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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  September 6, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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today at 5:00pm, the most powerful atlantic storm in a decade — hurricane irma — is already causing major damage, as it sweeps across the caribbean. the category 5 storm has destroyed buildings and caused majorflooding, with communications down on several islands. the the hurricane is now heading for the british virgin islands and cuba. we'll have the latest from the caribbean, and we hope to be talking to the prime minister of antigua. the other main stories on bbc news at 5:00pm... the immigration debate, and reaction to a leaked government document proposing cutting the number of unskilled eu migrants after brexit. 0verall, immigration has been good for the uk, but what people want to see is control of that immigration. we report from bangladesh on the plight of thousands of rohingya muslims fleeing the violence in neighbouring myanmar. andy murray says he will "most
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likely" miss the rest of the season because of his ongoing hip injury. the world number 2 says it's the best decision for his long term future. i did my first—ever commentary for bbc television from this very gantry. and in those days, nobody had heard of the internet, although i can vouch for the fact that i did say once upon a time, it's in the net. and, the unmistakeable voice of football for half a century — john motson decides to call it a day. it's 5 o'clock. our main story is that hurricane irma — one of the most powerful storms ever recorded in the atlantic — is now causing major damage on a number of caribbean islands. it first hit antigua and barbuda, before moving on to saint martin and st barts. communications with those islands are down, but irma is believed to have caused widespread flooding
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and damage to buildings. the category 5 storm — with sustained winds of 185 mph, and gusts of up to 225mph — is now heading towards the british virgin islands, puerto rico and then may hit florida by the end of the week. airports have closed on several islands, and people have rushed to shops for food, water, and emergency supplies before taking shelter. officials have been warning of potentially catastrophic effects, as our correspondent richard galpin reports. the leeward islands of the caribbean are now being battered by this huge storm. this unverified video apparently showing winds of more than 180mph hitting the tiny island of saint martin. it's becoming clear is that there has been significant damage here. it's becoming clear that there has been significant damage here.
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the storm surge flooding this area near the coast, and the wind ripping apart some buildings. the whole roof has gone. in the sky above, this special us research plane also takes a battering as it flies right through the hurricane, collecting vital data. for the crew, it's a wild ride. higher up, a satellite captures the seething, churning power of this, one of the biggest atlantic storms on record. and from the international space station, a sense of how big an area the storm clouds cover. knowing that the islands of antigua and barbuda would be amongst the first to be hit by the hurricane, people here started moving to safety yesterday. here we are on market street, usually a very, very busy street in stjohn‘s.
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not busy today, it's a ghost town. while antigua may not have been hit too badly, the situation in barbuda is not known. the biggest cause for concern right now is we seem to have completely lost contact with our sister island, barbuda. they're getting really the full force of this right now. i think they are currently in the eye and that should be coming to a close soon. and then they are going to get those 185 mile winds happening again shortly. so we will be very grateful when we hear and finally get some news back from barbuda. hurricane irma is steadily moving west and is thought to have damaged several of the islands it's passed over so far. so now, even as far away as florida, people are stocking up with supplies. the hurricane is expected to make landfall here by the weekend. there's a new and seems to be record—breaking hurricane headed right towards florida, puerto rico and other places.
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we will see what happens and we will know in a very short period of time but it looks as though it could be something that will be not good, believe me, not good. the storm is massive, and the storm surge predicted will go for miles and miles. it's incredibly important that all floridians keep a close eye on this incredibly dangerous storm. do not sit and wait to prepare. get prepared now. and already, the us authorities have ordered everyone living in the very vulnerable area of the florida keys to leave. richard galpin, bbc news. bearing in mind the westward path that this immensely powerful hurricane, we can bring you images from puerto rico, sanjuan beach,
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where they will be preparing for the onset of the storm. as we heard from president trump earlier, the signs for those in the past, are not good, as the president called it, because the hurricane is heading towards puerto rico and the rest of the caribbean. people have suffered flooding and loss of communications. in puerto rico right now we are told preparations are being made in some detail. we can go to cuba and havana. 0ur correspondent will grant joins us from havana. thinking of islands in the path and the people in the path of the storm, what can you tell us about preparations in cuba? cuba has a very good track record when it comes to hurricane preparedness. cubans tend to do what they are told by the government when it comes to the evacuation orders. indeed, for some there can be consequences if they don't carry out instructions as ordered. by and large, if they are
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trying to clear an area of population, they have quite a lot of success population, they have quite a lot of success in doing that. but there is a limit of what you can do against the storm of this magnitude. the real fear is the sum of the coastal communities along the northern coast of cuba, where we think irma is going to barrel along the coast before potentially heading up to florida. they are very concerned about storm surges which could be several feet about storm surges which could be severalfeet high about storm surges which could be several feet high and cause severe destruction on that northern coastline. the governor of florida was delivering another warning to people today to be on the lookout, not just people today to be on the lookout, notjust in people today to be on the lookout, not just in coastal people today to be on the lookout, notjust in coastal areas, but inland as well. what about the degree of preparation in cuba? as other people have been pointing out, there is a limit to what people can do. yes, and if you look behind me, there is quite a calm day in her
