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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  September 5, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11. a serious case review into the death of 21—month—old ayeeshia jane smith, who was murdered by her mother, has found that professionals weren't focused enough on her welfare. as south korea steps up naval exercises, russia's president putin says military pressure against the north may lead to global catastrophe. a paedophile from county durham is jailed for 16 years for rape, after abusing teenagers online in canada, the us and australia. a french court is to rule on the publication of topless photographs of the duchess of cambridge in closer magazine five years ago. a surge in rohingya refugees fleeing violence in myanmar. the un counts 35,000 new arrivals into bangladesh in the last 2a hours. also this hour, in the path of hurricane irma. caribbean islands brace themselves for the category four storm with winds of up to 140 miles per hour. florida declares a state of emergency. and how solar storms could be
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responsible for the deaths of nearly 30 sperm whales on european beaches last year. good morning. it's september 5th. i'm joanna gosling. welcome to bbc newsroom live. breaking news, serious case review into the death of ayeeshia jane smith who was murdered by her mother in 2014 is fine professionals were not focused enough on the child's welfare. 0ur correspondent chi chi izundu is here. the details of a serious case review
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arejust the details of a serious case review are just out but first of all tell us more are just out but first of all tell us more about ayeeshia and what happened. she was known to social services and professionals before her birth because her mum was found living in a garage venture was pregnant. she was also taken into foster ca re pregnant. she was also taken into foster care during her 21—month—old life and then turned back to her pa rents life and then turned back to her parents or her mother, i should say, after a short while and soon afterwards she passed away from a number of injuries. in the trial for her mother and her mother ‘s ex—boyfriend, it was found she had 16 different quite severe injuries across a body, some historical and some current. what has a serious case review found 7 some current. what has a serious case review found? they have found that the professionals involved were too focused on the needs of ayeeshia's mother and the risk she was deemed to be as a victim of domestic abuse because she had a number of ex—boyfriend that were
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quite violent and she would lie about the extent of the violence. they also made nine recommendations, those recommendations including that garbage is safeguarding children's board is to now undergo a multi—agency audit of children subject to a supervision order to assure themselves that there is good evidence that a care package put in place after a supervision order is robust and the outcome is firmer. they also found that professionals didn't pay enough attention to the mother ‘s historical mental health issues and drug abuse, they didn't pay enough attention to the significance of the relationships of her ex—partners, and they also noted that hospitals and medical staff missed opportunities to alert social ca re missed opportunities to alert social care about the issues going on in that house. what will happen now? as well as the social care and health
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ca re well as the social care and health care partners being told that they have to share information, an mp has called for an independent enquiry into this as well. because he's likened it to other cases for the you may remember a case where there was a number of points where social care, baby p, so i guess we have to wait and see if it comes to fruition. thank you. russia's president, vladimir putin, has warned of a "global catastrophe" if military tensions with north korea continue to increase. mr putin also dismissed the worth of imposing further sanctions on pyongyang, saying the country's leadership would rather eat grass than abandon its nuclear programme. meanwhile, south korea has been holding more live fire drills and has been staging a major naval exercise off the country's east coast. a south korean commander said the north's forces would be "buried at sea" in the event of a further provocation. the country's president says he's open to dialogue with the north but now is not the time for talks.
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china, the north's main ally, is still urging caution and has called for a return to negotiations. 0ur correspondentjohn sudworth is in dandong, on the border between china and north korea. the chinese city of dandong where i'm standing is a very good position from which to contemplate china's role in the north korean crisis. if we pan the camera across, you can see just how close the two countries are at this point, connected by the iron bridge behind me. and almost all of north korea's trading goods, as well as its vital crude oil supply, flows across this border. you can see a dilapidated north korean power station on the other side there, a sign of its antiquated energy infrastructure. donald trump's argument, of course, is china could, if it wanted to, force north korea into submission by turning off the tap on this lifeline, but when you look at this proximity, you can understand why
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the chinese leadership sees things very differently indeed. the idea of pushing north korea towards regime collapse would bring chaos, instability, factional infighting, the possibility of war in a state that already has its hands on nuclear weapons, which is why beijing won't contemplate the idea of a total trade embargo. it won't contemplate the idea of military action. it has insisted all along that the only way to resolve this crisis is, as unpalatable to washington as it may be, is for the us to sit down with north korea at the negotiation table and for a return to dialogue. let's get more now on those comments from president putin, speaking in china this morning and speak to our moscow correspondent sarah ra i nsfo rd. sarah, vladimir putin has, like china, dismissed putting further sanctions on north korea. what is moscow ‘s view of the way forward? that's right, russia's position is
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similarto that's right, russia's position is similar to that of china. russia and china but forward a road map for resolving the crisis on the korean peninsula. president putin has made clear that whilst russia sees the latest nuclear test by north korea as provocative, as he put it, and has condemned those, he doesn't think sanctions are the way forward. in fact, these are the north korean leadership would prefer to wheat grass than enter their nuclear programme says sanctions he said we re programme says sanctions he said were a dead—end road but also he was very strong in terms of what he called the military hysteria that he said was being whipped up over the crisis on the korean peninsula. he said that that was to nowhere, this kind of rhetoric needs to end and all sides need to return to the negotiation table. as russia sees it, it seems all sides, including john young, like china, are pushing for a return to talks and says the only way to resolve this crisis is through diplomacy, but it's difficult to know what influence
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russia can bring to bear on the situation. it has important historic ties withjohn situation. it has important historic ties with john young, situation. it has important historic ties withjohn young, but in terms of economic leverage, political leverage even, it's difficult to know how much pressure russia can actually exert on north korea. thank you very much, sarah. let's look at some of today's other developing stories. the search has resumed for a man missing off the cornish coast. he was one of two men swept into the sea in treyarnon bay yesterday afternoon, while fishing. another man was taken to hospital where he was confirmed dead. the government has taken over children's services in the london borough of croydon after a report by 0fsted inspectors identified what it described as "widespread and serious" failures. the report said children were forced to wait too long for help and too few young people who ran away were spoken to by a social worker when they were found. an inquest into the deaths of eight people killed in one of the uk's worst road accidents opens in milton keynes this morning. the group were travelling
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in a minibus on the m1 near newport pagnell when they were involved in a collision with two lorries. the lorries' drivers have since been charged with causing death by dangerous driving and will appear in court later this month. for a full summary of the news you can go to our website where you'll be able to get more details on all of those stories. and all the latest developments in north korea. a paedophile has beenjailed for 16 years after admitting rape, despite being thousands of miles away when the offences happened. paul leighton from county durham, created up to 40 fake facebook profiles to befriend teenagers in the uk, canada, the united states and australia. he then tricked them into sending him naked pictures and blackmailed them into abusing relatives. some viewers may find stuart whincup's report distressing. paul leighton, a dangerous man who blackmailed youngsters into abusing their own friends and family
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members. he is a man who detectives say carried out one of the most horrific cases of grooming ever seen in the uk. paul leighton is one of the most vile, sick and serious offenders with ever dealt with. ‘s actions undoubtedly had a devastating impact on victims all over the world. here is, without a doubt, every parent ‘s worst nightmare and his approach, targeting victims online, is a stark reminder of the dangers of the internet. some of the victims of those closest to them will never recover from the trauma of these offences. he pretended to be a young woman online, creating up to 40 fake profiles on facebook using different names in different pictures. at first, he builds relationships with the youngsters got them to send him online naked pictures of themselves. he then used those pictures to blackmail them. he the youngsters he would show the victims and videos to their parents and publish them online for the world to see. unless
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they carried out sexual assaults against their own family members and filmed it for him. they were so terrified of being exposed, they carried out unthinkable abuse. 114—year—old boy in the usa who flattened by late filmed in southern abusing his 12—month—old niece. this afternoon, the court heard from the mother of one of his victims. she's angry and anxious all the time, terrified he's going to come and get. she wants to end her life and she does not want to be here any more. it's never—ending. i don't know how i'm going to get her through this. sentencing leighton to 16 years in prison, judge robert adams totally committed to the appalling abuse and was a danger to children here and abroad. the united nations' refugee agency says there's been a surge in the number of rohingya muslims who have fled to bangladesh from neighbouring myanmar. officials say that in the past 24
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hours they've identified an additional 35,000 who've arrived in bangladesh, taking the total to 123,000 in less than two weeks. the unhcr says many have walked for days without food or water. 0ur correspondent, sanjoy majumder, is at a refugee camp in bangladesh. there are two main refugee camps which are run by the government as well as the aid authorities, aid agencies, completely filled to capacity so what is happening with the fresh arrivals, tens of thousands of muslims who have been coming over the past few days as they are simply building new camps, either coming into areas where they are pitching tents on a own a mac is moving into any kind of building, any shelter they can find. there is one for instance right behind me that way and this morning i have been seeing people come from there, trying to take back that of tarpaulin and shooting. to build some kind of shelter to protect
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them. the other big concern of course is making sure they have enough food to eat, many are exhausted. they've spent several days on the road trying to get to bangladesh which is not far from where i am and aid agencies say it's very difficult to provide enough supplies for everybody. the leading british pr firm, bell pottinger, has been thrown out of the industry's trade body, the public relations and communications association, for a campaign which stoked racial tensions in south africa. the company had been hired by the controversial gupta family, who have close links to president zuma. an independent report found that bell pottinger had spread misleading information. 0ur reporter nomsa maseko is in johannesburg for us. what was this campaign about? what we do know is that bell pottinger, the pr company, was hired by a private company owned by the controversial the bitter family,
