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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 8, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. more than one million people have been hit by hurricane irma in the carribean. the british virgin islands are the latest to report major damage and deaths. the governor declares a state of emergency. all of us have been afflicted by hurricane irma, some more mothers. apart from the structural damage there have been reports of casualties and fatalities. it's predicted another 26 million people are at risk from the giant storm in the coming days. major tourism areas in cuba and florida are being evacuated. the uk government promises £32 million to help with the clean—up operation and deploys troops and ships to the area. good morning. it's friday, 8th september. also this morning: a warning of race bias in the british justice system. a government—backed report says
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prosecution against some offenders should be dropped. in the last few hours pilots working for thomas cook airlines have gone on strike. it's the first industrial action by uk pilots in a0 years. i'll be asking the airline's boss and the pilot's union what's gone wrong. in sport, big ben is still striking, at lord's at least. ben stokes takes six wickets on a crazy day at lord's, with both the west indies and then england suffering batting collapses, in the 3rd and deciding test. hello from marvellous morecambe. once the daylight arrives, you will see that the breakfast chair is here for its final hurrah after the tour around it and's coasts. we will be looking back, peter thomson forward, to the future of our seaside towns. and sarah has the weather. and sarah has the weather. and unsettled day today with lots of
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lost three showers around. i will bring you all the details of the forecast here in the uk, as well as hurricane irma and where it is heading next, in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the path of destruction brought by hurricane irma has now affected more thani million people across the caribbean. at least 1a people have been killed, and a state of emergency has been declared on the british virgin islands. overnight, the british overseas territory of turks and caicos has been pummelled by the storm, leaving tourists and residents with no option but to hunker down. the hurricane is projected to move across to the bahamas and cuba where mass evacuations are underway, before it reaches florida at the weekend. andy moore reports. this is what it is like to look out of your hotel room in the turks and k course, knowing that one of the strongest storms in recent memory is coming your way. —— caicos. strongest storms in recent memory is coming your way. -- caicos. we could start to hear the noise all around us. start to hear the noise all around us. we are not even close to the
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worst bits yet, which is a bit scary. on the british virgin islands there have been an unknown number of deaths, with communications severely disrupted, the governor issued this audio message declaring a state of emergency. all of us have been afflicted by hurricane irma, some more than others. apart from the structural damage they have sadly been reports of casualties and fatalities. i am truly heartbroken by this news. my thoughts and prayers are with each and every one of you. at least one person is believed to have died on the british territory of anguilla, where residents sheltered in the strongest parts of their homes for safety. we we re parts of their homes for safety. we were in the bath with a mattress above us. that is how we managed to keep safe and dry. i think a lot of people were in a similar situation. we have seen houses with cars that have been just picked
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we have seen houses with cars that have beenjust picked up and we have seen houses with cars that have been just picked up and thrown through the house. barbuda was one of the first items to be hit by hurricane irma. it is now less than 48 hours away from the impact of a second hurricane. hurricanejose has sustained wind speeds of 120 mph and it looks likely to gain industry over the next day or two. —— gain in strength. let's find out more about the impact the hurricane is having. we can now speak to simon cross, who moved to the british virgin islands two years ago from essex, and is in tortola this morning. hello, good morning. obviously it is the early hours of the morning at the early hours of the morning at the moment. it is pretty quiet. you can hear the odd tractor in the distance, hopefully performing the function of clearing the roads. there is plenty of debris and trees and really the only method of
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getting around anyway here is by car, it is a mountainous island and you can't really do anything without a car. so it is important to us that the roads are clear and the place is safe. earlier today when we manage to go to town to try to check up on things, it is not great, the properties are in a terrible state at the moment. just hoping someone be done overnight. in truth, it feels like the islanders on its to be honest. the last thing we want is any sort of doubt whether, let alone any sort of doubt whether, let alone a category three or whatever hurricanejose a category three or whatever hurricane jose is a category three or whatever hurricanejose is supposed to be. can you tell us what it was like when hurricane irma hit? we are seeing pictures of rulings devastated and we have heard horrific stories of people holding onto doors as the doors are being blown through. can you tell us what it was like, the ferocity as it hit
