griffiths made it two after half—time. if they can win their last two games, then they can qualify
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for the play—offs, despite a slow start to their campaign. i'm all right with that. i think when you get to that stage and the tournament is in your hands, that is all you can ask for. we can look back on the tournament and say, we could have done better there, there and there. but we try to make up for the bad performances, or the low—key performances, by doing the best we can. tonight, wales are in moldova, looking to keep their hopes of qualifying alive. juan martin del potro produced an incredible comeback overnight to reach the quarter—finals of the us open. he fought back from two sets down and match point down to beat dominic thiem of austria, that despite saying that he couldn't breathe properly at times during the match. his reward is a meeting with roger federer. meanwhile, teenager andrey rublev will play rafa nadal in the last eight, after he beat ninth seed david goffin in straight sets. rublev is the first teenager since andy roddick, in 2001, to reach this stage of the men's draw. he says nadal was one of his childhood idols.
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women's world number one karolina pliskova dropped just one game against americanjennifer brady on her way to the quarter—finals. the match was over in 46 minutes. who will be the uk's candidate city for the 2022 commonwealth games? well, we should find out in the next week or so. liverpool and birmingham are the two vying for the award, and birmingham's bid team have released a list of 22 reasons why it should be them. they include leaving an athletics legacy by refurbishing the alexander stadium, home of the british trials, increasing the capacity to 45,000 for the commonwealth games. liverpool say they could host the ceremony at anfield. rugby sevens,
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and swimming in the docks. a floating swimming pool in the docks. it isa floating swimming pool in the docks. it is a fabulous place to swim, i am not meant to be biased but it is a great place to swim. and archery at entry. along straight. -- aintree. the duke and duchess of cambridge are expecting their third child, but once again, catherine is suffering from severe morning sickness. hyperemesis gravidarum affects around one in 100 pregnant women. so what is it, and what can be done to treat it? dr yusra khan is a gp who is pregnant with her second child, and suffers from the condition. shejoins us now. very good morning to you. have i pronounced it right? absolutely, that was spot on. so you suffer from it yourself, and to call it a severe form of morning sickness is probably
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an understatement. tell us what it is like. absolutely, so as you save hyperemesis effects one in 100 pregnancies, and i would say this torturous and soul snatching. i am 24 weeks pregnant, this is my second pregnancy. i fell pregnant two years ago and this was an unplanned pregnancy, and it did come as a bit ofa pregnancy, and it did come as a bit of a shock and it came with the severe symptoms of hyperemesis the main thing to say is that morning sickness is an underestimation. it is a spectrum, and hyperemesis gravidarum is at the severe end. metaphorically i would say that morning sickness is unpleasant, and it is something that is like walking on lego, i suppose, but hyperemesis gravidarum is like walking on fire. so both is unpleasant but one is severely more unpleasant but one is severely more unpleasant than the other, and in this case it is hyperemesis gravidarum. morning sickness is something that you expect in pregnancy. pygott women like to feel nauseous, because it shows them that
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they are pregnant, their hormones are active, and the foetus is developing well —— pregnant women. mild nausea may improve by rest, by that gingered biscuit cure that eve ryo ne that gingered biscuit cure that everyone goes on about. but hyperemesis gravidarum, on the other hand,is hyperemesis gravidarum, on the other hand, is the complete opposite —— ginger biscuit. it is severely the —— debilitating, i have passed the acute phase of hyperemesis. for me that was from five to 18 weeks, and ican... that was from five to 18 weeks, and i can... what sort of things? because people can be sick 60, 70 times a day? so for me sickness was about ten times a day. the main symptom was the crippling nausea. i was unable to eat and drink, i was unable to set up in bed. my mother and my husband had to lift me up to drink. without them, i wouldn't have been able to function. i still can't look after my two—year—old child, which obviously is extremely upsetting. i lost weight, my
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prepregnancy weight back at five weeks was 52 kg, and it went down to 42 kg. and that can be... you talked about feeling awful, but actually it can be dangerous as well. because i think the duchess was in hospital ones with it. you also have ended up in hospital. his dehydration the problem? i ended up in hospital three times on this occasion, and it was severe three times on this occasion, and it was severe dehydration. i felt dizzy, i wasn't urinating, i was unable to keep anything down for weeks on end. i had lost so much weight. my antenatal consultant described me, with all due respect to those people, described me as an african child who looked extremely malnourished when i fainted on her own clinic, at the time she admitted meet for iv steroids, which was the life changing treatment which i didn't access in my last pregnancy. we talked about the programme