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which has close links with president jacob zuma, to actually do work for particular organisations and that's what has brought outrage in this country because of family and bell pottinger were accused of derailing tension and making the family look good while, at the same time, fuelling racial tensions here in this country using terms like white monopoly capital, and also the fact that white wealthy families were attacked. and also white journalists we re attacked. and also white journalists were attacked in this country because of the things that they were doing in terms of fuelling these racial tensions, made a lot of people in south africa very uncomfortable which is why we saw the democrats, the main opposition party, going to london making representations, saying bell pottinger should be expelled and thatis pottinger should be expelled and that is what we have seen so far happening. thank you very much. an
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update on the headlines. a serious case review into the death of 21—month—old ayeeshia jane smith murdered by her mother has found professionals were not focused enough on her welfare. as south korea steps up naval exercises, president putin says increasing military pressure against the north may lead to global catastrophe. police and the west midlands have arrested four men on suspicion of terrorism offences, suspected of being members of the band neo—nazi group national action. a french court is expected to deliver verdicts today in a privacy case involving topless photographs of the duchess of cambridge. the pictures were taken while the duchess and her husband were on holiday in provence five years ago, and published in the magazine closer. 0ur paris correspondent hugh schofield reports. it was five years ago, while the royal couple were staying at this mansion in the south of france, that the secret photographs were taken. the topless images of the duchess of cambridge were published in a french celebrity magazine
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but they were quickly withdrawn from circulation after the couple obtained an injunction. separately, though, criminal charges were brought against the magazine and, last may, two of the editorial staff and two photographers were tried for invasion of privacy. with the 20th anniversaryjust past on the death of prince william's mother in paris, inevitably it evokes memories of the role paparazzi played in pursuing princess diana's limousine. a coroner's court in the uk said photographers were part—responsible for her unlawful death. today, after they announced the good news of their third expected baby, for the duke and duchess, the verdict in paris may bring back memories they'd much ratherforget but by pushing from the start for record damages, they have made their point. the right to privacy is not something the uk royals will give up without a fight. hugh schofield, bbc news, paris. and our correspondent hugh schofield joins us from paris. france has strict privacy laws. what
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was the defence used in justifying the publication of these photographs? the defence said at the court hearing back in may that these we re court hearing back in may that these were pictures which were in the public interest, because this was a very well—known couple that people wa nt to very well—known couple that people want to know about, and that the pictures did not in any way demean the couple, in fact it showed them to bea the couple, in fact it showed them to be a loving couple and could only enhance their standing with the public. i have to say that all the lawyers and people who know about this, i've spoken to, find the item and pretty tenuous, and is universal speculation there will be a guilty verdict at the end of this because far less important cases with less important people come up regularly in the courts and they are routinely guilty verdicts returned. the law was quite clear here, you cannot
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invade privacy in so glaring a fashion as it seems was the case here. what happens is that the fla bby here. what happens is that the flabby magazines in france regularly do it anyway because they can withstand the relatively small fines which routinely get handed down bashing celebrity magazines. what's interesting about this case is there's an expectation it will begin to but what kind of damages are issued? the to but what kind of damages are issued ? the royal to but what kind of damages are issued? the royal couple and their lawyers are pushing for a very, very high figure of lawyers are pushing for a very, very highfigure of1.5 lawyers are pushing for a very, very high figure of 1.5 million euros which would be totally unprecedented in france. the question is whether the court decides that there is something special about this case. the fact they are the royal family, and secondly, this argument that prince william in particular had cause to suffer because of the memory of his mother and the way that she died and the link shall we say with a paparazzi, whether that
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extra torment on his part might lead the court to deliver higher damages. that's what we are really waiting to see. thanks very much. keep us updated. the brexit secretary, david davis, will face questions in the commons this afternoon, as mps return to westminster after the summer recess. mr davis is expected to be pressed on the state of the negotiations with the european union. 0ur assistant political editor, norman smith is in downing street. norman, boris johnson just leaving downing street behind you. what's going on? theresa may has been briefing her cabinet for the new parliamentary terms although she has stressed she wants to press ahead with a non—brexit agenda. she doesn't want the premiership to be defined just by brexit. i think the brutal truth is it's brexit all the way now. it's hard to see how the government find space to do much else, not least of course because they have the eight brexit bills, they've got to get through
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parliament paving the way for our departure. they've also got to try to seal a deal in brussels. there's accusations that the british government has not really come forward with any concrete proposals. now, what i think we will hear from david davis in the commons this afternoon is his view that they have put some matters on the table, but that they are unwilling to sign up... mr davies, are we running out of time for a deal on brexit? are we running out of time? that is the big question, because michel barnier, the eu's chief negotiator, is arguing not enough progress has been made and if not enough progress has been made, they won't recommend moving to the second stage of talks, soi moving to the second stage of talks, so i think what you'll hear from david davis this afternoon is an attempt to reassure mps that progress is being made, perhaps not in the big areas, but in some of the
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smaller areas and the private hope i think is that, come the hour, germany and france will put pressure on michel barnier to compromise and move on michel barnier to compromise and m ove o nto on michel barnier to compromise and move onto the next stage of negotiations. how is sentiment in the commons changing? well, the most noticeable change obviously is the mathematics, for theresa may, it's much tighter since the election, so the prospect of getting these brexit bill through parliament becomes altogether more fraught, i think it's fair to say. those who are critical of theresa may are more confident and we would get a sense of that with this eu withdrawal bill, which started passage through parliament later this week, the first key vote on monday, and that will be the real test of whether theresa may's critics in her own party feel they can now challenge even vote against her on issues like the single market and giving mps a
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bigger say in the final shape of brexit, so these are very, very turbulent, difficult, fraught times for mrs may, notjust in brussels, but here at westminster, to. what about labour's changing stance on brexit and voting on the repeal bill? what impact could that potentially have? well, we know labour are pretty much saying they are going to vote against the withdrawal bill as it's now when it has its second reading on monday, but labour, two, it's a delicate balancing act. there are those within the labour party who privately are deeply sceptical, hostile to the whole idea of brexit, and would like to slow it down and some would like to try and ensure we remained in some sort of permanent transition phase and never actually leave. against that, there are those around jeremy corbyn who fear that
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would be profoundly damaging to labour support, particularly amongst its core traditional voters, so there was a sort of balancing act, attention in labour ranks between their remain supporters and its core traditional labour backers. thank you, norman. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, will set out her government's legislative programme this afternoon pledging a bold and ambitious plan for the coming year. she is expected to focus on health, the economy and, principally, education, an area where opposition parties say the snp should be embarrassed by its record. one of britain's most senior counter—terrorism officers has warned that the terror threat level will remain at ‘severe' for at least the next five years. neil basu, the national co—ordinator for counter—terrorism policing, described the risk to the uk as "an unknown threat in our midst". he warned isolated communities and unregulated schooling in the uk were a "breeding ground" for extremism. there are currently about 600 active counter—terrorism investigations. a 14—year—old boy is in a critical condition in hospital
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and a 17—year—old has suffered "life—changing" injuries in a double shooting in east london. the metropolitan police said there were "serious concerns" of retaliation and has put extra officers on the streets. no arrests have been made. the met said the boys were taken to an east london hospital. a 46—year—old woman has been charged with fraud after making claims for support being provided to survivors of the grenfell tower disaster. joyce msokeri, from sutton in south london, charged with six counts of fraud linked to the fire where at least 89 people lost their lives in june. she is due to appear at westminster magistrates' court later today. parts of the caribbean and the south—east of the us are bracing for a storm bigger, both in size and wind speed, than hurricane harvey. a state of emergency has been declared in florida in the face of hurricane irma. it is now a category four storm, bearing down on the eastern caribbean and likely to reach land by tonight.
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virginia langeberg has more. 0na caribbean on a caribbean island of antigua, boats are pulled from the water as the region braces for a thread of harry kane a which continues to strengthen i did see. this is the best way to move when we have a kind ofa best way to move when we have a kind of a disaster like this —— hurricane residents do what they can boarding up residents do what they can boarding up windows and stocking up their fridges ahead of her arrival. 0ver in the dominican republic, small waves roll in under blue skies but this is just the calm before the storm. the government is very to face what ever situation may present itself. from this moment on, we are ona itself. from this moment on, we are on a constant monitoring situation. the harry kane has been upgraded to a category four storm and likely to make landfall by tuesday night or the early hours of wednesday
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prompting ayeeshia a state of emergency has also been declared in florida which could be in her past. this is a strengthening storm up to half metres worth of rain is possible from it but the wind strength could be the major issue, sustained wind, the average wind speeds of 220, does an hour, with gusts of much higher than that, damage and destruction is certainly possible. in santo domingo, the president honoured american republic is met with the emergency commission and stands ready to issue evacuations. all the authorities here today will do everything possible so that nobody is directly affected. people should know that when the evacuation order was given, especially when a lead levels are sent, the first thing to do to manage risk is self evacuation. its forecast to strengthen over the next 48 hours. residents of porto plotter
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brace themselves for the intensifying storm and hope she spares them some grace. the security firm g4s has suspended a tenth member of staff at brook house following an investigation by the bbc‘s panorama programme. the employee was one of five workers on restricted duties after reports of violent and abusive behaviour by some g4s staff at the immigration detention centre near gatwick airport. an independent review is being set up to look at the cultural practices and expectations of staff at brook house and other centres run by the company. researchers believe nearly 30 sperm whales which became stranded on european beaches early last year may have been the victims of large solar storms. scientists were puzzled by the loss of the mammals because they were healthy, mainly young and well—fed. but, other factors such as global warming may have been a factor. matt mcgrath reports. crowds gathered at hunstanton, on the coast of norfolk, in february 2016, to see this ocean giant washed up on a popular tourist beach.