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the buildings? yeah, in our house it started, the major warning was when a skylight was blown off the roof. you could hear the wind blasting through the upstairs of the house, and at that point we thought maybe the roof was going to go. that was oui’ the roof was going to go. that was our main indicator to get downstairs into the basement, the most secure pa rt into the basement, the most secure part of the building. we have a metal shutters that had been secured, and i had been pulling them around and had a lot of confidence they would protect the building, but they would protect the building, but the next thing you know they were ripped off the french doors which we re ripped off the french doors which were project in us —— protecting us. ten minutes later the other one went off the other set of doors. so it was completely exposed. there were missiles from three or debris or whatever, just penetrating through there, and fortunately nothing happened. they held firm. but when
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the eye came its sort of gave us a half—time to re—evaluate and see what we could do in the meantime. so myself and the family rushed u psta i rs myself and the family rushed upstairs and did our best to put some timber over the skylights to try to prevent the wind from getting under the roof. we just try to prevent the wind from getting under the roof. wejust about managed to do that and complete that before the second half came, at which point we rushed back downstairs to our original position in the basement. the wind was scary, we all ended up of link together in the adjoining bathroom. —— huddling together. it had a small window but that was protected by metal shutters, so that was the safest spot. fortunately the mahogany french doors managed to hold. the wind was like nothing i have ever known in my life. it was crazy. it
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sounds absolutely terrifying. simon, we wish you and your family well. thank you for the time you have taken to speak to us. the government has come in for criticism for its response to the disaster, with it labelled "inadequate" by islanders. let's get more detail now from our news correspondent andy moore, who is outside the foreign office for us this morning. what picture is emerging from what has been done, or maybe what has not been done? first of all, the government has earmarked £32 million in disaster relief. then there are the military assets which are either in the region or on their way. there isa in the region or on their way. there is a royal fleet auxiliary ship, mounts bay, which is off anguilla. that has a helicopter on—board, earthmoving equipment, release supplies. then we have the first element task group heading out from raf rise norton this morning. —— brize norton. apple engineers, doctors, soldiers. then we have a
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helicopter carrier on the way from the mediterranean to the caribbean. the critics are saying this is too little, too late, especially compare to the relief efforts mounted by france, the netherlands and united states, which also have territories and the caribbean. andy, thank you. young offenders from ethnic minority backgrounds will become the next generation of criminals unless the justice system is reformed, according to a review by david lammy. the inquiry commissioned by the government, makes a series of recommendations. these include allowing some prosecutions to be deferred, or even dropped, if suspects get treatment for issues such as drug or alcohol problems. elaine dunkley reports. noel williams was 11 years old when he first got involved in gangs. by the age of 13 he was imprisoned for robberies and drug dealing. the age of 13 he was imprisoned for robberies and drug dealinglj the age of 13 he was imprisoned for robberies and drug dealing. i am in and out of the system. i was in there three times. lots of lingos on, and there is a lack of prison staff, so they don't pick up on
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certain things. people are self harming. if they aren't cutting their arms they are trying to kill themselves. he has turned his life around, but he believes that race and ethnicity plays a part in how you are treated and punished within the criminal justice you are treated and punished within the criminaljustice system. it is unjust, of course it is. if you look at the sentence as we get, they are longer, they are harsher. people are coming out not rehabilitated. sometimes they are coming out and reoffending at an accelerated rate than their counterparts. the david lammy review makes a number of key recommendations, such as removing identifying information about ethnicity when cases are passed from police to prosecutors, so that racial bias doesn't influence charging decisions. racial bias doesn't influence charging decisionslj racial bias doesn't influence charging decisions. i am very worried about our prison system, where i do think that there are still prisons where it is clear there is overt discrimination going on, and some of the treatment is just unacceptable. it is one of the largest reviews of its kind, and highlights that radical reform is urgently needed to bring fairness to
