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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 6, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a drastic plan to curb the number of eu migrants living and working in the uk. a leaked home office document says the free movement of people will be banned after brexit, but the government says nothing's been signed off yet. good morning, it's wednesday the 6th of september. also this morning: hurricane irma, one of the most powerful atlantic storms ever recorded, has begun lashing islands in the caribbean. just half of dentists in england are accepting new nhs patients, a bbc investigation reveals. good morning. as part of our coastal series i'm at grimsby fish market at
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one of the world's busiest ports looking at how the industry has changed for the uk and what brexit will mean for its workers. in sport... wales manager chris coleman says bring it on after a late victory over moldova in their world cup qualifier. two more wins and they should be in russia next year. what a goal! what a goal! radford has scored. ronnie radford odd box. after 10 world cups and more than 200 england games, the legendary commentator john motson is hanging up his sheepskin coat and calling time on his 50—year career with the bbc. we've got an interview with him later. and sarah has the weather. hurricane irma continues to produce dangerous winds and heavy rain and a storm surge. i'll update you on the latest in a few minutes and a full uk forecast through the programme. thanks very much, see you later in the programme. good morning. first, our main story. a leaked home office document has set out plans for how the uk immigration system could work after brexit. the paper, which has been published
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by the guardian newspaper, considers how the government could dramatically reduce the number number of low—skilled eu migrants. it also proposes time limits on how long eu nationals could stay in the uk. let's get more from our political correspondent iain watson who's in westminster. ian, tell us, what more can you tell us ian, tell us, what more can you tell us about the document, what does it say? it's an 82 page document so not much in the time available but i'll do my best, you will notice it says official, sensitive and it certainly isa official, sensitive and it certainly is a sensitive topic. there's caveats from the government, it hasn't been signed off by ministers and the contents will be subject to negotiation with the eu but it gives us negotiation with the eu but it gives us the clearest indication of thinking about the immigration system inside the home office and in essence the document says there will bea essence the document says there will be a three stage approach taken to immigration, people already here from the eu can apply for settled status with more less the same
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rights as british citizens and then there will be a transition period of at least two years where people can come here relatively freely to live and work but if they want to work for any length of time they will have to register and then beyond that there will be a new immigration system and that system would put restrictions on low skilled migrants, people here only very temporarily, if you have higher skills you might get leave to stay in britain for between three and five years but only if you've been here for five years would you then have the right to settle permanently so have the right to settle permanently $03 have the right to settle permanently so a much more restrictive system than at the moment. there will be new restrictions including family members during that phase as well. thanks are much. we will be talking about in through the morning. we will be speaking to defence secretary sir michael fallon just after 7:30am about the government's plans post—brexit. islands in the caribbean are making last—minute preparations for hurricane irma, one of the most powerful atlantic storms on record, with officials warning of its potentially catastrophic effects. it's already lashing the british
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territory of anguilla where residents say the powerful waves and high winds have been pounding the coastline. our correspondent sarah corker has the latest. this is the eye of the storm from space. dramatic images from nasa ca ptu re space. dramatic images from nasa capture the sheer scale and magnitude of hurricane earner. the category five storm is on a collision course with several caribbean islands. popular holiday destinations like antigua and saint martin are preparing for life—threatening winds and torrential rains. storm surges of up torrential rains. storm surges of up to 12 feet are forecast and overnight some islands have started to flood. hurricane irma's path may change but at the moment it looks set to head towards the british berlin islands, puerto rico, cuba and by the weekend, the florida keys. in miami they are stocking up
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on sandbags and preparing for the worst. the storm surge is massive and the storm surge predicted will go for miles and miles. why now it is travelling at 15 mph and it is tracked to move south of the florida keys on a westerly path with a slight north turn —— right now. it's incredibly important that all florida jens keep a close eye on this incredibly dangerous storm. do not sit and wait and prepare, get prepared now. this monster hurricane comes on the heels of harvey, which struck texas and louisiana last month. irma is forecast to be even more dangerous. now millions of people across the caribbean are bracing themselves for one of the most powerful hurricanes ever recorded in the atlantic basin. sarah corker, bbc news. let's get the latest now from sarah, who's been tracking the storm from the bbc‘s weather centre. sarah, what more can you tell us?
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this is a really powerful storm moving through the caribbean and potentially towards florida as well. that's right, dan. i'llshow potentially towards florida as well. that's right, dan. i'll show you the satellite image, it's a huge hurricane. you can see that really well—defined i. that's an indication of the strength of the storm, it has really been strengthening over the past 2a hour is, reaching category five status and it's rare we ca a category five hurricane. —— 2a hours. exceptionally strong winds —— we see a category five. we have seen gusts in excess of 200 mph and winds of 185 mph. dangerous conditions. it's not just of 185 mph. dangerous conditions. it's notjust the wind, it will be the exceptionally heavy rainfall as well as the storm surge. as it passes its way close to the virgin isles and then towards this spaniel, over the next 2a hours, before then heading to cuba and then florida. dangerous conditions, the storm is
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exceptionally strong. we will keep you posted on the forecast through the morning. more on that and the uk weather through the morning. and we'll be speaking to some holiday makers and residents who are making preparations for the worst of the storm throughout the morning. just half of dentists in england are accepting new nhs patients, according to research by the bbc. the british dental association said the figure was a disgrace and evidence of an emerging crisis in dental care. but the nhs says 95% of patients do manage to get an appointment. david rhodes reports. this is a familiar sight for fozia, who has been fined rash trying to find an nhs dentist in bradford. who has been fined rash trying to find an nhs dentist in bradfordlj was find an nhs dentist in bradford.” was devastated there wasn't anyone locally. she needs a local nhs dentist for her sun, who has an overcrowded mouth and a mineral deficiency with this teeth.”
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overcrowded mouth and a mineral deficiency with this teeth. i tried going through the lo pages and using the internet and then i used the 101 where they find you the nearest nhs dentist and they said there wasn't one in bradford —— the yellow pages. the bbc has analysed the day of two and a half thousand dental practices in england that provided information about weather they were except in new patients. 48% said they were not accepting new adult patients and 40% said they weren't excepting new child patients. there's a emerging crisis about more dentist not accepting new patients simply because they are not allowed to see more patients, the government has only commissioned enough to treat half the adult population and it's a disgrace. people that need an nhs dentist should get one. nhs england said the latest patient survey found 95% of people seeking a dental appointment were able to get one and overall the number of dentists offered nhs care is 3800 higher than
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a decade ago. david rhodes, bbc news. the indian prime minister, narendra modi, is shortly to meet the de—facto leader of myanmar, aung san suu kyi, as the country faces diplomatic pressure to end the violence its security forces are reportedly inflicting on the rohingya minority. tens of thousands of rohingya muslims have fled myanmar in recent weeks. the un secretary general, antonio guterres, called on the state to end to what he called the vicious cycle of violence. a 14—year—old boy has died after a double shooting in east london. coreyjunior davis and another boy, who's 17, were found with gunshot injuries in forest gate on monday afternoon. the second victim is said to have life—changing injuries. police have launched a murder investigation. the archbishop of canterbury has warned that the uk's economic model is broken as wages stagnate. justin welby is a member of the commission behind a report published today by the institute for public policy research. it says the country faces the longest period of stagnating earnings for 150 years. north korea has warned it
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will take counter—measures against what it called the heinous sanctions called for by the us following the regime's nuclear bomb test this weekend. the state news agency said north korea would not be frightened or persuaded by the white house's promises to explore all options on the table and said america would be responsible for any catastrophic consequences caused by escalating tensions. 13 people have been rescued after becoming trapped in a 53 metre high viewing tower in dorset. 11 members of the public and two staff members were winched to safety from the jurassic skyline tower in weymouth by a coastguard helicopter on tuesday afternoon. a full investigation into the incident is under way. i once got stuck on the london eye. it just stopped. at the i once got stuck on the london eye. itjust stopped. at the top? at the
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top, it stopped. they did an announcement and they said to stay where you are, someone announcement and they said to stay where you are, someone will come to rescue you. but then you get more for your muggy! we got about an hour more, but eventually it started working. did you have a packed lunch? i'm not going to say -- money. you get inside information that are not going to pass on. what do you mean? i can't say. we weren't rescued. i'll get to the bottom of this! the commentatorjohn motson is calling time on his bbc career at the end of the football season. motty has covered 10 world cups, 10 european championships and thousands of domestic matches during his 50 years with the corporation. his final bbc commentary will be the fa cup final in may. i was going to say it was like being paid for your hobby, that's what people always say to me but there is a little bit of hard work involved. the preparation and the homework and
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watching players and going to see games so that you could do the one you were doing next a bit better. it was a challenge, but it was a challenge that i always enjoyed. i'm sure he will still be around but it will be strange not to hear his voice all the time. on those big occasions, those big moments when we see the national team particularly playing, we are really very used to hearing his voice. ivanov the last few years guy mowbray has taken over but you still associate mommsen with major tournaments —— even though over. i will talk about john moore during the papers because we can't not mention the coats, can we? -- john moore. let's start with the actual football because wales have gone and done it, they have ruined the surprise, everyone now knows that wales are really quite good! they let the cat out of the bag last year at the euros but now everyone is aware that they are a really
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strong side. wales left it late in moldova, but their hopes of qualifying for next yea r‘s world cup remain in tact after a 2—0 victory. teenager ben woodburn was inspirational again, setting up one of the goals that moved wales up to second in theirgroup. england women's boss mark sampson says his conscience is clear after being accused of discriminating against one of his players. two investigations cleared sampson of any wrongdoing. chris froome has nearly doubled his lead in the tour of spain. victory in the individual time trial has pushed his advantage up to almost two minutes, with the race hitting the mountains in ca ntabria today. and venus williams‘ remarkable eason continues, she's through to the semi—finals of the us open for the first time in seven years after beating petra kvitova. obviously not been spending too many nights out with her sister's new baby. not been doing that yet, she's been concentrating on the dayjob. are you going to hang around for the papers ina are you going to hang around for the papers in a moment?” are you going to hang around for the
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papers in a moment? i am. let's find out what's happening with the weather. here's sarah. it is beautiful. pretty quiet conditions across much of the country through the day. sunny spells and it is feeling fresher than recent days. less sticky and certainly more dry than yesterday. today we've got a westerly influence. the wind coming in from the atlantic. it would be dry everywhere. a few showers. with the clear spells it's a cool start, so temperatures at the moment down in single figures fairly widely. especially chilly first thing in rural spots, but we have sunshine pretty much from the word go. the areas most likely to see showers are northern and western scotland, a couple for northern ireland and a few into the west of england. elsewhere you will avoid the showers and have decent sunshine. cumulus cloud building in the afternoon and
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temperatures doing reasonably well. it will feel fresh, but there will be dry and bright weather. the isolated showers his way through this evening and overnight. into the early hours of thursday, a bit of a change from the west as we have more cloud bringing some rain. so things will change on thursday. further south we hold on to the fresher feel, with sunshine. southern and eastern england staying dry, but you will notice further north the arrival of the wet and windy weather. tomorrow afternoon in more detail now. the heavy rain across much of scotland. quite windy. and across northern ireland a bit of a damp story by the afternoon. heading south across england and wales you can see the heavy burst into north wales and manchester. further south across england it's a bit of a dry story. still the odd shower and 90 degrees. pleasant enough for much of
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southern and south—west england. —— 90 degrees. then we have the arrival of the low pressure which will push eastwards into friday and it could be bringing some pretty unsettled weather as we head towards the end of the week. this is friday. wendy blustery showers. longer spells of rain likely in southern england by the time we get to friday. cooler and windy. that's setting us up for and windy. that's setting us up for an unsettled weekend. saturday, some sunshine and showers around. if you avoid the showers, 19 degrees or should feel pleasant. unsettled again by sunday. i know we will see you later to tell us hurricane irma. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: proposals aimed at cutting the numbers of low—skilled migrants from europe following brexit have been disclosed in a leaked document.