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yesterday about the difference between a headache and a migraine, and the sufferer said if you haven't had it you don't know how bad it is. this sounds pretty similar. i wonder, is there support from gps? to gps understand? and if someone goes to the gp and says this is not morning sickness, this is worse, is that support network out there? morning sickness, this is worse, is that support network out there ?|j would say there is a growing support network out there. i think some gps may not be aware of what hyperemesis gravidarum is, but they will certainly be willing to find out, look it up, and i would advise gps at the moment to look up the rcog guidelines. there is also a conference taking place in windsor, in october, so midwives and gps, go to that if you can. send your team members. hyperemesis is... not a lot of people suffer from it. most people suffer from mild to moderate end of nausea and vomiting, and a lot of gps, for example myself, when
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i was lot of gps, for example myself, when iwasa gp lot of gps, for example myself, when i was a gp training, i was doing might have citrix and gynaecology in the first year of my gt —— obstetrics and gynaecology in the first year of my gp training, and there is a lot of support out there from gps. and they are willing to work and established that doctor—patient relationship, to improve that. the second thing is a support charity which i am a trustee for have helpline which runs from 9am to 4:30pm and they can give you advice if you are facing barriers with mid midwives, with gps, or getting into hospital to dehydration. they also have a volunteer support. so 1—to—1 tech support, and that is why i am a trustee on this charity. and how are you today? just briefly, are you 0k? yes, so i have passed my acute illness phase, or i wouldn't be here. today is a massive step for
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me. it is the first four our journey, my brave sister brought me up journey, my brave sister brought me up here, my mum is looking after my little boy and she has been fantastic. my husband is extremely supportive. the full family involved. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. it is miserable in some places. we have cloud and rain around this morning but not everywhere. a bit of brightness. more of us will see the brightness. more of us will see the brightness later in the day. this morning, things are looking like this. a lot of cloud and missed. across many parts of the country, a similar story. mist. across many parts of the country, a similarstory. mist. mild and muggy from the word go but the skies will brighten up for many of us. here is the rain it draped across the country. some heavier birth down towards the south—west. further
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east, less rain but still the odd drizzly shower around. 17 degrees. quite a bit of a fog around the hills with the low cloud, too. 0utbreaks hills with the low cloud, too. outbreaks of rain continue across northern england. also, clearer conditions with some sunshine and also showers are around, too. this rain we have this morning will edge its way eastwards. some parts down towards the midlands will stay cloudy. some brighter spells further south. it will feel warm. the chance of continuing showers. into this morning and overnight, we say goodbye to them and we are in the clear, fresh weather. still, a few
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showers it will feel different today. a touch of grass frost to the north. the fresh conditions continue on wednesday and the winds coming from atlantic. the best day of the week in terms of sunshine tomorrow. a few showers for western scotland, north—west england, too. with the light winds of further south, present temperatures, 19 degrees or so. present temperatures, 19 degrees or so. further north, 16 or 17. less humid. the fresh, dry weather continues across the southern half of the country, lasting on thursday. further north, things are changing, bringing wet and windy weather. particularly for scotland, northern ireland and north of england. late on thursday and into friday. we will see this area of low pressure. it is fitting to the north of the uk,
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bringing windy conditions. it could set us up for a fairly unsettled, windy and at times wet weekend. now, cup of tea. a on my number three today. in terms of brewing, you have to go tag in first and then milk. without question, dan. we will put it to the test. i will surprise you and ask you afterwards. we are talking about this because the sales of traditional black tea are falling but fruit and herbal teas are on the rise. sean's at a tea factory in north yorkshire to tell us more. i don't think you put milk in any fruity or herbal teas either. this
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is the factory in harrogate where they make yorkshire tea. that is what is going on there. sales are down. rest assured, that is not the tea over there that will be going in your tea bags. ian has the greatjob title as head of tea. you have thousands of these big bags out the back and you are basically in charge of bringing this stuff in. what is the biggest change you have seen in the biggest change you have seen in the market? a shift into african tea. there wasn't much tea growing in africa in the 1950s. it was india and china. we are seeing a big shift in tea production in africa so a lot of the tea is coming in from africa. most of the tiwi buyer is from kenya and rwanda where we buy a lot. ——
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most of the tiwi buyer. —— most of the tea we buy. there has been criticism of the industry globally. 0n the whole, the way it has been treated. tailors have said they are worried about the conditions they have been working in. what changes have been working in. what changes have inmates? we were founding members of the ethical tea partnership. the consortium of tea packers around the world working to improve standards globally. we add tailors are also helping to work. we are doing work within the communities of farmers to raise standards and bring water to schools. —— taylors. we are building relationships. we have contracts in place so we know we are with them
