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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  September 5, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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dry elsewhere. north—west scotland. dry elsewhere. temperatures lower than recent days and feeling fresher with highs between 15 celsius and 20 celsius. that's your weather. today at 5.00pm: the british soldiers arrested on suspicion of belonging to a banned far—right group. the four soldiers, some thought to be from the royal anglian regiment, are arrested on suspicion of preparing acts of terrorism. the men arrested across england and wales are alleged to be members of national action, a banned neo—nazi group. we'll have the latest and we'll be talking to an expert on the group in question. the other main stories on bbc news at 5.00pm: the little girl murdered by her mother — a serious case review says that social workers failed to spot signs the little girl was being abused. we accept all the findings, i accept all the findings of this review and for those areas of practice that should have been stronger. i've apologised to the family and i'm truly sorry. president putin warns of a "global catastrophe" if military tensions continue to increase around north korea. hurricane irma is reclassified
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as an "extremely dangerous" as it heads towards the caribbean and the southern united states. the duchess of cambridge is awarded thousands in damages after a french magazine published topless photos of her sunbathing. it is 5.00pm. our main story is that four serving members of the army have been arrested under the terrorism act on suspicion of being members of a banned neo—nazi group called national action. the men were detained as part of a pre—planned operation. west midland police say there was "no threat to the public‘s safety". national action has been described by the home office
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as "virulently racist, anti—semitic and homophobic" and it was the first extreme right—wing group to be banned under terrorism laws last year. our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani is here with the latest. eand e and what we know today. this morning we got a statement from the west midlands counter—terrorism unit saying that four men had been arrested, three of them in england, in birmingham, ipswich and northampton, and the fourth in powys on to allegations. it is quite an unusual investigation to be going on, national action is quite a small group. birmingham is where they are being held. police have up to 1a days toward them. we then found out
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that the army had been involved in this. the army has confirmed that some serving members of the forces are amongst those who have been arrested. three of the individuals are members of the royal anglian regiment. we are not quite sure about the identity of the fourth individual at the moment. police have 1a days to hold them. individual at the moment. police have 14 days to hold them. as the army said anything more than confirming that they have been cooperating? they say they are cooperating. they are leaving at night to the civilian police force is to get on with that. we don't know exactly what the army's involvement and this has been, whether it is just been facilitating. the army will now stand back now the men are in custody. clearly, we are assuming it is part of a wider project, wider
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investigation. do we know anything more about the wider context of this? there has been a growing investigation into the far right in the uk over the last year. we had the uk over the last year. we had the murder ofjo cox and that was a wake—up call for many in the counterterrorism environment over the threat that these groups pose. national action is a small group but it was very act of up to the point when it was banned last december. they used to go online, try to radicalise young men to join them in flash demonstrations in towns and cities and you solve the regalia and language of the extreme far right and neo—nazi signs and symbols. they gathered quite a following online, but in practice when it turned out that demonstrations they were quite small. it said it disbanded in the uk following prescription, but there are uk following prescription, but there a re clearly uk following prescription, but there are clearly suspicions that it is still active. west midlands police
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did say today that they did not think the public safety had been at risk. that's right. that is their way of saying that at this stage of the investigation there is no suggestion that something violent was about to happen. they are trying to put people's mount everest. this isa to put people's mount everest. this is a complex investigation into the background of what is going on, but no sense there is any immediate danger. thank you, dominic. thank you, dominic. let's talk to dr chris allen of the university of birmingham, who has studied the ideology and rise of far—right groups and has written on the national action group. thanks forjoining us. what are your thoughts? i am thanks forjoining us. what are your thoughts? iam not thanks forjoining us. what are your thoughts? i am not really surprised. from the research i did prior to them being banned a new day but very active, very much targeting the youth demographic. very much a kind of group which is a traditional
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national socialist organisation, so with hearing hitler, quoting from mein kampfand with hearing hitler, quoting from mein kampf and using a lot of the nazi symbols within their promotional material. one of the things from today it is that my anecdotal evidence was that there we re anecdotal evidence was that there were still active in the west midlands in certain circles. so many ways i am not surprise arrests been made. they are relatively small group. tell us more about their organisation and what kind of numbers are talking about? organisation and what kind of numbers are talking abounm organisation and what kind of numbers are talking about? it came out of the young british national party from a few years ago. the people that bolted together initially were part of that traditional far initially were part of that traditionalfar right initially were part of that traditional far right group initially were part of that traditionalfar right group in. one of the interesting things is that they have sought to differentiate themselves from those groups such as themselves from those groups such as the english defence league or britain first, they see them as having water down the nationalist ideology so they have gone back to
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this traditional authentic anti—semitic, homophobic anti—disabled ideology. they have spoken about establishing britain as a white homeland. so it is this white supremacy ideology. in terms of their activities, there has been a lot online and their website is active. 0n a lot online and their website is active. on one instant their website had a competition for young female nazis and it was called miss hepler. it was interesting in the way they'd use social media in terms of selfie is also promoting that traditional ideology. numbers very small in terms of their meetings and activities but very effective in those that they had. a much bigger presence online when they tapped into youth culture. it is a banned organisation under the terms of the home office degree of last year and