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the justice system. and after seven o'clock we will be speaking to the report author, david lammy. the government is accusing labour of a "cynical" attempt to block the eu withdrawal bill. the bill paves the way for leaving the european union in march 2019. labour and other opposition parties have promised to vote against it next week, insisting it gives sweeping powers to ministers and reduces mps to spectators. our political correspondent chris mason joins us from westminster. chris, what can we expect from today? good morning. they really are. we have seen a good morning. they really are. we have seen a summer good morning. they really are. we have seen a summer of disagreements between the government and brussels. what we are now seeing is disagreement bubbling up here in westminster between different groups of mps, sometimes between the parties and sometimes within the parties, over the flavour of brexit, if you like, that we should end up with, and how the whole process of
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delivering it should be scrutinised. labour said that the government's plans amounted to an unprecedented power grab. yesterday we were speaking about henry viii and those henry viii powers to stop sufficient scrutiny, as some see it, of the finer details. the government says that labour are simply getting in the way and are picking away at a rule that has existed for many yea rs, rule that has existed for many years, and was used for european legislation up until now anyway, in terms of turning it into uk law. as i say, you have little breakout of disagreement within parties, so yesterday, some conservative mps wrote a letter they were planning to give to a sunday newspaper, which was leaked to the bbc, saying they didn't want to see the uk staying in the eu by stealth. then there was a response to that by some other malt pro— european conservatives, suggesting that letter was not particularly helpful in negotiations. so the politics is very much alive and well between the uk and brussels, and now, once
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again, unsurprisingly, it is alive and well here at westminster as well. the big vote comes up on monday. i am sure we will talk about that on monday. chris, thank you. we arejust that on monday. chris, thank you. we are just getting news of an earthquake with a magnitude of 8.0 shaking southern mexico. it is struck off the pacific coast of the country, rustling buildings in mexico city, which is hundreds of kilometres away. no reports so far of damage or casualties. the nobel prize winner, malala yousafzai, has called on the leader of myanamar, aung san suu kyi, to protect the country's rohingya muslim minority. more than 160,000 rohingyas have fled to bangladesh since unrest erupted two weeks ago. ms suu kyi has been widely criticised for failing to condemn the violence. a 13—year—old girl from somerset whose organs were donated after her death has saved or transformed the lives of eight patients — a record for a single donor in the uk. jemima layzell collapsed with a brain aneurysm and died four days later in hospital. five of the patients who received
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life—saving transplants of her organs were children. jemima's story is part of an nhs campaign appealing for more donors. there are thousands of people waiting for a transplant. three people a day die. if you would be willing to accept an organ you should be willing to donate an organ, and that is what we are asking people to consider, and make asking people to consider, and make a decision that they will support organ donation. an amazing story. absolutely incredible. and some comfort for her family, after losing her. and now mike has the sport. good morning. reflecting on a crazy day at lord's, 14 wickets fell under darkening skies. this test series between england and the west indies has been such a rollercoaster, who knows what will happen in the remaining few days. big ben, ben stokes, he did the damage for england, but then england themselves suffered a batting collapse. let's toast ben stokes, first of all,
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taking his career best tally. he helped dismiss the the windies, forjust 123 in theirfirst innings, but poor batting from his team—mates means england have it all to do, when they resume later on 46—4. there will be two new faces in the women's us open final. unseeded sloane stephens held her nerve to beat venus williams in three sets and sets up a final against fellow american madison keys. we've seen the last of players like alex oxlade—chamberlain moving between premier league clubs once the season starts. clubs have voted to close next summer's transfer window before the campaign. it will close at 5pm on the thursday evening before the season. manchester united and manchester city were among five clubs who voted against the proposal. chris froome has extended his lead over vincenzo nibali after stage 18 of the vuelta a espana. the team sky rider now leads by1 minute, 37 seconds. there are two stages left before sunday's parade into madrid. more on that later and some papers
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ina more on that later and some papers in a moment. will do that in a moment. thanks, mike. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. you're covering all sides of the atlantic, we can't ignore what's going on with hurricane and also hurricane jose behind it? -- harry kane erma. it's not often we have three hurricanes. hurricane catcher is sitting east of mexico. katie. hurricane hoser... is sitting east of mexico. katie. hurricane hoser. .. here's is sitting east of mexico. katie. hurricane hoser... here's the satellite image showing the well—defined eye as the storm goes north—west, passing across the turks
