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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  September 6, 2017 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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draft proposals on immigration. low skilled workers from the eu could face tighter border controls. theresa may says it will help low—paid workers here. overall, immigration has been good for the uk, but what people want to see is control of that immigration. from baking to agriculture, unions and restaurants, critics say cutting immigration could hit their businesses. it's going to make it much more difficult to recruit people, and also the impact on ingredients‘ prices will mean that we have to pass the cost on to our customers. also tonight: hurricane irma, the most powerful atlantic storm ever, makes landfall with gusts of over 180 mph. the storm rips through one caribbean island after another. she won the nobel peace prize, but now aung san suu kyi is under fire for not speaking out about the plight of muslims in her country.
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motty is ready to hang up his commentator‘s mic. how will football survive without him and his gags? i did my first ever commentary for bbc television from this very gantry, and in those days no one had ever heard of the internet, although i can vouch that once upon a time i did say it's in the net. and coming up in sportsday on bbc news: andy murray has confirmed he's unlikely to play for the rest of the tennis season after battling with a hip injury. he's hoping to return injanuary. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. it's a leaked document of an early draft, but the revelation of the government's thinking on immigration after brexit has produced both political opposition and business concern.
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today ministers have been explaining why they believe low—skilled immigration from the eu should be restricted. theresa may said free movement hurt some of the lowest—paid workers in the uk. but business leaders say eu workers are good for the economy. here's our political editor, laura kuenssberg. there in black and white, a plan for immigration after we leave the eu. leaked ideas to answer the demand the prime minister believes millions made when they voted to go. prime minister, is your immigration policy going to hurt the economy?‘ minister, is your immigration policy going to hurt the economy? a draft ofa going to hurt the economy? a draft of a tighter system of control that could come with its own costs. overall, immigration has been good for the overall, immigration has been good forthe uk, overall, immigration has been good for the uk, but what people want to see is control of that immigration. that is what people want to see as a result of coming out of the european union. we are already able to
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exercise controls in relation to those who come to this country from outside the countries within the european union, and we continue to believe is a government that it is important to have net migration at sustainable levels. document from august says freeman to movement where unlimited eu citizens can come here will end when we leave. new arrivals after 2019 would have to register to stay long term. there will be tighter rules for lower skilled workers, to prioritise british employees, perhaps even with a cap on numbers. and the eu citizens who do come to the uk, it'll be harder to bring family along. this birmingham food factory is already losing one italian chef who's worried about brexit. and the concerned it will make it harder to attract new arrivals, the staff she needs. it will definitely hinder our job as an employer and food
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manufacturer. we do have chefs from all over the world. it will impact oui’ all over the world. it will impact our ability to recruit people. officially, labour is rather silent on the, not yet government policy, but the theory is that stopping immigration could choke off business. the lower skilled workers who work in hospitality, construction, the idea that stopping them coming here will lead to us being more prosperous is ridiculous, so being more prosperous is ridiculous, soi being more prosperous is ridiculous, so i hope that that is not genuine government policy, and if it is, i hope there is a rethink. is it not time we took back control of our immigration policy? the government is not budging on its view that the referendum was about to control immigration. this draft was put together only last month, and there have been six more versions of the plan. with not just
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have been six more versions of the plan. with notjust the home office but the treasury, the brexit department and number ten all determined to chip in. and don't forget, whatever they decide here, they have to try to persuade the eu. leaving the eu is notjust about obscure negotiations in the back rooms of brussels, but government departments right now engaged in rewriting the country's rules. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, westminster. so if this draft document is anything to go by, the government wants to cut back the number of low—skilled workers coming into britain from the eu. but what effect would that have on our economy and services if their numbers were restricted? here's our home editor, mark easton. for many, brexit was about restricting eu immigration. here in clacton, for example, there's support for an immigration policy that deters low—skilled european workers from coming to the uk unless it can be shown that they make british people richer. britain should come first, because it's broken britain at the minute. they shouldn't just come over here and get a job straightaway.