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that terrorism legislation. given that terrorism legislation. given that ban, what can we say about the nature of the activity and where that may not have gone to? that is very difficult until more details come out. one of the things they we re come out. one of the things they were doing prior to their banning was that they would target university campuses and university society groups, so save the lb gt groups 01’ society groups, so save the lb gt groups or the jewish society groups, so save the lb gt groups or thejewish societies on campus. as regards their activities now, my anecdotal evidence is that some of those activities may have been continuing. i wouldn't be surprised that that is the kind of why we have gone down that route. the public persona and social media profile would have been taken straight down immediately after the banning. very interesting to talk to you. thank you. a serious case review into the murder of a little girl
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in staffordshire has found that social workers "missed danger signs". ayeeshia—jayne smith was 21 months old when she was murdered by her mother, kathryn smith, in may 2014. the review found a lack of "professional curiosity" meant social and health workers had failed to spot signs the little girl was being abused. kathryn smith was jailed for at least 19 years. 0ur correspondent phil mackie reports. the smiling face of ayeeshia—jayne smith, or a], as a family called her. only 21 months old, she was murdered by her mother during a savage outburst. my daughter is not breathing... this was the 999 call kathryn smith made after stamping on her daughter so hard that the child's heart was literally broken. she's not breathing. can you hear anything coming from her mouth? there's nothing. she's gone. smith is serving a 19 year prison sentence for murder. her partner matthew rigby three
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and a half years for allowing the death of a child. even during their trial it was clear social workers and medics might have missed opportunities to spot the abuse. today's serious case review identified 17 different agencies involved in aj's at and made the recommendations. social workers showed a lack of professional curiosity and were too quick to believe kathryn smith's lies and it tragically reveals there was a growing sense of unease and a meeting was held to discuss aj. it happened the day before she died. i just want to recognise that ayeeshia—jayne's death was an absolute tragedy. it's been devastating for everybody involved in her care. but mostly for her family. i have already met with her family and we accept all the findings. i accept all the findings of this review. and for those errors of practice that should have been stronger, i have apologised to the family and i am truly sorry that on this
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occasion we were not... we did not prevent death. medics who treated her at the queens hospital in burton also missed signs of abuse. thinking she had suffered a fit brought on by a childhood fever, known as afebrile contusion. we had two instances where we definitely didn't exhibit enough professional curiosity and ayeeshia—jayne's attendance. it turns out it wasn't a febrile convulsion. we didn't to family situation as much as we should have done and didn't ask enough questions. despite the missed opportunities, the report says there was nothing that would have indicated that a] was likely to be killed by her mother, catherine smith. it does highlight other problems including
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an intervention by the child's natural father, ricky an intervention by the child's naturalfather, ricky burns, who an intervention by the child's natural father, ricky burns, who was ignored when he raised concerns. since her death social workers have been issued with new guidance, but it didn't come in time, sadly, to describe the life of the little child described in the report is lively and loving toddler. joining us from central london is the children's commissioner for england, anne longfield. when we talk about a lack of professional curiosity among social workers, you could really not think of anything more damning. could you agree? it is a tragedy in every way. just listening once again to the description of what happened to this little girl who should have a future ahead of her but doesn't, we have the serious case review and we have had the apology, which is welcomed, but there are a number of things that stand out from me in the report. we just heard that there is
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about the health professional thing, that they didn't look into the circumstances enough. they didn't have that professional curiosity at the level they should've done. there was also align them there that said professionals didn't have enough focus on the experience of the child. for me, that is there to defend children and ensure that children are getting the help that they need, that is absolutely pertinent. this is a very vulnerable child in the high risk situation with parents exhibiting high risk habits. it should be something which eve ryo ne habits. it should be something which everyone should be on high alert for. sadly, it is not the first time that we have discussed the case like this and normally there is a combination of things that people bringing. i suppose other group them as questions of professional competence and sometimes questions about resources, were social workers
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are about resources, were social workers a re overstretched about resources, were social workers are overstretched and accountable the time to cases. where does the balance lie in this case?” the time to cases. where does the balance lie in this case? i am really concerned that we don't know enough about what the impact of those vulnerabilities of very young infa nts those vulnerabilities of very young infants are, and also that we are not sure that there is the right response in many local areas about that. it is something i will be looking into over the next six months. i will be looking at what it means to be infant. and as a nation, if you like, how we can ensure that children get the support they need in these high risk situations. when you are a very young child in that situation sometime too can be living in chaotic circumstances and there is very little times for meetings and so on, so we need to be sure that we provide the right support of those children at the right time. let's talk about cooperation among
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the agencies involved. what needs to be done better? it is very clear in the review, that whilst agencies we re the review, that whilst agencies were following their own processes, there was an bad overview. it was unclear who the lead responsible person was. they talk about authoritative practice and the lack of it. for me that as someone who ta kes of it. for me that as someone who takes responsibility for that child, who sees the big picture. that is something that i intend to look. who sees the big picture. that is something that i intend to lookm isaid to something that i intend to lookm i said to you that somebody listening to this interview might say, how can we have faith in the system, that the system has the kind of integrity and strength that is needed to protect vulnerable children? mortgagor response be? these are the highest risk cases and they know that workers spend huge amounts of energy looking at the challenge of getting that balance
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rightand, in challenge of getting that balance right and, in the main, challenge of getting that balance rightand, in the main, the judgments are right, i think. in some cases, and they are always too frequent, including this, it doesn't happen. we need to make sure there is the best possible sharing of the information. we need better understanding of vulnerability, then looking at all of the agencies being on absolute alert when there is a family situation that puts children at risk. occasionally, that will mean that more children will need additional support from the state, rather than leaving them with their pa rents. is that support there, that's the point? there are more children going into ca re point? there are more children going into care than there have been and some will see that as a good thing, some will see that as a good thing, some will see that as a good thing, some will not. i want to be sure that the children who are getting extra help from the state to need it that help. again, another area of work will be looking at those around