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more on that later. winds of 180mph from hurricane irma have begun lashing islands in the caribbean, where people have been told to evacuate their homes. let's have a look at some of the front pages. most of them have a picture of meghan markle, who has given herfirst picture of meghan markle, who has given her first interview, picture of meghan markle, who has given herfirst interview, saying how much she is in love with prince harry. she spoke to vanity fair magazine. lots of papers speculating on how to win the engagement might if the that's one of the main stories. this headline: of different stories on the telegraph. they've also got this lea ked telegraph. they've also got this leaked document about brexit. a story about bbc launching a review into salaries. the director—general will give information about the today. —— that today. and natural
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selection is weeding out alzheimer's and asthma from the human gene pool, according to a major study. the front page of the times. we will speak to michael fallon about that later on. this is an android named erica. it's a picture of her in a portrait competition and they‘ re it's a picture of her in a portrait competition and they're discussing whether that breaks rules because she is actually an android, but you wouldn't be able to tell. and there's an interesting story. dog walkers told to carry two pasig bags. —— two as the bags. even before your dog has done a poo, if you don't have two bags ready to go you don't have two bags ready to go you could be fined. you have to have a backup. police can't search you, they can say, can you produce two bags? if you can't, you could be
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fined. you don't need two bags. i don't carry two, but i will from now on. one in each pocket! have you got some now? the mall, it's funny. we've had a few weeks whether papers have had lots of different stories. mostly they talk about brexit and meghan markle. eddiejones was talking yesterday about a foot or convention. he is talking about fear of failure in the england football team. he said traders have to get over the fear of failure and have to get over the target of getting to a quarter—final. he also says life is too comfortable. they get their big car, their big house, they do the same thing at training, someone else tells them what to eat. he says you have to give people a little bit of
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autonomy. you have to give them the responsibility for running their life and that way you will develop and get more confident. i mentioned don watson. a great picture. —— johnb motson. this was in 1990. confirming that their match with peterborough was off because it was snowing. there is another story which are not allowed to give you full details. not necessarily for breakfast! it is about a day that went horribly wrong. if you would like to know the details, you can go on the website. it is hard to imagine a worse first date. when you started saying that, there we re when you started saying that, there were cries in the gallery of people saying, were cries in the gallery of people s . there are some things that are not to be talked about first thing in
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the morning. i like how you have moved on. fishing is one of the oldest industries in the world but it has faced tough times in britain in recent years, bringing challenges for towns that rely on it. the fishing industry voted overwhelming to leave the eu, and as part of our series looking at coastal communities, we've sent sean to grimsby to find out how it is preparing for brexit. good morning! good morning. preparing for brexit and the sale of all of this fish this morning in grimsby. we spent the last day also speaking to a lot of people around here about what this industry means to them now and it's a pretty big deal. across the uk there are only about 12,000 fishermen getting these kinds of fishermen getting these kinds of fish in. in the mid— 90s, that was about 20,000. so quite a drop even in the last 20 years. but as a proportion of our entire economy you
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are only talking about 0.1%, including all of the fish processing stuff that goes on in places like rooms be. in terms of the amount, in this entire room with got about 50 tons of cod and haddock but we fish about 400,000 tons of fish every yearin about 400,000 tons of fish every year in the uk, but we import loads as well, just so you can get your fish and chips, an —— another £1 billion also is imported. just to give you an idea of how people are feeling, and the collapse of the industry here, i went around grimsby andi industry here, i went around grimsby and i kicked it off by speaking to darren, one of the few fishermen left ear. darren is now one of the last fishermen working in grimsby. we've got crabs. the lad sort them out. we get a good price for the hen crabs. they go to the chinese market. what's it like being a fishermen here in grimsby these days? card
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with the prices. they go up every year and it's getting bad. —— it is ha rd year and it's getting bad. —— it is hard with the prices. before it was working 24 hours a day, seven days a week. dennis remembers those days vividly. he started on the boats backin vividly. he started on the boats back in the boomtime, in 1959. so you were skipper of this boat.” certainly was. decades ago. and in the heyday, even before you were skipper, how many of these kind of boats would there have been around grimsby? there were actually 12 of these. all of the other companies had a similar size of ship. this type of ship, you are talking a couple of 100. a few hundred of these? but 700 trawlers altogether in revesby. these are known as the biggest port in the world. —— grimsby. they have been reduced to a handful of trawlers, partly because the uk lost a battle with iceland overfish. and new real pinballs
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came on in the 1980s that left many people here feeling like they didn't have as much access to fish as they did before —— new european rules. so grimsby has had to reinvent itself asa grimsby has had to reinvent itself as a fish processing hub and many small businesses still running buildings like this. there are lots of food places in grimsby, right from the really high technical end, with lots of innovation and lots of modern facilities, taking care of modern facilities, taking care of modern needs, to this. to what you've got. and what have we got here? this is traditional coal smoking, smokehouse. smoking salmon and haddock. we do that in a traditional way. this is one of the smokehouse is. you talk about trade barriers, future negotiations that the uk might have with the eu and other countries. how important to you is it that there aren't any more barriers? really important. grimsby in particular, which is a fabulous food—processing town, the supply of
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fish, the timely supply of fish, is really crucial. so let's not hold it up really crucial. so let's not hold it up on the way here. that was a variety of the folks we spoke to. a couple of them set up around the docks here. they are trying to regenerate it. but what will brexit mean? let's have a chat to mike, from the fishing industry. good morning. it is beautiful here. we've heard a few people say there are opportunities, but also uncertainty around brexit. a lot of people in your industry voted to leave the eu. how are they feeling now? uncertainty and opportunity very much sums up the mood in the industry. we have a huge opportunity with the change, hopefully fishing opportunities will come our way post brexit when we see fishing opportunities across europe we figured, so that within the uk we have a better share of the fish that are found in our waters. that's a
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big opportunity for the uk industry to hopefully grow. we will see some regeneration in some of the coastal towns you are talking about. but there is also uncertainty. if you are an importer of all of these fish or the shellfish that a lot of business is like yourself import, the trade barriers that might, after the trade barriers that might, after the european union, what effect could that have on your business? trade relations reaching a state where we can still trade freely with europe on good terms is very important. importers in grimsby need to bring catchier to sell to uk consumers. are you hearing things to reassure you? we are still waiting to hear from the government. we exported a lot to europe so we have a strong interest within the catching sector to keep the free trading relationship going. thank you very much. the weaker pound will have helped him a bit. so many things to take into account. we will look at what wrecks at might mean
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for the future of the industry and what they're doing here now —— raqqa. they have reinvented themselves. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. an investigation into a double shooting in east london has become a murder inquiry after a 14—year—old boy died in hospital last night. he's been named as coreyjunior davis. a 17—year—old was also injured during the incident on moore walk in forest gate on monday afternoon. police describe the incident as an extreme act of violence, but no arrests have been made so far. the mayor says he'll spend £250 million buying up land for new affordable homes. it's a key part of city hall's strategy to tackle the capital's housing crisis which is being unveiled later. sadiq khan has pledged to build ninety thousand new affordable homes over the next four years and to boost protection for tenants renting privately.
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he's a world champion athletics star. now adam gemili is back in kent and he's been inspiring a new generation of athletes at his old school. the 23—year—old took a trip to dartford grammar to open up a brand new athletics track for the students there. it is amazing. there are so many young athletes who are so enthusiastic about track and field, which is what we need in britain. we lose it as they get older, so for them to have this amazing facility here, to come and train and run is brilliant. so i feel lucky to be here and be part of it. let's have a look at the travel situation now. a good situation on the tube this morning. on the roads, in islington the a1 upper street remains closed southbound from liverpool road to city road for roadworks. in the city, fenchurch street is closed between gracechurch street and lime street for repairs to a burst water main. a burst water main is also causing problems in mitcham where manor road is closed between robinhood lane and wide way.
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let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's feeling a little bit fresher compared to this time yesterday, but we have more sunshine and we are going to continue to see these sunny spells through the course of the day. staying dry as well. this sunshine gives way to a bit of cloud that will bubble up through the morning into the afternoon, especially a little bit easy. but the temperatures managing to reach about 20 celsius. so in the shelter in the sunshine it will feel warm. overnight tonight we still have clear spells and a bit of patchy cloud, but it could feel a little bit chilly. the windfalls light. the minimum temperature in clearer skies down the 10—11dc, especially towards rural spots. again, a promising start to thursday. sunshine to start the day, but gradually the cloud will move to the north—west and we could start to see a couple of showers. we see again tomorrow and temperatures
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about 19— 20. the low pressure to the north of the uk starts to bring these weather fronts through the course of friday. it may be a dry start by turning wet through the day. a showery day in prospect for saturday. there could be a rumble or two of thunder. in the sunday it turns progressively autumnal. expect a spell of wet and windy weather. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: as tensions increase over north korea, we'll be asking defence secretary sir michael fallon about the government's plans to modernise and expand the royal navy fleet. also this morning, the cromer crab has been caught off the norfolk coast for centuries but could its future be under threat because of the lack of fishermen?
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and, is life is a cabaret for singers louise redknapp and will young? they'll be here to tell us about dusting off their dance shoes for their new production of the smash hit musical. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. a leaked home office document has set out plans for how the uk immigration system could work after brexit. the paper, which has been published by the guardian newspaper, considers how the government could dramatically reduce the number number of low—skilled eu migrants. it also proposes time limits on how long eu nationals could stay in the uk. the bbc understands the document, which was produced last month, has not been approved by ministers. let's speak to iain watson about it. you've got the document, what is in
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it? a risk of a new world record, summarising and 82 page document in a minute but there are several things we should concentrate on, you can go online if you want more detail but effectively this gives an insight into the home office thinking about what will happen with immigration after brexit. it's not been signed off by ministers, it's a discussion document. the suggestion is there will be a transition period after brexit of at least two years and during that time not that much would change with the system, eu nationals could still work here or study here but if they here for three or six months they would have to register to state. if you're a jobseeker trying to find work then you wouldn't be able to register, you wouldn't be able to register, you wouldn't be able to register, you would have to have at least a guarantee of employment before doing so guarantee of employment before doing so “— guarantee of employment before doing so —— state. beyond that there would bea so —— state. beyond that there would be a restrictive system —— state. if you are unskilled or low skilled as a worker —— stay. you might only be allowed to stay for one or two years
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and then you would have to go home but if you are highly skilled you could go for three or five years and then apply for permanent residency and all eu migrants will find new restrictions on bringing in family members. thanks very much, iain, we will speak to you later. we will be speaking to defence secretary sir michael fallon just after 7:30am about the government's plans post—brexit. winds from hurricane irma have begun lashing islands in the caribbean, where people have been told to evacuate their homes. officials are warning of the potentially catastrophic effects of the category five hurricane which has already sustained winds of 180mph. it's starting to hit the leeward islands and will move on towards puerto rico and the dominican republic. it's projected to reach the us state of florida on saturday. let's speak now to genevieve stewart smith, who's currently on holiday with her family in st martins. good morning, genevieve. what are the conditions like at the moment?
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good morning. it's 1:30am good morning. it's1:30am approximately here. yes, it's getting very gusty. nothing too savea at the moment. lots of palm trees are waving terrifically —— savea. where i am standing from my apartment window, the sea breakers are coming over the sea wall into the lower parts of the houses that i can see. we still have power although we have been warned it may get turned off, they are expecting it to fail. water was turned off earlier today, and the desalination plants. the hotel itself has been reasonably good at updating us, mostly telling people to get plenty of supplies of water and tinned food into their apartments. but all in all, at the moment we are doing ok.