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it's not right. brexit means the same rules we currently use for non—eu migrants can be applied to those from the eu, for instance, discouraging low—skilled workers. the home office document proposes that low skilled eu workers be limited to staying a maximum of two years, that they meet a specific salary threshold with a cap on overall numbers. but what does low skilled mean? for non—eu, it means a job paying less than £30,000 a year, so many care workers, for example, teachers, builders and nurses, are barred unless their occupation is on a shortage list. this afternoon, nurses were demonstrating outside parliament, demanding better pay, but also warning that the nhs in england is currently 40,000 nurses short. one of the difficulties is, because of the low pay of nurses, they don't fall into the category of the skilled workforce we want to bring in. so we have always been dependent on nursing
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being on the shortage list, and we would encourage and demand that it stays on the shortage list. inside the houses of parliament, mps were today discussing how lower immigration might hit key services like social care. but those in favour of tougher controls say the uk must do more to fill britishjobs with british workers. we want to encourage employers to train local people to make more of an effort to look ahead and prepare for the time when there won't be all these people coming in with ready—made skills, prepared to work for lower wages. today's policy proposals also envisage tighter controls on family members an eu worker can bring with them, a minimum income for spouses, for example. but official government advisers have said that post—brexit, low immigration would cost britain £113 million a week by 2021. employers including the creative
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industries, construction, agriculture and the hospitality industry have been warning of dire economic consequences. the european market is really important to us and adds another skill base to our workforce. that skill base is often something we cannot get locally. today's policy proposal document may well enjoy public support, but it also highlights the swings and roundabouts of the journey to a lower migration britain. mark easton, bbc news. hurricane irma, the most powerful storm ever recorded in the atlantic, has now made landfall as it sweeps across a number of caribbean islands. the category 5 storm, with sustained winds of 185 mph, is now heading towards the british virgin islands, puerto rico and then may hit florida by the end of the week. our correspondent laura bicker is in puerto rico. you can see the effect of the
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hurricane already, and it is already quite a bit away. we believe it is over the virgin islands, and it was last recorded with wind speeds of 185 mph. they have not seen a storm in the region of this strength since 1928. all the preparations have been made on this island now, and the only thing they can do is wait and see what the next few hours will bring. strong winds gust. this is what it sounds like to be in the heart of one of the strongest the winds, like a jet engine, roar through the eastern caribbean. the category five hurricane ripped roofs off homes, devastating some of the oldest buildings in saint martin. and all communication was lost to 2000 people stuck on the island of barbuda where there are reports of a 20 foot storm surge. irma has become known as a beast. and as she barrelled
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towards the virgin islands, hundreds tried to get to safer ground. this rare view from the air gives you an idea of the sheer scale of the storm. around the eye are catastrophic 185 mile an hour winds. and this is what they fear on the island of puerto rico. the aim is to try to save as much as possible. neighbours in this area are handing out wood boarding and supplies. this shop owner describes them as angels. we are a strong island, you know, we have been through this before. it's a lot of emotions going on, you know? the governor inspects one of the shelters set up for the thousands who are expected to evacuate low—lying areas. he says the next few hours of preparation could be the difference between life and death on this island. a big impact, should those hurricane winds hit puerto rico. we are hopeful that it will skid off somewhere
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north—east of puerto rico, but we are prepared for the worst as well. we can't leave anything to chance and our priority right now is to make sure the people of puerto rico are safe. these families hope they will be safe in this school. this woman tells us her house is already filled with water. irma is closing in and all people here can do now is watch and wait. laura bicker, bbc news, puerto rico. our weather presenter chris fawkes is here. how bad is irma looking, chris? hurricane irma is the second strongest hurricane on record, with the winds gusting to an astonishing 225mph. in harm's way, barbuda found itself in the wrong place with the hurricane's destructive core mowing straight across the island. nobody has heard from barbuda since. irma's trail of devastation then moved to st maarten and anguila with another direct hit.