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the thresholds and whether we have that balance right. we know there are inconsistencies around the country so we need to make sure that there is constituency —— consistency for the children who are the most vulnerable. thank you. this is bbc news at 5.00pm. the headlines: four serving members of the army, alleged members of a banned far—right group, have been arrested on suspicion of preparing acts of terrorism. social services apologise for failing to spot a toddler who was killed by her mother was being abused. president putin warns of the google capacity of military tensions continue to increase around north korea. mark sampson says his conscience is clear after allegations of bullying, discrimination and racism made by
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england striker any legal. he was cleared by an fa enquiry and by an independent investigation. it is all smiles for chris froome as he wins the individual time trial to extend his lead at the vuelta a espana. gareth bale says wheels will approach the world cup qualifier tonight with convention after their win over austria on saturday. tonight they are away to moldova, a side 4— nil last year. the russian president, vladimir putin, has warned of a "global catastrophe" if military tensions with north korea continue to increase. he was speaking after south korea's navy staged a major exercise as a show of strength following the north's latest nuclear test. president trump says he is prepared to approve the sale of billions of dollars of weapons to south korea. our correspondent robin brant reports from seoul. for the second day running, south korea has been displaying its military might.
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this time it was the navy, in what was described as a massive live firing exercise off the eastern coast. to show how this country could defend itself, or attack. there's no doubt the military is stepping up its readiness. the ministry of defence said the us had agreed to sell south korea more weapons. that was after approval was given yesterday to restore the us missile defence system here known as thaad. but all this could lead to a global catastrophe according to the russian president. he said tougher sanctions wouldn't work either. translation: the use of sanctions of any kind in this case is already useless and inefficient. as i told my colleagues yesterday, they will eat grass, but they will not give up this programme if they do not feel safe. but further sanctions with the threat of military action is exactly what the americans told the united nations is the answer. his abusive use of missiles
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and his nuclear threats show that he is begging for war. war is never something the united states wants. we don't want it now. but our country's patience is not unlimited. the recent self defensive measures by my country, dprk, are a gift package to none other than the us. the us will receive more gift packages from my country as long as it relies on reckless provocations and futile attempts to put pressure on the dprk. this is north korea's border with china, where further sanctions would bite. but beijing is reluctant to cause any further waves yet. you could give people heading home here in seoul this evening for perhaps feeling a little bit confused. on the one hand they have seen images of their military preparing maybe for a confrontation.
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and yet they have a president here who has talked instead about a new round of economic sanctions. and now russia, not far to the north, has stepped in and labelled those useless and may be ineffective. as the around the chance of conflict increases, there was this injapan. a silent protest in hiroshima. a place where they know what nuclear devastation looks like. robin brant, bbc news, seoul. the brexit secretary, david davis, has told mps that discussions with european union negotiators have yielded "significant steps forward" in securing the rights of eu citizens living in the uk and british citizens living in the eu. the eu has claimed that the talks so far have failed to deliver "decisive progress." we are talking about the major
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legislative process that is now underway in parliament now that the brexit process moves forward. process moves forward. our political correspondent eleanor garnier is in westminster. we saw the tension between the two sides at the end of the negotiations last week in brussels today and the house of commons david davis has not been holding back. there was a big dollop of criticism for the eu's approach to the docks. he says that the uk have been substantially more flexible and pragmatic than the eu. he stressed about her large part of the talks about technical details and he said that these were progress has been made, for example the border in northern ireland under public of ireland, also reciprocal recognition of professional qualifications. he also conceded where there are areas with a lack of progress, and he said one of those
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was the brexit bill, how much the uk will pay when it leaves the european union. there he said there was a substantial difference between the two sides. at the start of these because asians both sides agreed that the aim was to make progress on four key areas. citrus and rights, financial settlement, northern ireland and ireland and broader separation issues. we have been doing just that andi issues. we have been doing just that and i have always said... nobody has ever pretend that this would be simple or easy. i have always said that this because you should would be tough, complex... tough, complex and at times confrontational. the shadow brexit secretary said his party recognised the talks were extremely complicated but he said this was a case where fantasy had met brutal reality and that there
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was a realisation that promises had been made that night could not be. he said he was worried the two sides in the negotiations are further apart than ever before. i'm sure that colleagues and officials in his department are working hard in these difficult negotiations and they paid tribute to what they are doing behind—the—scenes, but the state of affairs and a slow process —— process of progress is a real cause for concern. the parties appear to be getting further apart rather than closer together. round three of five in phase one is gone. we would expect agreement to be emerging on the key issues. the last round is in october and that should be for formal agreement. there is not a huge pressure on the negotiating round in september. this afternoon has been an update from david davis to mps on the first day back after
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the summer holidays, but on thursday mps are going to start debating actual legislation around brexit and what is up first is the eu withdrawal bill. so, transferring all eu law that affects us into british law. that is where the government could face potential problems. in the longer term, when mps not to put amendments down, changes to that legislation, that is when labour, the snp and liberal democrats, also a handful of tory rebels potentially, might cause theresa may at of a headache. thank you very much. let's go from westminster to the scottish parliament. nicola sturgeon has unveiled her legislative programme for the coming year, with a pledge that ministers would invest in the future and shape scotland's destiny. the first minister made clear that improving education and closing the achievement gap between rich and poor remained her government's number one priority. our scotland political correspondent andrew kerr is at holyrood for us.