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still. there is no sense of panic at this stage. i would say there is a couple of days to go before it reaches cuba, certainly the eastern tip of the island will maybe receive the initial wins as early as tomorrow. but we haven't seen those scenes of panic buying of water. but this is a country that has other difficulties. it has been under decades of a us economic embargo, so getting hold of construction materials to board up your home with is tricky. it can be hard to find basic goods. people heading out to things like fresh water supplies, gas, all of that can be a real issue. will grant, our correspondent in havana, on the latest preparations there. 0n the line is the prime minister of antigua and barbuda — gaston browne. we are very grateful for you joining
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us, prime minister. can you bring us up us, prime minister. can you bring us up to date on the experience on your islands? absolutely. we have certainly weathered what would have been one of the most powerful hurricanes to have made its way through the caribbean. i have to say that we have had some stunning results. the forecast initially predicted there would be severe devastation and destruction. however, so far, we have no reports of any casualties or fatalities arising from the passage of irma. i think it's an impressive story of readiness and resilience. the people of antigua and barbuda heeded the warnings. they have treated the storm with the absolute seriousness it deserves. in that sense we have been spared the projected horrendous damage predicted. within a matter of hours, antigua and barbuda should be open for business. we believe that
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will be in the next 12 hours, the airport will be available to take commercialflights. airport will be available to take commercial flights. what we airport will be available to take commercialflights. what we have done as well, is we have made sure we have cleaned up most of the trees, putting the broken trees and debris away. we still have power lines down. we believe most of the country will be restored with power by the end of the day. in that sense we have shown resilience with our infrastructure. i think the preparedness of our people was exemplary, and certainly a model for other countries to follow. you talked about readiness, could you give some practical examples of the kind of measures you took, which you think have been really important in the outcome you have been describing? over the years we have been paying attention to the building code here, making sure all the buildings here, if not all of them, over the last few decades,
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will have been built to withstand storms of 200 mph. in addition, the public facilities have been repaired and strengthens to deal with those types of storms. in the last 72 hours we have spent an enormous amount of resources to clear all the drains that were blocked, we made sure the storm water would be able to flow freely, and as a result we did not have that much serious flooding. i would say the preparedness in terms of people securing themselves and their families, their property and valuables, will have been exemplary. asa valuables, will have been exemplary. as a result, the damage is minimal compared to what would have happened if we were not ready. what are your thoughts on the path of the hurricane and what it could yet bring in terms of damage, when you think of other islands and countries and nations that lie in that path?|j understand and nations that lie in that path?”
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understand that at saint martin there is a significant amount of damage already. we have been lucky. we are not totally clear as to the position on barbuda. the last time we had an update was around 3am. at that time we were told there was property damage, but not extensive. we are hoping that's still the case. we are hoping that's still the case. we are hoping that's still the case. we are arranging to fly over to barbuda very shortly. they have had the all clear, so we can get a more accurate picture as to the extent of the damage on barbuda. but in any event, i believe because we are accustomed to these hurricanes, i believe the islands within the caribbean, over the last couple of decades in particular, will have improved their resilience. i would say it ranks above many other islands in the caribbean in terms of its preparedness. thank you very
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much forjoining us. absolute pleasure. thank you. the prime minister of antigua and barbuda there. good of him tojoin us. the bbc weather presenter chris fawkes is here now to tell us more about the hurricane. the prime minister was talking about antigua but there were questions about barbuda. reports are not so clear, is a callous about that picture. one thing you have to bear in mind with hurricanes is how tightly packed around the eye wall the high winds are. but in the video footage, you can see the maelstrom of the storm around the eye wall. going to around 50 kilometres away from the centre of the britain, the winds were around 50 mph. but around the eye wall, it is up around 200 mph. taking a look at where the storm hit, antigua is about here,
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just to the south of the eye wall. barbuda is here, going straight through the middle of the storm, so i would expect the strongest wind, biggest damage and most disruption to have affected barbuda. if they haven't got much damage, they have done incredibly well, but the full picture of what the storm has done will emerge over the coming hours and days. from barbuda the storm has been working in a westward, north—westwa rd been working in a westward, north—westward direction. going over the island of saint martin and aguilar as well. apparently some of the strongest buildings on saint martin, the government—owned buildings, have been destroyed, giving some idea of the power of the storm. powerful winds are just one factor. the other factor is the storm surge and in the centre of these hurricanes we get deep pressure causing the ocean surface to bulge upwards. the bulge of water comes inland and and dates anything.