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the first signs of irma's power are beginning to emerge. the french interior minister gerard collomb, quoted by afp news agency, said government buildings on saint maarten, the most sturdy there, had been destroyed. hurricane irma will remain as an extremely dangerous category 5 storm, with another direct landfall expected across the british virgin islands in the next hour or two. winds are just one of the threats to life in this storm's arsenal. low pressure in the eye of the storm will cause the ocean to bulge upwards, with the resulting wall of water slamming into coastal areas, seen here with devastating effects from typhoon hyian. i'm six foot three, but the storm surge due in the british virgin islands is expected to reach up to 11 foot high — nearly twice my height. the resulting inundation is also likely to be catastrophic, and in addition there's colossal falls of rain. irma will then extend its swathe of destruction to puerto rico, the turks and caicos islands and the bahamas before turning sharply to batter florida around sunday night. there is no question that this storm
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will bring catastrophic damage, but it will take many days before we truly know the full extent of this storm's fury. thank you very much, chris. five men charged in connection with the investigation into the hillsbrough disaster have appeared at preston crown court. they included the former chief constable, sir norman bettison, who is charged with misconduct in a public office. the hearing was taken up with procedural matters and no pleas were entered although all the men have previously indicated they will plead not guilty. this time yesterday we reported the plight of rohingya muslim is fleeing violence in myanmar. one of the country's leaders, aung san suu kyi, said the crisis in rakhine state was being distorted by what she called a "huge iceberg of misinformation. many
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accuse myanmar‘s military of murder and rate. caroline hawley reports. the exodus seems to be accelerating. terrified rohingyas are fleeing from myanmar however they can. several children are said to have drowned today trying to escape to bangladesh. translation: they burned our houses. we couldn't take our belongings. we were hiding near a hill for two days. we were there in the rain without food and with my children. when we heard the sound of shooting, we took a boat across the sea to come here to bangladesh. the refugees bring with them new reports of atrocities that have drawn international condemnation. the world had hoped the country's de facto leader would use her moral authority to speak out. aung san suu kyi won the nobel peace prize in 1991 for her nonviolent struggle for democracy and human rights. here she was accepting it in 2012. she had spent 15 years under house arrest during the country's military rule. but today, at a press conference with the indian prime minister, aung san suu kyi was conspicuously silent on the victims of myanmar‘s military crackdown.
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she said misinformation was distorting reality, and she blamed terrorists for the crisis. we believe that together we can work to make sure that terrorism is not allowed to take root on our soil or on the soil of any neighbouring countries. so who are the rohingya? they are muslims who've faced discrimination and persecution for decades in mainly buddhist myanmar, which considers them illegal immigrants from bangladesh. but bangladesh denies they are its citizens. many were forced from their villages by communal violence in rakhine state in 2012. the latest refugee crisis has been caused by what the military is calling "clearance operations", following attacks by rohingya militants on police positions. 150,000 rohingyas have fled myanmar in the last two weeks alone. more than 230,000 have escaped to bangladesh since last october. malala yousafzai, a fellow recipient of the nobel peace prize,
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this week called on aung san suu kyi to condemn what she called the tragic and shameful treatment of the rohingyas. aid agencies haven't been allowed into the areas they are fleeing from, and the un secretary—general has warned this crisis could spiral into a humanitarian catastrophe. caroline hawley, bbc news. our top story this evening: the government's rejected suggestions it will turn its back on eu workers after brexit — but says the current immigration system must change. and still to come, we hear from jennifer lawrence, the world's highest paid actress, about the gender pay gap in hollywood and her new film, mother! and coming up in sportsday on bbc news, a tough day for chris froome at the vuelta a espana. he's had his lead cut by 42 seconds. he's hoping to win both the vuelta and tourde france in the same year.
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for decades now, british scientists have been receiving billions of pounds for research from the european union. since the referendum they've been worried about what happens to that funding. well, the government's answer came in the form of its latest position paper. ministers hope to negotiate a special status for the uk's membership of the european union's science funding bodies. here's our science editor david shukman. european funding underpins much of british science. it supports the search for a new, clean source of energy, with this experimental fusion reactor near oxford. it helps the exploration of graphene, an astonishing material with huge industrial potential, and it contributes to research into flooding and how best to predict it. and because of links like this,