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tell us more about the statement and where it takes us in terms of may be, does it mean a new direction for the scottish government? good evening. yes, big day at hollywood for the first minister, the equivalent i suppose of the queen's speech, she was laying on the programme for government. it is a different direction for this cove na nt, different direction for this covenant, focusing on the domestic agenda. education perhaps been the cornerstone of that, improving life chances for young people. on the economy, another fundamental pillar, measures to improve the economy with that national investment bank, an innovative economy that is inclusive. that clearly interesting
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announcement when it comes to the environment, the third pillar, as it were. over the next few months we will set out detailed plans to massively expand the number of electric charging points in rural, urban and domestic settings. plans to extend the green bus fund and accelerate the green bus fund and accelerate the procurement of electric or u it ra low the procurement of electric or ultralow emission vehicles in both the public and private sectors. plans for pilot demonstrator projects that promote the uptake of the vehicles and private motorists and plans for a new innovation fund, to encourage business and academia to encourage business and academia to come up with solutions for some of our particular challenges. nicola sturgeon trying to demonstrate her environmental credentials. we would need to have a much bigger network of charging points right across scotland. there was a blizzard of other announcements. free personal care for the under 65 who suffer from
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conditions like motor neuron disease. backing for a ban on smacking. bottle deposit scheme, too. this is a real return to the domestic agenda. i think the government has been stung by criticism that they have not been getting on with their dayjob. as much as we welcome the tone and some of the content of today's statement, we are also entitled to be sceptical. we just had 12 month where it is fair to say that delivery has not been topmost of this government's list of priorities. today the first minister comes to this chamber with 16 bills. last use chicken with 15 and only got through four. the public are entitled that has lifted a's16 are in front or behind last year's leftovers in the queue. ruth davidson added that she didn't wa nt ruth davidson added that she didn't want the government to use brexit as a fig leaf for independence. labour
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will use in the government to use their powers here for a 50p rate of tax. the lib dems were highly critical of this programme for government saying that not much was being proposed. the debate is going on in there and it will continue for another couple of days. thank you, andrew. so, the major developments there in scottish politics. in america, the programme to allow the children of some illegal emigrants in the us has been entered today by the trump administration. protesters have been marching in support of the scheme, scheme put in by president obama. the scrapping of the scheme will affect around 800,000 people. the us congress by her six months to pass new legislation on the issue before this scheme ends. a court in paris has ordered the celebrity magazine closer to pay 100,000 euros in damages to the duke
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and duchess of cambridge for publishing topless of the duchess sunbathing on holiday five years ago. the royal couple were on a private holiday in provence when the pictures were taken. the court found some of those associated with the publication guilty of invading the duchess's privacy. our correspondent hugh schofield reports from paris. no surprise with the verdict. the pictures, taken at this chateaux in southern france were indeed, said the court, and evasion of the royal couple's privacy. the images of a topless duchess of cambridge appeared briefly five years ago in a french gossip magazine before an injunction ordered the edition removed from newsstands. the criminal case has dragged on ever since with two executives and two photographers at the magazine answering charges they violated the royals' rights to a private life. at the trial in may, a lawyer for prince william said memories of his own mother, princess diana, made the affair all the more stressful. it's exactly 20 years since she died in a car crash in paris, chased by paparazzi.
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the sum awarded in damages might fall short of the 1.5 million euros asked for by the royals, but by french standards it's still extremely high, reflecting the court's view that this was a glaringly shameless offence. coming after news of their third expected baby, news of the judgment in paris might be an unwelcome reminder of an unhappy episode, but the royal couple have made their point. in the battle for privacy, they will fight back. in 80 minutes, later after the sports news i will be talking to our weather expert chris here about hurricane irma, which is now developing into a very serious storm indeed and is a big threat to the southern united states. chris, you will tell us more later but can you give us the rest of the weather as
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well? yes, there is a huge category five hurricane on the way, the atlantic hurricane on the way, the atlantic hurricane on the way, the atlantic hurricane on record, would you believe? at the moment it is heading towards antigua, landfall in ten hours' time. it will bring in devastating scenes. today, it's humid day with cloud across england and wales, patchy outbreaks of rain and wales, patchy outbreaks of rain and humidity will increase overnight —— will be a overnight. yes, there will be showers in the north and west but a fresher kind of night. lows of 11 or 12 degrees. it should bea lows of 11 or 12 degrees. it should be a fine start of the day for most of us, with decent spells of sunshine. some cloud bubbling up as the day goes by that there will be more sunshine then we have seen over the last few days. some showers in north—west scotland, and into the north—west scotland, and into the north coast of northern ireland but for most of us it is a dry day. in the south, it is still present in the south, it is still present in the september sunshine. i is 15—20d.