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we are expecting this water to work across the islands. umesh and in and dates anything. —— and in and dates anything. at the british virgin islands, the storm is expected to reach 11 foot high, those storm surges. i am six foot three, so imagine two of me slamming into these areas on land. not to mention that, we have severe rainfall as well. hundreds of millimetres of rain falling well. hundreds of millimetres of rainfalling in well. hundreds of millimetres of rain falling in a short period of time. a number of records to be broken. notjust the storm surge, but the amount of rainfall as well. the full picture will emerge over the coming days. after the british virgin islands, puerto rico is on the calling list, as well as the bahamas, and all the models are sharply turning the storm to the
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east and into florida. we will know if it gets there because it's expected to reach their around sunday night. that could cause some big problems in the coming days. on the trajectory, how reliable is that projection at this stage, several days out? we could do island by island over the next few hours. it will deftly hit the british virgin islands and puerto rico. a lot of projection sending it up to florida but that might not happen. we will have to keep monitoring over the next few days. the headlines. hurricane irma
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causing damage as it sweeps across several caribbean islands with saint martin, barbuda and antigua or badly hit. tighter border controls, a cut on low skilled workers allowed in. tens of thousands of rohingyas fleeing into bank this. myanmar rejects accusations its military is undertaking a campaign of violence in this criminally. in sport, andy murray has confirmed his season is most likely over because of an ongoing hip injury. he posted online atan ongoing hip injury. he posted online at an extended period of rest would help in challenge tour grand slams next season. toby roland—jones has been named in place of chris woakes for the third test against the west indies in his home ground of lourdes beginning tomorrow. and it's been a tough day in the mountains for chris froome at the vuelta as his overall
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lead was cut by francesco neighbourly tojust lead was cut by francesco neighbourly to just over one minute. —— francesco neighbourly. theresa may has told the commons the government is committed to controlling immigration, because of the impact it can have on low paid workers and public services. but she did not comment on a leaked draft home office document that proposes restrictions on the number of low—skilled migrants from the eu after brexit. it also suggests employers should recruit british workers first. business leaders have expressed concern about the proposals. the food and drink federation said they showed a deep lack of understanding of the vital contribution made by eu workers. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports. for many voters, it was the key issue on which they made their choice in the brexit referendum. what should britain's immigration policy be for eu citizens? today, a government document leaked to journalists from the guardian newspaper gave some answers.
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the key philosophy being that immigration should benefit notjust the migrants themselves but also make existing residents better off. those who have campaigned for years for lower immigration are delighted. it's broadly on the right lines. it's to be welcomed. if implemented, as proposed, then we see a considerable, significant reduction in the sort of numbers coming from the eu, which is what people broadly voted for a year and a bit ago. the document is clearly a recent draft of the home office's long—awaited white paper on immigration after brexit. 0fficials here insist it is not the latest draft, it's very much a work in progress and the cabinet is still arguing over it. that said, it's not back of the envelope stuff either. it is more than 80 pages of proposals. one of the key phrases in the draft says that, "wherever possible, uk employers should look to meet their labour needs from resident labour."
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but businesses insist they're already doing that. they do everything they can to employ british workers, it's just very difficult. sometimes you have skills gaps that you need to fill with people from outside the uk, and that's just the way it is. the draft proposes that any eu citizen already living here before a certain not yet specified date would be allowed to stay. and even after brexit, there would be a transition period of at least two years. but at that point, the key proposals suggests that free movement for eu citizens ends, they would need passports, not id cards at the border, two year work permits would be available for eu citizens, though highly skilled workers could get longer permits. for the holiday and hospitality industry, like butlins in bognor regis, the future could be a real challenge. 30% of their workforce are eu citizens and they may find themselves applying for lots of work permits. i think nationally coastal resorts
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struggle to recruit, so recruiting from the european market is really important to us. today's leaked document will only fuel the debate about britain's future immigration policy. daniel sandford, bbc news. as we heard, firms that rely on eu workers have warned of the "catastrophic" impact of proposals to cut unskilled migration on the day britain leaves the eu. under the leaked proposals, firms would have to recruit locally, unless they could prove an "economic need" to employ eu citizens. 0ur correspondent iain watson has some more of the day's political reaction. when britain leaves the european union, the government wants to reassure businesses that the economy won't, as they put it, fall off a cliff edge. so there won't be massive changes to eu migration for at least a couple of years. but the leaked document points to a sea—change in attitudes after that, with far more restrictions
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on unskilled workers. in the commons today, the snp asked the prime minister to restate the benefits, rather than the burdens, of immigration. does the prime minister agree that immigration is essential to the strength of the uk economy as well as enhancing our diversity and culturalfabric? 0verall, immigration has been good for the uk. but what people want to see is control of that immigration. that is, i think, what people wanted to see as a result of coming out of the european union. we are already able to exercise controls in relation to those who come to this country from outside the countries within the european union. and we continue to believe as a government that it's important to have net migration at sustainable levels. theresa may knows the only way she can get net migration down to the tens of thousands is if she cuts eu immigration significantly. that said, non—eu migration is way above that level, even with tighter controls.