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a new government paper recognises that a deep relationship should continue after brexit. research leaders are relieved. it's very encouraging in both its tone and its aspirations, but it's clear that there's going to be a lot of work that needs to be done to hammer out the details of an eventual agreement. over the years, british scientists have done well with european funding. between 2007 and 2013, they received £8 billion in grants, and that's 3 billion more than the uk paid to the eu research budget. so where does this go? well, here's one example. at imperial college in london, mosquitoes are used to investigate a vaccine for malaria, part of a multinational european project. dozens of teams here and literally thousands across the uk benefit from eu funding. the government hopes that this can continue, but no one is sure exactly how. what scientists are desperate to find out is exactly what kind of future relationship there will be
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with the european union. will it be like norway and switzerland, which are outside the eu, but in its science programme? for that, they have to pay and accept freedom of movement. or will there be some other unique arrangement for britain? whatever it is, it will take some serious negotiation. a key issue is freedom of movement for scientists. of this team of 12 at the francis crick institute, ten are from eu countries, and they feel uncertain. it is a concern, and it is one that plays on all of our minds and that is possibly leading to at least some people beginning to contemplate offers elsewhere which they may not have contemplated before. from researching the jet stream and how it affects our weather... to investigating the deep ocean, british science is integrated with a wider european effort. unpicking that, or adjusting
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it, won't be easy. david shukman, bbc news. the bbc has announced that it's conducting three wide—ranging reviews into pay following the controversy over presenter salaries this summer. two will look into equal pay across the corporation — the other will be a review of pay and diversity for on—air stars. our media editor, amol rajan is here. there was an outcry at the time. what is the bbc‘s response? there was an outcry at the time. what is the bbc's response? as you say, the speech by the director—general today, tony hall, was significant, because it was his first big speech since the outcry. there are three things going on. there are three things going on. there is an internal audit looking addenda bay, an external audit looking at all bbc staff and the issue of equal pay, whether people doing the same job at being paid the same. on top of that is that there is the issue of talent, a big issue that
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caused ceremony headlines in the summer. caused ceremony headlines in the summer. lots of people have identified the problems facing the bbc. that doesn't make it easy to identify the solutions. if you are trying to get equality in a public sector organisation, you can either do it by raising the salaries of those who are lower down, which could be inflationary, or you reduce the salaries of those at the top, but that could prove controversial because you get lots of legal action and big p ublic there is an attempt to address the lack of equality at the bbc so there is an attempt to address the lack of equality at but we are a long way from finding concrete solutions these reviews are going on. knowing this care of the problem, and that is why these reviews are going on. thank you. a test carried out on dna taken from the body of the dead spanish artist salvador dali has shown that a woman was wrong to
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claim he was herfather. dali died in 1989. his body was exhumed injuly from a crypt in figueres so that samples could be taken to settle the paternity claim. maria pilar abel martinez, a tarot card reader, had maintained that her mother had had an affair with the artist in 1955. more than 400 pupils at a comprehensive school in aberystwyth were given detention on their first day back from the summer holidays for breaking school uniform rules. ysgol penglais changed its uniform policy for the new school term, but a third of pupils, the ones who were given detention, are believed to have been wearing clothes or shoes that didn't comply with the new policy. some parents have started a petition saying their children have been treated "unfairly". jennifer lawrence was the highest paid actress in the world last year. she's made her name and herfortune playing gritty roles and her new part in the dark, psychological thriller, mother!, is no exception. our arts editor, will gompertz, has been to meet the 27—year—old oscar winner ahead of the film's uk premiere. thank all our we spend all our is the eponymous mother, house—proud
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and devoted to her husband, a much older literary man played byjavier blanco. what do they want? there. jennifer lawrence is the eponymous mother, house—proud and devoted to her husband, a much older literary man played by javier her husband, a much older literary man played byjavier blanco. her husband, a much older literary man played by javier blanco. what do they want? distance into a living which effects laden horror movie which effects laden horror movie which critics are slamming and lauding in equal measure. i'm so sorry a metaphor which effects laden horror movie which critics are slamming and lauding in equal measure. i'm so sorry. there will anyone who sees the movie. it's hard to watch. it's an assault. if i was writing a review while watching it, i would be like, meh for anyone who sees the movie. it's hard to watch. it's an assault. if i was writing a review while watching it, i would be don't go! if you sit with it a bit and 45 minutes when you realise how important it, you realise how important it, you realise how important it, you realise how important it going to let him sleep in our house? hello. did you know he had a wife? what was in it that was important here's a stranger and we are going to let him sleep in our