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highs. this is bbc news at five — the headlines. four serving members of the british army have been arrested on suspicion of preparing acts of terrorism. the men, aged between 22 and 32, are alleged to belong to the banned neo—nazi group, national action. a serious case review into the death of 21 month—old ayeeshia jane smith has found social workers missed signs of danger before she was murdered by her mother. we accept all findings, i accept all the findings of this review and for those areas of practice that should have been stronger. i've apologised to the family and i'm truly sorry. the russian leader, vladimir putin, has warned that "military hysteria" over north korea could lead to a global catastrophe. he described pursuing further sanctions as useless. the duchess of cambridge has been
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awarded 100,000 euros in damages by awarded 100,000 euros in damages by a french court, after a french magazine published topless photos of her sunbathing. we will catch up with all of today's sports news and we willjoin leah boletta now. hello there. england's women's manager mark sampson says his "conscience is clear" following the allegations of bullying, discrimination and racism made by striker eni aluko. sampson was cleared by an internal football association inquiry into aluko's claims, and by an independent investigation. i have heard there are specifics in the allegation and, at the time, we released a statement to be clear that i did not say that, and i'm very disappointed the allegations have come out but i understand it and alli have come out but i understand it and all i can say that i did not say that to eni. with any of my
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communication my intention is to support the players and give them confidence and give them every chance to be successful on the field. sampson has named a 26—player squad for their opening world cup qualifier against russia later this month. wales will be looking to maintain the 100% home nations record during the international break they beat austria 1—0 in cardiff on saturday. they're in kishinau for tonight's match against group d's bottom side moldova. gareth bale and his team—mates are two points behind the republic of ireland in second spot and four adrift of leaders serbia. they play each other tonight so it's a chance for wales to make up some ground. we have said we have four finals basically to keep our hopes alive. if we win all four we have a good chance of being top and if not, we get into the play—offs. one down, three to go. this is as important as the last and we will be going into the last and we will be going into the match prepared, very well prepared and very confident. they
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will make it difficult for us and we will make it difficult for us and we will give everything we can to get those three points and put ourselves into an even better position. liverpool right—back nathaniel clyne has been ruled out for a significant period of time due to a back injury. clyne wasn't named in liverpool's champions league squad for the group stage. managerjurgen klopp says the reality is that the england defender won't be back playing for "some time". chris froome has nearly doubled his lead after winning the individual time trial at the vuelta a espana. froome is aiming to complete the tour de france—vuelta double and obliterated the field over the 40 kilometre course today. he now heads his nearest rival vincenzo nibali by one minute and 59 seconds and is strong favourite to win the vuelta for the first time. bath have announced that head coach tabai matson is to leave the premiership club forfamily reasons. matson arrived at the rec from new zealand side crusaders with director of rugby todd blackadder injuly 2016. he will return to his native new zealand after bath's premiership game against northampton saints
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on friday. the world heavyweight champion anthonyjoshua has confirmed his next fight will be in cardiff at the principality stadium on october 28th against the bulgarian kubrat pulevjoshua holds three belts and pulev is the mandatory ibf challenger. joshua's last fight was the unification spectacular bout against vladimir klitchko at wembley stadium, the ukrainian has since retired ruling out a rematch. the 36—year—old pulev has only lost one of his 26 pro—fights and that was to klitcshko two years ago. joshua says all three belts are on the line, but it mayjust be the ibf by fight—night. the wba and the lesser regarded ibo may take those titles out of the equation because he isn't facing their challengers. the first of the men's quarterfinals at the usa open is under way.
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spain's pablo carreno busta is currently taking on diego schwartzman from argentina you can catch up with all the latest on the tennis pages at the bbc sport website. for now, that is all from us. that website there to keep you up—to—date. website there to keep you up-to-date. we will have more for you on sportsday at 6:30pm. studio: leah boletta, thank you. we will see you there at the bbc sport centre later. it's his 46th novel, and they include fantastically successful works for younger readers and for adults, but this time the author anthony horowitz has placed himself at the centre of the story called the word is murder. it's the first in a series about hawthorne, a former cop sacked by the metropolitan police. one critic says the book is the most audacious yet written by the author, and it's already prompted a debate about what's real and what's fiction. anthony horowitz is with me now. it's good to have you with us.