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& caicos islands —— hurricanejose. still 165 mph winds, making it a strong category five. looking at the forecast track, it's going to move further north—west in between cuba and the bahamas, again bringing heavy rain, up to half a metre of rain, catastrophic strong winds and a significant storm surge before it makes its way towards for that in time for the weekend. a very serious storm the other side of the atlantic. let's look at the forecast closer to home. here's a picture we had taken by one of our weather watchers a few hours ago, the or boriello is, a fantastic display last night and with clear spells many enjoyed the or borealis. for today it's an unsettled picture. it will feel breezy and windy with some showers. low pressure dominating the
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weather and the winds will be iraq telling around this area of low pressure and importing showers as we had through the day with a weather front in the southern part of the uk, more persistent rain at times. here's how the day shapes up, sunny spells and scattered showers almost anywhere with heavier and more prolonged rainfall in parts of southern england but even further north some showers could bring thunder and lightning as well. looking at this afternoon, plenty of showers rattling in across scotland and northern ireland. to the east of higher ground you will see fewer showers but they will be slow—moving by the afternoon so there could be heavy and prolonged downpours. south across england and wales you will see sunshine and heavy showers with more prolonged rainfall likely in central and southern england into the afternoon but some brighter skies inbetweener showers and it will feel fairly cool, around 16—17. we stick with the showers overnight
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but some clear spells, as we start the weekend, temperatures around... still windy towards the west. it looks like we will have a quiet quieter spell to stop the day on sunday but things again staying u nsettled sunday but things again staying unsettled with further rain —— to start the day. thanks very much, sarah. them and mike havejoined us for a look at the papers. some of the front pages —— ben and mike. the sun are focusing on hurricane erma. this is the number of brits they think will be caught up. 30,000 people could be affected and we will get more on the latest in terms of the damage through the morning. we hope to speak to eyewitnesses and people from the islands affected. the daily star looking at a story of two
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daughters, two women, who may be among the victims of hurricane erma. claire frank has said she has had no contact with her daughter, who is pregnant, and asher as well, obviously very concerned. the front page of the times looking and britain being criticised for delaying help. they promised £32 million and they are sending a royal navy flagship with helicopters, marines and engineers. the daily mail interested in the language being used between brussels and david davis personally. they are quoting jean—claude juncker, suggesting the brexit secretary was lazy and unstable, that's the quote that he's taken. the photo on most of the front pages is of prince george, that is a very good representation of how most four —year—olds feel about starting school, slightly apprehensive but he held hands with his dad and the head of the lower school at saint
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thomases in battersea, where he is beginning school. what have you got? a lot about frankfurt defeating paris in the eu bank battle. they are vying for a slice of the financial services market, up until 110w financial services market, up until now london has dominated. questions about whether banks may move to if they do move. paris has been vying for the top spot —— where the banks. frankfurt is managing to do that, though. there are concerns about what that means for germany's dominance as far as the use concerned. the story, we will deliver electric cars but what about the network. we spoke to the boss of jaguar land rover, talking about the number of new carmakers coming up with electric vehicles but the question is where they will be charged. did you shop in the argos catalogue when you were younger?” browsed through it just catalogue when you were younger?” browsed through itjust for catalogue when you were younger?” browsed through it just for fun. to do your christmas list for father
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christmas and you would circle things you wanted ? christmas and you would circle things you wanted?” christmas and you would circle things you wanted? i would fold the page is very neatly. apparently the argos catalogue could be going out of print, that's the story in the mirror. we had the yellow pages earlier in the week. they have said they are going to try it in some stores because some either use ta blets stores because some either use tablets or browse online. they said it isa tablets or browse online. they said it is a trial at the moment but it could disappear in print if the trial is successful. the argos catalogue, what's interesting, they have records of past catalogues at the british library because they are quite a record of our history. you can see what people were buying and if you think it was all clock radios and kettles and other things and they tell us a story of the time. we do really still buy kettles and toasters. the error, though. an alarm clock with a... a wallace and gromit alarm clock. the one that folded into three parts into a case.