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all around the north sea, more than two dozen other sperm whales were found stranded in the first two months of last year. scientists were extremely puzzled — the creatures were young, healthy and generally disease—free. now, it's thought the northern lights may have played a role in the loses. the aurora are the visible evidence of large solar storms, which distort the earth's magnetic field. this can cause species that rely on that field for navigation, like sperm whales, to lose their way. after big solar storms in december, 2015, scientists say the confused creatures swam into the shallow north sea and beached themselves trying to find a way out. other researchers say the theory is plausible but argue it is impossible to prove. matt mcgrath, bbc news. time now for a look at the weather. we've had in terrible conditions
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this morning across parts of northern england, wales, some really quite heavy rain around with lots of puddles on the road. do consider rain moving gradually eased but it's starting to break up particular leap across southern starting to break up particular leap across southern areas starting to break up particular leap across southern areas of england and, through the afternoon, you will continue to see some cloud, a few spots of rain here and there, brighter skies developing, but the best of sunshine will be across scotland, northern ireland, into the afternoon and with that sunshine, feeling a bit fresher. temperatures, 16-18. feeling a bit fresher. temperatures, 16—18. elsewhere, despite the cloud and rain, still feeling quite warm up and rain, still feeling quite warm up the rain will continue to clear away toward the used this evening and tonight many of us with clear skies, it will turn chilly compared to the last few nights. a bit chilly on wednesday morning, lots of sunshine, though. a few showers developing into the afternoon and for scotland and north—west england, but elsewhere, temperatures 20. bye— bye. this is bbc newsroom live.
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the headlines: a serious case review into the death of 21 month—old ayeeshia jane smith finds social workers missed signs of danger before she was stamped to death by her mother. as south korea steps up naval exercises — russian president vladimir putin has said pursuing further sanctions against north korea is "useless", saying the ramping up of "military hysteria" could lead to global catastrophe. police in the west midlands have arrested four men on suspicion of terrorism offences. they are suspected of being members of the banned neo—nazi group, national action. a french court is to rule on whether france's closer magazine should pay up to 1.5 million euros in damages to the duke and duchess of cambridge for violating her privacy five years ago. hello, this is sport today, live from the bbc sport centre.
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coming up on this programme: 0n on and on the visitors took the visitors took their chance brilliantly. in slovakia win would have seen the move to the top of group f buckley equalised by half time and lashed a wonderful winner on the hour mark. two more points from the last two matches will seek england qualify. dele alli's involvement could be in the balance. he says he made an obscene hand gesture to his team—mate as they shared a joke, not the referee. fever will wait to see if the match official‘s report mentions it. fever will wait to see if the match official's report mentions it.|j have not seen but i have been made aware of it. they were mucking about and delhi gestured towards kyle. i don't know what is visible on the
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picture and what the angle of the picture and what the angle of the picture is and the pair of them have a strange way of communicating, but thatis a strange way of communicating, but that is what they have said when it was race. i have not seen it myself. it's now in scotland's hands as they look to finish in second place. it won't guarantee a play—off match to reach the world cup but only one of the nine runners up will miss out. they beat malta at hampden park. they beat malta at hampden park. they need to beat to other people. northern ireland are assured of a runner—up spot. they beat the czech republic. group leaders germany are next up. we don't fear anybody coming here, things will change. i'm sure there will be a lot of big
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teams at the play—off places. we will prepare as best we can. what will prepare as best we can. what will be will be. but we don't fear anyone. we fancy ourselves to compete and win games in belfast. we have shown, especially away from home, but we are capable of getting results away from home as well. it is not likely in a good situation but it's not an easy one. two wins out of two fair england, scotland and northern ireland in its international break. slight wales will look to follow suit. they beat austria 1 million cardiff. gareth bale and his team—mates are behind the republic of ireland, they play each other tonight. a chance for wales to make up some ground. we have four finals to keep our hopes alive. if we win all four we have a great chance of being top, if not into the play—offs. 0ne down, three
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to go. this is still important. we will be going into the match prepared very well, very confident, and we know they will make it difficult for us but we will be giving everything to get those three points and put ourselves in an even better position. in the last half hour the world heavyweight champion every delaware anthonyjoshua has confirmed he will fight next in cardiff on october 28 against a bulgarian. he held three belts and his opponent is the mandatory ibf challenger. his last fight was against vladimir fitch. another big crowd expected in cardiff. he is only lost one of 26 pro fights and that was to admit it go. greetings, fans. 0ctober that was to admit it go. greetings, fans. october 281 that was to admit it go. greetings, fans. october 28 i will be defending my idf, wba, ipo title. he is game,
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ready and it has been a long time coming. a way to get back in the ring. he says all three belts are on the line. it mightjust be the ibf by fight night. the others might not sanction it because he is not taking on their challengers. tennis, the first—quarter bridles at the us open are almost upon us. they start later afternoon. all the details are on the bbc sport website. i'll be back with more sport bbc news in the next hour. let's get more now on the international tensions surrounding north korea's latest nuclear test. the russian president vladimir putin has said pursuing further sanctions against the country is "useless", saying "they'd rather eat grass than give up their nuclear programme". 0ur diplomatic correspondent jonathan marcus is here. took about the diplomacy in a
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moment, at first what have we learned over the recent weeks about what exactly north korea's capability is? we know it wants to have an intercontinental range missile capable of carrying a nuclear warhead to be able to take target the continental united states. in recent weeks it has had a couple of reasonably successful long—range tests. it has had another nuclear test destination. the jury is still out on precisely what type of device was tested, but it was certainly much more powerful than previously. the question is, is it one that is small enough to be able to be mounted in a warhead of a missile, but the overall, a lot of uncertainty, but the overall ta keaway uncertainty, but the overall takeaway is that north korea is making steady and probably faster progress towards its goals than many
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experts had perhaps imagined. russia is saying north korea would rather eat grass than give up its nuclear programme. strongly, russia is strongly against sanctions. what does that say about whether sanctions are likely? the regime does not eat grass in north korea although there have been frequent famines. but mr putin is right in the sense that north korea has invested huge amounts of national wealth in this programme. the problem is that sanctions up to now do not seem to have worked. the critical factor as ever is china, they are the fundamental prop of the north korean stage and economy. it must be a rather frustrated china at the moment because the timing of the recent tests have been able and i think at embarrassing the chinese leadership, coming at key conferences and so on, key times in
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their political calendar. the chinese presidents must feel annoyed with the north koreans. easy so annoyed that he is prepared to bring much greater pressure to bear? that is unclear. china has was taken the view that whilst it doesn't like north korea, having nuclear weapons, thatis north korea, having nuclear weapons, that is preferable to taking any action that might threaten the survival of the regime. it is a regime china does not much like but prefers to have a north korea separate from the south rather than seeing its collapse, have a unified korea and a redrawing of a strategic map in asia with a united career that would probably be in the us orbit. and as long as north korea keeps on carrying out these tests, what is going to happen in terms of the region and potentially a regional arms race? that is a great risk. it is a risk that extends more broadly away from just the korean peninsula at the military balance
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between north korea and its potential foes. the americans and the south koreans have agreed to relax whole series of restrictions on south korea's missile forces from the late 70s they were limited in terms of their range and the payload is the size of warhead they could carry. as in part a nonproliferation effort and in part a step to try not to upset the russians and the chinese. they have been relaxed in the past but most of those limitations we understand have been lifted now. more crucially, that won't please moscow and beijing, but more crucially we are seeing a thing of the focus on ballistic missile defence in both south korea and japan. that again is something that is particularly beijing sees as alarming because it believes that any missile defences, even if they are claimed to be against north korea, will impinge on the effectiveness of its own nuclear deterrent. it is very much a mirror
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of the arguments russia uses to nato. nato says these are defences against potential iranian attacks and russia says that's ok, you say that now, but if they work they may well be directed against us. i think you'll see an upping of those kind of wider strategic tensions as well. there are ramifications of the arms race on the korean peninsula and in the region which extend out much more widely. some breaking news to bring you about some arrests of members of a band neo—nazi group. we're hearing from the mod that alleged members of the band group national action who have been arrested on suspicion of preparing acts of terror are serving members of the army. the men aged 22 to 32 have been arrested on suspicion of being involved in the commission, preparation and instigation of acts of terrorism and of being members of the group national action. this group was the
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first far right group to be outlawed in britain last year after the murder of the mp jo in britain last year after the murder of the mpjo cox. the group had praised her killing. the four arrests were made by cash terrorism officers in birmingham, ipswich and northampton and all is in powers in wales. police said the arrests were preplanned and intelligence led, there was no threat to the public safety. that news just through, those four members of the group arrested are serving members of the army. the mod has confirmed it. we will bring you the latest on that with our correspondence. some residents who escaped the grenfell fire are finally getting some of their possessions back. whilst most of the flats were totally destroyed — 33 flats on the lower floors had limited damage — meaning some belongings survived the fire. the victoria derbyshire programme has been told that, so far,12 families from grenfell tower have received property the victoria derbyshire programme has been told that, so far, 12 families from grenfell tower have received property
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from their old homes. one of those is 69—year—old rumayatu mamudu who escaped from the first floor in her dressing gown carrying her 12—year—old adopted grandson. ashleyjohn baptiste has been following her story. we're at a hotel in west london where some grenfell survivors are being reunited with personal possessions that survived the fire. we are here with rumayatu mamudu, a grenfell resident who we've been following since the fire. we are here to see some of the items in my flat. what thoughts do you have on that? how are you feeling about seeing some of the items that have been in your flat at grenfell tower? mixed feelings. yeah? let's have a look. and these are possessions
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of mrs mamudu's from her flat at grenfell tower? that's right. do you want to have a look? would you like me to take some out? how about this one? do you recognise it? the colour has changed. you've got your national insurance card back. you're going to need that. yay! my gemini stone. is that really important to you?