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we have been told that the worst is going to be between 1am and 5am today. i understand that they've tried to move the boats away and put them to safety, what's going on? there's a lagoon at the back of simpson bay and boats have been queueing up for the last two days to go in. there's a road bridge that has to be raised several times during the day and they have all scurried into the lagoon at the back of simpson bay for safety. genevieve, very good luck to you and i hope you stay safe. thanks for talking to us on breakfast. a 14—year—old boy has died after a double shooting in east london. coreyjunior davis and another boy, who's17, were found with gunshot injuries in forest gate on monday afternoon. the second victim is said to have life—changing injuries. police have launched a murder investigation. just half of dentists in england are accepting new nhs patients,
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according to research by the bbc. the british dental association said the figure was a disgrace and evidence of an emerging crisis in dental care. but the nhs says 95% of patients do manage to get an appointment. the archbishop of canterbury has warned that the uk's economic model is broken as wages stagnate. justin welby is a member of the commission behind a report published today by the institute for public policy research. it says the country faces the longest period of stagnating earnings for 150 years. 13 people have been rescued after becoming trapped in a 53 metre high viewing tower in dorset. 11 members of the public and two staff members were winched to safety from the jurassic skyline tower in weymouth by a coastguard helicopter on tuesday afternoon. a full investigation into the incident is under way. there's been a huge demand... it's
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interesting there are no stairs, are there no stairs? i don't know. why don't you know? in terms of what we need to know, big demand from our viewers about what's going on on the london eye, you can't say that there's something you can't tell us about. we were on the london eye and it stopped at the top and an emergency voice it stopped at the top and an emergency voice came it stopped at the top and an emergency voice came the tannoy and said you are safe, your rescuers will be on the way. that's kind of alarming when you are at the top. we waited and waited and then they said there is a emergency supplies in the pod. we never cracked open them. we should have gone for it. where are they? they didn't tell us that because it didn't get to that stage. biscuits? i don't know, iwould probably put in some gin. i'm is
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sure it's something more sensible like water. probably use something like water. probably use something like water. probably use something like water. after an hour it eventually moved but i was more than slightly out of breath. you didn't need to break out the gin all get winched down? thank you for an unveiling that. there are supplies? i don't ever want to test that theory! shall we not do that? probably a good idea. ben woodburn, how good is he, played for wales la st how good is he, played for wales last night, he's had the most fantastic week. interestingly he's been very well looked after at liverpool by jurgen klopp been very well looked after at liverpool byjurgen klopp and chris coleman also has a similar theory to klopp, coleman also has a similar theory to klopp, they are going to try to protect him a bit, how long for, we're not sure. wales are still on track to qualify for next year's world cup after a 2—0 win in moldova. it was another great night for ben woodburn, who set up al robson—kanu ten minutes from time. woodburn scored the winner against austria at the weekend. and in injury time, aaron ramsey sealed the win
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that leaves them second in their group. serbia are top after they beat the republic of ireland in dublin. former manchester city player aleksander kolarov scored the only goal of the game. england women's manager mark sampson says he has a clear conscience after being accused of bullying and discrimination by striker eni aluko. sampson led england to the semi—finals of the last world cup and european championship and he was cleared of any wrongdoing by two investigations. he insists he is happy to meet with aluko to discuss any differences since he dropped herfrom the squad. i've heard the specifics of the allegation and at the time we released a statement and we were very clear that i didn't say that. i'm very disappointed the allegation's come out but i understand it and all i can say is i didn't say that to eni. with any of my communication my intention is to
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support the players, give them confidence and give them chance to be successful on the field. at the age of 37, venus williams is two wins away from another grand slam title. she beat petra kvitova in a real thriller to reach her first us open semi—final in seven years. it took over two and a half hours and the deciding set went to a tie—break, williams said it felt like a special match. her last grand slam triumph was nine years ago. jamie murray picked himself up to partner martina hingis to victory in the quarter—finals of the mixed doubles, that after he and bruno suarez, the defending champions, were knocked out of the men's doubles. chris froome heads into another day in the hills on the tour of spain today and he's nearly two minutes in front. froome won his fourth tour de france injuly but he's never taken the vuelta before, he dominated yesterday's time trial to almost double his lead. and finally,
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the sign of a good sportsman is being able to take advice. rarely more important than in golf where phil mickelson sought some help during the final round of a tournament in boston. step forward riley... would you go for here out of the rough or would you lay up?m would you go for here out of the rough or would you lay up? if i could hit my three wood to hundreds 601 could hit my three wood to hundreds 60 i would probably go for it. laughter that would be wryly, i'm not sure how old he is but i'm guessing... —— riley. i'm guessing around seven. extremely informed. phil said, would you like a job as my caddie? he's one of the great chapters in the game. lovely. you would be a proud parent. to come back with something so specific and right as well, clever boy. well done, riley. from reaching mars to developing nuclear power, british scientists must continue to work in collaboration with their european partners after brexit.
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that's the message from the government as it sets out a position paper on leaving the european union. in a moment we'll get reaction from two people who work in the sector. first, here's our science correspondent pallab ghosh with some more details. british science is one of the biggest winners of membership of the european union. between 2007 and 2013, the uk received £8 billion from the eu. that's £3 billion more thanit from the eu. that's £3 billion more than it put into the research budget. its membership of the main european research programme enables uk researchers and businesses to develop collaborations with leading european research labs and industrial partners. researcher leaders have argued that withdrawal would be a body blow for british science. the government it seems has listened. i understand it's expected to say all options for research with eu partners are on the table, including a special status for the
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uk that would allow continued close collaboration. nick wright is an astronomer at keele university, whose research relies heavily on eu funding. hejoins us here in the studio. and sarah main, from the campaign for science and engineering, is in our london newsroom. good morning. sara conor how important is it that we keep collaborating with our european partners on science? —— sarah,. collaborating with our european partners on science? -- sarah,. it's one of the most aspects of science and innovation in the uk. we have survey scientists before and they tell us in the vast majority of responses, over 90%, they really value highly the collaborative networks with other researchers in the european union as well as access to important facilities that allow research to go on across many countries. nick, for you, as eu funding affected your research and what are your concerns going forward ? what are your concerns going forward? i'm not directly funded by
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the eu but i've looked at it in the future and knowing that could be taken away is worrying for my future research career and what i may be able to achieve. the collaborations that are beginning to fray at the edges because of brexit are quite worrying. i have been told by a collaborator that i wouldn't be included in a potential project because i was in the uk and therefore there could be a risk to therefore there could be a risk to the funding proposal because of my involvement, and i know examples of this beginning to appear. in that conversation, was there anything you could do to dissuade them?” conversation, was there anything you could do to dissuade them? i kind of understood the point that he was making. he has to apply for research funds to support his research career. if he felt there was a risk, i personally didn't, i try to persuade him of that, if he feels there's a risk then you can't encourage somebody to put you on a proposal which could their chances.
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others from outside the uk might say they aren't willing to partner up because they are buoyed about what would happen post— brexit? because they are buoyed about what would happen post- brexit? that has beena would happen post- brexit? that has been a really worrying feature of the uncertainty caused with the transition process, i suppose, of moving from the referendum vote into a new scenario. i think i would never underestimate the challenge that brexit poses to science. it is a very significant challenge. a positive thing about it is it shows the government making an overdue to the government making an overdue to the eu and saying these are the ways in which we currently collaborate on science with the eu and we want to discuss how to keep this going in the future. so i see it as the uk government being quite positive and say that all options are still on the table and we want to negotiate perhaps closer ways that can work
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with the eu particularly on science. give us an idea, nick, how much do you talk to european colleagues at how important is that relationship between scientists here and european scientists? i've had many conversations in a typical day with astronomers across europe, as well astronomers across europe, as well as in other countries. we discuss the scientific research projects, proposals we will put forward for funding, to build projects or to move projects forward or to bring a project to publication. it sort of a continual process. are there other countries that you could be doing this with? there are other countries ican this with? there are other countries i can collaborate with and i collaborate with people in a number of countries, but it is difficult to have the funding and collaborative framework that the eu has set up that allows us to apply for a large pot of money that could be shared between multiple countries. individual governments can't really do that. i know there are positives
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in what the government is saying, but surely you can understand the genuine concerns of people like nick and many others? absolutely. i really wouldn't underestimate that at all. the situation at the moment, the way in which we collaborate with the way in which we collaborate with the eu, it works very well because the eu, it works very well because the structures and processes are already in place and there are funding programmes bear and collaborative programmes which make it easy for researchers in the uk to work with counterparts across europe. there are important global challenges on health and space and the environment, all kinds of things, where you really need people to work together across countries in order to tackle these problems. the weight ins are set up, it works well for signs at the moment —— the way things are set up. i hope through this starting paper, the starting position of the uk government, we can work towards keeping this going beyond brexit. thanks very much for
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your time this morning. it's very interesting. and david davis says about the paper that it sends a clear message to the research and innovation community, that we value their work and feel it is crucial to maintain collaboration with our european partners. thanks very much. let's find out what's happening with the weather. we will be concentrating a lot for —— on hurricane irma. a much quieter story this side of the atlantic. it is all eyes on hurricane irma at the moment, with its potentially catastrophic impacts. we will keep you up—to—date through the morning. the weather here is pretty quiet. this is sunrise, taken recently by one of our weather watchers. clear skies around and with those clear skies around and with those clear skies it is quite chilly start the day. we've lost the weather front that brought the rain over the past few days. that's clear to the east and we have more of a westerly influence as we head the day. to
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start things off with a clear skies temperatures widely done in single figures, so a fresh start. less muqqy figures, so a fresh start. less muggy and humid than recently. through the day we have a lot of dry weather on the cards across much of the country. a few showers propping up the country. a few showers propping up in northern ireland in the north—west scotland and a few perhaps for cumbria and lancashire. but most of us avoiding the showers. it will be breezy, with some fair weather cloud. it feel pleasant —— feels pleasant, with temperatures about 50— 20. we will see a few showers for the north—west of scotland, but then most of us are looking dry, with clear skies again. as the recipe for a chilly night again. during the second half of the night we have more cloud moving on from the north and west, bringing outbreaks of rain. so not as chilly tomorrow morning as it is outside at the moment. across scotland and northern ireland we have the rain and wind picking up through the morning. further south across england and wales it will cloud over
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from the north—west, but towards the south and east you should stay mostly dry. tomorrow afternoon we see more heavy rain setting in marking the start of an unsettled speu marking the start of an unsettled spell of weather. across much of scotla nd spell of weather. across much of scotland and northern ireland we have a wet and breezy afternoon. feeling cool. there could be a bit of surface water lying around, with heavy rain in the north—west england and wales. in the north—east you are likely to stay mostly dry. temperatures about 90 degrees. and a few showers across the south—west of england, with the breeze picking up later. this is the culprit bringing us later. this is the culprit bringing us the unsettled weather. low pressure moving in. on friday that sits to the north of the uk. it will bea sits to the north of the uk. it will be a windy day on friday, with some sunshine but also plenty of showers and perhaps longer spells of rain around parts of southern england on friday. quite cool and showery and that will continue into the weekend, with low pressure staying not far
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away. some showers around on saturday. it could turn the key wet and windy by sunday. back to you both. thank you. the crabbing industry is to cromer what sticks of rock are to blackpool. tourists flock to the north norfolk coast just to sample the local delicacy. but according to the charity seafarers uk, towns like cromer or aldeburgh in suffolk, which were built on traditional fishing methods, are in decline and need more support. brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin is in aldeburgh for us this morning. it looks like a lovely day. good morning. good morning! it has been the most amazing sunrise down here. just absolutely gorgeous. no wonder so many people want to live in places like this. it is picturesque. this is aldeburgh on the suffolk coast at an amazing place. people have been selling their wares from places like this all along the coast here for the best part of 100 years. but
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numbers of fishermen are declining. backin numbers of fishermen are declining. back in the 1600 there were about 1500 fishermen based here in aldeburgh. in the 1800 that halved to about 700. if the news ago there we re to about 700. if the news ago there were just 35 and today only three fishermen are left. so what happens in cases like this when the fishermen leave and the tourists, the second home owners, movie and? we went about two hours further up the coast that way to cromer, famous for its crap, to find out the answer to that question. fishing is so a part of the fabric of cromer that if you stop someone on the shore and ask their name... johnny. surname? seibu. people think it's a fake name. jonny first went to see here at five, full—time as soon as to see here at five, full—time as soon as he could skip school. what makes cromer cromer? virtually
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untouched. no big roads, it hasn't got the mass tourism, we don't need the hotels, and the fast food chains and stuff like that. special? very special. special, but it is changing. you are obviously a lot faster than me. i've been doing this since i was about eight, nine years old. he does what his parents did and what his grandparents did before them, at the next—generation... never. no, it's not... no. he is only a boy, he never. no, it's not... no. he is onlya boy, he might never. no, it's not... no. he is only a boy, he might change his mind. you never know. is this emotional blackmail? is tried to emotionally but they'll be in the past but failed miserably. the number of cramming both you has fallen from 150 30 years ago to about a dozen today —— crabbing. plastic battery now stands where a crabbing back we once stood. —— a
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plastic factory. could this be the last generation in cromer? obviously it would be very sad. it would be heartbreaking. the old fishermans cottages a re heartbreaking. the old fishermans cottages are being snapped up as holiday rentals and second homes by people like mark. a very sweet little cottage. mark tells me change is good. it's starting to go slightly more upmarket. are you worried at all about the fishing industry here? not really, but i'm not a fishermen, so the town needs we re not a fishermen, so the town needs were at —— needs tourists. i think what we can do to encourage that is good. but sarah who served as a crowd is less certain that change serves eve ryo ne crowd is less certain that change serves everyone well. you were here wigging them, were due?” serves everyone well. you were here wigging them, were due? i was. are you cross? i am. it easy and almost trite for property developers to say
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it is progress, but it's got to be donein it is progress, but it's got to be done ina it is progress, but it's got to be done in a measured way. we have four children of our own and they are young adults now and i doubt very much that they would be able to buy a property in this area. on the high these shops are closing down to make way for the first big—name coffee shop. a petition was taken to the council to try to stop the korean crabbing tractors on the beach, they we re crabbing tractors on the beach, they were disturbing some of the new arrivals. when people don't leave here all year round there's no incentive to invest essential services, so transport, education, health, all of these things suffer and comes somewhere where people to live if people don't live in it loses its identity. the very thing that brought the second homeowners in the first place? yes. so you think it's worth fighting for?” certainly do. many of these
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traditional communities are changing. what is progress the sum is not to all. this is a dilemma. they arejust bringing in their wall. people love seeing this. what do you keep this place is as real living, breathing, dynamic areas, where real people live, or do they become a museum piece for tourists? this is the problem. seafarers uk, a charity that supported fishermen for 100 yea rs, that supported fishermen for 100 years, say there is more need today and ever before to support this fishing communities. back to you. it is wonderful scene that go on behind you. they you so much. back with you later. much better weather than yesterday. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. an investigation into a double
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shooting in east london has become a murder inquiry after a 14—year—old boy died in hospital last night. he's been named as coreyjunior davis. a 17—year—old was also injured during the incident on moore walk in forest gate on monday afternoon. police describe the incident as an extreme act of violence, but no arrests have been made so far. the mayor says he'll spend £250 million buying up land for new affordable homes. it's a key part of city hall's strategy to tackle the capital's housing crisis which is being unveiled later. sadiq khan has pledged to build 90,000 new affordable homes over the next four years and to boost protection for tenants renting privately. he's a world champion athletics star, but adam gemili's been back to his old school to inspire a new generation of athletes. the 23—year—old was at dartford grammer to open a new track.