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and furbies as well. sorry to interrupt, there's a brilliant ad that says all these things you can buy at stores like that, alarm clock radio, calculator, torch, you can buy them as individual items, now they are all in a smart phone. buy them as individual items, now they are all in a smart phonem just ruins it. that's no fun, is it? tu rkeytu rkeys just ruins it. that's no fun, is it? turkeyturkeys voting for christmas is the decision by the premier league too closed the transfer window before the transfer —— season starts. the clubs opposed to this change —— to close. in europe it stays the same. barcelona could come in and cherry pick. can you backtrack, what is the problem? they voted to close the transfer window before the season starts next summer s0 before the season starts next summer so there's no distractions but that doesn't apply to the rest of europe
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s0 doesn't apply to the rest of europe so european clubs can come in and by the premier league players from premier league clubs and then you've lost your top striker and you can't replace him. the spanish deadline is later than ours anyway. this time it will be by a month. they need to be better organised. if you haven't switched on to tms for the final game between the west indies and england, the final commentary from henry blofeld, he was talking about sausages, cranes and pigeons, it reminded us of some of his greats, he is hanging up the mike. flintoff sta rts he is hanging up the mike. flintoff starts his run, his shadow behind him, where else would it be. what was the sausage reference?‘ him, where else would it be. what was the sausage reference? a butcher sent him the sausages but he said that's rather tactless of the father, i don't know the background of that bit. sausages, pigeons and cranes. more than half a million people have
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been ordered to leave their homes in florida before hurricane erma hits the us on sunday and many tourists are stranded at miami airport with no seats left to come home. tens of thousands have been told to evacuate their homes on the northern coast of cuba. red cross is estimating up to 26 million people in total could be exposed to the destructive winds and heavy rains. the bbc‘s will grant is in havana. cubans have spent the past few days watching as nearby islands were devastated by this vast storm as it ploughed through the caribbean. now they know their country's next on its path. the pace of preparations has picked up significantly, with residents on the eastern end of the island taking steps to secure their homes and stock up on basic goods. fresh drinking water and fuel for generators top of their lists. cuba is now also a hugely popular tourist destination and the island was busy with holidaymakers when irma began to form.
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now many of those visitors find themselves trapped in a situation they never expected and have never experienced before. countries with large numbers of citizens in cuba are co—ordinating with the cuban authorities to get them out. assuming the hurricane doesn't change course at the last—minute, it's expected to barrel around the cu ban coastline, dumping large amounts of rain on the island as it passes. then it should begin to move up to the united states and into florida. there a state of emergency is already in place and even the man who approved it is having to take measures against irma. president trump's mar—a—lago golf resort boarding up against the storm. many have tried to leave before it makes landfall. others are trapped. ijust came here for a couple of weeks, i'm supposed to fly out next week but all flights... a lot of them are cancelled. there's some for saturday but pretty much they're going to be cancelled so i'm just going to stay in, get waters, canned foods, snack bars, enough for, like, a week or two and pray and hope
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for the best. i don't know, i'm going to go to the airport and just figure out what to do. people across the caribbean are used to dealing with hurricanes, they're an annual part of life in this region, however many have never seen anything quite like hurricane irma in their lifetime and fear the worst. cubans are well aware these are the final few hours of calm before the devastating force of irma reaches the island, and having seen exactly what it's capable of elsewhere in the caribbean, many are just hoping the storm is a little kinder here and begins to weaken en route. will grant, bbc news, cuba. throughout the morning we will be checking in on various locations where they think the storm is hitting, we will keep you're up to date with any developments and sarah will keep you across how it is travelling as well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news.