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buying tea every week. leftjust come around here for a second. when you look at the traditional tea bag, how do you know what flavours people want? we have talked about raspberry and cranberry. you have been used to lack of tea. yeah, black tea is still so popular. —— lakh. even my children drink it. they like green tea as well so they are trying different labour ‘s. we have research and developing team. —— research and developing team. —— research and developing team. —— research and development —— flavours. i'm not surprised your children are drinking it if you're in dad is head of tea at taylors. let's look at how manufacturing is check —— changing. it is not a cotton mill. this is because they are making these sachets for all the new types of tea. this is a green tea line. this is a whole different
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type of production that tailors have had to invest in. —— taylors. good morning, richard. how much of the change has the industry had to deal with when it comes to it? are they spending lots of money? there has been a change in the tea market in recent yea rs been a change in the tea market in recent years in that we have seen sales of black tea declining for a long time by volume but other areas within the tea market such as green tea which we are seeing over here and also fruit and herbal teas and you're more speciality blends which have been doing very well. that is actually compensated us to a certain extent to the decline seen in traditional black tea. simple answer, what is your favourite alternative flavour? i do like green tea. nice little first step towards
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something a bit more funky. we will be looking at it later at tasting. we will have a taste test and see how we can tell the difference between a black tea and a rhubarb and custard tea. to be honest, most of us can probably tell. that's fair. what is wrong with the mango or something, i mean, fair. what is wrong with the mango orsomething, i mean, come on. fair. what is wrong with the mango or something, i mean, come on. not for me. simple pleasures. from calm and relaxed to energised and happy, how can a trip to the coast affect your mood? we've sent our deckchair across britain to find out why you like to be beside the seaside. being by the sea makes me feel happy. happy because i like to swim in the sea. being by the sea always
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makes me feel refreshed, i had a really hard time about 15 years ago and i spent a couple of months living on the coast and it really blew the wind through my soul and helped me get myself together. makes me feel really happy. yeah, being by the sea is, i think it's the best. even on a rainy day, you can come up here with, you know, you're waterproofs on or an umbrella but you still have the magnificent view, you can still go and have fish and chips even if it's raining. for me, it takes me back home as well. it's very peaceful and quiet. it is away from my daily routine. i like being beside the sea, it brings the family together, it's nice, relaxing family time. the boys love it, don't you? it's about 2,000 likes, i like it. very relaxed and i love watching him because he loves
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watching the waves so being by the sea makes him very happy and makes him smile. it makes me feel like nice and all and the sand in between our feet makes it feel like it's all, like, lovely. thank you so much for getting in touch. we will reel at —— readout your e—mail. most of you making the gel is saying in our live by the sea, lucky you. 100% of people are saying that it does make a difference. even the idea of going to the sea can lift your spirits. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm claudia—liza armah. a man's died after being stabbed, in what's believed to have been a fight between two
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groups, in hounslow. police were called to roseberry road shortly after 4:00 yesterday afternoon. an air ambulance was also called to treat the 29—year—old, but he was pronounced dead at the scene. a murder investigation has been launched. a 14—year—old boy is fighting for his life and a second teenager is seriously injured after they were shot in east london yesterday. it happened on moore walk in forest gate at around three o clock yesterday afternoon. the 14—year—old's injuries are being treated as life—threatening, while the 17—year—old has suffered "life—changing" injuries. police have put extra officers on the streets over fears of a possible of retaliation. wheel clamping is being reintroduced at several train station car parks in surrey in a move that could affect commuters from dorking, redhill and leatherhead. govia thameslink, the parent company of southern rail, operates several car parks in the south—east, and says it is only "targetting persistent offenders" — but transport groups say the practice is illogical. what southern rail are doing is really shooting themselves in the foot because if you clamp a vehicle it means you are blocking that parking space so it is not logical. what they should do is pursue
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persistent offenders through the courts which they are entitled to do. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube — there are severe delays on the district line between earls court and ealing broadway westbound. and minor delays between barking and upminster eastbound due to an earlier signalling problem. and on the metropolitan there are severe delays due to signal failure at wembley park. and on the trains. there are delays of up to 20 minues and some cancellations on south—western trains between waterloo and clapham junction because of an earlier points failure. and in rainham. there are problems both ways on the a13 at ferry lane, because of an earlier accident and diesel spillage. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. well, after quite a sticky night, it is a warm and humid start to the day. there is quite a lot of low cloud around and it will stay mostly cloudy. but this humidity stays with us.