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it's good to have you with usm it's good to have you with us. it is nice to be here. and i've got the word article because well. the word is murder by anthony horowitz, a familiar name on a lot of book covers, including in my house i am pleased to say. how did this come about? i've been thinking about writing whodunnits for a while now, i wrote the magpie murders and i wa nted i wrote the magpie murders and i wanted to do something different, i wa nted wanted to do something different, i wanted to do something different, i wanted to take the murder mystery idea and give it a twist which is how i ended up with the book. idea and give it a twist which is howl ended up with the book. and what is the twist? will it bring it to people —— for people? what is the twist? will it bring it to people -- for people? the mainly character, daniel hawthorne, is a disgraced detective, he is only a co nsulta nt disgraced detective, he is only a consultant to ghostwrite his story, his investigation. a lady was murdered after arranging her own funeral. that is how it begins, and half an hour later she is dead. he goes to a writer to get the right to
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doa goes to a writer to get the right to do a ghost written book about him, and the writer is me which is howl get drawn in. why did you get the idea to inject yourself into the narrative? i've is very interested in the tribal between the writer, the detective and the sidekick. —— the detective and the sidekick. —— the triangle. there would be sherlock holmes, and arthur conan doyle writing the whole book. what if the author comes out of the hill and into the mystery? i'm writing a book i am supposedly in control of, but i'm the idiot who gets nothing right, i'm the one following hawthorne about in the hope that you will solve it so i have the book to write. it is metafiction with a capital m. iam not capital m. i am not the centre of the book, i am just the sidekick narrator. i am hastings, i am watson. with some readers be right to be confused as to what is actually real and what is fiction in the book? would you say to people excuse me, this is all
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fiction? not confused, i don't think thatis fiction? not confused, i don't think that is the word. i think they would be used as there are elements of my life in it. meetings with famous people... my wife turns up. she was quite nervous about making an appearance in the book but i persuaded her it would be all right. my persuaded her it would be all right. my children are in there briefly, the fact i live in london. but when you've read sherlock holmes, how much do you actually know about what's on? you hear his voice and that he is married, a doctor. but that he is married, a doctor. but thatis that he is married, a doctor. but that is how this works too. i'm trying to think that who this is aimed at, what kind of readership? in the past you've reached out to a wide range of readers, not only in terms of age but backgrounds and interests. what about this? anybody who loves golden age murder mysteries. people like agatha christie, and at the end of the day it plays fair with you as a straightforward murder mystery.
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there are clues, red herrings and suspects, a puzzle to be guest. if you like that kind of book with a post modern twist, that is who it is for. and children, it is interesting being a writerfor for. and children, it is interesting being a writer for both audiences, how many young people aged 12 to 14 are moving into adult literature and finding my books. having placed yourself in it, and describing a little bit about the factors behind that, has this been a challenging writing your other books? every vote isa writing your other books? every vote is a challenge, this was enormous fun to write. i wrote it during a blast of activity at the start of the year and i just blast of activity at the start of the year and ijust enjoyed it, i got a real kick from it because it was so peculiar to be one step behind my character and arguing with him the whole time. hawthorne read my book in the course of the book and tells me that it is terrible, his writing —— my writing is not what he wants. rory kinnear, he did
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the audio for this but it was my voice because i wrote it, and that was even more peculiar! i'm hopeful that if the book is a success , i'm hopeful that if the book is a success, and people enjoy it, i want to do another half dozen, maybe as many as nine or ten. there is a mystery about hawthorne. why is he as difficult as he is? why is he damaged? as difficult as he is? why is he damaged ? what happened as difficult as he is? why is he damaged? what happened in his life to turn him? i become a detective trying to find out where he lives. is he married ? trying to find out where he lives. is he married? what is his background? is he married? what is his background ? why was is he married? what is his background? why was he fired? during ten bucks, there is a journey for me to make. and when you consider what you've done with this, and the hope it will lead to more, how do you differentiate it, what is the main differentiation here? to do a whodunnit, and a mystery but i'm
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interesting in right —— but i am interested in writing about writing. and i thought about the process of writing, what it is like to be a writer. and where murder mysteries come from, why do we need murder in books? i've wanted to write about that. you can write about entertaining mysteries but at the same time, give it an added something. that's the nature of literature and books like this. and when he finished it, and you set out thinking about what you set out to do, what parts of this work best in terms of the technique of the book? obviously be solution, —— the solution. i love the layering, the structure. with agatha christie i love how you get to the end of one of her books and you may or may not get it. you have been played. everything has been fair and in its correct place. what i love about a book like this, aside from that discussion, laying everything out in
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a way that will give you a kick at the end. no other book gives you such a buzz or a sense when you arrive at a truth in the right place at the end of that. that's what i most enjoyed. and for those readers who enjoy it and are keen, when can they expect a next? my next one is a bond novel, but then i think the rest of my life will be following hawthorne solving murders. the word is murder, anthony horowitz, thank you. good luck with the book. the leading british public relations firm, bell pottinger, has been thrown out of the industry's trade body , because of a campaign which stoked racial tensions in south africa. an independent report found that bell pottinger had spread misleading information. the company, whose chief executive resigned over the weekend, says it accepts that lessons do need to be learned, our media editor amol rajan reports. post—apartheid south africa
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was meant to be the rainbow nation. but over 25 years, one family has acquired a degree of power and influence that critics say is anything but democratic. the three gupta brothers only conglomerate with interest from mining the media. with close links to jacob zuma, they are accused of rampant corruption, which they deny. but with a reputation to salvage, they gave the british pr firm bell pottinger a call. for several months, bell pottinger ran a disinformation campaign stoking racial hatred, and targeting hostile journalists. all the journalists who were writing about state capture who were interested in this new crony network, really, you could see almost daily there would be, largely driven on twitter and social media, quite insulting images of them made. and only now do you understand that it was actually a constructed
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campaign. the scandal has claimed the scalp of several staff at the firm including partner victoria geoghegan and ceo james henderson. now the trade body that represents britain's your industry has chucked out bell pottinger. now the trade body that represents britain's pr industry has chucked out bell pottinger. it is the harshest penalty available to us and the harshest we have ever imposed on members and that reflects the fact that it was the worst piece of pr work that i have seen in ten years. the pr industry is overwhelmingly professional, bell pottinger neither of those. last night, the former adviser to margaret thatcher who founded the firm but left after falling out with mr henderson said the company was finished. i think that it probably is getting near the end, yes. you can try and rescue it but it will not be very this scandal has sent shock waves through the british pr industry and also young democracy of south africa.