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so some leave campaigners are hoping the government will officially adopt some of the ideas in this document for further restrictions. people were fed up with people just coming in from the eu into this country, putting public services under pressure. that was the number one issue why people voted to leave, i would say. the government is acting on a promise to end free movement. the document is marked "sensitive". but restrictions on immigration are far more sensitive in some parts of the country than others. this extreme, hard brexit is a blueprint for strangling the london economy. why do i say that? i, on a regular basis i speak to chief executives and employers, speak to businesses in london, and i know the positive impact eu workers make. this summer the home secretary commissioned research into the impact of immigration, so, some mps say, she shouldn't be floating the idea of new restrictions until she sees the result. they really must wait
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for the evidence from the migration advisory committee about the overall impact is and what the needs are in different sectors of the economy before they take decisions. the cabinet is yet to finalise what restrictions it wants to see on immigration. but critics say it's important that skilled workers who might benefit the economy will still feel welcome. iain watson, bbc news. let's speak to the labour mp kate hoey. she's at westminster for us. this is a leaked document, but it hasn't been disowned, that's fair to say. is the broad thrust of it something you agree with?” say. is the broad thrust of it something you agree with? i think a lot of it is common sense. when we leave the european union, obviously free movement will end, it's amazing that was a headline, as if it was something new. ithink that was a headline, as if it was something new. i think what people wa nt to something new. i think what people want to see, it's friendly to
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immigration, but we want to make sure we can plan and control immigration. i think some of the ideas in it, and there will be discussion on this, are actually quite sensible. we should be encouraging employers to employ more people from this country. we need to get higher skills available so people can take the jobs. but when it is talking about low skills, there's no doubt about it that in parts of the country, being able to have a free movement of people from all over the eu has meant wages have been depressed. i think that's something that was very apparent during the referendum campaign. a lot of this is now up for discussion. it is only leaked, as you say. i think the important point is, nobody is saying they don't want immigration, but we really do want to know who is coming in, how long they are going to stay, and to stop perhaps what has happened, where people have, in and then very very
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extended members of the family have come in and we have no idea how many are going to come. i'm quite struck by the strength in parts of business today, using words like, it could be catastrophic. there has been talk problems with the food supply chain. these are not mild reaction. have they just got these are not mild reaction. have theyjust got it these are not mild reaction. have they just got it wrong? these are not mild reaction. have theyjust got it wrong? there is obviously concerned because do rely on the moment, perhaps for the wrong reasons, on people coming into work. but some of the seasonal work... i remember years and years ago as a student working up in lincolnshire picking fruit. we have always had that need to have extra people. i don't understand why a lot more stu d e nts don't understand why a lot more students are not doing some of these jobs that we used to do. i think there is concern, but it's something where once people recognise that's what leaving the eu meant, we would
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control our own borders, and we will only be doing what the rest of the world does. very few other countries have free movement from other countries other than the eu. america doesn't do this, canada doesn't do this. lots of african countries, you have to be able to know what you are coming inforand have to be able to know what you are coming in for and how have to be able to know what you are coming inforand how long. we are becoming a bit more like the rest of the world and not having this absolute free movement from 27 other countries where we have no control of it whatsoever. would you be concerned, for example, some meps responding in brussels that this is a toxic position. another word from brussels saying this could put the transition deal, this kind of transition deal, this kind of transition deal, this kind of transition deal that david davis is trying to put together into danger. is there some danger, even though you say these are draft proposals at this point, is there a danger that this point, is there a danger that this will send a negative signal to the people we are meant to be negotiating with? i think the eu at
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the moment are wanting to make everything negative, because really they want to make life as difficult as possible. i think they still have as possible. i think they still have a feeling in brussels that the more difficult they make it for us, the more negative they are, the more the uk will change its mind, because that's what other countries have done where there have been referendums. the british people are not like that. we are not going to do that. while it may be presented in this negative way, and a lot of meps will be losing theirjobs, who are not happy, so they will lose that kind of thing. this isjust another area that is needed to be discussed. because we are changing the way we run our immigration system. and we will have to do that. it's common sense. kate hoey, thank you for coming in, labour mp. we can join vicki young now, our political correspondent. that's the line from kate hoey, and i'm sure she represents a lot of opinion in the