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it will feel quite warm today and with that, we get one or two spots of rain. we have showers around and this afternoon we could see the cloud thinning and braking. if the sun comes out, it will get a bit warmer but in turn, that could spark off one or two sharp showers. 0vernight, the showers will clear away. it was a cold front so behind it, the air is that little bit fresher. the temperature a a little bit cooler than last night, 12 celsius as a minimum. tomorrow, less cloud and more in the way of sunny spells around. a bit of cloud bubbling up in the afternoon but mostly dry. temperatures getting up to 19 but it will feel that little bit fresher. a similar day on thursday, sunny spells around but then low pressure begins to throw one or two weather fronts at us as we head through friday and into the weekend as well. progressively, turning a little bit more unsettled towards the end of the week. tomorrow, we are looking at more sunny spells, similar for thursday and then things freshening up and turning unsettled for the weekend. i'm back with the latest
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from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. ansey hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. south korea's navy holds live fire drills in a show of force. it comes as the us and china fail to agree on a way to address the escalating crisis in north korea. good morning, it's tuesday the 5th of september. also this morning — the feel—good factor of our coasts. good morning from falmouth, we have brought a deck chair to look at the so—called blue health on the cornish
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coast. researchers are using virtual reality technology to try to harness the therapeutic power of the sea. it's back to business for mps in westminster as david davis faces questions over how his brexit negotiations are going. good morning. are we falling out of love with the humble cuppa? vigurs seen love with the humble cuppa? vigurs seen by breakfast show that we are buying fewer black tea bags but we are buying more things like green tea and decaf tea. i am at a tea factory in harrogate to find out why. in sport, world cup qualifying wins last night for england, scotland and northern ireland. michael 0'neill‘s side beat the czech republic 2—0 in belfast, which should guarantee them a play—off spot. get me out of this boat! utterly horrible. horrible. he has endured arctic conditions and horrendous blisters. we will check in with a record—breaking rower who was back
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in the uk, look at those hands, after more than two weeks stranded ona after more than two weeks stranded on a remote norwegian island. we will be finding out whether his hands have recovered. sarah has the weather. good morning, quite murky, misty and drizzly firs thing but the weather will brighten up thing but the weather will brighten up later and into tomorrow. all the details in around 15 minutes. thank you very much, sarah. good morning. first, our main story. south korea's navy has held major live fire drills in the latest show of force to north korea. a south korean commander said the north's forces would be buried at sea in the event of a further provocation. meanwhile international pressure continues to build against the regime following its largest nuclear bomb test to date. yesterday the south staged a simulated attack on the north's nuclear test site involving land—based missile launchers and aircraft. while in new york, the united states warned the un security council that kim jong un was begging for war and that although washington does not want conflict, its patience was not unlimited. nuclear powers understand their
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responsibilities. kimjong nuclear powers understand their responsibilities. kim jong un shows no such understanding. his abusive use of missiles and his nuclear threats show that he is begging for war. earlier we spoke to our china correspondentjohn sudworth, who is in dangdong, on the border between china and north korea. the chinese city of dangdong is a good place to contemplate china's position in this crisis. you can see how close the two countries are at this point, they are connected by that iron bridge behind me and almost all of north korea's trade in goods and its vital crude oil supply flows across this border. you can see an antiquated north korean power station on the other side, a sign of how dilapidated its energy
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infrastructure is. donald trump's argument is that china could, if it wa nted argument is that china could, if it wanted to, simply force north korea into submission by turning off this lifeline, but when you look at this proximity you can see why the chinese leadership see things very differently indeed. their fear is that pushing north korea towards regime collapse would bring chaos and instability, fractional infighting, possibly even wore right up infighting, possibly even wore right up against the border. that is why beijing insists it will not contemplate a total trade embargo, it will not contemplate talk of military options and all it wants to see is a return to dialogue. that has been its position all along. in just over 15 minutes we will be getting a view of what life is like inside north korea. we'll be speaking to a tour operator to the region. they have visited the country several times. the brexit secretary david davis will face questions in the commons this afternoon as mps return to westminster after the summer break.
