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tv   Asia Business Report  BBC News  September 6, 2017 1:30am-1:46am BST

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as north korea's kim jung—un mulls over his his next move, world powers fail to reach agreement over fresh sanctions. with pyongyang remaining defiant, president putin of russia has warned of a global catastrophe unless a diplomatic solution is reached. residents of several island nations in the caribbean are being warned to prepare for the arrival of hurricane irma. it has now been upgraded to a potentially devastating category five storm. and this story is trending on bbc.com. the trump administration is ending the legal protection for immigrant children brought to the us illegally by their parents. the 0bama policy, called daca, gave legal status to almost 800,000 young people, known as dreamers. that's all from me for now. stay with bbc news. and the top story here in the uk: a serious case review into the murder of a 21—month—old ayeeshia—jayne smith has found that social workers missed danger signs. the little girl was murdered by her mother. now on bbc news all the latest
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business news live from singapore. no recession for more than 25 years. find out if the australian economy is still going strong as we count down to the latest great figures. and the price of bitcoin dips after china hits the breaks on crypto currencies. welcome to asia business report, i'm sharanjit leyl. welcome to asia business report, i'm shara njit leyl. australia welcome to asia business report, i'm sharanjit leyl. australia has been ona sharanjit leyl. australia has been on a record streak of economic growth, mainly due to a mining boom. there are expectations it will continue to show steady growth as we wait for second—quarter gdp due out
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this morning. but why household debt as well as slowing demand for minerals from china could dampen growth in the future —— high. earlier i spoke to paul dale is from capital economics in sydney and i asked him how the australian economy will fare over the next few years. i don't think australia will do terribly badly over the next few yea rs terribly badly over the next few years but i don't think equally it will do incredibly well. i think australia is employed period of around 2.5% growth which by the standards of a lot of advanced economies would be a great result. but australia's potential growth rate or the growth of rate it should be able to grow at is just below 3% so be able to grow at is just below 3% so by australian standards that would be weaker than perhaps most people would want. we've got the central bank keeping interest rates at record lows, what is that doing to the economy, especially when you have a situation of high—level is of household debt? this is very
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interesting —— high levels. household debt in australia has continued to increase since the globalfinancial continued to increase since the global financial crisis as a share of disposable income and there's not many advanced economies around the world where that's the case so australia has carried on regardless. this was a deliberate ploy by policymakers because when the mining boom collapsed in 2012, 2013, policymakers needed something to ta ke policymakers needed something to take up the slack so by cutting interest rates to their record low of 1.5%, that generated something of a housing boom that filled the whole a housing boom that filled the whole a bitand a housing boom that filled the whole a bit and kept the australian economy going. looking ahead we are ina economy going. looking ahead we are in a situation where we can no longer rely on the housing boom to add as much to the economy as previously and if we're right at capitol economics were growth in china will come off the boil a bit then it's right for australia's economic growth rate to be somewhat subdued rather than brilliant. paul dales speaking to me earlier.