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oxford street has reopened after an electrical explosion caused panic during yesterday evening's rush hour. police say one man was injured in what they describe as a small power network explosion. cordons were put in place, blocking traffic and pedestrians, but has now been lifted. suddenly ijust heard that massive explosion and, like, flame and also a lot of smoke and itjust smells very like a plastic and very artificial smell. everyone was shouting bomb, bomb. over £1 million of taxpayers' money is spent clearing up fly tipping each year in essex, the council has said. it's launched a campaign to crack down on incidents like this in basildon, just one of the 17 thousand clear ups recorded by the council last year.
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it says the money could have been better spent on vital services. for the first time, transport for london has been able to track the movements of people using the tube by collecting their wi—fi data. the anonymous data was harnessed during a four—week trial at the end of last year. tfl says that no personal information was collected, and hopes that it will help provide better information on journeys in the future. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube there is a good service on all lines this morning. on the roads, and in brentford, a lane is blocked into town on the a4 great west road at harlequin avenue due to an accident. new southgate, a lane is closed on the a406 north circular westbound between bounds green road and colney hatch lane due to a burst water main. gatwick airport, heavy traffic on the a23 due to an accident at north terminal roundabout. congestion back to m23. let's have a check on the weather now. hello, good morning. it's going to
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feel an awful lot more like autumn today. quite windy at times. plenty of cloud, very little in the way of brightness and there will be some showery outbreaks of rain on and off through the day too. quite a blustery start, a mild start to the day and some places seeing quite a bit of dry weather through the morning, especially in eastern areas and a bit of brightness to the north as well but that reigned in a far away and having said that it will be raining all the time and drier spells through the day and that rain will become more widespread. into the afternoon, maybe some embedded thunderstorms, the rain will ease down a touch and temperatures largely academic because it will feel quite cool in that rain. a cool night tonight, the rain will play away in the rush—hour, clear skies, single figures away from the towns and soa single figures away from the towns and so a chilly start to the weekend but saturday, a nice day of weather. yes, some showers developing in the
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afternoon but for much of the morning it will be dry and maybe even some spells of sunshine and highs of 19. likewise on sunday will get off to a drier and brighter start but for the second half of the day will start to see some outbreaks of patchy rain, turning heavier into the evening and it will turn windy. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll have the latest news and sport injust a moment. coming up, pilots for thomas cook airlines are on strike today over pay. we'll find out what that means for passengers at home and abroad. rick astleyjoins us ahead of performing at a benefit concert for those affected by may's manchester arena terror attack. we've shed a tear with her as she reunited siblings on long lost family, and now davina mccall is tackling the issues of mental health, stress and parenting —
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she'll be on the sofa to tell us why. but now a summary of this morning's main news. 1.2 million people have now been affected by the destructive trail of hurricane irma, according to the international red cross. millions more are in danger, as the storm progressed into haiti and the turks and caicos islands overnight. the british virgin islands are the latest report damage and deaths, where the governor has declared a state of emergency. it is predicted another 26 million people are at risk from the storm in the coming days, with major areas in florida and cuba being evacuated. foreign secretary boris johnson and cuba being evacuated. foreign secretary borisjohnson says the u.k.'s acting swiftly in response the devastation. the royal navy ship the devastation. the royal navy ship the rfa mounts bay has arrived in the rfa mounts bay has arrived in the region, and a second ship is en