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house of commons. what's your opinion on where this debate has landed today? it's interesting that during the referendum itself there was a lot of talk about immigration but no detail. even know this is a lea ked but no detail. even know this is a leaked document, a draft that downing street insists has been red rafted several downing street insists has been redrafted several times since that version in august, these are ideas that could happen. the uk will need a new immigration system when we have left the eu. i thought what was striking about theresa may's tone in prime minister's questions today is that she didn't completely dismiss it. if you listen to what she has said over the years, when she was home secretary, and since the referendum result, she feels very strongly that a lot of the brexit vote was about making sure britain had control of who came into the country and who leaves as well. she certainly said that again today. yes, there are other sides of immigration, but she said there are downsides as well. she says she wa nts to downsides as well. she says she wants to make sure britain can pick and choose who comes into the
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country, and more crucially, breaking the link between people who come here to work for one or two yea rs come here to work for one or two years and then stay permanently. she wa nts years and then stay permanently. she wants that to end. when you talk about fruit pickers and seasonal workers that farmers want to work for them, for example, then yes, the new system would say that you can come along and have a working visa but you can leave at the end of it. the other side of the argument from business today, many of them very concerned that there will be gaps in the labour market basically can't fill. the government response to that has always been to train up british workers. that was a thread throughout the document saying there has to be more training and skills for people already here. but remember, this has not been discussed by the cabinet yet and there will be an awful lot of discussion is still to come. the whole idea of the transition period after we leave in 2019, this could bea after we leave in 2019, this could be a real issue when it comes to our eu counterparts. many thanks, vicki. after 5301 am
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hoping to bejoined by the italian eu minister sandro gozi who is in westminster today having meetings with david davis and others including tony blair. we will see what he says possibly in response to this document. he should bejoining us this document. he should bejoining us just after 530. this document. he should bejoining usjust after 530. time this document. he should bejoining us just after 530. time for the weather with chris. we will concentrate on our weather, the sun chan was out and the sophos up in cornwall, beautiful skies, chan was out and the sophos up in cornwall, beautifulskies, most places have had decent weather although we have seen clad building during the day, it clouded over in cumbria, thanks to michelle for that picture. 0vernight tonight the cloud will thicken further, across northern ireland, scotland and north west england and wales patches of rain in the night, had eased, dry and chilly of the north east
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scotland, otherwise 12—13d, tomorrow will be different, a downward slide into more unsettled spell of weather on the way. cloud and rain into northern ireland and scotland and through the afternoon the wet weather pushing across north—west england and wales. that leaves the midlands with a dry and bright morning, things tending to cloud over, maybe with some spots of rain, not too bad but feeling quite chilly for the north—west, highest temple just 1a in glasgow, that is your weather. this is bbc news at five — the headlines. hurricane irma, the most powerful atlantic storm ever makes landfall with gusts of over a hundred and eighty miles per hour. the category five storm has already caused major damage as it sweeps through the caribbean, destroying buildings, there is majorflooding
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and communications are also down on several islands. also today, business leaders who rely on european workers warn that a draft proposal to cut the number of low skilled migrants after brexit could have catastrophic consequences. but theresa may says things have to change. 0verall immigration has been good for the uk, but what people want to see is control of that immigration. as tens of thousands of rohingyas flee to bangladesh the government in myanmar rejects accusations its military is conducting a campaign of indiscriminate violence. at 5:33pm letsjoin leah boleto at 5:33pm lets join leah boleto with the sports news. thank you. andy murray says he is likely to miss the rest of the tennis season with his hip injury. he pulled out of the us open two days before the tournament began and hasn't played since
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wimbledon in july. he posted on social media that he was confident after an extended period of rest and rehabilitation, he'd be challenging for grand slams again next season. england have made one change to their team for the third and final test against west indies at lord's. the series is level at 1—1. bowler toby roland—jones comes into the team for chris woakes. he was dropped for the game at edgbaston in favour of woakes, who was returning from injury. this test will be england's last before the winter's ashes. this week we went in, we've gone in thinking, what side will win in these conditions, looking at the surface, the way toby has been bowling this summer, it was a big asset, chris coming back in. and producing the form that he did last summer. producing the form that he did last summer. and i fully
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producing the form that he did last summer. and ifully expect producing the form that he did last summer. and i fully expect toby will be able to come in and produce a similar sort of performance that he has done throughout this summer. chris froome's lead at the vuelta a espana has been cut by his main rival vincenzo nibali. the race exploded into life in the last five miles of stage seventeen as the riders tackled inclines of up to 30%. while froome struggled to keep up, nibali surged forward, cutting the briton‘s advantage by forty two seconds. austria's stefan denny—fell claimed the stage win. froome retained the leader's red jersey, but is now one minute and sixteen seconds ahead of nibali with four stages to go. the wales and lions fly—half dan biggar will join northampton from 0spreys next summer. after more than 10 years in south wales. biggar will move to franklin's gardens after completing this season with 0spreys. biggar has won 56 caps for wales and was a member of the british & irish lions squad in new zealand this summer.