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it's amazing. there are so many young athletes who are so enthusiastic about track and field, which is what we need in britain. we lose it as they get older, so for them to have this amazing facility here, to come and train and run is brilliant. so i feel lucky to be here and be part of it. let's have a look at the travel situation now. a good situation on most tube lines. on the roads, there's been a crash on oxford street, so it's blocked westbound between tottehnam court road and oxford circus and buses are on diversion. in the city, fenchurch street is closed between gracechurch street and lime street for repairs to a burst water main. in islington, upper street remains closed southbound from liverpool road to city road for roadworks. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's feeling a little bit fresher compared to this time yesterday, but we do have much more sunshine and we are going to continue to see these sunny spells through
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the course of the day. staying dry as well. this sunshine gives way to a bit of cloud that will bubble up through the morning into the afternoon, especially a little bit breezy. but the temperatures managing to reach about 20 celsius. so in the shelter, in the sunshine, it will feel warm. overnight tonight we still have clear spells and a bit of patchy cloud around, but it could feel a little bit chillier. the windfalls light. the minimum temperature in clearer skies down the 10—11dc, especially towards rural spots. again, a promising start to thursday. sunshine to start the day, but gradually that cloud will move in from the north—west and we could start to see a couple of showers. the low pressure to the north of the uk starts to bring these weather fronts through the course of friday. it may be a dry start by turning
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wet through the day. a showery day in prospect for saturday. there could be a rumble or two of thunder. into sunday it turns progressively autumnal. expect a spell of wet and windy weather. that's all for now. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. plans to curb the number of eu migrants living and working in the uk are set out in a leaked home office document. it suggests the free movement of people will be banned after brexit. but the government says nothing's been signed off yet. good morning. it's wednesday the 6th of september. also this morning: hurricane irma, one of the most powerful atlantic storms ever recorded, has begun lashing islands in the caribbean. news this morning thatjust half of dentists in england are accepting
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new nhs patients. we are flogging fish this morning, the latest in our coastal series to see how brexit is affecting the industry. in sport, wales manager, chris coleman, says "bring it on," after a late victory over moldova in their world cup qualifier. two more wins and they should be in russia next year. 0k, ok, good. leanforward. the unsung heroes of sport. we'll look at the award that celebrates those making a difference at the grassroots. and sarah has the weather. good morning. good morning. a bright and breezy day today. dry for most of us. a few showers in the north—west. i will bring you all the
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details in 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. a leaked home office document has set out plans for how the uk immigration system could work after brexit. the proposal, which has been published by the guardian newspaper, considers how the government could dramatically reduce the number number of low—skilled eu migrants. it also proposes time limits on how long eu nationals could stay in the uk. the bbc understands the document has not been approved by ministers. let's get more from our political correspondent iain watson who's in westminster. is this a damaging document? what is in it? i don't know if it will be damaging the pe depends on your political point of view. this is it. it is sensitive. it suggests after brexit there will be a transition period of at least two years in which immigration from the eu does not change much. eu migrants wanting
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to stay for six months would have to register for the first time. beyond that, radicalsuggestions register for the first time. beyond that, radical suggestions are being suggested. low—skilled workers could only stay here for two years. highly skilled workers may not even be able to stay permanently at all. 3—5 yea rs. to stay permanently at all. 3—5 years. family members, if you want to bring them, that will face new restrictions as well. is implemented, and it has not been decided yet, it could be a radical change. —— if. decided yet, it could be a radical change. -- if. we will speak to the defence secretary sir michael fallon just after 730 about the government's plans post—brexit. islands in the caribbean are making last—minute preparations for hurricane irma, one of the most powerful atlantic storms on record, with officials warning of its "potentially catastrophic" effects. it's already lashing the british territory of anguilla where residents say the powerful waves and high winds have been pounding the coastline.
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our correspondent, sarah corker, reports. this is the eye of the storm from space. dramatic images from nasa capture the sheer scale and magnitude of hurricane irma. the category five storm is on a collision course with several caribbean islands. popular holiday destinations like antigua and saint martin are preparing for life—threatening winds and torrential rains. storm surges of up to 12 feet are forecast and overnight some islands have started to flood. irma's path may change but at the moment it looks set to head towards the british virgin islands, puerto rico, cuba and by the weekend, the florida keys. in miami they are stocking up on sandbags and preparing for the worst. the storm surge is massive and the storm surge is predicted to go for miles and miles. right now it is travelling at 15 mph
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and it is tracked to move south of the florida keys on a westerly path with a slight north turn. it's incredibly important that all floridians keep a close eye on this incredibly dangerous storm. do not sit and wait to prepare, get prepared now. this monster hurricane comes on the heels of harvey, which struck texas and louisiana last month. irma is forecast to be even more dangerous. now millions of people across the caribbean are bracing themselves for one of the most powerful hurricanes ever recorded in the atlantic basin. sarah corker, bbc news. we can speak now to carolyne coleby who's been preparing for the storm in montserrat. just tell us where you are and what conditions are like at the moment.”
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think the main impact will be tomorrow. since yesterday afternoon, the winds been increasing. and over the winds been increasing. and over the last few hours it's gotten louder. what preparations have you been making? we are in our house. others went to shelters. i have livestock, so i have moved to a friend's house. they are at the back of the property. the goats don't do
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well in water and i had to get them out of the water, basically, out of the rain. right. it is the middle of the rain. right. it is the middle of the night, actually, and i have been asleep. it is pretty loud so i have not had much sleep yet. the place you are in, do you know if it is safe and secure? it should be. the houseis safe and secure? it should be. the house is very, very solid. wejust had a new roof put on. i am hoping we will not lose it. so far, so good. ok. good luck with that. i hope your livestock are ok as well. good luck as the storm passes. thank you. we will get more information soon on you. we will get more information soon on where it is, where it is passing, and where it will go. now for some other news this morning. a 14—year—old boy has died after a double shooting in east london.
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coreyjunior davis and another boy, who's17, were found with gunshot injuries in forest gate on monday afternoon. the second victim is said to have "life—changing injuries." police have launched a murder investigation. just half of dentists in england are accepting new nhs patients, according to research by the bbc. the british dental association said the figure was a "disgrace" and evidence of an "emerging crisis" in dental care. but the nhs says 95% of patients do manage to get an appointment. david rhodes reports. this is a familiar sight for fozia, who's been trying to find an nhs dentist in bradford. i was absolutley gobsmacked and in a sense quite devastated there's none locally. a mum of two on benefits, fozia needs a local nhs dentist for her son, mansur, who has an overcrowded mouth and a mineral deficiency with this teeth. i tried going through the yellow pages and using the internet
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and then i used the 101 where they find you the nearest nhs dentist, and they said there wasn't one in bradford. the bbc has analysed the data of two and a half thousand dental practices across england that provided information about whether they were accepting new nhs patients. 48% said they were not accepting new adult patients while 40% said they weren't accepting new child patients. there's an emerging crisis about more dentists not accepting new patients simply because they are not allowed to see more patients, the government has only commissioned enough dentistry to treat half the adult population and it's a disgrace. people that need an nhs dentist should get one. nhs england says the latest patient survey found 95% of people seeking a dental appointment were able to get one and overall the number of dentists offering nhs care is 3,800 higher than a decade ago. david rhodes, bbc news. the archbishop of canterbury has warned that britain's economic model is "broken" as the gap between the richest and poorest parts of the uk widens.
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justin welby is a member of the commission behind a report published today by the centre—left think tank, the institute for public policy research. it says the country faces the longest period of stagnating earnings for 150 years. the indian prime minister, narendra modi, is shortly to meet the de—facto leader of myanmar, aung san suu kyi. myanmar is currently under intense diplomatic pressure to end the violence its security forces are reportedly inflicting on the rohingya minority. tens of thousands have fled into neighbouring bangladesh. 13 people have been rescued after becoming trapped in a 53—metre high viewing tower in dorset. 11 members of the public and two staff members were winched to safety from thejurassic skyline tower in weymouth by a coastguard helicopter on tuesday afternoon. a full investigation into the incident is under way. look at that. there are no stairs
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apparently. you were saying you got stuck at the top of the london eye. a p pa re ntly stuck at the top of the london eye. apparently there is an emergency box. they told me that rescuers are on the way. then they said there we re on the way. then they said there were emergency supplies. and this is what is in it. foiljackets for shock purposes, cups and water, a first aid kit, glucose tablets, a bag, and what everyone needs, wet wipes. and chocolate? none of that. tha nkfully wipes. and chocolate? none of that.