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route. we can now speak to fergus thomas, a human caring adviser working with the caribbean disaster emergency management agency, and he is in antigua this morning. thank you for your time. could you give us your summary of how the caribbean and those areas you are looking to have infected? it has been a really split story. many islands were virtually untouched. this is the biggest storm to hit the caribbean since the beginning of storm is being recorded, so this is enormous. u nfortu nately, being recorded, so this is enormous. unfortunately, as you know, some of the islands on the northern leeward side have been really badly hit, like anguilla, barbuda, and as far as we know, the british virgin islands have also been really badly hit. there have been committed issues of those places. —— communication issues in those places. we are hoping to be on the
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ground in the british virgin islands tomorrow morning. the ship, the mounts bay, was in anguilla this morning and delivered the first assistance. they will be moving to the british virgin islands to get a better picture of the needs there. soi better picture of the needs there. so i think we have got our systems... (inaudible). we should be able to make clear decisions about how to best assist in the coming hours and days. yes, obviously there are some immediate problems to be communications issues, that would be one of the big ones, but also accessing some of these places initially? exactly. what you have is atolls, these communities are often not very big. there are some islands with only a few thousand people. they are incredibly difficult to get to, similarto our they are incredibly difficult to get to, similar to our response in the philippines, in 2014. logistically,
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that was very difficult, we had to send planes out on the first assessment. that is why working with the military air assets is really important. it is a good example of how the ministry of defence and the foreign office... (inaudible). fergus, thank you very much for your time this morning. that was fergus thomas speaking to us, a human caring adviser speaking to us from antigua. apologies for the communications problem there, he was its planning that is one of the issues they are facing. we will be speaking to some of the other people who have seen first hand the damage from hurricane later in the programme. young offenders from ethnic minority backgrounds will become "the next generation" of adult criminals unless the justice system is reformed, according to a review led by the mp david lammy. the report makes more than 30 recommendations including allowing some prosecutions to be deferred or even dropped if suspects get
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treatment for issues such as drug or alcohol problems. what struck me about the report, two, was the reality that a very large numbers of british people, from our black and ethnic minority communities, lack confidence in the criminal justice system. communities, lack confidence in the criminaljustice system. no minister, no government of any political colour, can be happy with that state of affairs. we need to address that roblin. david lammy‘s recommendations offer a possible route for doing some of that, and we will be responding in details of every item in his report. an earthquake with a magnitude of eight has shaken southern mexico. the quake struckjust off the pacific coast of the country, rattling buildings in mexico city hundreds of kilometres away. there are no reports so far of any major damage or casualties. the government is accusing labour of a "cynical" attempt to block
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the eu withdrawal bill. the bill paves the way for leaving the european union in march 2019. labour and other opposition parties have promised to vote against it next week insisting it gives sweeping powers to ministers and reduces mps to spectators. the brexit secretary david davis claimed britons will not forgive labour if they try to "delay or destroy" the process of leaving the eu. a 13—year—old girl from somerset, whose organs were donated after her death, has saved or transformed the lives of eight patients. that's a record for a single donor in the uk. jemima layzell collapsed with a brain aneurysm and died four days later in hospital. five of the patients who received life—saving transplants of her organs were children. jemima's story is part of an nhs campaign appealing for more donors. time to talk about sport with mike.