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i think if you look around the premiership, teams are getting stronger. you only have to look at leicester, who were playing with an all international back line this weekend, the quality is going up and weekend, the quality is going up and we need to keep improving our squad. darn big are, as well as being a real professional, has a great attitude, that real desire to win, he isa attitude, that real desire to win, he is a warrior, dog, he would do anything he can to be a winner. that will only rub off on the rest of our team. leicester city missed out on signing midfielder adrien silva by 1a seconds. leicester believed they'd completed a £22 million deal for him from sporting lisbon but fifa rejected their application to register the player because it came just after the deadline of the summer transfer window. leicester are appealing against the decision. former two—weight world champion carl frampton has confirmed
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jamie moore as his new trainer. frampton recently ended his long term relationship with manager barry mcguigan and his trainer—son shane. that's all sport for now. keep up—to—date with all the stories on the bbc sport website including all the action from the us open. at the moment karolina pliskova is playing coco vandeweghe in the quarterfinal and nadal and roger federer will play in the quarterfinals later. that's bbc .co uk slash sports. i'll have more in sportsday at 6.30pm. thank you, we will see later. more reaction to the leaked home office immigration plans, which suggests restrictions will be placed on the number of low—skilled migrants from the eu, after britain leaves. here, companies that rely on eu workers have warned of the "catastrophic" impact of the proposals, but what about reaction from the european union? joining us from westminster is sandro gozi, the italian minister
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for european affairs. minister, it is good of you tojoin us, thank you. what is your assessment of the state of negotiations between britain and the eu? positive steps have been taken but there is still much work to be done. notably on the financial obligations but also, i hope in september the negotiations will intensify, otherwise it will be difficult to meet that deadline. you have been meeting david davis today, the british minister involved. what is your message to the british government? the messages that we must redouble our efforts to get positive solutions on citizens rights, and financial obligations, on the irish border, and also that we need not let the situation get
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soui’. we need not let the situation get sour. we need to keep positive relations, we need to give mutual trust, because this is going to be important, not only to go to with the negotiation but to build our future relationship in the second place. you talk about trust and being positive. this leaked documents today which the government has not disowned, about reducing the number of unskilled eu workers coming in after brexit, what would that do to the atmosphere if that policy was adopted? gilbert will not. i note that it is a draft. i also take note that some members said to me, they hadn't even read the document, the first reaction, very negative, as from the business world, from the british economic world, from the british economic world, it is clear, i hope, that it is not the official direction in
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which the british government will 90, which the british government will go, certainly it is the wrong direction, we will not be ready to negotiate along those lines, which are very restricted and not acceptable. smug us but apparently in the light of the reaction of the british business world notably bad for british business in britain. british business world notably bad for british business in britainm the proposals were adopted, what would that mean for the negotiations and any chance of a special transition deal which we have been talking about. how would you rate the prospect of that? special transition deal is very important. of course our good relations in this phase will determine also our good relations and effectiveness in shaping the transition period. i repeat what i said to you, i'd take
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notice that this is not the official line of the government, some members of the government said they hadn't even of the government said they hadn't eve n rea d of the government said they hadn't even read the document. i hope that they will because i hope they will walk another line. again, the point i want to put to you, and you have made your point clear on your connection with some of the ministers today, what would be the implication for negotiations if this became official british policy?m would make the negotiations more difficult and complicated. it would be very demanding on both sides, the eu side and the uk side. it is too early to say that it would make a transition impossible. i believe it is impossible not to have a transition deal but to talk about it we need a deal and now we should focus on how to reach the deal. do
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you feel relations at the moment as difficult as some people describe them? no, i feel at difficult as some people describe them? no, ifeel at the difficult as some people describe them? no, i feel at the moment relations are not as difficult as people describe. i think there's awareness on both side of the need to deepen negotiations. it is better to deepen negotiations. it is better to identify negotiations in september because we are just at the beginning of a process and we need to do much more together. is it still your fear that the negotiations on future relationships, trade and all the rest, will not be able to take place until there has been agreement on both issues including the financial settle m e nt both issues including the financial settlement that michel barnier has been talking about. his line is the eu line, she is working according to their mandate. i think it's interesting, the proposal that has been made for the transition period to keep the uk and the single
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market, in the customs union in the transition period. this proposal that has come up in london is very interesting. i think this perspective could help a lot. also to solve financial obligations, and i hope that the british government and the british parliament will work towards this direction which i think isa towards this direction which i think is a good and sensible and helpful one. do you think that the timetable is still realistic? it is difficult but still possible to make it by 0ctober. but still possible to make it by october. i wouldn't dramatise if we didn't reach a deal by october, if we don't wejoined didn't reach a deal by october, if we don't we joined by october maybe by december at the next european council, time is ticking, it is true but we can still make it by march 29, 2019. especially if we consider asa 29, 2019. especially if we consider as a real option, as i say, to keep for a transition period, the uk in
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the single market, in a customs union. minister, good of you to join us, thank you. thank you to the italian ministerfor us, thank you. thank you to the italian minister for european affairs, sandro gozi who has been holding several meetings in westminster today. the conservative mpjacob westminster today. the conservative mp jacob rhys mogg westminster today. the conservative mpjacob rhys mogg has said he is com pletely mpjacob rhys mogg has said he is completely opposed to abortion including in cases of rape and incest. the mp for north east somerset was appearing on good morning britain on itv one he was asked about it. as i am. life is sacrosa nct asked about it. as i am. life is sacrosanct and begins at the point of conception. so if a woman is raped, say you a prime minister and a woman was raped by a family member, right, you would say that she had absolutely no right to have that baby aborted. a right under uk
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law. you would not agree with it. butler will not change. but my personal opinion is that life begins at the point of conception and abortion is morally indefensible. you would make her have that baby? jacob rhys mogg being questioned on good morning britain on itv this morning. tens of thousands more people are fleeing their homes and crossing the border from myanmar to bangladesh. the rohingya muslims are escaping what they say is a bloody campaign by the burmese military. but myanmar‘s leader, aung san suu kyi, says fake news is fuelling the crisis in rakhine state — where most rohingya muslims live — and she made no mention of the exodus of refugees. 0ur correspndent caroline hawley‘s report contains flash photography. the human toll of this crisis is growing by the day. more and more rohingyas are fleeing from burma for their lives. there is little for them in bangladesh, but even less across the border in rakhine state. the terror they have endured there, the difficulty of reaching safety, is written on their faces. translation: they burned our houses. we couldn't take our belongings.