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but the prca is a trade body rather than a regulator and when some very rich individuals or families are prepared to spend huge sums to burnish their reputation, frankly, some pr firms like bell pottinger in london will take the money. and a ticking off and temporary ban from a trade association is not going to change that. but for opponents of president zuma, this is not so much about the state of pr is the state of south africa. one family's grip on power is tightening, even as the reputation of their pr advisers is now in the gutter. let's talk a little more about hurricane, some disturbing reports about the strength of it. hurricane irma, has been reclassified as an "extremely dangerous" category five storm — which is heading towards the caribbean and the southern united states. with sustained winds of 175 miles—per—hour, irma is due to move over part of the leeward islands tonight — around antigua.
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our weather presenter, chris fawkes is here... it really does sound as though it could cause monumental damage? it really does sound as though it could cause monumental damage ?|j think could cause monumental damage?” think you are right, category five is the strongest it can get and this is the strongest it can get and this is the strongest one we have ever had in the atlantic basin. 180 mph winds, stronger gusts which reached 220 mph. that is a phenomenal wind speed. at the moment, it is working straight could go up towards barbuda, that is a possibility but it will not move much beyond that. we could get a direct hit in the next 11 hours. the trajectory is antigua, this region, and beyond that? beyond that, this graphic should hopefully show that the eye of the storm goes right past those two islands. the british virgin islands too. as well as the strong wind we have talked about, there is a massive storm surge. what happens underneath these, there is water at
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the core and water bulges up under these areas of low pressure and as hurricane winds come in, this water moves inland. this storm surge moving in across the leeward islands and british virgin islands, it could reach 11 foot in height in places. as well as that, torrential rain and damaging destructive winds. i think you are damaging destructive winds. i think you a re exactly damaging destructive winds. i think you are exactly right. and in antigua, they will have to take some pretty major precautions there. we have some images of what is going on. this is antigua right now. and given the strength of the storm that you are describing, whether this kind of preparation, looking pretty heavy duty, will that really help them? in terms of the impact that it will have on antigua, presumably the eye will go straight over them, which is worth the strongest winds are. if you are in a well built concrete hotel it will survive a hit like that but there will
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probably be no windows left. in a more flimsy house it will be blown to pieces. those are the kinds of impacts which are difficult to gauge. how much damage is caused by those winds is an unknown quantity. because it is so powerful, the strongest ever in the atlantic basin, we must assume it will bring catastrophic damage. and measuring the strength and speed of it, that's another thing that is interesting, how it is achieved. can you tell us about that? one of the things the national hurricane centre does is send out hurricane hunter aircraft, these aeroplanes fly into the centre of the storm, they measure the wind speed and throw out radio songs into the middle of the storm which measures the central atmospheric pressure in the eye of the hurricane and the wind speeds. from that information, it goes into the supercomputer models which tell us how strong the hurricane is. what is
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phenomenal is thinking that in antigua it is a nice day. we go from a50 antigua it is a nice day. we go from a 50 mile per hour wind in the space of 11 hours going up to 220 mph. we we re of 11 hours going up to 220 mph. we were talking about hurricane javi and the work that had to be done in the usa on that, how can we compare these two events —— hurricane javi. how does this compare to what we saw with javi? that was category four, this is stronger thanjavi but what caused the damage with harvey was that it became slow—moving and most of the damage was a tropical storm. it was not the wind but the colossal rain. we had over 1.2 metres of rain from javi. it was the wettest storm, bringing the most amount of rain that has ever hit the united states on record which is why we have seen
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so much flooding around eastern texas and louisiana. and you mentioned 11 hours in terms of antigua, what about the southern us? it could be heading for florida but further out in the forecast, just small movements make a big difference about where it will end up difference about where it will end up infive difference about where it will end up in five days. it could go towards florida, it could go to the gulf of mexico, that could protect louisiana, but we just don't know. we will be looking at impact, perhaps around the us, around this weekend. chris fawkes there looking at hurricane irma. last year, 29 sperm whales became stranded on beaches in the uk
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and elsewhere in europe. scientists were puzzled because the mammals were all young and healthy. now they think the whales may have been victims of large solar storms, which played havoc with their navigational abilities, as our environment correspondent matt mcgrath explains. crowds gathered at hunstanton, on the coast of norfolk, in february 2016, to see this ocean giant washed up on a popular tourist beach. all around the north sea, more than two dozen other sperm whales were found stranded in the first two months of last year. scientists were extremely puzzled — the creatures were young, healthy and generally disease—free. now it's thought the northern lights may have played a role in the losses. the aurora are the visible evidence of large solar storms, which distort the earth's magnetic field. this can cause species that rely on that field for navigation, like sperm whales, to lose their way. after big solar storms in december 2015, scientists say the confused creatures swam into the shallow