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thankfully after an hour it moved and we were safe. and now we go back to the main story. it's a tense time for those in the path of hurricane irma as they try and protect themselves from the most powerful atlantic storm in a decade. the category five hurricane has already sustained wind speeds of 185 miles per hour and there is no sign that it will let up in the coming days. weather presenter, simon king, joins us. ina lot in a lot about this. you made a documentary about chasing hurricanes. i made a programme for radio5live. i went to miami to talk about the forecast of hurricane katrina. i went to the weather
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centre and spent time with the hurricane hunters, fascinating people, who fly into hurricanes to ta ke people, who fly into hurricanes to take measurements. this is a video of them in irma. it seems crazy you would want to fly into or around one. it is safe to do. they can see the turbulence, the up and down d rafts, the turbulence, the up and down drafts, which can cause damage to planes. they can cope with the high winds and punch through into the eye of the hurricane. and this is from irma? yes. on monday night there we re irma? yes. on monday night there were three aircrafts in hurricane irma. how bad is this one? think
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about the size of irma. if you can imagine france, irma is the same size. gosh. it is absolutely huge. think about the tiny islands in the caribbean it is going over, it engulfs them. we mention hurricane categories of one to five, with one the weakest. it is five. that is rare. 185 miles per hour. what is the most dangerous part of this storm, wind, waves? a lot of people think it's the winds but it is actually the storm surge that can kill more people. a massive from the national hurricane centre
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to me and to everyone is that it is the floodwaters that can actually cause more harm. it is hard to predict the path of the storm perfectly. what affects that and where might it go? because florida and a number of other places are on high alert. this is the key thing. hurricane hunters are crucial in the forecasting. they measure within and around the hurricane. that helps to getan around the hurricane. that helps to get an idea of the flow, where it will go. all of that data they collect and send back to the national hurricane centre. it is a category four hurricane, or five, for quite a time and will move towards the virgin islands next, then towards puerto rico, towards cuba and beyond that there is uncertainty but it is becoming
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increasingly likely that it will hit parts of florida, southern florida. so we've seen parts of florida have been under an evacuation notice. so that will be the weekend. we will be keeping a very close eye on the situation. no sign of it dying out. we haven't had a major hurricane hit the us for 12 years. after harvey, this will be the second one and that in itself is the wreck. you've given us an in itself is the wreck. you've given us an idea of what might be to come. thank you very much. the size of france, that gives you the picture of how huge it is. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: proposals aimed at cutting the numbers of low—skilled migrants from europe following brexit have been disclosed in a leaked document. winds of 180 miles per hour
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from hurricane irma have begun lashing islands in the caribbean where people have been told to evacuate their homes. let's find out what's happening with the weather. here's sarah. good morning. all lies on the caribbean, but here on our shores it's a very quiet day weatherwise. calm, a serene start. we have some breezy weather developing. winds coming in from the atlantic. they are pushing away this cold front that brought us rain over the past day. a fresher feel. that brought us rain over the past day. a fresherfeel. the temperatures are fairly widely in single figures. just one degree above freezing in some parts of the rural sheltered glens of scotland. it will be chilly, with a lot of sunshine. for most of us it looks like a bright day. we will have a
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few showers across parts of the north—west of england and the north and west of scotland. but for the bulk of the country a dry day ahead, with fair weather cloud bubbling up through the afternoon. temperatures between 15— 20 degrees. so in a shelter it should feel pleasant. breezy further north of the country. into the evening it is looking bright, and temperatures will fall quite quickly again. turning chilly. but during the second half of the night of the cloud builds from the north and west, bringing outbreaks of rain through the early hours of thursday. so it won't be quite as chilly as it is first thing. through the day things are on the change. the wet and windy weather is working through scotland and northern ireland further south and east. it should stay dry for a good part of the day. tomorrow afternoon is when we have some fairly heavy bursts of rain across scotland and into northern ireland. there could be supplying water into the north—west of england too. heading south across
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england and wales the wet weather had seen and it is quite easy. further south—east it's a dry a picture, with perhaps a few showers. temperatures again of19— picture, with perhaps a few showers. temperatures again of 19— 20. the cloud is building into the south—west, bringing rain later in the day. and then things are looking u nsettled the day. and then things are looking unsettled towards the end of the week. the low pressure through thursday night and into friday becomes well—established across the north of the uk. quite a breezy picture on friday. those winds are circulating around, bringing some showers or perhaps longer spells of rain, especially across parts of southern england. temperature is typical of the time of year. but that low pressure stays with us through the weekend. so showers around on saturday and things could turn quite wet and windy by sunday. back to you. thanks very much! fishing is one of the oldest industries in the world but it has faced tough times in britain in recent years, bringing challenges
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for towns that rely on it. all this week we are talking about coastal britain. the fishing industry voted overwhelming to leave the eu, and as part of our series we're looking at coastal communities, and we've sent sean to grimsby to find out how it is preparing for brexit. i reckon there is an auction about to start! it is getting under way right now. we are right in the middle of the auction. a lot of this stuff that we eat in the uk comes from abroad. so they are doing a good job and a lot of this fish... cani good job and a lot of this fish... can i ask you, where has this fish come from? this is fresh icelandic fish. this is fresh in last night. weirdly, we actually import a lot of the fish we eat... sorry. a lot of the fish we eat... sorry. a lot of the fish we catch ourselves we
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export. so it is complicated what happens. over the last day or so i've been looking around grimsby to try to find what the workers around here think might happen. darren works on the other side of the ports andi works on the other side of the ports and i asked what he thinks the future might hold. darren is now one of the last fishermen working in grimsby. we've got hen crabs. the lads sort them out. we get a good price for the hen crabs. they go to the chinese market. what's it like being a fisherman here in grimsby these days? it's hard in grimsby, with the prices. the prices go up every year and it's getting bad. this port was working 24 hours a day, seven days a week. dennis remembers those days vividly. he started on the boats back in the boomtime, in 1959. so you were skipper of this boat? i certainly was. yeah. decades ago. and in the heyday, even before you were
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skipper, iguess, how many of these kinds of boats would there have been around grimsby? there were actually 12 of these boats. but all of the other companies had a similar size of ship. this type of ship, you are talking a couple of hundred. a few hundred of these? of this type. but 700 trawlers altogether in grimsby. these were once known as the biggest ports in the world, but have been reduced since to a handful of trawlers. that's partly because the uk lost a battle with iceland overfish. and also new european rules came in in the early ‘80s that left many people here feeling like they didn't have as much access to fish as they did before. so grimsby has had to reinvent itself as a fish processing hub and many small businesses still run in buildings like this. there are lots of food processers in grimsby, right from the really high technical end, with lots of innovation
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and lots of modern facilities, taking care of modern needs, to this. to what you've got. and what have we got here? this is a traditional coal smoking smokehouse, smoking salmon and haddock. mainly haddock. we do that in a traditional way and this is one of the smokehouses. you talk about trade barriers, future negotiations that the uk might have with the eu and other countries. how important to you is it that there aren't any more barriers? really important. grimsby in particular, which is a fabulous food—processing town, the supply of fish, the timely supply of fish, is really crucial. so let's not hold it up on the way here. right, they are nearly done. just a few boxes left. you can see on here, the way it works is no money changes hands. so they say. that's how it
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should work in theory. when you get down to the last few boxes, does that mean they are the dregs? no, the fish is graded and this happen to be the last few boxes. well, you might get that one if you put your bid in right. richard is from the university of hull. a busy time of the morning. nothing like the smell of fish to wake you up! it is pretty strong here! we have talked a lot about grimsby and how the fishing industry has collapsed a bit here and they are try to reinvent themselves, but with brexit and if we get more access to our own waters, scotland would be hugely affect it, wouldn't it? how much of affect it, wouldn't it? how much of a difference are we talking when we look at the scottish economy? it's a massive issue the scotland legally, politically, economically. legally, they want more control over their
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own waters. yeah, having control over scottish waters for scottish fishermen will be a big thing. over scottish waters for scottish fishermen will be a big thingm looks really hectic here. we've caught it at the peak time of the auction. but good grimsby ever really get back to that biggest port in the world status, or is it all about food processing?” in the world status, or is it all about food processing? i think it's about food processing? i think it's about food processing? i think it's about food processing. the days of fishing, lots of small vessels bringing their catch to grimsby, it's just not going to happen again. most fishing is industrial, large vessels, and economically this is a big earner betting they want to make sure they can retain control of this. thank you very much. i think i've missed the boat in terms of getting one of these deals. everything has been sold, which
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means it's a good morning. i'm not sure their day's work has done. —— has been done. what a flurry of activity! thank you very much. i've never seen so many wellies. look at this. and we are also in aldeburgh in suffolk this morning as part of our series looking at life in coastal britain. this is the view on the beach there. what a beautiful sunrise. the town was built on fishing. it used to have over 1,500 fishermen in the 1600s. that figure fell to 35 twenty years ago. today we're told there are just three left. the changing face of the industry. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: from keeping kids off the street by getting them into boxing, to helping champions of the future, we'll be finding out how you can nominate your local unsung heros for a bbc sports personality of the year award.
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time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. an investigation into a double shooting in east london has become a murder inquiry after a 14—year—old boy died in hospital last night. he's been named as coreyjunior davis. a 17—year—old was also injured during the incident on moore walk in forest gate on monday afternoon. police describe the incident as an extreme act of violence, but no arrests have been made so far. the mayor says he'll spend £250 million buying up land for new affordable homes. it's a key part of city hall's strategy to tackle the capital's housing crisis which is being unveiled later. sadiq khan has pledged to build 90,000 new affordable homes over the next four years and to boost protection for tenants
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renting privately. he's a world champion athletics star, but adam gemili's been back to his old school to inspire a new generation of athletes. the 23—year—old was at dartford grammer to open a new track. it's amazing. there are so many young athletes who are so enthusiastic about track and field, which is what we need in britain. we lose it as these guys get older, so for them to have this amazing facility here, to actually come and train and run, it's brilliant. so i feel lucky to be here and to be part of it. let's have a look at the travel situation now. a good situation on most tube lines. on the roads, the a10 is closed in dalston kingsland near to shacklewell lane after a police van overturned. there's been a crash on oxford street, so it's blocked westbound between tottehnam court road and oxford circus and buses are on diversion. in the city, fenchurch street is closed between gracechurch street and lime street for repairs
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to a burst water main. in islington, upper street remains closed southbound from liverpool road to city road for roadworks. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's feeling a little bit fresher compared to this time yesterday, but we do have much more sunshine and we are going to continue to see these sunny spells through the course of the day. staying dry as well. this sunshine gives way to a bit of cloud that will bubble up through the morning into the afternoon, especially a little bit breezy. but the temperature managing to reach about 20 celsius. so in the shelter, in the sunshine, it will feel quite warm. overnight tonight we still have clear spells and a bit of patchy cloud around, but it could feel a little bit chillier. the windfalls light. the minimum temperature under the clearer skies down to 10—11, particularly towards rural spots. again, a promising start to thursday. some sunshine to start the day, but gradually that cloud will move in from the west and north—west
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and we could start to see a couple of showers. breezy again tomorrow and temperatures about 19—20. this area of low pressure to the north of the uk starts to bring these weather fronts through the course of friday. so it may be a dry start, but turning wet through the day. a showery day in prospect for saturday. there could be a rumble or two of thunder. as we head into sunday it turns progressively more autumnal. expect a spell of wet and windy weather. that's all for now. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a leaked home office document has set out plans for how the uk immigration system could work after brexit. the paper, which has been published by the guardian newspaper, considers how the government could dramatically reduce the number number of low—skilled eu migrants. it also proposes time limits on how