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house? hello. did you know he had a wife? what was in it that was was great about it is that everyone will me, it was what had with something that resonates with them. for me, it was what happened we treated our planet with care we treated our planet with care we treated our planet with care we treated our planet with care, with humanity. pulling out of the paris climate deal was not a good step. that's what keeps a marriage going. this is all just. .. what keeps a marriage going. this is alljust. .. . pulling what keeps a marriage going. this is alljust... . pulling out of what keeps a marriage going. this is alljust. .. . pulling out of the paris climate deal was not a good step. that's what keeps a marriage going. this is alljust... 0h, step. that's what keeps a marriage going. this is alljust... oh, you do want them. what about gender in hollywood, something you have talked a lot about? do you think it is still? . i think a lot about? do you think it is still? . ithink there is a lot about? do you think it is still? . i think there is still a lot of, yeah. i think there is still a lot of unfairness we are making changes. the gap is very slowly closing, but there is still work to be done. did you make sure, for instance, that you got paid the same 01’ even more instance, that you got paid the same or even more than javier instance, that you got paid the same or even more thanjavier bardem in this movie we are making changes. the gap is very slowly closing, but there is still work to be done. did
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you make sure, for instance, that you make sure, for instance, that you got paid the same or even more than javier bardem in you got paid the same or even more thanjavier bardem in this you would have a word! jennifer lawrence, speaking to our arts editor, i didn't look at what he was getting, ijust didn't look at what he was getting, i just knew what didn't look at what he was getting, ijust knew what i deserved and i fought for that. and if you found out he was being paid more? there would be a phone call. you would have a word! jennifer lawrence, speaking to our arts editor, will gompertz. for 50 years, he has been the voice of football. but nowjohn motson has decided to hang up his microphone and sheepskin coat. motty — as he's famously known — has covered ten world cups, 200 england games and 29 fa cup finals, each in his own unique style well, i'm afraid that mark west and martin o'neill will have to wait a few days longer if they are going to add another chapter to wycombe's famous cup history because, as you can see, this part of buckinghamshire is absolutely snowbound and there is a bit of a gale hurtling around me now as well. match of the day theme. now tudor has gone down
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down for newcastle. radford again. oh, what a goal! what a goal! radford, the scorer. ronnie radford. and there it is. the crazy gang have beaten the culture club. wimbledon have destroyed liverpool's dreams of the double. tigana... tigana, platini... goal! platini for france. brian, you're just saying anything, just to be awkward. certainly not, i'm saying, the hills are alive with the sound of music. the last time you and i were seen doing an interview on television, we were a couple of puppets. i'm not sure if that's a compliment or whether itjust shows how long we've both been around. oh, dear. oh, dear me. he's going to be out of the final if england get there. povlsen put his arms up. is it over? it is. it's dramatic, it's delightful. it's denmark who are the european champions. time for a look at the weather. chris fawkes is back
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again, this time with the forecast closer to home. will we will take a quick look and their reminder about the yes, we will take a quick look and their reminder about the irma as well irma as landfall on barbuda, the second most powerful hurricane that has ever been. it then impacted directly on saint irma made landfall on barbuda, the second most powerful hurricane that has ever been. it then impacted directly on. as well as those incredibly powerful winds, as those incredibly powerful winds, a massive storm surge will cause inundation, heavy. we have had reports of damage here and it is currently mowing its way into the british virgin islands. as well as those incredibly powerful winds, a massive storm surge will cause inundation, but we did see cloud ringing flooding and from there, puerto rico is the next place that will get impacts. closer to home, it was a decent day here. most of us saw some brighter spells today, but we did see cloud building in the
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afternoon for the for the rest of work into northern ireland, those thick clouds will work into northern ireland, there could be a few patches of light, the rest of england and wales and there could be a few patches of. for much of england, it will scotland, where it will turn quite chilly for aberdeenshire. tomorrow, a downward slide weather—wise into a more u nsettled slide weather—wise into a more unsettled spell of weather. outbreaks of rain working in quickly into northern ireland and scotland. though stronger winds will blow the rain, as will eastern scotland, where it will turn quite chilly for aberdeenshire. tomorrow, a downward slide weather—wise into a more u nsettled slide weather—wise into a more unsettled spell of weather. outbreaks of rain working in quickly into northern ireland and scotland. though stronger winds will blow the rain into of england and wales. for much of spell east anglia were feeling cool. feeling cool conditions. friday sees a band of rain threatening southern england with those blustery conditions. friday sees a band of rain threatening southern sunshine and showers that will be with us, i'm afraid, that's all from the bbc news at six, so it's goodbye from me and on bbc one, we nowjoin the bbc‘s news teams where you are.
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the idea that we stop eu citizens coming here, the lower skilled ones, who are important in hospitality, construction and social care, will somehow lead to us being a more prosperous is ridiculous. 's ‘s hello. this is bbc news. top stories at 6:30pm. hurricane irma, the most powerful atlantic storm in nearly a century, is leaving a trail of destruction across the caribbean. with winds of up to 225 miles an hour, reports are emerging of flooding, fires and power cuts. thousands of homes have been evacuated. we'll have all the very latest from the disaster zone,
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