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it is. it my best stone and i made it into a ring. wow, that's interesting. that's good. yes! talk to me about why you are so happy. my late husband's watch. does that not make me happy? so it's been over two months now since you lost your flat. you are still living in a hotel. but you have received some of your possessions from the flat. what sort of consolation is that for you? to me, actually, the consolation was that i was alive. all these are materialistic things. i'm happy i got them, but my life was more important. yeah. as soon as they start letting me build my life again, the sooner there will be closure. even if i got all these things back,
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there is no closure because i don't have a roof. i don't have my self—respect. i don't have dignity. i have nothing. even though she has some of her jewellery back, the majority of mrs mamudu's possessions remain in the tower. she's just one of 12 families to be reunited with their belongings so far but, for the majority of residents who survived, there's nothing left to be returned. police in the west midlands have arrested four men on suspicion of terrorism offences. they are suspected of being members of the banned neo—nazi group, national action. i'm joined by our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani. what can you tell us? these four arrests which happened across
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england and wales, raids, four locations, one man in his 20s arrested in birmingham, another in northampton another in ipswich, are fourth in his 30s in powers. they we re fourth in his 30s in powers. they were arrested following a joint operation for operations in wales and the east midlands. it has been a major operation and we now have confirmation that all four members are serving members of the army. we don't know if it is the same regiment or different ones. we don't have that information. but clearly they are all serving members. in the army were aware of this operation so they have been supporting the police prior to the arrests. this has been an intelligence led operation. it is worth saying that if anyone has been seeing police activity where the searches have been going on, the police are saying there is no specific threat to the public in relation to these arrests. what can
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you tell us about national action? they are a really strange group. they are a really strange group. they were the first british neo—nazi group to be banned under terrorism laws and effectively for that to happen there has to be some kind of evidence or intelligence they are involved in inciting violence or trying to carry out violence for an ideological motive. they were banned last december. it's slightly compensated what will happen but some of their members online supported the murder of thejo cox. as we know that had at ideological background to that. also they have been carrying out a number of very belligerence protests, almost like a flash mob where they turn up in a city centre masked and carrying nazi regalia. and effectively they do the nazi salute with megaphones, intimidating people and trying to call for a quite so only britain.
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0ne call for a quite so only britain. one of the most provocative demonstrations was on the steps of york minster, literally came from nowhere. about two dozen chaps turned up and carried out this demonstration. they have also been involved in other neo—nazi or far right activity on the streets of the uk. they have been slightly below the media's radar to be frank. many of their ways of working kind of mirror the banned islamist group which was led by the jailed hate preacher. targeting youth, try to get used tojoin preacher. targeting youth, try to get used to join and then carrying out provocative street demonstrations. that is why they we re demonstrations. that is why they were banned last december. is it known family members it had or has? it is banned now. it is always difficult to tell how may people work members before an organisation was banned. my best guess based on research done is it could be as many as 100. it is difficult to tell. if
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you look at their facebook activity. since they have been banned it is an offence to be a member of that group. so if you were to ask them they will have to say they are not. these men who are being held, they are being investigated the two offences. 0ne are being investigated the two offences. one is on suspicion of being concerned in the preparation of a cts being concerned in the preparation of acts of terrorism and also on suspicion of being members of national action. the police can hold them for 14 days before they have to make a decision. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour, but first the headlines on bbc newsroom live: a serious case review into the death of 21 month—old ayeeshia jane smith — murdered by her mother — finds that professionals weren't focused enough on her welfare. russia's president putin says increasing military pressure against the north may lead to global catastrophe if against the north may lead to global catastrophe. if police in the west midlands have arrested four men on suspicion of terrorism offences.
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they are suspected of being members of the banned neo—nazi group, national action. they are all members of the armed forces. in the business news: a pr disaster for bell pottinger. the public relations agency is expelled from the uk trade body for the worst breach of ethics in its history after advising on speeches that blamed unemployment and inequality in south africa on white—owned businesses. new figures show britain's dominant services industry grew at its slowest pace in almost a year last month, suggesting the economy is slowing as worries grow over brexit. at the same time new car registrations fell for the fifth month in a row in august — down 6.4%. lego is to cut 8% of its workforce after reporting a drop in first half sales. the firm said it would cut around 1,400 positions, the majority of them before the end of 2017. it comes after the firm reported a 5% fall in revenue to £1.8 billion.
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the company currently employs around 18,000 people. more on that news that pr firm bell pottinger has been expelled from the pr trade body in the uk. the public relations and communications association says the company was unethical and unprofessional and brought the industry into disrepute. in an unprecedented move it's expelled bell pottinger for five years. it follows the firm's media campaign for the wealthy gupta family of south africa. it's been heavily criticised for stirring up racial tensions in the country. the family has been accused of benefiting financially from links to south africa's president zuma. they hired bell pottinger to change their image. bell pottinger did that by setting up a social media campaign and advised on political messaging and speeches that blamed unemployment and inequality in south africa on white—owned businesses. amid protests about the campaign,
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the uk trade described it as the worst breach of ethics in its history. here's the head of the prca, francis ingham. we did it because the breach we have seen we did it because the breach we have seen is the worst i've seen in all my time here. it's important to show the industry have standards. the industry needs to make a stand about this and to say the kind of work stirring up racial tension and hatred in quite a tense country, quite a flourishing democracy in many ways, is just unacceptable. and thatis many ways, is just unacceptable. and that is what we have done. we have expeued that is what we have done. we have expelled from the prca. we have not done anything of this magnitude before. we want to make it very clear this industry is ethical, has standards and will enforce them. the company's chief executive resigned at the weekend, but how did the firm get it so wrong? either they knew what was happening
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and turned a blind eye to it or the internal management processes were so bad that a couple of rogue people could go off and do these things. either way, it is not acceptable and thatis either way, it is not acceptable and that is why they are no longer a member of the body. the vast majority of prca members are ethical, professional. they run their companies well and they care about doing the right thing. that is why we have expelled bell pottinger, because they did the wrong thing. in other business news... british engineering software company aveva group is to merge with france's schneider electric. the move will create a software firm worth more than £3 billion. schneider will take a 60% stake in the combined group, which makes 3d designs for businesses and factories. £184 million worth of goods were stolen from uk businesses between 2013 and 2016, according to new figures. they show greater manchester is britain's business theft hotspot, with 147,887 cases recorded over a three—month period, followed by west yorkshire and derbyshire.
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business theft refers to theft from shops and stalls, running away without paying, attempted theft or theft by an employee. the bank of scotland remains the most complained about financial business in the uk, according to the complaints watchdog. in the first six months of the year, the financial 0mbudsman said it dealt with 20,541 complaints about the firm — part of the lloyds banking group. the vast majority of the complaints about the bank of scotland — 83%— concerned its sales of ppi insurance. we've been talking a lot about wages keeping up with rising prices. the bbc has put together this. it is a quick guide to see how your pay co m pa res to quick guide to see how your pay compares to others who are doing similar jobs. compares to others who are doing similarjobs. and whether you should feel better off or worse. 0nce inflation is taken into account. find yourjob, type it into the page, it is on the bbc website. a
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quick look at the market numbers. talktalk is considering hiving off its mobile business, according to the financial times. they said it is in order to concentrate on cheap low—cost broadband. let's bring you some comments from france and north korea's nuclear capabilities. france's defence mizner is warning north korea could develop their stick missiles to reach europe sooner than expected. let's catch up with the weather. we had some heavy rain around this morning, particularly across north—western england, parts of wales, first thing this morning. that rate is moving eastwards. it is breaking up as it does. for many of ask through this morning it has been pretty cloudy. this is a typical scene. lots of grey skies there. but
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a little sunshine out there. the cloud is breaking up in london london. we will continue to see a few brighter spells developing in central and eastern parts of england through this afternoon. this band of rain will continue to gradually move eastwards. as the rain clears from scotla nd eastwards. as the rain clears from scotland and northern ireland, a big improvement here this afternoon with some good sunny spells. 12 showers perhaps. a few showers towards the far north—west of england but here we will see more sunshine breaking through the cloud, a bit of sunshine as well towards west wales. but the north—east england in the midlands and it will remain quite cloudy with further outbreaks of rain at times. some showers affecting central and eastern areas but also hear some brea ks eastern areas but also hear some breaks in the cloud. still quite warm, temperatures getting into the high teens and low 20s. through this evening, the rain will continue to clear eastwards and with mostly
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clear eastwards and with mostly clear skies and fresh air it will be chillier than the last few nights. temperatures in towns and cities down to 11 to 13 degrees. in the countryside it will be a little fresher. wednesday, not a bad day for the week. probably the driest of the week. sunny spells are many, a few showers in the late morning and early afternoon in scotland and north england. temperatures down a little from today. largely dry. as we go to thursday, we will see this next area of low pressure and weather fronts slowly moving in. after what will be a dry start of the many, the rain spreads into scotland, northern ireland, eventually into england and wales. the further south and east you are the drier it will stay for longest. quite breezy conditions and eventually the rain spreading to many of us. what details are
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available on our website. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday. four serving members of the army, alleged members of neo—nazi group national action, have been arrested on suspicion of preparing acts of terror. social workers missed danger signs around toddler, ayeeshia jane smith, who was stamped to death by her mother. as south korea steps up naval exercises, russia's president putin says military pressure against the north may lead to global catastrophe. a court in paris is to rule on a privacy case over publication of topless photographs of the duchess of cambridge in a french magazine. a surge in rohingya refugees fleeing violence in myanmar. the un counts 35,000 new arrivals into bangladesh in the last 24 hours. the biggest thing now, even though