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long eu nationals could stay in the uk. the bbc understands the document, which was produced last month, has not been approved by ministers. we will be speaking to defence secretary, sir michael fallon, in a few minutes. winds from hurricane irma have begun lashing islands in the caribbean, where people have been told to evacuate their homes. officials are warning of the "potentially catastrophic" effects of the category five hurricane which has already sustained winds of 180 miles per hour. it's starting to hit the leeward islands and will move on towards puerto rico and the dominican republic. it's projected to reach the us state of florida on saturday. we were just told earlier it is the size of france. we will keep you up—to—date on that. a 14—year—old boy has died after a double shooting in east london. coreyjunior davis, and another boy, who's17, were found with gunshot
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injuries in forest gate on monday afternoon. the second victim is said to have "life—changing injuries." police have launched a murder investigation. just half of dentists in england are accepting new nhs patients, according to research by the bbc. the british dental association said the figure was a "disgrace" and evidence of an "emerging crisis" in dental care. but the nhs says 95% of patients do manage to get an appointment. we will talk about that with some guests later on. let us know what you think about it as well. the indian prime minister, narendra modi, is shortly to meet the de—facto leader of myanmar, aung san suu kyi. myanmar is currently under intense diplomatic pressure to end the violence its security forces are reportedly inflicting on the rohingya minority. tens of thousands have fled into neighbouring bangladesh. aung san suu kyi says a huge amount of wrong information is floating around about it. the archbishop of canterbury has warned that britain's economic model
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is "broken" as the gap between the richest and poorest parts of the uk widens. justin welby is a member of the commission behind a report published today by the centre—left think tank, the institute for public policy research. it says the country faces the longest period of stagnating earnings for 150 years. john watson is calling time on his bbc career. his final commentary will be the fa cup final next may. his voice is so recognisable. part
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of so many important matches, it stays with you. what would he make of wales at the moment? he would be quite chuffed. wales are still on track to qualify for next year's world cup after a 2—0 win in moldova. it was another great night for 17—year—old, ben woodburn, who set up al robson—kanu ten minutes from time. woodburn scored the winner against austria at the weekend, on his debut for wales. and in injury time, aaron ramsey sealed the win that leaves them second in their group. it is all about the results. it is great. we have that victory and that mentality. i think the cameraman was standing ona mentality. i think the cameraman was standing on a ladder. serbia are top after they beat
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the republic of ireland in dublin. former manchester city player aleksander kolarov scored the only goal of the game. england women's manager mark sampson says he has a clear conscience after being accused of bullying and discrimination by striker eni aluko. sampson led england to the semi—finals of the last world cup and european championship and he was cleared of any wrongdoing by two investigations. he insists he is happy to meet with aluko to discuss any differences since he dropped herfrom the squad. i've heard the specifics of the allegation and at the time we released a statement and we were very clear that i didn't say that. i'm very disappointed the allegation's come out but i understand it and all i can say is i didn't say that to eni. with any of my communication my intention is to support the players, give them confidence and give them chance to be successful on the field. at the age of 37, venus williams is two wins away from another grand slam title.she beat petra kvitova in a real thriller to reach the us
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open semi—finals. it took over two and a half hours and the deciding set went to a tie—break. kvitova only returned to the tour three months ago after the knife attack that damaged her playing hand, and williams said it felt like a "special match." this match meant a lot to me. obviously, playing at home, in a major. petra coming back and being able to compete. proving to herself she can do anything. it was amazing to see her shine today. chris froome heads into another day in the hills on the tour of spain today, and he's nearly two minutes in front. froome won his fourth tour de france injuly but he's never taken the vuelta before. he dominated yesterday's time trial to almost double his lead. of course, he is trying to become
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the third man to do the tour and vuelta double. that takes some doing. that is an incredible achievement. he seems to have the energy to keep doing it. thank you. it isa it is a very glitzy night in the sporting calendar. many world—famous stars and athletes. it goes in my diary very early. it is one of those nights i work until midnight and 1am and then work again in the morning. most mornings. bbc's sports personality of the year. it is one of the great awards. nominations for
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the get inspired unsung hero award. here are some of the heroes the winner was up against. keep it going. i am a community cricket coach and play for my local club. 13s, 15s. i really enjoy coaching. it isa 13s, 15s. i really enjoy coaching. it is a passion. she came to us and said if! it is a passion. she came to us and said if i get a table would you like it for the hall? then she pointed out she was a coach and we said yes, yes, yes. so she bought us our first table and here we are. nice and fast. off we go! it is lovely. i really appreciate it. it is great that at the end of the session they a lwa ys that at the end of the session they always walk up and say thank you. so
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long as they are smiling and enjoying it, i don't care. that is one of my favourite awards of the night. fantastic. the man who beat them to the prize is the winner from last year, marsalis, along with darren campbell, a famous sprinter. an ambassador for the award. you told us you did not sleep last night. how has the last few months been since winning the award?m night. how has the last few months been since winning the award? it has just been surreal. it completely changed my life. it has beenjust non—stop now. lots of things happened. lots of people supported us happened. lots of people supported us and helped us and we have been more sustainable. volunteers have been given more opportunity to volunteer. we basically, you know, have just taken the club to a com pletely have just taken the club to a completely different level. it has
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been an amazing experience to be the unsung hero of 2016. what strikes me is there are so many in sport across all sports, there are so many volu nteers all sports, there are so many volunteers doing incredible work. how much difference did they make to your career? umm, ithink how much difference did they make to your career? umm, i think the highest accolade i could give is it saved my life. the guidance, i think, it has given me the belief that i was still important, i had value, i could achieve great things. without backgrounding value, i could achieve great things. without backg rounding at value, i could achieve great things. without backgrounding at an early age where i was able to see bad things in life, but then volunteers and good people were guiding me on a different path and giving me the belief that, look you want to go to the olympic games, it is possible, but you need to put in the work to olympic gold. without volunteers it does not happen. boxing was your way
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out, wasn't it? being involved in thatis out, wasn't it? being involved in that is one thing. wanting to reach out to other people is the next step. what was thatjourney out to other people is the next step. what was that journey for you? it was... the journey was up and down. boxing gave me a safe environment. it helped channel my angerand environment. it helped channel my anger and aggression in a positive way. it gave me positive role models to be able to be around and look at and learn from. and gave me the perfect environment. sport is the best place to give people a great environment to transform their lives. and, you know, coming from that to this is just, you lives. and, you know, coming from that to this isjust, you know, it isjust a that to this isjust, you know, it is just a completely different world. and is now helping other people change their lives is one of the best feelings that can happen. and sport can do that. it is not... they are changing it a bit this year. it is all of physical
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activity. what has changed? that is important. sometimes sport scares people, especially traditional sports. we all cannot be great. it is great that it is other activities like dancing and yoga. however you can help somebody, giving someone five minutes over time, they could be the most valuable five minutes of that person ‘s life. it shows by opening up to other activities it gets more people involved in other activities that could potentially change their lives. speaking with him, it is almost like sliding doors for me because i see a path that i could have ended up down but it doesn't matter ultimately, it is how you turn your life around and what you turn your life around and what you get back. you got invited to a really special party, didn't you? yeah. it is an amazing story. this is what this award can do. tell us about it. yeah, i... tell us about
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this party. yes, stevie wonder, that is me and him. to have a chance to act to represent my country with this award and go over to america and get called over to stevie wonder's party... anthony joshua as well. it has been phenomenal. i have met really inspirational people who have turned me into a better person to enable other people to grow as well. a brilliant story. how do people nominate? the website? the website. the nomination is open today and ends on the 22nd of october. you will get many nominations. thank you. and to all those volunteers as well. that is what keeps sport going. you are watching breakfast on bbc news. the main stories this morning: proposals aimed at cutting the numbers of low—skilled migrants from europe following brexit have been disclosed in a leaked document.
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winds of 180mph from hurricane irma have begun lashing islands in the caribbean where people have been told to evacuate their homes. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. this side of the atlantic things are looking pretty quiet. it is likely to be the best day of the week weatherwise. it's a beautiful picture with this sunrise, taken in somerset in the last ten minutes or so. somerset in the last ten minutes or so. a gorgeous start in many parts of the country. we've lost the weather front that toured all the rain in the last few days. that's clear to the east and we have the wind is coming in from the atlantic at the moment. a few showers on the cards, but with the clear skies to start things off it will be quite chilly first. a fresh feel stepping out this morning. temperatures in rural spots chilly. fair weather
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cloud bubbling up. some showers around, perhaps in cumbria, lancashire and in northern and western scotland, the future northern ireland but they should ease later in the day. easy on the northern half of the uk. less so further south. temperatures between 15- 20 further south. temperatures between 15— 20 degrees. feeling pleasant and less humid than recently. in the this evening and showers towards the north—west is away. most of us are dry and clear, especially in the first half of the night, and that's when temperatures drop again. later in the early hours of thursday more cloud builds. so tomorrow morning it would be as chilly first thing, although there is a fresh start towards the east. the day we are likely to see the arrival of the wet and windy weather for scotland and northern ireland. things quieter further south—east. looking at tomorrow, that's when things turn more unsettled. at 4pm, heavy rain
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pushes on across much of scotland and northern ireland. in the north—west england the rain can be heavy at times, bringing surface water and spray on the roads. in the south—east you are likely to stay dry for much of the day. 19— 20 degrees. still the chance of the odd shower and still breezy. towards south wales the cloud builds on and the rain arrives later. that sets us up the rain arrives later. that sets us upforan the rain arrives later. that sets us up for an unsettled and to the week. this low pressure moves in on thursday and into friday. sitting across the northern half of the uk. the winds will be rotating around the low pressure. breezy feel to the weather on friday. with some heavy showers. perhaps longer spells around on friday too, though it will feel cooler, about 14— 18. low pressure stays nearby through the weekend. so there will be some sunshine on saturday and scattered showers and into the second half of the weekend many of us will see the arrival of the wet and windy
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weather, a rather autumnal feel to the weekend. thank you very much. more details on hurricane irma throughout the morning as well. now back to one of our main stories. we now have the clearest indication yet of the likely shape of the immigration system in the uk after brexit. it is suggested free movement will end the moment the uk leads the eu, although this hasn't yet been signed off by ministers, we understand. let's talk to defence secretary michael fallon, good morning. thank you very much for talking to us. have you seen this document? i haven't and i'm not going to comment on elite document, but you will get the government's firm proposals. we have to sort out exactly what will happen after we leave the eu when freedom of movement ends and there is no longer a right for people from the eu to come to this country and expect us to —— and we will set out
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how that will be managed later in the year. do you think it's good to restrict low skilled migrants to two yea rs' restrict low skilled migrants to two years' residency in the future?” won't comment on that because we haven't finalised the policy, to be clear freedom of movement has to end because we are leaving the eu, that's what people voted for, and freedom of movement is part of membership. to finish. we don't want to shut the door on immigration, equally the public want to see immigration continued to come down. it is falling at the moment. we've a lwa ys it is falling at the moment. we've always said we wanted to get it down from hundreds of thousands of —— per year down the tens of thousands, so we will set out the pros also as to who exactly can come here from the rest of the european union, how long they can work here and what their various rights will be and all that will be set out by the home secretary later year. would it be decided on whether they are skilled or unskilled? icon set out that yet.