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he will give an update on last week's third round of negotiations with the european union as downing street promises to intensify its approach to the talks. 0ur political correspondent iain watson joins us from westminster. is he likely to get a bit of a grilling on the first day back?|j grilling on the first day back?” think that is fair to say. 0ver grilling on the first day back?” think that is fair to say. over the summer the government set out in more detail its brexit strategy in a different position paper, another is coming tomorrow. mps will be keen to check the progress, or lack of it, on the negotiations with the eu commission. the government is very keen to move onto wider trade talks this autumn. the european commission far less so. i think david davis will get many questions about his negotiation strategy and whether he is adopting the right approach. i think an even bigger challenge for the government will come later this week with the eu withdrawal bill, as it is called, the great repeal bill,
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as the government would like to call it, is debated. that would take us out of the eu but transfer lots of eu laws into british laws. the labour shadow cabinet is meeting of thejeremy labour shadow cabinet is meeting of the jeremy corbyn labour shadow cabinet is meeting of thejeremy corbyn this morning and they will be pushing the government to guarantee workers' writes. there will be also more parliamentary scrutiny of the brexit process. they say ministers want too much pressure for themselves. i think it will be a difficult first week back for the government ministers. there could be a bit ofa government ministers. there could be a bit of a ding—dong. a man who was swept to sea off cornwall yesterday afternoon has died, police have confirmed. he was one of two men who were washed off rocks while fishing at treyarnon bay, near padstow. a search for the second man is resuming this morning. —— has resumed. a report into whether social services failed a young girl who was murdered by her mother will be published today. ayeeshia smith died in 2014 aged 21 months. she had been left in the care of her mother, kathryn smith, despite concerns raised by other relatives. the findings of a serious case review will be published online at midday.
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islands in the caribbean and the us state of florida are preparing for hurricane irma, which is due to make landfall tomorrow morning. it's a bigger storm — both in size and wind speed — than hurricane harvey, which devastated the states of texas and louisiana last month. the governor of florida has declared a state of emergency to give local government enough time to prepare. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, will set out her government's legislative programme this afternoon — pledging a bold and ambitious plan for the coming year. a deposit scheme is expected to be announced the return of plastic bottles. but the main focus of the programme will be on improving education and the economy. 0ur scotland correspondent lorna gordonjoins us from holyrood. what do we expect?
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this is described as the green is programme for government ever seen, so programme for government ever seen, so there will be the deposit return scheme for plastic waste, expect more announcements to do with the environment. i think the challenge for nicola sturgeon and her government is to counter accusations from the opposition in scotland that they have neglected the dayjob, the domestic agenda, to focus on arguments for a second independence referendum. before the summer she said she would take stock and refreshed and said that after ten yea rs refreshed and said that after ten years in power the snp needed to set out what she called creative, bold and radical policy. i think it is fairto and radical policy. i think it is fair to say we can expect lots of announcements today touching on every area of public life like health, education, handing more powers to head teachers. there will be announcements on the economy, a lifting of the controversial 1% cap on public sector pay as well. in total, we expect 16 pieces of legislation to be announced today.