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hewlett—packa rd appears to paul dales speaking to me earlier. hewlett—packard appears to be faring well after the company was split in two, its services arm hp enterprises big profit expectations with net earnings of $200 million in the third quarter and the chief executive meg woodman said the results were encouraging and shares of hp rose by nearly 5% on that news. if you like to start your day with a glass of orange juice then get ready to pay more for it. futures for the commodity jumped get ready to pay more for it. futures for the commodityjumped by more than 6% in us trade on concerns hurricane may hit the us mainland. florida is its biggest producer of orangejuice florida is its biggest producer of orange juice and it florida is its biggest producer of orangejuice and it has florida is its biggest producer of orange juice and it has declared a state of emergency —— hurricane irma. hurricane irma has strengthened to a category five hurricane, the second major storm to hit america in a little over a week. lego is cutting 11100 jobs worldwide in the face of falling sales and profits. the figure is 8% of the danish company's profits. the figure is 8% of the danish compa ny‘s workforce. profits. the figure is 8% of the danish company's workforce. the company chairman says the move was
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necessary. well, i wouldn't say it's too much to handle, companies that have grown a lot bigger than we ever have, but i think we grew very fast, we did not do it in the most appropriate way and we're finding ourselves today with a bit much bureaucracy, too many layers in the organisation and we've lost a bit of touch on the market side and i think there is opportunity for us to really strengthen the way we launch our products and be much more successful with that and that's important because, as you know, we've grown a lot and penetrated markets very much so lot and penetrated markets very much so to continue to grow we need to sharpen our so to continue to grow we need to sharpen oui’ game. the sharpen our game. the value of the crypto currencies bitcoin has rebounder had somewhat after losing nearly 20% of its value over several days —— currency. they came off their record highs and fell further after china banned what's known as an ico, initial coding offerings, much like a share offering. the offer is a way of
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raising capital by offering a new crypto currencies and according to figures there were 55 icos in china in the first seven months of the year, totalling a whopping $398 million. is this a prudent move or has beijing overreacted on the regulation side of things? earlier i spoke to tim phillips, the head of deloitte's international crime network and asked him why they are worried. regulated markets in most markets around the world if you want to raise funds in the public you have to have a prospectus and be a registered dealer, it is well controlled by regulators and it presents real transparency and safety. it is completely missing in the ico market, it is very anonymous, it is all out there in the ether and it's quite a challenge. out there in the ether, but shouldn't it be potentially an easier move to bring in the regulation as opposed to banning it
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out right? it isjust there was too much heat, as you can see by the numbers, they were very substantial. what the regulators are doing is saying let's take a pause. i don't think it will be a long—term band, i think it will be a long—term band, i think things will come back quickly, regulators around the world are called talking about it, in singapore the mif have issued guidance. they will be very quick to try to create the opportunity for people to do this but to do it in a more structured and secure way. tim phillips speaking to me earlier. nissan is about to unveil its redesigned or electric car injapan and it is revving up to be a highly anticipated event giving, given the rising demand for green vehicles —— all electric. what are the details? —— given. nissan held its global launch in the past couple of minutes, they are live streaming the eventin minutes, they are live streaming the event in japan minutes, they are live streaming the event injapan and the redesigned car...i event injapan and the redesigned car... i haven't seen what it looks
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like yet but i expect it to be more sleek than the original leaf but it is expected to have the improved battery which is important because it will give this all electric vehicle a wider range meaning with one charge it can go for a longer distance. this is highly anticipated because there is a significant growing demand for electric cars and green vehicles but there aren't many affordable mass—market cars the average person can buy. the leaf is one of the world's top—selling electric cars, it's only about $30,000, the tesla model 3 starts at $35,000 and general motors, another big competitor, as their car at $37,500. luxury ones start at $50,000 so many people watching this launch. and we got a sneak peak at when you talked about what back are looked at, factory much! 0ut when you talked about what back are looked at, factory much! out of the global population 2 billion are
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working mothers —— thanks very much. research indicates mums are making purchasing decisions in 80% of households so their spending power is an attractive market for advertisers. in asia spending on baby products in indonesia and thailand combined are expected to surpass $420 million by 2020 but not all marketing can deliver a success story. earlier i spoke to a member ofa story. earlier i spoke to a member of a japanese advertising agency and i asked her about what campaigns resonate with mothers. all this year the ones that worked well resonated well, one is very relevant to mothers, the ones that understand us as mothers. those not painting women as mothers. those not painting women as stereotypes, not ones showing us in the household doing chores. something that really touches us in our hearts, something that talks to ask. examples would be, my personal