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north sea and beached themselves, trying to find a way out. researchers at london zoo autopsied a number of the whales stranded on british shores. we know that sperm whales are stranded around the north sea for many, many years historically and it's certainly a possible factor in this instance that we have these whales that got into the north sea for an unknown reason and then once they are in there, they cannot find their way out and they become so disorientated, dehydrated and then strand. so that's what happened in last year's events. why did they end up there in the first place? to be honest, i think we will never know. there is too much uncertainty around the events in this instance in terms of where, where they came from, and so on. and so i think we will really never know what really caused last year's events. proving the impact of geomagnetic storms on the strandings of sperm whales may well be impossible, however researchers here at london zoo and a team at nasa are actively investigating the impact of solar activities on the strandings of species around the world. the results in that study are due in the next month or so.
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that might shed some definitive light on the role of solar storms on species. matt mcgrath, bbc news. before we head back to chris fawkes for more weather news, let's go straight to the house of commons. they have been in session, talking about the eu withdrawal bill, which is coming up. david davis, the brexit secretary, made a statement and we had a few contributions from all parts of the house on the brexit process. we are now waiting in the house of commons for foreign secretary boris johnson house of commons for foreign secretary borisjohnson to make a statement on the north korea crisis, which you will be able to see on bbc parliament, it is life there. he should be at the dispatch box quite soon. timings in the house of commons can slip, as we all know. but we should be with the foreign secretary, who can have a look ——
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you can have a look on bbc parliament for that. time for a look at the weather... here's chris fawkes. a reminder of hurricane, the most powerful hurricane in the atlantic basin on record. it is heading towards antigua. wind gusts of 220 mph, damaging and devastating winds, there will be a large storm surge and torrential outbreaks of rain. notjust at and torrential outbreaks of rain. not just at the leeward and torrential outbreaks of rain. notjust at the leeward islands, but westwards a cross notjust at the leeward islands, but westwards across the british virgin islands towards puerto rico and north of haiti and the dominican republic. it could be close enough to bring torrential rain which could cause nasty flooding across this pa rt cause nasty flooding across this part of the world. and potentially towards the south—east of the us in time for the weekend. here, the weather is quite a bit it has been wetter times. this band of rain pushing eastwards across the british isles with cloudy skies. patchy rain in the afternoon and bright skies in scotla nd in the afternoon and bright skies in scotland and northern ireland. plus some brightness pushing into dorset too. some breaks in the cloud here
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and there. through the evening, this damp and humid weather will gradually push eastwards. it will ta ke gradually push eastwards. it will take its time before it clears. expect more rain for some time this evening in the midlands. central and southern england, and eventually it will clear. humidity dropping overnight. it will feel cool and fresher. there will be some showers in the north west of scotland. a couple around the receipt coasts. temperature was 11 or 12 degrees and it will feel fresher than it has done. on wednesday, we have high pressure in charge. just for the one day. wednesday will probably be the driest day of the week with sunshine coming through from most areas. some cloud bubbling up and we will have some showers in north—west scotland, running into north—west england. temperatures of 15—20d. certainly feeling much fresher than has done. looking at the pressure chart, this
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area of high pressure will be bringing us quiet weather. but through thursday and friday and into the weekend, low—pressure moves in right across the british isles. we can expect a fairly lengthy and settled spell of weather. on thursday, friday and saturday there will be spells of sunshine between but it will also be blustery at times due to the wind feeling cool at times as well. eyes of 14 degrees. on thursday and friday in glasgow. some bright spells, the main message is to make the most of the relatively quiet day we have coming up tomorrow. enjoy those fresh conditions with more sunshine to go around. tonight at 6pm — four serving soldiers arrested on suspicion
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of links to a neo—nazi group. three of them are believed to be members of the royal anglian regiment. they are being detained under terror laws. they're accused of belonging to national action — it was banned last year for being racist, homophobic and anti—semitic. a fifth person, a civilian, is also being held. also tonight — the toddler stamped to death by her mother — a review blames care workers for believing the killer. south korea shows off its weapons — russia's president putin warns that a military stand—off threatens a global catastrophe. kate and william win their privacy battle over topless photos — a french celebrity magazine is ordered to pay damages. my run will start from los angeles and it will go

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