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we were hiding near a hill for two days. we were there in rain without food and with my children. when we heard the sound of shooting, we took a boat across the sea to come here to bangladesh. aung san suu kyi, the de facto leader of myanmar, is under international pressure to use her moral authority to speak out, but today during a visit by the indian prime minister, the former human rights icon instead appeared to back the military crackdown and blamed the crisis on terrorists. we would like to thank india particularly for the strong stand it has taken with regard to the terrorist threat that came to our country a couple of weeks ago. we believe that together we can work to make sure terrorism is not allowed to take root on our soil or on the soil of any neighbouring countries. in a phone call with turkey's president, she reportedly spoke of a huge iceberg of misinformation calculated to create problems between different communities with the aim,
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she said, of promoting the interests of terrorists. it is a line that has been echoed by other government officials. i am deeply disappointed and saddened by the disinformation campaign being waged around the world with regard to the situation in rakhine. these fabricated news items are written and published with the intent to mislead the public. they are patently false and cannot be accepted and it will only exacerbate the situation. but the burmese government has denied the world free access to rakhine state. the latest military campaign that has forced so many people to flee began after insurgent attacks last month on police posts. the response has been collective punishment of the rohingya, a people described as the world's most persecuted minority. caroline hawley, bbc news. staying with this story.
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the un is warning that the situation in myanmar could spiral into a "humanitarian catastrophe" after almost 140,000 people fled across the border injust two weeks. 0ur correspondent, sanjoy majumder, is near cox's bazaar one of the refugee camps set up on the myanmar bangladesh border from where he's sent this report. all these boats are carrying rohynga refugees fleeing persecution in myanmar and they have been coming through the night, through the day. i am told there are several other boatloads of refugees just waiting off the coast of bangladesh. this is one fresh lot of refugees who have just arrived. they have come off this boat
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here, and you can see how they are carrying with them their household belongings, things that they have just managed to grab as they ran. several of them have told me that their villages were attacked, they were burnt. there are some people here with gunshot wounds, some people with other injuries, but most of all, they are extremely tired. they are exhausted. this is a really dangerous voyage, and it has taken them several days to come here. from here, they will move on to one of the many refugee camps that have been set up for these arrivals — and there are more coming in every hour. that was the latest on that humanitarian crisis developing on the border between myanmar and bangladesh. for the best part of half a century john motson has been the bbc‘s voice of football. but now at the age of 72 he's decided to put down the microphone and hang up the familiar sheepskin coat. john has covered ten world cups, two—hundred england games and twenty—nine fa cup finals. before we talk to someone who knows him well, why not look at his finest moments. tudor has gone down again. what a
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goal! ronnie radford. and the crowd are invading the pitch. and there it is. the crazy gang have beaten the culture club. wimbledon have destroyed liverpool's dreams of the double. her royal highness applauding. 0ne dreams of the double. her royal highness applauding. one of the great cup shocks of all time. platini for france! goal! with a minute to go! and 3—2. haven't seen anything like it for yea rs. he won't be shaken off. the german
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bench get up and protest at that last challenge. paul gascoigne has got a yellow card already and, oh dear me, he'll be out of the final if england get there, for that title on the number 1a. paul gascoigne has had his second yellow card of the competition and here is a moment that almost brings tears to his eyes. the free kick is given. is it over? it is! it is dramatic. it is delightful. it's denmark or other european champions! —— it's denmark who are the european champions. some of the magic of motty. let's talk to someone of the magic of motty. let's talk to someone who knows him well, mark lawrenson. if i ask you the secret of his success what would be?”
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would say, attention to detail. you know what it is like in far—flung places where you have to get every single word right, and i think that's the thing with commentators, whether on cricket, golf, tennis or football, it is not making that mistake. they live and die by the fa ct mistake. they live and die by the fact that they get everything right. and the thing withjohn, and he will tell everyone, his big break was one of those clips that you saw, when rowley hereford beat newcastle united, he was sent there thinking there wouldn't be shocked and of course it was one of the biggest shocks ever in the cup. he will tell you it was his road to success, after 50 yea rs you it was his road to success, after 50 years to still be in this business is a fantastic achievement. isa business is a fantastic achievement. is a remarkable one. i was amazed to read earlierfrom is a remarkable one. i was amazed to read earlier from an is a remarkable one. i was amazed to read earlierfrom an interview a is a remarkable one. i was amazed to read earlier from an interview a few yea rs read earlier from an interview a few years ago, saying, still, decades after he had started, he would get anxious, it was all to do with the preparation, he would lose sleep before the match, even though clearly the guy loved the job. yeah.