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they've got to safety, what will happen to the next? they have to be fed and eventually they need to find some place to live, someplace to build their lives again. in the path of hurricane irma. caribbean islands brace themselves for the category four storm winds of up to 150 miles per hour. good afternoon. it's tuesday 5th september. i'm joanne gosling. the ministry of defence has confirmed that four men arrested in the west midlands on suspicion of terrorism offences are serving members of the army. the men aged between 22 and 32 are alleged to belong to the banned neo—nazi group, national action. the group was banned last year
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by home secretary amber rudd. we got the latest short time ago. these arrests should happen across england and wales, across england and wales, four locations, one man in his 20s arrested in birmingham, another in northampton, another in ipswich, and a fourth man in his 30s in powys. they were arrested after a joint operation involved in the west midlands counter—terrorism unit and also in wales and the east midlands, and major operation. we now have confirmation that all four are serving members of the army. it don't know which regiments, whether it's the same or different, we simply don't have that information but clearly they are all serving members. and the army were aware of this operation so they have been
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supporting the police prior to the arrest. this has been an intelligence led operation so it's worth saying that police activity, search activity has been going on, they are saying there's no specific threat to the public relation to these arrests of these alleged national action members. this is a really strange group. they were the first british neo—nazi group to be banned under terrorism laws and effectively there has to be some kind of evidence or intelligence they were involved in inciting violence or trying to carry out violent acts. they were banned last december, slightly, but they did what happened, but some of their members online supported the murder of the mpjo cox, which had an ideological background, but also they've carried out a number of very, very belligerent protests, almost like a flash mob, if you know
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what i mean, where theyjust turn up in the city centre, masked and carrying nazi regalia and effectively salute with megaphones, intimidating people, trying to call for a white only britain. 0ne intimidating people, trying to call for a white only britain. one of their most provocative demonstrations was on the steps of york minster, it literally came from nowhere, about 24 chaps turned up carrying out this demonstration but there were also involved in other far right activities on the streets of the uk, slightly below the media radar to be perfectly frank, many of their ways of working kind of mirror their ways of working kind of mirror the islamist group which has been banned led by anjem choudary, so targeting youth, trying to get used tojoin and targeting youth, trying to get used to join and then carrying out street demonstrations, and that's why the group was banned last december.m it known how many members it has? it's always difficult to tell how
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the people were members of an organisation before it was banned, particularly if it was semi—underground. my best guest based on research into this group is it could be as many as 100. difficult to tell. you look at their facebook activity. since they have been banned, it's now an offence to been banned, it's now an offence to bea been banned, it's now an offence to be a member of the group said it you we re be a member of the group said it you were to approach them they would say no, because they are breaking the law but these men being held, they are being investigated on acts of terrorism, the highest end. a serious case review into the death of 21—month—old ayeeshia jane smith, who was murdered by her mother, has found that professionals weren't focused enough on her welfare. a serious case review into the death of a 21—month—old girl who was killed by her mother is due to be published today. ayeeshia jane smith,
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who was known to her family as aj, died in burton—on—trent in staffordshire in 2014. she was murdered by her mother, who was jailed last year, tell us more about the findings of the serious case review. joanna, despite being described in here as a lively and loving toddler, the short life of ayeeshia jane smith is a tough and tragic one by any measure. social services were aware of her and her mother catherine smith before she was even born angela is briefly placed into foster care over concerns of safety. in april 2014, she was stabbed to death by her mother at herfamily she was stabbed to death by her mother at her family home she was stabbed to death by her mother at herfamily home in burton on trent and last year, smith was given a life sentence for her daughter ‘s murder and is currently serving a 19 yearjail term. this review has been looking into what lessons review has been looking into what lesso ns ca n review has been looking into what lessons can be learned from her death by the agencies involved and there are six findings and nine recommendations in total presented in this review by derbyshire police
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guard in children board. crucially, it says social services could not have predicted her death. but among the points it makes it highlights there was a lack of professional curiosity, by social services the issues affecting ayeeshia, like the role of her mother's partner, matthew rigby, also found guilty of causing and allowing her death and is currently serving a three and a half yearjail term. it also says professionals didn't explore whether the mother had psychological disorder and emergency department and paediatric staff at burton queen hospital didn't consider whether child abuse was a possibility when ayeeshia was admitted to hospital after a seizure, an event which was described as life—threatening in the trial fourth of issues around housing and a focus on smith rather than her daughter as also mentioned on herfull span than her daughter as also mentioned on her full span of than her daughter as also mentioned on herfull span of a than her daughter as also mentioned on her full span of a tragically till we learned was the day before
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she died, conference was held into her care after concerns of domestic violence between catherine smith and matthew rigby. it's hoped the recommendations in here ranging from emergency department and paediatric staff considering abuse is a possibility come at a more consultation and assessment with male partners, will prevent another death like this one and we will hear from children's services and safeguarding children later today. thank you. russia's president, vladimir putin, has warned of a "global catastrophe" if military tensions with north korea continue to increase. mr putin also dismissed the worth of imposing further sanctions on pyongyang, saying the country's leadership would rather eat grass than abandon its nuclear programme. meanwhile, south korea has been holding more live fire drills and has been staging a major naval exercise off the country's east coast. a south korean commander said the north's forces would be "buried at sea" in the event of a further provocation. the country's president says he's open to dialogue with the north but now is not the time for talks. china, the north's main ally,
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is still urging caution and has called for a return to negotiations. 0ur correspondentjohn sudworth is in dandong, on the border between china and north korea. the chinese city of dandong is a very good place to contemplate china's position in the north korean nuclear crisis. if we pan across the river you can see just how close the two countries are at this point. they are connected by that iron bridge behind me and almost all of north korea's trade in goods, as well as its vital crude oil supply, flows across this border. you can see an antiquated north korean power station on the other side there. a sign ofjust how dilapidated its energy infrastructure is. donald trump's argument, of course, is china could, if it wanted to, simply force north korea into submission by turning off this lifeline, but when you look at this proximity, you can see why the chinese leadership see things very differently indeed. their fear is that pushing
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north korea towards regime collapse will bring chaos and instability, factional infighting, possibly even war, right up against this border, and that is why beijing is insisting that it will not contemplate a total trade embargo. it will not contemplate talk of military options. all it wants to see is a return to dialogue and that has been its position all along. let's get more now on those comments from president putin, speaking in china this morning and speak to our moscow correspondent sarah ra i nsfo rd. russia's position is similar to that of china. russia and china but forward a road map for resolving the crisis
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on the korean peninsula. president putin has made clear that whilst russia sees the latest nuclear test by north korea as provocative, as he put it, and has condemned those, he doesn't think sanctions are the way forward. in fact, these are the north korean leadership would prefer to wheat leadership would prefer to eat grass than enter their nuclear programme says sanctions he said were a dead—end road but also he was very strong in terms of what he called the military hysteria that he said was being whipped up over the crisis on the korean peninsula. he said that that was a road to nowhere, this kind of rhetoric needs to end and all sides need to return to the negotiation table. as russia sees it, it seems all sides, including pyongyang, like china, are pushing for a return to talks and says the only way to resolve this crisis is through diplomacy, but it's difficult to know what influence russia can bring to bear on the situation. it has important historic ties with them, but in terms of economic leverage, political leverage even, it's difficult to know how much pressure russia can actually exert on north korea. a 46—year—old woman has been charged
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with fraud after making claims for support being provided to survivors of the grenfell tower disaster. in south london, is charged with six counts of fraud linked to the fire where at least 89 people lost their lives in june. she is due to appear at westminster magistrates' court later today let's look at some of today's other developing stories. the search has resumed for a man missing off the cornish coast. he was one of two men swept into the sea in treyarnon bay yesterday afternoon, while fishing. another man was taken to hospital where he was confirmed dead. the government has taken over children's services in the london borough of croydon after a report by 0fsted inspectors identified what it described as "widespread and serious" failures. the report said children were forced to wait too long for help and too few young people who ran away were spoken to by a social worker when they were found. for a full summary of the news
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you can go to our website and all the latest developments in north korea. where you'll be able to get more details on all of those stories. a paedophile has beenjailed for 16 years after admitting rape, despite being thousands of miles away when the offences happened. paul leighton from county durham, created up to 40 fake facebook profiles to befriend teenagers in the uk, canada, the united states and australia. he then tricked them into sending him naked pictures and blackmailed them into abusing relatives. some viewers may find stuart whincup's report distressing. paul leighton, a dangerous man who blackmailed youngsters into abusing their own friends and family members. he is a man who detectives say carried out one of the most horrific cases of grooming ever seen in the uk. paul leighton is one of the most vile, sick and serious offenders we have ever dealt with. his actions have undoubtedly had a devastating impact on victims all over the world. here is, without a doubt,
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every pa rent‘s worst nightmare and his approach, targeting victims online, is a stark reminder of the dangers of the internet. some of the victims and those closest to them will never recover from the trauma of these offences. leighton pretended to be a young woman online. he created up to 40 fake profiles on facebook using different names and different pictures. at first, leighton built relationships with the youngsters and got them to send him online naked pictures of themselves. he then used those pictures to blackmail them. he told the youngsters that he would show the pictures and videos to their parents or publish them online for the world to see unless they carried out sexual assaults against their own family members and filmed it for him. they were so terrified of being exposed, that they carried out unthinkable abuse. 0ne14—year—old boy in the usa who was threatened by leighton
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filmed himself abusing his 12—month—old niece. this afternoon, the court heard from the mother of one of his victims. she's angry and anxious all the time. she's terrified he's going to come and get her. she wants to end her life and she does not want to be here any more. it's never—ending. i don't know how i'm going to get her through this. sentencing leighton to 16 years in prison, judge robert adams told him he had committed utterly appalling abuse and was a danger to children here and abroad. stuart whincup, bbc look north, newcastle. 0ur headlines on bbc newsroom live. four serving members of the army alleged members of the neo—nazi group national action had been arrested on suspicion of preparing a cts arrested on suspicion of preparing acts of terror. social workers mr danger signs around toddler ayeeshia jane smith who was done to death by her mother. as south korea steps up naval exercises, president putin