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thank you very much, lorna. bangladeshi officials say they are running out of space to accommodate the growing number of rohingya muslims fleeing their homes in myanmar. nearly 90,000 people have left myanmar since the army there began a campaign against extremist groups. many say they were attacked by troops and buddhist mobs. a french court is expected to deliver verdicts today in a privacy case involving topless photographs of the duchess of cambridge. the pictures were taken while the royal couple were on holiday in provence five years ago, and published in the magazine closer. four people are on trial, along with two photographers who've been charged in connection with separate pictures published in a french newspaper. it comes a day after the duke and duchess announced they are expecting their third child. that makes lots of front pages, as you can imagine. including the times. lots of different pictures. we were talking about that about half an hour ago,
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she suffers from this really extreme form of morning sickness. i think with her first child she was in hospitalfor quite i think with her first child she was in hospital for quite some time. solar storms may have played a role in the fatal stranding of sperm whales last year on the coasts of britain, germany, france and the netherlands. scientists say the 29 whales were young and free of disease — but their navigational abilities may have been disrupted by the storms, which distort the earth's magnetic field. other researchers say the theory is plausible but argue it's impossible to prove. if you have a fear of snakes this is not going to make you feel too good. you might want to go and make a cup of tea! a family in southend had an unwelcome visitor this week. a five—year—old boy got a bit of shock when he found a python in the toilet. his mum laura called in a reptile specialist after using a broom handle to lift the lid and seeing the creature's head pop out of the bowl. according to its rescuer the snake most likely arrived via the u—bend and is expected to
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make a full recovery. interesting with your pronunciation of you bend. you bend?! iam really unhappy with that story. it is very seldom that you fold your arms like that. you are very unhappy. snakes ina drain that. you are very unhappy. snakes in a drain does not make me feel good! iam in a drain does not make me feel good! i am going fully prepared to the toilet today! let's talk about an amazing adventure. they've broken 11 world records — the most for any ocean rowing expedition in history — but for the nine men crew of polar row, it hasn't all been smooth sailing. forced to abandon the final leg of theirjourney from norway to iceland, the rowers became stranded on a remote volcanic island for over two weeks. now safely back home, one of the crew — olympic gold
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medallist alex gregory — will be telling us about his ordeal in just a moment. we talked to him when he was on the island. but first let's look back at their incredible journey. it's all going to be dependent on weather and ice. we don't know how long it's going to take. it might take 20 days, it might take more, it might take less. we're not sure. it's freezing out here. we've got enough food, we've got enough provisions, we're all set, we are all ready to go. oh, man! get me out of this boat! we're on the beach here, scattered
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with driftwood and whale bones. there are a group of 18 norwegian people who live here. we've probably overstayed our welcome by now, so we're really working hard on trying to flag down a boat, and we hear there's a boat coming past next week sometime, and so we're hoping to jump aboard that. it looked like a movie, but it was real life. and double olympic champion alex gregory is safely back home in 0xfordshire this morning, and joins us now. good morning. those were your hands, can you show your hands to the camera to make sure they are back to normal, please? the hands are absolutely fine now. just a little bit of peeling skin, that is all.
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how painful was that? we talk about the adventure, but what had happened, was the just water getting into the skin? that wasjust days and days, probably ten days, of wearing white gloves and never having the opportunity to dry out. we were wet in cold conditions for 12 days in total, really. there is no time or place to dry out. the hands just soaked up all the moisture. that was the result. my goodness. you got 11 world records, you just missed out on one, tell us about those last few days? the whole experience was incredible. ifeel so lucky to have had the opportunity to do that. i started on svalbard, the whole exhibition started in northern norway and a fee —— a crew of five
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rotors svalbard, that is the island ‘s with the most continuously inhabited people... the most northerly town in the world that is continuously inhabited. i arrived on svalbard on august the 2nd, on the 8th of august we pushed off land and headed north. we tried to roll as far north as we possibly could and so far north as we possibly could and so forfour far north as we possibly could and so for four days far north as we possibly could and so forfour days in far north as we possibly could and so for four days in four nights we travelled north, got to the permanent ice, we got as far as we could possibly row and apply it was amazing, it was ice as far as you could see, wales were popping up, seals were popping up and we turned south—west and headed for iceland, that was the end destination, the ultimate goal. but on the way we encountered some pretty rough forever. very rough weather, i would say. it was fairly horrendous for a number of days. i was scared.