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i'm not being funny but he would be in the tunnel, huw, and he would ask the two managers, their assistance, and their assistants what the team was. he already knew it but it was this attention to detail. i worked with him many times when i was his fellow commentator. i used to leave him, turned up at the ground, make sure he was ok and i would see him five minutes before the game because he would be, would say, he's got his head on, he is thinking about the game. and you'd just leave him. and you knew when the game started, the big thing forjohn, of all the great commentators, he commentated to the largest audiences. and when you commentate on england, you commentate on england, you commentate to the whole of the country. and the slightest mistake is picked up. he always, always got the pitch of the game right, the mood of the game, the crowd, etc, he was really brilliant at his job. and
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talking as if he is dead, thank god he isn't! but you see what i'm trying to say. he's had an amazing career spanning trying to say. he's had an amazing career spanning half a century so it is right to be attributed to that. i couldn't believe it when he said he was 72, you must have started very young. you mentioned his big break. asa young. you mentioned his big break. as a broadcaster what is it like working alongside him?” as a broadcaster what is it like working alongside him? ijust gave you a little insight into, i've said before, i just used you a little insight into, i've said before, ijust used to leave him and turn up at the commentary and we would have one conversation before the game which was, with all the foreign players nowadays, i would say, how pronouncing the name of this guy. he would tell me and i would write it down phonetically so we would get it absolutely right. 0nce we would get it absolutely right. once the game started, huw, he was an absolutely fantastic professional. afterwards he would have a drink with you, he was a very
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good tourist which is all part of it and he was also very good, he would get loads of letters from young lads wa nted get loads of letters from young lads wanted to be commentators. he was very aware writing back to them, trying to help them, trying to give them a bit of experience if possible. and he also enjoyed his life. while you were speaking we are watching images of brian clough talking tojohn. watching images of brian clough talking to john. they watching images of brian clough talking tojohn. they had a robust relationship. brian clough gave as good as he got butjohn's sense of humour, it is fair to say, got him out of a lot of spots, didn't it. yes, it did! if he is watching busy would also admit that his sense of humour came would also admit that his sense of humourcamea would also admit that his sense of humour came a bit later in life, insofar as, he had commentated, got himself into a position, and remember, for many years, it was him and barry davies and they used to ta ke and barry davies and they used to take it in turns who did the cup final. there was real rivalry and
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they both got on, very good commentators both that as he got older he relaxed more and realised that football, supposedly, is entertainment, everyone said he was mad on stats. he wasn't that he was well aware that if nothing was happening on tv occasionally he would fill it with words. ok so he won't broadcast after the next fa cup, but really, you cannot imagine him losing interest in football, can you? no, oh no, no, no. he's very clever as well. 0ver you? no, oh no, no, no. he's very clever as well. over the years he has made friends with all the chairman and chief executives at all the premier league grounds. he will be in one on a friday night, saturday afternoon, sunday, wherever. he will be mr football until he unfortunately pops his clients! mark, as ever, great to talk to you. thank you forjoining
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mark lawrenson. giving us a sense of whatjohn might be doing with his network of contacts which we can well believe. it's three minutes to six, in three minutes the news at six. time for a look at the weather. here's chris fawkes. a quick reminder that hurricane irma has made landfall in barbuda, that's right in the middle of the strongest winds from this and king, the second strongest hurricane on record, winds gusting at 225 mph, it then moved to san martin, disturbing reports of damage there. it will make an impact over the british virgin islands in the next hour or two and as well as those strong winds a storm surge that could be up to 11 feet high. it is forecast to slam into areas of the british virgin islands so that
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could bring catastrophic disruption. it's been a quiet day, sunshine in cornwall, the cloud has been tending to build as the day goes by, that's the case in point, in bassenthwaite, cumbria, the cloud is getting a bit lower over the hills the lakes, it's a bit misty on the horizon. as you go to this evening and overnight cloud will thicken further across scotla nd cloud will thicken further across scotland and northern ireland, north west, both england and wales, across more eastern areas it stays dry and has turned to chilly across rural parts of north—east scotland, temperatures getting down into low single figures in the coldest spots. tomorrow, slow downward slide into a more unsettled spell, to thursday, rain to start the day from northern ireland and scotland, strengthening winds which will eventually broke the rain across north west england and wales, match of the day across the midlands and eastern england a lot of dry weather. in london but
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cool for the time of year glasgow, 14. by cool for the time of year glasgow, 1a. by friday the weather front will look across southern england, we are not sure how far north or south varane will be put to the north we will see a mixture of sunshine and showers, one way or the other we have a chance of general rain in the south or passing showers elsewhere with sunny spells. still feeling cool with blustery winds in the north—west, temperatures and 1a degrees in glasgow and this u nsettled degrees in glasgow and this unsettled theme continues into the weekend, with low pressure in charge, widespread showers, often cloudy and increasingly windy as well. feeling cool across the northwest and those brisk winds. u nsettled northwest and those brisk winds. unsettled weather around the corner, keep up to date weather — wise with the bbc weather website, that it from me for now. draft proposals on immigration.
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low skilled workers from the eu could face tighter border controls. theresa may says it will help low—paid workers here. 0verall, immigration has been good for the uk, but what people want to see is control of that immigration. from baking to agriculture, unions and restaurants, critics say cutting immigration could hit their businesses. it's going to make it much more difficult to recruit people, and also the impact on ingredients' prices will mean that we have to pass the cost on to our customers. also tonight: hurricane irma, the most powerful atlantic storm ever, makes landfall with gusts of over 180 mph.

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