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said increasing military pressure against the north may lead to global catastrophe. lets join against the north may lead to global catastrophe. letsjoin 0llie against the north may lead to global catastrophe. lets join 0llie for a sports update. anthonyjoshua has confirmed that his next fight is going to be in cardiff at the principality stadium in october 28, against the bulgarian pulev. his last fight was the spectacular bout against wladimir klitschko at wembley stadium, another big crowd is expected in cardiff. up to 70,000. the challenger pulev has only lost one of his 26 pro fights and that was to admit it go.|j only lost one of his 26 pro fights and that was to admit it go. i hope the fans are well. 0ctober and that was to admit it go. i hope the fans are well. october the 28th, i will be defending my ibf wba heavyweight championship title of the world against a fighter named
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pulev. he is ready, it's been a long time coming. i can't wait to get backin time coming. i can't wait to get back in the ring. he says all three of his belts are on the line but it may just be of his belts are on the line but it mayjust be the ibf, the ipo and wba might not sanction the fight because he isn't facing one of their challengers. we will have to see about that in a couple of months. world cup qualifying winds for northern ireland and scotland last night and england, northern ireland and scotland last nightand england, and northern ireland and scotland last night and england, and they stay top of their group after beating slovakia but fifa awaiting the match official support from wembley after dele alli appeared to make an obscene gesture towards the referee. at totte n ha m obscene gesture towards the referee. at tottenham midfielder said it was directed towards his team—mate kyle walker as a joke. i have not seen it, but i've been made aware of it, they were mucking about and he made a gesture towards kyle. i don't know what has been visible on the pictures and what the angle of the pictures and what the angle of the
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picture was, but they have a strange way of communicating, but that's what they have said when it was raised. i haven't seen it myself. two wins out of two for scotland, england and northern ireland and tonight wales will hope to follow suit, beating austria on saturday and tonight they are a to moldova fuld gareth bale and his team—mates are two points behind the republic of ireland in second spot, crew of four adrift of serbia but those two teams play job four adrift of serbia but those two teams playjob at night so it's a great chance for wales to make up some more ground. that's the sport for now fuld and i will be back after the one o'clock news at 1:30pm with a full update. see you then. thank you very much, 0llie. an inquest into the deaths of eight people killed in one of the uk's worst road accidents opens in milton keynes this morning. the group were travelling in a minibus on the m1 near newport pagnell when they were involved
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in a collision with two lorries. ben ando was at the hearing. tell us more about what was said. this crash is absolutely horrific. it was a minibus that was trapped between two trucks. the senior coroner milton keynes, tom 0sborne, opened the inquest into the deaths of eight people, six men and two women who we re people, six men and two women who were in the minibus and were killed. he expressed his condolences to family members in court. he said the minibus had been travelling southbound on the m1 motorway, 3:15am, but when i came across a vehicle stationary in lane one for the driver slowed down and stopped but the minibus was hit from behind by another lorry in the same lane and crushed. all the victims died from multiple injuries. the confirmed their identities and said paperwork had been done to enable their bodies to be released to the families, and their funerals their bodies to be released to the families, and theirfunerals could ta ke
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families, and theirfunerals could take place and some were going to be repatriated to india because all of those who died were members of the malay community has originated from southern india. afterwards, a family member, matthewjohn, said he knew the driver well and he was a good man. he was a great father. very family orientated person. very active in the church, in the community. when somebody needed anything, he was there for them. so it's a big loss, notjust for the family, but for the community as well. the coroner adjourned the inquest today because he needs to allow court proceedings to take place because after the accident the drivers of the two lorries were both arrested, and one of them, originally from poland, has been charged with eight counts of causing death by dangerous driving and has also been charged with offences with
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drink—driving while the other driver david wagstaff from stoke—on—trent has been charged with dangerous driving. this week included want any court proceedings arising from those charges have been completed. thank you. united nations refugee agency says there's been a surge in the number of muslims who have fled from bangladesh to the neighbouring country. our correspondent is at a refugee camp in bangladesh. there are two main refugee camps which are organised or run by the government here as well as the aid authorities, aid agencies. lots of children, lots of women who have been walking the days. they are
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exhausted because whatever food they had to eat along the way has long run out. some are dehydrated but the biggest thing for them is they made it to relative safety. 0ver biggest thing for them is they made it to relative safety. over on that side is myanmar where we have seen fresh fire break out from burning villages, there's no way to verify this, and these people are fleeing for their lives. what they will do now is head to any kind of temporary shelter they can find at the side of a hill, inside a building, just to get a bit of protection. it is starting to rain. even though they have got to safety, what will happen to them next? they have to be fed and eventually they need to find some place to live, some place to build their lives again. some news from the manager of sir bruce forsyth, ian wilson, who has confirmed that his funeral took place yesterday, a private service
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and he won't be giving any further details although he said a short statement will be put out from the family later, confirmation that sir bruce forsyth's funeral took place yesterday. the brexit secretary, david davis, will face questions in the commons this afternoon, as mps return to westminster after the summer recess. mr davis is expected to be pressed on the state of the negotiations with the european union. 0ur assistant political editor, norman smith is in downing street. when we were talking to you earlier, the cabinet were coming out. what is the cabinet were coming out. what is the mood there about the sort of questions he's going to face and what his tone will be?|j questions he's going to face and what his tone will be? i think his tone will be one of reassurance to try and counter a lot of the criticism for that we have heard from brussels that no progress is being made in these brexit negotiations, the british are not prepared, not saying what they want, and the talks are sort of drifting aimlessly. what david davis will
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seek to say is, yes, 0k, there are many disagreements over big issues, such as money, the role of the european court of justice, such as money, the role of the european court ofjustice, but in the smaller but important technical areas around health insurance, recognition of qualifications, their progress is actually being made. secondly, on these critical issues such as money and the so—called divorce bill, the view of the british government is they are not going to put a figure on the table until they can see what they're going to get in return in terms of some sort of trade deal. just talking to those around david davis, their hope is, whatever the eu macro—duchess negotiator michel barnier might be saying about the slow pace of talks, eu countries, the big ones like germany and france, will be much cleanerfor the big ones like germany and france, will be much cleaner for the talks to move on to those critical trade issues which michel barnier is saying can't be discussed until we
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have arranged those divorce arrangements, so have arranged those divorce arrangements, so i think he will be trying to reassure mps that we are not sort of drifting towards the rocks. later this week, the brexit repeal bill will be debated in the commons. what should we look out for because labour have indicated they will vote against it in the second stage? will many tory mps potentially do the same?” stage? will many tory mps potentially do the same? i think the key thing to realise is that the big bust up over this eu withdrawal bill is not going to happen this week and the beginning of next gourmet vote on the second reading because although labour are going to vote against it, all the signs are tory critics of mrs may are not going to join ranks of labour because they fear it will be seen as doing jeremy corbyn's bidding, however, down the line, a couple of months ahead, get
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into the amendments, when mps can table the sort of changes they want to the legislation, expect tory mps to the legislation, expect tory mps to pile in with amendments demanding for example that mps should have a bigger say in the final brexit deal, maybe we should stay in the single market, and when they get to that stage, mrs may could face real difficulties because post—election, she got a tiny majority and only needs a handful of mps to vote against for her to be defeated and thatis against for her to be defeated and that is when we will see mrs may and a real pressure this legislation. thank you very much, norman. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, will set out her government's legislative programme this afternoon pledging a bold and ambitious plan for the coming year. she is expected to focus on health, the economy and, principally, education, an area where opposition parties say the snp should be embarrassed by its record. one of britain's most senior counter—terrorism officers has warned that the terror threat level will remain at ‘severe' for at least the next five years. neil basu, the national co—ordinator for counter—terrorism policing, described the risk to the uk as "an unknown threat in our midst".
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he warned isolated communities and unregulated schooling in the uk were a "breeding ground" for extremism. there are currently about 600 active counter—terrorism investigations. a 14—year—old boy is in a critical condition in hospital and a 17—year—old has suffered "life—changing" injuries in a double shooting in east london. the metropolitan police said there were "serious concerns" of retaliation and has put extra officers on the streets. no arrests have been made. the met said the boys were taken to an east london hospital. a french court is expected to deliver verdicts today in a privacy case involving topless photographs of the duchess of cambridge. the pictures were taken while the duchess and her husband were on holiday in provence five years ago, and published in the magazine closer. 0ur paris correspondent hugh schofield reports. it was five years ago, while the royal couple were staying at this mansion in the south of france, that the secret
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photographs were taken. the topless images of the duchess of cambridge were published in a french celebrity magazine but they were quickly withdrawn from circulation after the couple obtained an injunction. separately, though, criminal charges were brought against the magazine and, last may, two of the editorial staff and two photographers were tried for invasion of privacy. with the 20th anniversary just past on the death of prince william's mother in paris, inevitably it evokes memories of the role paparazzi played in pursuing princess diana's limousine. a coroner's court in the uk said photographers were part—responsible for her unlawful death. today, after they announced the good news of their third expected baby, for the duke and duchess, the verdict in paris may bring back memories they'd much ratherforget but by pushing from the start for record damages, they have made their point. the right to privacy is not something the uk royals will give up without a fight. hugh schofield, bbc news, paris. we are expecting a ruling shortly
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and we will be live in paris for reaction as soon and we will be live in paris for reaction as soon as we and we will be live in paris for reaction as soon as we get it. parts of the caribbean and the south—east of the us are bracing for a storm bigger, both in size and wind speed, than hurricane harvey. a state of emergency has been declared in florida in the face of hurricane irma. it is now a category four storm, bearing down on the eastern caribbean and likely to reach land by tonight. virginia langeberg has more. 0n the caribbean island of antigua, boats are pulled from the water as the region braces for the thread of hurricane irma which continues to build strength out at sea. we have to get a crane and barge, which is more expensive. this is the best way to move when we have a kind of a disaster like this. residents do what they can, boarding up windows and stocking up their fridges ahead of irma's arrival. over in the dominican republic, small waves roll in under blue skies but this is just the calm before the storm.