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we saw in the video those dark times and how emotional you got. you genuinely felt this could be the end, that you might not have got back to see your family if you had carried on? yes, at certain times i felt that and when you're tired and exhausted and in high waves and rough conditions, ah, it's scary and it want necessarily the size of the waves that worried me, it was the cold of the water and if, if by chance the boat had flipped which does happen ne ocean rowing, if that happened i believe one of us or some of us wouldn't have come home alive. you don't have much chance in that water to get warm and dry and particularly on that boat where there was no dry area and no warm area then i think it would have been the end. so we headed for, when our
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power supplies declined, were out of action, we headed for an island and we landed on the beach there and we we re we landed on the beach there and we were welcomed by the norwegian people on that island. we spoke to you when you were on the island and you when you were on the island and you were just waiting for a ship to come past and it did? yeah, that's right. we had been there more about a week, well just right. we had been there more about a week, welljust over a week, and it was, my decision not to continue to iceland. we had maybe 300 miles left to go and as far as i was concerned the expedition was a massive success. we had achieved everything and more we wanted to achieve and i didn't want to take the risk because i wanted to come home to my family and see my family. ididn't want home to my family and see my family. i didn't want to take that risk. i didn't want to be an irresponsible pa rent didn't want to be an irresponsible parent so we decided to stay and it was just a case of waiting, waiting for a boat to come past. you can't have flights on the island. it's a
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military base. there is a meteorological station and there is 18 people station thered and there wasn't much chance of getting off the island. so wejust wasn't much chance of getting off the island. so we just had to wait and we were perfectly well looked after. it was an amazing place. we we re after. it was an amazing place. we were fed so well. it was a beautiful island. a volcanic island covered in the black sands and the black rock we re the black sands and the black rock were covered in green moss. it was an amazing place to live and we just had to wait and luckily the norwegian coastguard was coming past a few days ago. we're thankful you're back home safely. you spoke about being a responsible parent. is it right your little daughter daisy, it right your little daughter daisy, it is first day at school today, so you were desperate to get back to ta ke you were desperate to get back to take daisy to school? is she there with you? daisy is here. it is her first day. daisy, yourfirst with you? daisy is here. it is her first day. daisy, your first day of school? she is very excited and jasper is coming into year 3. i got
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home yesterday afternoon and i'm glad to be back with them. how many have you got? are you going to keep bringing children in from left, right and centre there, alex. there is one more, but he's having his brea kfast. is one more, but he's having his breakfast. he doesn't need to come. he's not going to school yet! i'm sure it's lovely to have dad back. daisy, i hope you have a fantastic first day at school. thank you very much. thank you. it is lovely to see you home safe and well. thank you very much indeed. there will be so many people out there starting their first day of school. good luck to everybody. good luck to all the mums and dads. that moment when you leave them. they have got a baby called jessie as well. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. for all the children heading back to school today it is a soggy school
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run this morning. bear with the weather, there will be brightness later on. by home time some of us will see sunshine. it is a damp start to the day. muggy and humid out there with all the cloud and the drizzle and low cloud and hill fog, but it will turn brighter later because this slow moving weather front will ease its way towards the east. so parts of northern england and down towards the midlands and wales will stay quite soggy through the day, but towards the north and the west of the country here we will see the brighter, clearer conditions moving in and further towards the south and south—east, here we will see a few showers continuing on into the afternoon, but this is 4pm now. you will start to see a few glimmers of sunshine breaking through the cloud, but still the chance of showers into the afternoon and temperatures 20, perhaps as high as 22 celsius in the sunnier spots. i think north of birmingham probably staying damp through much of the day, up towards lincolnshire, northumberland too. to the north of that, for cumbria and
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northern ireland and for much of scotla nd northern ireland and for much of scotland it is a return to the clearer skies later on today. so sunshine, still a chance of a few showers and breezy here too. into the evening hours, we will lose that slow moving front as it clears the east coast and we are all in the different air mass. so clearer, fresher conditions and breezy with a few showers in the far north—west too, but temperatures this time tomorrow morning will be cooler than they are this morning. colder in the countryside. so we've got the breeze coming in from the atlantic tomorrow. that brings us a fresher feel and a breezy day as well with showers continuing across parts of western scotland and perhaps the odd one into north—west england, but for the majority of places tomorrow is looking like a dry day. probably the best day of the week, wednesday, if you like it sunny and dry too. it will feel less muggy and less humid with temperatures around 16 to 19 celsius. and then it is likely to start thursday on that fresher note. mostly dry across the southern half of the country through the day, but
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further north you will notice this rain and the wind picking up too across northern ireland and scotland and pushing further south later on in the day. i think we will hold on to the brighter skies across parts of southern england and south wales where it could be 20 celsius, but as we head towards the end of the week and into the weekend more of us will feel the influence of this area of low pressure. so that sits to the north of the uk. the winds rotating around the low pressure, a breezy feel by the time we get to friday with sunshine and also a few heavy showers and that sets us up for a pretty unsettled weekend. back to you both. a failed state, a rogue nation, led by the world's most dangerous man — north korea has been described as many things, but few would consider it a holiday destination, especially in light of the regime's recent nuclear bomb test. our next guest, however, has not only travelled to the country but makes his living operating tours to the notoriously secretive country. carl meadows welcome. good morning to you. you were last