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it hasn't been finalised. they are being worked on at the moment. there's obviously a balance to be struck. we to shut the door. we are a lwa ys struck. we to shut the door. we are always welcoming people to the country those who can contribute to our economy and our society. on the other hand, we want british companies to do more to train up british workers to do more to improve skills. so there's always a balance to be struck. where not closing the door on future immigration, but it has to be managed properly and people do expect numbers to come down. when will we know? this does breed uncertainty for businesses as well. we are publishing week by week a series of documents, setting out what the future partnership with the european union will look like in each of the different areas. we are doing it this week for science, for
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example, so that universities are clear on what will happen to their funding and movement of scientists from europe. we are doing it week by week and setting out specific proposals to the european union of how we want this new partnership, after we've left, to work with europe and you will see very specific proposals on how manage movement from the eu and india movement from the eu and india movement of british citizens to the rest of europe. you will see that later this year. —— and indeed movement. will there be a transition period? you are pressing me the details and as i said we haven't finalised the details yet, it is being worked on at the moment. there are going to be transitional periods involved in quite a lot of areas. let's talk about ship building. it's a new national shipbuilding
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strategy, and there will be cuts made elsewhere. how are you balancing the books? we are increasing the defence budget. it goes up each year and it is important it does. there are growing threats to this country from russian aggression, daesh terrorism, using the instability with north korea conducting nuclear tests. so we are building up ourarmed conducting nuclear tests. so we are building up our armed forces, investing in them, buying new aircraft, new armoured vehicles and we are growing the royal navy. you see the new queen elizabeth aircraft carrier arrived in portsmouth on —— and we have cut steel on heavy duty submarine frigates, the first build on the clyde at the moment. today we are announcing the new lighter frigate that will build up the size of the royal navy and allow us to have presence across the world. as far as have presence across the world. as farasi have presence across the world. as far as i understand the new frigate might be built in lots of different parts of the uk. does it mean some job losses in other places? no, we
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are making it properly competitive, challenging all of the shipyards of great britain and northern ireland, birkenhead, the shipyards in devon andindeedin birkenhead, the shipyards in devon and indeed in belfast, as well as those in scotland. any of them will be able to bid. it competitive process. shipyards are revising now, so process. shipyards are revising now, so there are a few —— huge opportunities for all companies in the supply chain and this week contracts for five new frigates for an expanding navy. it's a great day for the royal navy. tell us about when they will be ready, cosby would be pretty. years. does that leave us exposed until we are? —— because they won't be ready for some year. our current frigates will be slowly phased out. the first of the new frigates we hope willjoin the royal navy in 2023. that's just six years away. we will run the tender competition next year and we hope to
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start building in 2019, in time to get this new ships in as the existing ships have to be replaced. you mentioned north korea and the situation there at the moment. do you think diplomacy can work at this stage? diplomacy has to work. the alternative is far too grim and the prime minister spoke to president trump yesterday. i reviewed the various options with the american defence secretaryjim matters —— james mattis yesterday. although the us are making military preparations to defend their own homeland and defend their bases in guam and japan, we have to exhaust the diplomatic route first and we have assured the us that we will be working flat out to get a stronger diplomatic solution to this, a stronger resolution by the united nations, enforcement of the sanctions against north korea, to
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bring a freeze to their nuclear programme and to get china to understand that in the end it have to ta ke understand that in the end it have to take responsibility for its neighbour and bring a halt to this programme. you said you had been discussing options. did you discuss whether or not the uk might provide military support if it was asked by the us? we aren't at that stage yet. what is important is we intensified the diplomatic work that is needed. but it is serious. the tests continue, the nuclear programme has exhilarated, despite the resolutions of the united nations —— accelerated. do we have to work hard at this and get a resolution with sanctions that we can properly enforced, to stop raw materials and finance get into the north korean regime and to bring a halt to this programme. if we don't do that we face very programme. if we don't do that we fa ce very severe programme. if we don't do that we face very severe consequences in programme. if we don't do that we face very severe consequences in the asia—pacific region. face very severe consequences in the
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asia-pacific region. michael fallon, defence secretary, thank you for your time on breakfast. sailing, sand dunes and, of course, fresh seafood. these are only a handful reasons why we flock to the beach. all this week we've been looking at life in coastal communities and our deckchair has been travelling across britain to find out why you like to be beside the seaside. the coast is really nice because it's so different. sometimes the beaches are lawn and sometimes the same “— beaches are lawn and sometimes the same —— sand dunes and the sea comes in here. you get the day it's really nice and sunny. every other day is really wet and windy. what's your favourite bit? eating chips. eating chips.
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i enjoy fishing, so this is wonderful. there are so many different spots i can go to and when iam different spots i can go to and when i am fishing here an up close and seeing all that is happening, what's coming out of the dockyard. it's unreadable. it's quite nice to come down here as an escape from the city. maybe living down here would ta ke city. maybe living down here would take away from it little bit.” city. maybe living down here would take away from it little bit. i live on the coast and i can bring my boat in underneath. i really love the british coast because i'm coming from the himalayas, in nepal, and it's a landlocked country and we don't have any sea. so it is very fascinating jews either c. —— fascinating jews either c. —— fascinating country. so it is very fascinating country. so it is very fascinating to see the sea. we want a farm, with chickens!
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we do wedoa we do a good bit ofjaunty holiday music! where do we get the deckchair and cani where do we get the deckchair and can i take it home? time now to get the news, travel and weather wherever you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. an investigation into a double shooting in east london has become a murder inquiry after a 14—year—old boy died in hospital last night. —— a 14—year—old boy injured in a double shooting in east london has died in hospital. he has been named as coreyjunior davis. police have described the incident in forest gate as an extreme act of violence. a 17—year—old was also injured. the mayor says he'll spend £250 million buying up land for new affordable homes. it's a key part of city hall's strategy to tackle the capital's housing crisis which is being unveiled later. sadiq khan has pledged to build
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90,000 new affordable homes over the next four years and to boost protection for tenants renting privately. a council in surrey has approved plans to introduce parking charges for disabled motorists in waverley. campaigners had argued that some pay and display machines aren't inaccessible to wheelchair users but the council says it will install ramps. blue badge holders will still get an extra hour free, and those with the most serious disabilities will continue to be exempt from charges. you just don't know anything about people with disabilities. and you we re people with disabilities. and you were offered the chance for me to learn new your spare chair, for people to actually try it out and see what happened. let's have a look at the travel situation now. a good situation on most tube lines. on the roads, a police van has overturned near dalston kingsland. a burst water main is causing problems in mitcham where manor road is closed between robinhood lane and wide way. there's been a crash on oxford street, so it's blocked westbound between tottehnam court
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road and oxford circus and buses are on diversion. in the city, fenchurch street is closed between gracechurch street and lime street for repairs to a burst water main. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's feeling a little bit fresher compared to this time yesterday, but we do have much more sunshine and we are going to continue to see these sunny spells through the course of the day. staying dry as well. this sunshine gives way to a bit of cloud that will bubble up through the morning into the afternoon, especially a little bit breezy. but the temperature managing to reach about 20 celsius. so in the shelter, in the sunshine, it will feel quite warm. overnight tonight we still have clear spells and a bit of patchy cloud around, but it could feel a little bit chillier. the windfalls light. the minimum temperature under the clearer skies down to 10—11, particularly towards rural spots. again, a promising start to thursday. some sunshine to start the day, but gradually that cloud will move in from the west and north—west and we could start to
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see a couple of showers. breezy again tomorrow and temperatures about 19—20. this area of low pressure to the north of the uk starts to bring these weather fronts through the course of friday. so it may be a dry start, but turning wet through the day. a showery day in prospect for saturday. there could be a rumble or two of thunder. as we head into sunday it turns progressively more autumnal. expect a spell of wet and windy weather. that's all for now. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. plans to curb the number of eu migrants living and working in the uk are set out in a leaked home office document. the defence secretary tells this programme that free movement will end after brexit and the government will set out its immigration
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strategy later this year. let's be clear freedom of movement has toe end. it has to end because we are leaving the european union. that's what people voted for last year. good morning. it's wednesday, 6th september. also this morning: hurricane irma, one of the most powerful atlantic storms ever recorded, has begun lashing islands in the caribbean. good morning. they are packing up the fish that's been sold at grimsby fish market, going off to the processors. lots of imports and exports in this industry. i will be looking at what brexit might mean for the workers in it. and we're also live in suffolk as part of our coastal britain series. can we go there?
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let's go there, now! in sport, wales manager chris coleman says "bring it on", after a late victory over moldova in their world cup qualifier — two more wins and they should be in russia next year. and strictly stars louise redknapp and will young will explain how they're dusting off their dance shoes one more time for a new production of cabaret. and sarah has the weather. good morning. we have got a bright and a breezy day ahead today. most places dry with sunshine. a few showers in the north—west. i'll bring you a full forecast in about 15 minutes. thank you, sarah. we will see you at 8.15am. the defence secretary sir michael fallon has told bbc breakfast the government is not closing the door on all future immigration but insists migration numbers must come down. the comments come as a leaked home office document appears to set out plans for how the uk immigration system could work after brexit including dramatically reducing the number
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of low—skilled eu migrants. the bbc understands the document has not been approved by ministers. let's get more from our political correspondent iain watson who is in westminster. we just wejust spoke to we just spoke to michael fallon. what do you make of what he said? that's right, louise. this is the document. it's official. but it's sensitive as you can see and it is a sensitive as you can see and it is a sensitive topic. what the document itself sets out is what would happen to the immigration system after brexit. so for example, there would bea brexit. so for example, there would be a two year or more period of transition during which not that much would change, but people coming from the eu to work here would have to register and then beyond that far more restrictions on immigration. so for example, people with lower level of skills might be restricted to two yea rs of skills might be restricted to two years in the country. people with high level of skills might be allowed to stay for three to five yea rs allowed to stay for three to five years and possibly beyond that. there would be restrictions in bringing family members into the
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country too and what sir michael fallon was saying was that he wasn't going to comment on a leaked document, but we were going to get the official position from the government later this year, but freedom of movement had to end. we don't want to shut the door, of course, don't want to shut the door, of course , we don't want to shut the door, of course, we have always welcomed to this country those who can make a contribution to our economy, to our society, people with high skills. on the other hand, we want british companies to do more to train up british workers, to do more to improve skills of those who leave our colleges. so, there is always a balance to be struck. we're not closing the door on all future immigration, but it has to be managed properly and people do expect to see the numbers coming down. michael fallon making it clear that he believes people voted in the referendum for brexit want to see immigration numbers coming down and certainly the leaked document is suggesting ways to do that and it includes employers would be checking
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on the status of the people they employ as well. a balance has to be struck. this doesn't close the door entirely to eu my gration, but it restricts the levels of eu my gration beyond brexit, but we'll get the government's official position later in the year. yes, as he said. iain watson, thank you very much. hurricane irma is battering the islands of anguilla, barbuda and antigua as it makes its way through the caribbean. yes, in antigua, the electricity grid has been disconnected as a precaution. the storm is projected to move west through the leeward islands, and on to puerto rico, hispaniola, cuba and florida. meteorologists warn it may have catastrophic consequences. let's get the latest now from sarah who's been tracking the storm from the bbc's weather centre. this is a catastrophic storm. it's a category 5. that's the strongest
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hurricane and it is producing winds of 185mph with gusts over 200mph. so certainly this storm is extremely dangerous. there has only been a handful of storms recorded with similarwind handful of storms recorded with similar wind speeds to this. it is making its way across caribbean. we we re making its way across caribbean. we were hearing from my colleague simon king that the size of the storm is about the same size as france and the hurricane—force winds are extending more than 60mph from the eye of the storm. you can see that well defined eye. that shows how much it has been strengthening over the past 24 hours. now here is where it is going to be heading. making its way west regards past the virgin islands and haiti and the dominican republic, before heading to cuba and into florida. it is not the devastating wind speeds, but it is the heavy rainfall and the significant storm surge. so we are
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expecting a storm surge in association with this hurricane of up association with this hurricane of up to 11 feet and that could cause widespread flooding as well as the damage from the very strong winds widely across the caribbean and heading up towards florida. thank you very much for that. it isa thank you very much for that. it is a nice day in the uk today. we have seen beautiful pictures from the suffolk coast this morning. simon king was talking to us earlier and he said the storm is the size of france. when it comes to vast things we measure by the size of whales or the number of double—decker buses. that gives you a scale of how big it is and the tiny islands that are caught in the path of the storm. sarah corker reports. this is the eye of the storm from space.