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translation: the government is very aware to face whatever situation may present itself. from this moment on, we are on a constant monitoring situation. irma has been upgraded to a powerful category four storm and likely to make landfall by tuesday night or the early hours of wednesday, prompting hurricane advisories to be issued for several caribbean islands. a state of emergency has also been declared in florida, which could be in irma's path. this is a severe and strengthening storm. up to half a metre's worth of rain is possible from it, but the wind strength could be the major issue. sustained wind, the average wind speeds of at least 220kms an hour, with gusts of much higher than that. damage and destruction is certainly possible. in santo domingo, the president of the domincan republic has met with the emergency commission and stands ready to issue evacuations. translation: all the authorities
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here today will do everything possible so that nobody is directly affected. people should know that when an evacuation order is given, especially when alert levels are sent, the first thing to do to manage risk is self evacuation. irma is forecast to strengthen over the next 48 hours. residents of porto puerta brace themselves for the intensifying storm and hope she spares them some grace. virginia langeberg, bbc news. irma, an incredibly powerful and dangerous harry kane. 185 mph winds andi dangerous harry kane. 185 mph winds and i reckon it will make a direct hit on antigua. devastating scenes to come out of that island i'm sure. here the weather is quieter. rain is pushing north and eastwards. it's turning a bit patchy and lighter
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throughout the afternoon. still quite humid across the eastern counties. the scotland and northern ireland are some sunshine moving in. it will fill fresher than recent days. 0vernight that fresher air will swing across the uk as the last of the cloud and rain clears. a few showers blowing into the north—west of scotla nd showers blowing into the north—west of scotland but otherwise it is dry overnight. a fresh appeal to the weather. tomorrow, many of us have a fine start to the day with plenty of sun. some fairweather cloud as the day goes by it but wednesday is probably the best day of the week in terms of sunshine. a few showers moving to scotland and cumbria but further south is a lot of fine weather. still quite fresh. highs of 20 but feeling fresher and not as humid. this is bbc newsroom live — the headlines: four serving members of the army — alleged members of neo—nazi group national action —
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have been arrested on suspicion of preparing acts of terror. police say the arrests had been pre—planned and intelligence—led, and there had been no threat to the public‘s safety. a serious case review into the death of 21 month—old ayeeshia jane smith finds social workers missed signs of danger before she was murdered by her mother. as south korea steps up naval exercises — russian president vladimir putin has said pursuing further sanctions against north korea is "useless", saying the ramping up of "military hysteria" could lead to global catastrophe. a french court is to rule on whether france's closer magazine should pay up to 1.5 million euros in damages to the duke and duchess of cambridge for violating her privacy five years ago. the security firm g4s has suspended a tenth member of staff at brook house following an investigation by the bbc‘s panorama programme. the employee was one of five workers on restricted duties after reports
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of violent and abusive behaviour by some g4s staff at the immigration detention centre near gatwick airport. an independent review is being set up to look at the cultural practices and expectations of staff at brook house and other centres run by the company. some residents who escaped the grenfell fire are finally getting some of their possessions back. whilst most of the flats were totally destroyed — 33 flats on the lower floors had limited damage — meaning some belongings survived the fire. the victoria derbyshire programme has been told that, so far, 12 families from grenfell tower have received property from their old homes. one of those is 69—year—old rumayatu mamudu who escaped from the first floor in her dressing gown carrying her 12—year—old adopted grandson. ashleyjohn baptiste has been following her story. we're at a hotel in west london where some grenfell survivors are being reunited with personal possessions that survived the fire. we are here with rumayatu mamudu,
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a grenfell resident who we've been following since the fire. we are here to see some of the items in my flat. what thoughts do you have on that? how are you feeling about seeing some of the items that have been in your flat at grenfell tower? mixed feelings. yeah? let's have a look. and these are possessions of mrs mamudu's from her
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flat at grenfell tower? that's right. do you want to have a look? would you like me to take some out? how about this one? do you recognise it? the colour has changed. you've got your national insurance card back. you're going to need that. yay! my gemini stone. is that really important to you? it is. it my birth stone and i made it into a ring. wow, that's interesting. that's good. yes! talk to me about why you are so happy. my late husband's watch.
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does that not make me happy? so it's been over two months now since you lost your flat. you are still living in a hotel. but you have received some of your possessions from the flat. what sort of consolation is that for you? to me, actually, the consolation was that i was alive. all these are materialistic things. i'm happy i got them, but my life was more important. yeah. as soon as they start letting me build my life again, the sooner they start letting me build my life again, the sooner there will be closure. even if i got all these things back, there is no closure because i don't have a roof. i don't have my self—respect. i don't have dignity. i have nothing. even though she has some of her jewellery back, the majority of mrs mamudu's
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possessions remain in the tower. she's just one of 12 families to be reunited with their belongings so far but, for the majority of residents who survived, there's nothing left to be returned. researchers believe nearly 30 sperm whales which became stranded on european beaches early last year may have been the victims of large solar storms. scientists were puzzled by the loss of the mammals because they were healthy, mainly young and well—fed. but, other factors such as global warming may have been a factor. matt mcgrath reports. crowds gathered at hunstanton, on the coast of norfolk, in february 2016, to see this ocean giant washed up on a popular tourist beach. all around the north sea, more than two dozen other sperm whales were found stranded in the first two months of last year. scientists were extremely puzzled — the creatures were young, healthy and generally disease—free. now, it's thought the northern lights may have played a role in the loses.
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the aurora are the visible evidence of large solar storms, which distort the earth's magnetic field. this can cause species that rely on that field for navigation, like sperm whales, to lose their way. after big solar storms in december, 2015, scientists say the confused creatures swam into the shallow north sea and beached themselves trying to find a way out. other researchers say the theory is plausible but argue it is impossible to prove. matt mcgrath, bbc news. sex workers say they are being left more vulnerable to attack by laws making it illegal for them to share premises for safety. the victoria derbyshre programme has been told that laws around brothel keeping force women to work alone in order to avoid prosecution. the sale and purchase of sexual services between consenting adults is legal in england and wales, but acts such as soliciting and brothel keeping are illegal. so might decriminilisation
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of the sex—industry be the best way to protect people who sell sex? 0ne activist and former sex worker has been investigating. 0k, my name is susie. i have worked in the sex industry on and off in my adult life. there's a perception that sex work is inherently degrading, that it's morally wrong, but when you look at it compared to the other low paid, long hours, incredibly physically demanding jobs, it's often the best choice for people because it is less jobs, it's often the best choice for people. according to one estimate, there are nearly 73,000 sex workers in the uk today. with 32,000 in london alone. there's no doubt that some of those people are coerced into selling sex. but, to be clear, this film isn't about people who are coerced into prostitution against their will. it's about people who have made a decision to work in the sex
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industry and how the law often fails to protect those people. i'm maria from portugal. i'm a sex worker. maria, not her real name, says she was working with a group of women at a brothel in london when she became the victim of an armed robbery. i was in a house working with a few different girls and then five or six different guys just came inside of the house. the security opened the doorfor them. and then theyjust went with knives and they just took all the money. the police arrived soon after to investigate but maria explained that the police seemed to be as interested in the work going on the premises as in the robbery itself. maria explained it is for precisely this reason that sex workers are often reluctant to report violent crime to the police for fear of being investigated themselves.
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if they call the police, the police willjust see the place that they are working and they will say to leave or something, they can't keep working there and they need places to work. i'm originally from romania. i'm a sex worker. i've been a sex worker for the last five years. i've been working in soho ever since. suzanne, once again not her real name, has an even more shocking story to tell. sadly, some years ago, suzanne was the victim of a violent attack while she was at work. and in the time of the service, the personjust put his hands the person was there to kill me. fortunately, suzanne was working with someone that night, her receptionist, who was eventually able to call for medical help. but she believes that, had she been working alone, she might not have survived the attack.
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if it wasn't for her that night, no one could have woken me up. the thing that sex workers want is full decriminalisation of sex work. but as long as the law continues to act as an incentive to unsafe working practices, more sex workers like the women we've heard from in this film will be at risk of violence and abuse. and you can see the full film on the victoria derbyshire programme page on our website. it's the first week of school for many youngsters here in the uk. but in pakistan more than 20 million children are not in education at all. in the city of karachi, campaigners are trying to change this by taking the classroom to the streets — literally. 0ur pakistan correspondent secunder kermani has been finding out more. in the middle of four lanes of busy traffic a school for some of pakistan's most vulnerable children.