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favourite is always, the hash tag, like a favourite is always, the hash tag, likea girl, favourite is always, the hash tag, like a girl, do you remember that? asa like a girl, do you remember that? as a mother sometimes you want to teach your children but they won't listen to you. its powerful for the people working to get this message across to really touched the mums‘ heart and to tell these messages, very effectively. a product for sanitary pads. it's an empowering message. we know there are lots of differences in various countries cultural elites of the message you are getting to these mums in this company, how are they different or potentially the same messages?m started with. .. if potentially the same messages?m started with... if you have many friends in different cultures, cultures are more conservative. there are very strict mothers. but today with millennial mums they are more open—minded with gadgets, technology, totally different from whatever pa rt technology, totally different from whatever part of the world you are
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in... i have a lot of friends from different cultures and when you discussed at lunch breaks and lunchtime we go, this is a rich source of information, i don't think any marketer would know this and we chat amongst ourselves. this is a rich source of data. there's 2 million working mums around the world, that is a staggering number --2 world, that is a staggering number —— 2 billion. but you seen the industry is slow to keep up, why is that? because we refused to look at it in that? because we refused to look at itina that? because we refused to look at it in a real way. we wanted to do cookie cutter communications demands and we treated them like they all the same but they are not. that's it for this edition of asia business report. i'm sharanjit leyl in singapore, for watching. you're watching bbc news. the headlines this our: north korea remains defiant as world powers fail
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to agree on fresh sanctions and what to do next. as hurricane irma strengthens to a dangerous category five caribbean islands make theirfinal preparations before the records breaking storm hits land. mimi anderson began running in her late 30s to help her overcome anorexia since then she's gone on to become one of the top endurance runners in the world, breaking records wherever she goes. now she's preparing for her biggest challenge so far, to become the fastest woman to run across america. sophie raworth went to meet her. for the next 7.5 weeks, mimi anderson will be running at least 55 miles every single day as she makes her way from la to new york. it's taken her way from la to new york. it's ta ke n yea rs her way from la to new york. it's ta ken years of her way from la to new york. it's taken years of planning and a lot of training. might run will start from los angeles and it will go all the way through colorado. she'll pass through 12 states in all as she tries to break the women's coast to coast record set in 1979. 2850 miles
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in total, that's a long way. here are all your medals, what a haul.|j have to say i'm quite proud of them. but mimi is used to cover challenges, she took up running in her mid— 30s and since then has conquered some of the hardest endurance races in the world. this one here, 250 kilometres over six daysin one here, 250 kilometres over six days in the sahara desert was my very first race in 2001, nearly died doing it but i loved it, that was fantastic. the arctic race is court six excretory extreme marathon, 350 miles non—stop over eight days in temperatures as low as —40 and i actually won that race overall, male and female —— 6633 —— called. actually won that race overall, male and female -- 6633 -- called. but running across america is her toughest challenge yet. what challenges you to do this?” toughest challenge yet. what challenges you to do this? i love the challenge, i love the thought of
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me physically and mentally, because that plays a big part, of actually being able to run the distances that i do. to power her to a new world record she's relying on a lot of coffee, ten pairs of running shoes and a support crew, including her husband, friends and a physio. she's already dreaming of the finish line stop diallo when i get to the steps of new york city for i'll crawl up those steps. those steps, i'm just going to love them and i'll get down on my knees and kissed them if necessary. best of luck to her. the umbrella group universities uk is calling for a government rethink on the cost of degrees for poorer students. it says with the interest rate for student loans now at 6.1%, ministers need to listen more to graduates financial concerns. the government says tuition fees provide sustainable funding for universities and reflect graduates higher earnings. time now for all the sports news in sport today. hello, i'm nick marshall—mccormack
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and this is sport today, live from the bbc sport centre. coming up on the show: ecstatic scenes in syria as the country sets up a world cup qualification playoff with australia. busta busts—a—move — pablo carreno reaches the us open semi—finals for the first time. and a comeback queen in queens, sloane stephens keeps the home fans happy by advancing to the semis too. hi there wherever you are around the world, welcome to sport today. more on syria's heroics to come. first though — saudi arabia are through to the world cup in russia. they are the first arabic nation at football's showpiece event since 2006. the saudisjoin iran, japan, south korea, brazil, mexico, belgium and hosts russia in the 32—team tournament.

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