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in north korea injune. good morning to you. you were last in north korea in june. back in june. tell us what is it like? it is a parallel universe. from the moment you step off the plane it's like you're still in the cold war. like the 1950s james bond world. it's something else. it's really impossible to describe. you first went there in 2004. 2004, yes. was it anything like you expected it to be and maybe you could develop that by saying how it has changed in the 13 years since then? it blew me away. i travelled for leisure and work to over 60 countries and compared to north korea, nothing can compared to north korea, nothing can compare to the place. back then, it was a lot stricter, a lot more controlled than it is now days and particularly in the last four or five years it is getting more relaxed and the locals are more of the outside world and the real world
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and less indoctrinated with the whole system that we know about. when you're there, you have to travel all the time with a state minder, do you? what's that like? from the moment you touch down, you have two minders looking after you. they stay in the hotel so they are with you 24/7. they are nice people with you 24/7. they are nice people with a good sense of humour. they are guides as opposed to guards. generally nice people, but it can be overbearing for some. can they let down their guard when they are talking to you? a little bit. sometimes, because a lot of these people i've worked with for years and years. so over time you get to build up friendly relations and they do let down their guard a bit, but some things are never discussed.” can imagine. what is your view having been there many times and spoken to many north korean residents what is your view of the recent posturing with missiles and tests ? recent posturing with missiles and tests? what is at play? in my opinion it is all about self
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preservation, the north koreans know if they went to war with the usa or the south it would be total suicide. it is about trying to get talks back to the table to stop there being military games between the usa and south korea and really want to be considered as a fully fledge nuclear state and treated on an equal playing field and about self preservation. they say looked what happened to saddam hussain and colonel ga tafy. tell us about how much information is there? do the north koreans, they have ideas about what is going with the nuclear missiles, but what about outside information? very little outside news. all the news for domestic consumption is districted by the state so it has a very positive north korean spin on it. they don't have an accurate idea of how we will
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be reacting here in the west as to what has been going on over the last few weeks and months. we hear a lot being said about the economy and the way people are living and really terrible conditions. we have heard reports. what have you seen? the conditions in the 1990s the country went through a terrible decade and there was famine and very bleak era, but since i have been going there, the country seems year—on—year to be getting better and better and if you area getting better and better and if you are a citizen of pyongyang now, it's are a citizen of pyongyang now, it's a relatively comfortable life. it's not, i think, a relatively comfortable life. it's not, ithink, as a relatively comfortable life. it's not, i think, as bad as we expect. when you compare it so south korea, they are poles apart, but when you compare it to poorer parts of asia or many countries in africa, it is better. are you going back next year? yes, looking forward to it. really interesting to talk to you. thank you very much indeed. a really fascinating insight. good morning. we have had some very
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heavy rainfall across north—western parts of england and west wales this morning, lots of surface water spray, lots of cuddles. the rain is easing as it pushes these stand there will be some brightness developing, particularly towards northern and western areas this afternoon. this whole area of rain, as it moves east, will have broken up, giving patchy rain towards the midlands, east anglia and the south—east of england. there will be clea ra nce across scotla nd south—east of england. there will be clearance across scotland and northern ireland. some sunshine this
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afternoon, one or two showers coming m, afternoon, one or two showers coming in, temperatures around 16 to 18. for much of northern england it will stay cloudy, some outbreaks of rain in north—east england, down from the midlands, east and south wales and into south—western parts of england. for the far west avails... wales, the far north—west of england, some brightness. we might see some brightness. we might see some brightness and ramparts of the humber, lincolnshire and burwash, but on the whole it will stay quite cloudy. it will move eastwards, clearing the skies behind it. the rain is associated with a cold front. with fresher conditions and fresh air over the uk, fresher conditions and fresh air overthe uk, a fresher conditions and fresh air over the uk, a chilly night compared to the last few nights. in the countryside, temperatures getting into single figures. a chilly but bright start to wednesday, wednesday probably the driest on brightest day of the week. some shallots in scotland, north—western areas of england as well, but for most of us it is dry with bright and sunny spells. temperatures down to around
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17 to 19 celsius. in this thursday, it will still be fairly bright across the central, eastern and southern areas, towards the far north and west you can see cloud and rain spreading, the breeze picking up through thursday, which will gradually move further south and east. goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. rebuilding the brics nations. china calls for closer ties of member states to speed up economic development. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday 5th september. as the brics — that's brazil, russia, india, china and south africa — wrap up theirsummit, we ask an expert whether these emerging giants are still relevant. also in the programme...
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a pr disaster for bell pottinger — the agency is expelled from the uk trade body for the worst breach of ethics in its history. and investors remain nervous amid expectations north korea will launch another missile — we'll look at what it

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