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many of the pupils here are barely in their teens but practically all of them used to work for a living. 11—year—old neha used to be a maid. now she hopes one day to be a doctor. translation: i used to have two sweep, to mop and just other translation: i used to have to sweep, to mop and dust other people's houses. my dad died so my mum said i needed to work. and how do you feel coming to school now? translation: i like it a lot. there are said to be hundreds of thousands of street children in the city of karachi. many of them live and work in the shadow of this religious shrine, where local charities and devotees distribute free food. so that's where one local businesswoman decided to start a school — opposite the shrine, underneath a flyover. translation: we are here because we don't have enough funding for a proper building and also because this is an area where a lot of gangs who try
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and exploit children operate. plus the kids all live nearby so it's easy for them to get here. at times, the noise from the traffic can be pretty deafening. you can see just how close the cars are, just the other side of this fence. but the school is hugely popular. 600 children are registered here alone and there's two other schools just like this elsewhere in the city. they say they'd like to open more but they don't have enough funds. the school runs entirely on voluntary donations but manages to provide free lunches and school uniforms. they also pay each child the equivalent of around 30p a day to make up for the money they would have been earning. that helps persuade their parents to allow them to attend. translation: at first my mum wouldn't let me come. i said i wanted to study but she said, no, i need to work. but since i have learned to read and write my mum is really happy.
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lessons take place under the watch of armed guards. there have been threats from criminal gangs who try and recruit youngsters in the area. but the school's founder has said she is determined every child should get an education, wherever it is. secunder kermani, bbc news, karachi. more now on the serious case review has found that social workers allowed the needs of a woman who killed her daughter to overshadow those of the toddler. ayeeshia jayne smith, who was 21 months old, was killed by her mother kathryn in 2014, at their home in burton—on—trent. chris cloke is head of child protection for the nspcc. hejoins me from our central london studio. thank you forjoining us. failings
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in this case, as there have been in many before, what are your thoughts on this case in particular? this is a horrific case and that a chill child could be killed in this way the 21st century is a major cause for concern. we'd consider the findings from this review very seriously. while the case review points to some areas of good practice, there are shortcomings and we need to ensure those are addressed so that children are better protected. how easy is it to learn lessons, because as we mentioned there have been previous cases, previous case reviews, and it doesn't stop certain things happening. in this case, for instance, it came down to a judgment about whether she posed a real risk to her daughter or not and the serious case review concluded that all of the evidence available to the professionals led them to believe that her parenting was more than
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adequate and in fact no one around her was suggesting that she might pose a risk to the child. that is right. and certainly we know that child protection is a very complex, difficult work, and that many children are effectively protected. but in this particular case the nspcc is very concerned about was that loss of focus on the needs of ayeeshia smith. we need to address all members of the family but we must remain child focused way comes to child protection. that must be the priority. and in this case, very sadly, that focus of attention was lost. so do social workers need to be more proactive in taking children out of a situation that is not a brilliant environment for a child to be in whether it is deemed they are at risk or not? yes, as the case review says, professionals need to be much more curious, professional curiosity, they need to be prepared to ask those difficult questions, could this child be abused, is the
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child vulnerable? and there were a lot of indicators in this case and cases like it, when there is drug misuse, domestic violence, which are classic indicators of risk, and therefore social workers and other child protection workers need to ask those questions. and the same of course applies to health professionals to. there will of course be a lot of children in that particular category in homes where there are those issues. what should happen to them? their needs must be properly assessed. and we need to make sure that children who are in those households are properly considered. and of course it falls us all, we all need to take responsibility and that can includes next—door neighbours, people in the street. if we have a concern and we have a nagging doubt at the back of our mind, we need to error on the side of caution, pick up the phone and tell someone. back doors be the nspcc helpline, we are here 24 hours a day. thank you much. the leading british pr firm,
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bell pottinger, has been thrown out of the industry's trade body, the public relations and communications association, for a campaign which stoked racial tensions in south africa. the company had been hired by the controversial gupta family, who have close links to president zuma. an independent report found that bell pottinger had spread misleading information. lets speak now to mark borkowski, pr specialist and author of "the art of the publicity stunt". thank you forjoining us. what is your reaction to this? it is obviously a very rare thing for a pr firm to be ditched by the trade body for the sector. indeed. it is the prca who have made this ruling. it isa prca who have made this ruling. it is a good day 15 pr. i think a lot of us were surprised by how forcibly they pushed through this ruling. after deliberation. it underlines i
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guess that there is a very strong commitment now that these type of publicity campaigns that might be operated under the scrutiny of the organisation and also people horror who are a lot more aware of what is going on and some of the tactics used by shall we say pr companies who lack that moral compass. when you say some of the tactics, how much of this sort of stuff is going on? well, it has been going on for many years. it is quite interesting. there is a very tough ruling in america about how pr can operate and this goes back to a time when the national socialist party, the nazis, employed an american pr company to represent their interests in american society. this is nothing new. those who have the ability to employ people, to launder their reputation or perhaps express their
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views, and everybody is entitled to be represented, but clearly the tactics, allegedly tactics, that bell pottinger used crossed a line. everybody has looked at this with interest to see just how tough the prca have been, and they have been tough. we all welcome it. what about the future for the company? the co—founder has said it is unlikely... the company will almost certainly fail to recover from the fallout. bell pottinger, one of the global stars of this business, and clearly if you are employed to manage and help clients who have perhaps a questionable reputation, if your own reputation is in question it is not easy to operate. news breaking at the moment is one of the shareholders has pulled out. it is in freefall at the moment and i would be very surprised to see
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bell pottinger operating again. this is not the end of this story. this isn't the end of the scrutiny on other pr companies. watch this space. thank you. researchers are investigating whether the benefits of a trip to the seaside could help people with anxiety, depression or loneliness— even if they live miles from the coast. or loneliness — even if they live miles from the coast. graham satchell explains. 0k, suse? happy? we're off the coast of falmouth, on a boat owned by the charity sea sanctuary. on board, a skipper, a therapist and two people, susie and ian, who are living with anxiety and depression. there's something very special about being on the water. it's such a calming place, you can leave whatever troubles you've got behind, and you can escape. gently, close your eyes. there are group sessions on board and everyone works as part of the crew. but the charity says the sea itself has a therapeutic quality. there's something going on, it's quite hard to define. but it's something to do
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with space, something to do with challenge, power. ian started feeling depressed and withdrawn after retiring from the fire service. there is something eternal about the sea, isn't there, about water. i'm so lucky to be living in cornwall, to have a pension and to be able to do this, you know. so what about people who don't live near the coast? a team of researchers from the university of exeter, a 360 virtual reality camera and a drone. they're trying to capture the power of the coast for people who can't get there themselves. there's quite a lot of evidence now to suggest that accessing and having exposure to natural spaces can be really beneficial for psychological well—being in terms of stress reduction, in terms of combating depression. we're particularly trying to bring that therapeutic blue space in for people who can't access it themselves. so particularly, in our project, it's for people who are living in care homes who can't perhaps get outside so easily. nicky's project is part of much
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larger european research into so—called "blue health". will it work? bring it over your glasses. now, i'll pop the earphones down. it's on my nose. nicky is trying out her videos on a group of volunteers. oh, that's amazing. oh, it's beautiful. some of the pictures are calm and relaxing. one could definitely fall asleep. others, more interactive, stimulating. oh, the turtle's coming behind me! oh, no! well, i thought it was a really interesting experience. it's not something i've done before. it feels like you're there. hey! where did you come from? anything, ithink, connected with the sea or rivers, water, it certainly takes away some of the day—to—day drudgery of life. what we wanted to do was test whether these environments really
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were relaxing and stimulating, and today we found that actually, the way people reacted to them was the way wed hope that they would, and so we will definitely take those videos forward now into our care homes project. definitely take those videos forward nicky will take her headsets into care homes next year to bring blue health to those who can't access it themselves. graham satchell, bbc news, falmouth. in a moment, the news at one. first the weather. it's a slow improving picture to ta ke it's a slow improving picture to take us through the afternoon. gradually turning a little brighter and drier as we go through the rest of the day. it was an atmospheric start of the day in ludlow with the early—morning rain giving way to mist and early—morning rain giving way to mistand humid early—morning rain giving way to mist and humid conditions. the rain is pushing eastwards but as it cleared away from the north—west of scotla nd cleared away from the north—west of scotland we have seen some showers
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move in interspersed by sunshine. perfect conditions for spotting some of these rainbows. today could through the afternoon, it will stay quite cloudy across most of england and wales. sell some rain around, probably turning increasingly patchy and light. still quite humid across eastern counties but as the sunshine moves into scotland and northern ireland it will feel a little bit fresher. 0vernight the rain clears away from eastern england and we will be left with largely clear skies with some blustery showers moving into the west of scotland overnight. temperature wise, to 13 degrees but it will feel a lot fresher than it has done recently. a decent start to wednesday for many. a lot of sunshine, almost clear skies to start with. some cloud bubbling up as the day goes by across england and england and wales and northern ireland. a few showers for the north and west of scotland.
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a fine looking day. feeling fresher everywhere. the wind is feeling a little cool across parts of western scotland. wednesday's pressure was influenced by high pressure. that moves out of the way and into the weekend this low pressure sits across the uk. it means the weather is it increasingly unsettled with rain or showers in the forecast. fairly blustery winds and feeling quite cool in those wins at times too. heading into the caribbean, we have a brute on our hands. harry kane erma has the lowest central pressure of any september harry kane on record. it is heading for antigua. gusts will be devastating a huge fall of rain and the british virgin islands are also in the firing line. that is the weather. the ministry of defence says four men arrested on suspicion
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of being members of a banned neo—nazi group are serving members of the army. the men were all arrested in cities in england and wales this morning on suspicion of preparing acts of terror. they are all believed to be members of the national action group. we will have the latest. also this lunchtime... the toddler murdered by her own mother — a serious case review finds that the child's needs were overshadowed by concerns for the mother. an apology from the local services. i've apologised to the family and i'm truly sorry that on this occasion we didn't prevent her death. russia's president warns that what he calls the military hysteria over north korea could lead to global catastrophe and heavy loss of life. a court
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