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dramatic images from nasa capture the sheer scale and magnitude of hurricane irma. the category five storm is on a collision course with several caribbean islands. popular holiday destinations like antigua and saint martin are preparing for life—threatening winds and torrential rains. storm surges of up to 12—feet are forecast and overnight some islands have started to flood. irma's path may change but at the moment it looks set to head towards the british virgin islands, puerto rico, cuba and by the weekend, the florida keys. in miami they are stocking up on sandbags and preparing for the worst. the storm surge is massive and the storm surge is predicted to go for miles and miles. right now irma is travelling at 15 mph and it is tracked to move south of the florida keys on a westerly path with a slight north turn. it's incredibly important that all floridians keep a close eye on this incredibly dangerous storm. do not sit and wait to prepare, get prepared now. this monster hurricane comes
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on the heels of harvey, which struck texas and louisiana last month. irma is forecast to be even more dangerous. now millions of people across the caribbean are bracing themselves for one of the most powerful hurricanes ever recorded in the atlantic basin. we can speak now to alison strand who lives in anguilla and is waiting for the storm to hit. good morning to you. what are conditions like at the moment? quite horrific actually. i think the eye of the storm is probably about 15 to 20 minutes out now. we lost power about two minutes ago. i know they lost power on the other side of the island about an hour ago. you can hear the winds picking up. there is a lot of stuff flying about in the air. it's quite dangerous out there
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now. what kind of preparations did you make ahead of the storm? we shored up the house with big pieces of wood that protect your windows and help to stop the flooding come in. we've done sandbagging as well and we've dug trenches in the garden to help draw the water away from the house and into the ocean and then obviously preparations for the family, getting some medical supplies, getting emergency food and water supplies as well. making sure that we have enough to keep going more about three weeks if we have to. that's an awful lot of preparations. what are you doing about, you know, presumably because it is quite a scary position to be in too. what are you doing about that? it's not too bad actually. we have four children and they are all fast asleep. what we did was just sort of make more noise than the storm. we had a little dance party earlier on this evening and just danced the night away and got the
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kids tired and now they're all in the room with me. they are all fast asleep. alison, good luck, thank you very much indeed for talking to us and good luck as the storm passes. a great idea having a hurricane party, turning the music up and dancing away while the noise is battering the house outside! a 14—year—old boy has died after a double shooting in east london. coreyjunior davis and another boy, who's17, were found with gunshot injuries in forest gate on monday afternoon. the second victim is said to have "life—changing injuries". police have launched a murder investigation. just half of dentists in england are accepting new nhs patients, according to research by the bbc. the british dental association said the figure was a "disgrace" and evidence of an "emerging crisis" in dental care. but the nhs says 95% of patients do manage to get an appointment. the archbishop of canterbury has warned that britain's economic model is "broken" as the gap
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between the richest and poorest parts of the uk widens. justin welby is a member of the commission behind a report published today by the centre—left think—tank, the institute for public policy research. it says the country faces the longest period of stagnating earnings for 150 years. this is a video of a family that's trying to catch a bat that's flying around their home. daddy, catch him. daddy catch him. there's a bat. there's a bat. get it out of the house. mam, will you get out? daddy, will you catch him ? have you tried to catch a bat? no. i have. were you successful. there is a brilliant bit where the mother is
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hiding behind a glass door and the dad is left in there just trying to attack this bat with a towel. it comes out, but in the excitement the dog wees on the floor! there are so many dog wees on the floor! there are so ma ny levels dog wees on the floor! there are so many levels of magic. can we listen toa many levels of magic. can we listen to a bit? there is the mum hiding behind the door. you can hear the son trying to encourage his dad to catch the bat. you're doing great. the bat conservation trust said we should dim the lights and open a window. the poor bat that was in our house, we did try and catch it, but it's very difficult. we just opened a window. my favourite bit is when he shouts at his dad, "he's taking the mickey out of you. he's taking the mickey out of you. he's taking the mickey out of you. he's taking the mickey out of you." the bat has not harmed. right at the end they get the bat in the towel and then you see the dad flick it out of the window. all is safe and fine. it is
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well worth a bit of your time. five million children and 21 million adults in england haven't seen a dentist in the last two years. and now, research by the bbc suggests half of dental practices are no longer accepting new nhs patients. the nhs says 95% of people who need an appointment do get one, but patients have reported long waiting lists and in some cases a need to travel for miles to find a surgery that will accept them. here's what people in leeds had to say. we're joined now by the dentist dr angela ly. thank you very much forjoining us. do you still accept, do you know people who are still accepting nhs patients? well, i have actually left the nhs now, but when i did work in nhs practise, we did accept nhs patients, but we were one of the few practises in the local area who did so we practises in the local area who did so we did have people travelling 20, 25 miles to see us. what is the cause of the problem for you? just not enough dentists out there? or not enough dentists out there? or
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not enough dentists out there? or not enough people know where to go to get dental care? is there a shortage in the system? the problem is, funding for dental practices hasn't increased by more than 1% each year, and the cost of rising a practice has increased by more than 50%. practices are squeezed and dentists are under a lot of pressure, so it is hard for practices to see a lot of new patients because the way the funding works is that dentists receive the same feed to provide 20 fillings as they would to do one filling, so practices like to keep their stable list of patients who attend regularly so they can meet those targets. and presumably, if they
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attend regularly, they don't get into the position of needing 20 fillings — is that also the case? some people haven't been for years, some people haven't been for years, so they me die —— so they may need a lot of work doing. if you spend a lot of work doing. if you spend a lot of work doing. if you spend a lot of time on those patients, you can't see as many people. so you are a lwa ys can't see as many people. so you are always fighting fires, because you can't do the pro active that the dentist might do with regular appointments. exactly. there's not enough focus on prevention at all, and dentists aren't remunerated for that. each day, you will see up to 25 patients, and in that time, you have to give advice, do your treatment, and it's not very manageable. in your view, i'm sure money is part of this, so what would be the solution? we need to focus
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more on prevention and education. most of these dental problems are preve nta ble. most of these dental problems are preventable. all these children going to hospital with extractions is preventable. there is not enough focus on education, and dentists aren't remunerated to do that. focus on education, and dentists aren't remunerated to do thatm you could tell people, what would you could tell people, what would you be telling them, then? about their diet, how to prevent dental decay, how to look after their teeth, and how often they need to see the dentist. angela, thank you. the latest nhs patient survey found that 95% of people seeking a dental appointment were able to get one. and there are 3800 more dentists offering nhs care than there were a decade ago. as you were putting out, angela, still problems in the system. a lot of people are missing appointments as well, which adds to the problem. there is time allocated
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to patients, and a lot of people don't turn up, which means we can't see as many patients. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the defence secretary sir michael fallon says the uk will not close the door on immigrants. winds of 180 miles per hour from hurricane irma have begun lashing islands in the caribbean, where people have been told to evacuate their homes. let's find out what's happening with the weather. here's sarah. todayis today is probably the best day of the week, in terms of weather. this is broadway in somerset — lovely skies. we have lost the wet weather that has been around in the last few days as this frontal system is
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cleared to the east, leaving us with more of an atlantic influence to the weather. with those clear skies, it is chilly out there this morning. a fresh morning if you are stepping out, but there is a good deal of sunshine. there will be some showers in north—west england, into north—west scotland as well, possibly some for northern ireland. elsewhere, you will avoid those altogether. lots of dry and bright weather. some cloud this afternoon. temperatures 15—20dc. a bit breezy out there, and definitely fresher thanit out there, and definitely fresher than it has been recently. the shower was in the north—west ease away this evening, so things become dry and clear for away this evening, so things become dry and clearfora away this evening, so things become dry and clearfor a time away this evening, so things become dry and clear for a time tonight. the temperatures will dip down quickly, but we will see a change from the north and west overnight, with cloud building in, bringing outbreaks of rain at the start of the day tomorrow. southend east,
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you're likely to stay dry tomorrow. showers in scotland and ireland. across much of scotland, outbreaks of rain, low cloud, breezy too. northern ireland looks pretty wet through the course of the afternoon. some of the rain is quite heavy in the north—west of england, so a lot of surface water on the roads. the southeast will be mostly dry, 19, 20 celsius. thing is set to change through the day tomorrow. and on friday, this area of low pressure ta kes friday, this area of low pressure takes charge, sitting to the north of the uk, but the winds rotating around that area of low pressure, so around that area of low pressure, so a breezy, showery picture. 14—18dc.
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the unsettled spell continues into the weekend. low pressure still around through saturday and sunday. still some sunshine and showers on the cards on saturday, but on sunday, things will be wet and windy. if you get a chance to head out and about, today will probably be the best day of the week. the crabbing industry is to cromer what sticks of rock are to blackpool. tourists flock to the north norfolk coast just to sample the local delicacy. but according to the charity seafarers uk, towns like cromer or aldeburgh in suffolk, which were built on traditional fishing methods, are in decline and need more support. brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin is in aldeburgh for us this morning. jane is in the lovely seaside town
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of aldeburgh. it is absolutely stunning down here, however you pronounce it! we have had the most amazing sunrise this morning. duncan has just arrived to open up one of the shacks that line the seafront. he has been selling fish straight out of the sea for the best part of 100 years. —— they have been. today, there are only three fisher men left, so what happens when the fisher men move out and the tourists moving? we went to cromer, about two powers up that way. —— about two hours. fishing is so a part of the fabric of cromer that if you stop someone on the shore and ask their name... johnny. surname? seaview. people think it's a fake name.
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jonny first went to sea here at five, full—time as soon as he could skip school. what makes cromer cromer? virtually untouched. no big roads, it hasn't got the mass tourism, we don't need the hotels, and the fast food chains and stuff like that. special? very special. special, but it is changing. you are obviously a lot faster than me. i've been doing this since i was about eight, nine years old. he does what his parents did and what his grandparents did before them, but the next generation... never. no, it's not... no. he is only a boy, he might change his mind. you never know. is this emotional blackmail? he tried to emotionally blackmail me in the past, but failed miserably. the number of crabbing boats here has fallen from 150 30 years ago to about a dozen today. a plastics factory now stands
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where a crabbing plant once stood. could this be the last generation in cromer? obviously it would be very sad. it would be heartbreaking. the old fishermen's cottages are being snapped up as holiday rentals and second homes by people like mark. a very sweet little cottage. mark tells me change is good. it's starting to go slightly more upmarket. are you worried at all about the fishing industry here? not really, but i'm not a fisherman. the town needs tourists. i think what we can do to encourage that is good. but sarah, who served us, is less certain that change serves everyone well. you were earwigging then, weren't you? i was. are you cross? lam. it's easy and almost trite for property developers
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to say it's progress, but it's got to be done in a measured way. we have four children of our own and they're young adults now and i doubt very much that they would be able to buy a property in this area. on the high street, these shops are closing down to make way for the first big—name coffee shop. a petition was taken to the council to try to stop the crabbing tractors on the beach, as they were said to be disturbing some of the new arrivals. when people don't live here all year round there's no incentive to invest essential services, so transport, education, health, all of these things suffer and it becomes somewhere where people don't live. if people don't live here, it loses its identity. the very thing that brought the second homeowners in the first place? in the first place, yes.
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so you think it's worth fighting for? i certainly do. many of these traditional communities are changing. what is progress to some is not to all. there can be conflict, but he was a fa ct — there can be conflict, but he was a fact — this is where benjamin britten spent most of his life, and it is where he based his opera peter grimes. the fisher men i spoke to hear tell me that there aren't enough apprentices coming in behind them. in fact, they don't know of anybody here who will replace them. seafarers uk tell me this is worth fighting for, and there was more need now than ever before to support these fishing communities and bring ina new these fishing communities and bring in a new generation. back to you. thank you very much. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning. today is going to be the best day of the week weather wise. chilly will clear skies through the night relating to a bit ofa through the night relating to a bit of a chill in the air. but as we go through today, we have got this ridge of high pressure that's influencing things. a brisk wind and that's bringing in a few showers across scotland and northern ireland, into northern parts of england through this morning. one or two showers england through this morning. one or two s howe rs a cross england through this morning. one or two showers across wales as well, but for many of us, today is going to bea but for many of us, today is going to be a largely dry day with a bit
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of sunshine. so let's take a look at things at 4pm. you can see temperatures getting up to 16 celsius to 20 celsius. feeling a tad fresher compared to the last few days. but through the evening, any showers will tend to disappear and with lots of clear skies, it will turn chilly quickly, but then the cloud increases across northern and western areas and with that outbreaks of rain starting to move in. temperatures in the towns and cities getting down to ten to 13 celsius, but it could be chillier in the countryside. through thursday then, the cloud increasing across scotland, northern ireland, into north—west england and wales. here you will see some of the rain spreading in. brisk winds, but further towards the south and the east, it will stay dry and there will be bright spells here as well. temperatures about 19 or 20 celsius. disappointing further north at 14 or 15 celsius. the rain is associated with the weather front which will clear to the south. the area of low pressure with it is likely to stick around and then we have got another wave of a weather front moving its way into the south. during friday
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southern areas turning wet throughout the day and the best of the brightness will be across lincolnshire and north—eastern parts of england and maximum temperatures on the disappointing in the high teens across the south. saturday is a little bit mixed. there will be sunny spells and showers. highs of 15 to 19 celsius. by sunday it could be breezy and still very unsettled. bye— bye. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. on the open road. us law—makers will vote to allow tech giants and car makers to test thousands more autonomous vehicles, but they'll have to meet tough new safety tests. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday, 6th september. with a fatal crash involving tesla's autonomous car last year,
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we ask an expert if this tech future means safer driving or disaster and what about the risk of hackers. also in the programme: over a new leaf!

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