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good morning. the cricket is going well? it is exciting. it went very well? it is exciting. it went very well for the ben, striking again in london, but at lord's. he took six wickets. england really up against it against this west indies team which they were supposed to thrash in this series. the west indies now have the initiative in the deciding test. england's ben stokes took a career best 6 wickets for just 22 runs on the first day of the third and deciding test against west indies at lords. he took apart the windies middle order, restricting them to a total of 123, but poor batting from his team—mates has put his side in trouble. the wickets tumbled last night. england resume this morning on 46/4. obviously we still have to score ru ns to obviously we still have to score runs to try to get ahead, but i think it will be one of those wickets where they will be that period of ways and mrs and not being able to score too much. if we can
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get up to their score, and get past it, we will fancy ourselves. there will be two new faces in the women's us open final. unseeded sloane stephens held her nerve overnight to beat venus williams in three sets in new york. and waiting for her in the final will be fellow american madison keys. she beat coco vandeweghe in just over an hour in straight sets. i wasn't playing well, just wasn't playing well. there were moments when you have to dig deep and figure out how to get the ball on the court and have a big name. i can't be tentative in figuring out how to get that all in. she played great defence. i haven't played her in a long time, clearly she has seen me playing many, many times, buti haven't seen her play as much. i'm super happy to be in a grand slam final, and to do it here, obviously my home slam, it is even more special. i think this is what every player dreams about. and unfortunately, fortunately but
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unfortunately, fortunately but unfortunately, i had to play venus. but having four americans in the semifinals, i think that says able to about american tennis and where we are right now. and waiting for her in the final will be fellow american madison keys. she beat coco vandeweghe in just over an hour in straight sets. we've seen the last of players like alex oxlade—chamberlain moving between premier league clubs once the season starts. clubs have voted to close next summer's transfer window before the campaign. it will close at 5:00 on the thursday evening before the season. manchester united and manchester city were among five clubs who voted against the proposal. the window overseas will remain the same, so players could still leave their clubs after the deadline in england closes. everton manager ronald koeman said he is "very disappointed" at wayne rooney's drink—driving charge and the player will be "dealt with internally at the appropriate time." rooney is currently on bail ahead
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of a hearing on september 18th. koeman also confirmed that the former england captain will play for everton against tottenham on saturday. iam very i am very disappointed that this situation regarding wayne rooney. we have spoken, that was last tuesday, and the chairman, bill kenwright, spoke also to wane about this situation. —— wayne. in line with any disciplinary matter, this will be dealt with internally by the club. britain's chris froome has extended his overall lead at the vuelta a espana. the tour de france winner attacked inside the final mile of stage eighteen to claw back twenty seconds on his nearest rival vincenzo nibali. he now leads the italian by more than a minute and a half. meanwhile, things aren't going so well on the tour of britain
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for team sky. geraint thomas could only finish eighth on the 10—mile individual time trial in clacton. that leaves him ninth overall, 19 seconds behind lars boom, who won the stage to take the overall lead from sky's elia viviani. that is just about it. but how about this? he has walked away unscathed from motorbike crashes at over 100 miles an hour, we are talking about cal critchlow, written's leading motor gp rider. —— britain's leading motor gp rider. —— britain's leading motor gp rider. now he is in doubt this weekend because of a dangerous piece of cheese. he was cutting palms and cheese. he says it is a very dangerous activity. he says the cheese was too hard. so he has had surgery cheese was too hard. so he has had surgery on his finger. of course, thatis surgery on his finger. of course, that is pretty vital when you are riding a motorbike. so the night has
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slipped? yeah. it reminds me of other bizarre sporting injuries, so if you have any, get in touch. there was dave present, who dropped a bottle of cream on his foot, and broke his toe. i had a friend who broke his toe. i had a friend who broke his toe. i had a friend who broke his arm playing sabutio. there are many more bizarre ones which i will keep coming. use vegetable peel, that is my tip for parmesan cheese. somebody put his back out, typing a letter. anything can happen. dangerous business, being in the kitchen ahead of sporting events. the first strike by uk pilots in 40 years has started in the last few hours. thomas cook airline pilots are unhappy over pay. ben has more. yes, the 12—hour strike started at 3:00 this morning and will last until 3:00 clock this afternoon. the pilots at thomas cook airlines are unhappy over low pay rises
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and the action involves 450 pilots. the airline says it's still planning to operate all scheduled flights today, but it has changed some departure times. we can speak to brian strutton, general secretary of the union, the british airline pilots association, or balpa. good morning, brian. just explain to us, if you will, what is it you are calling for? we have been in pain negotiations with thomas cook since the start of this year and we are asking for a substantial playwright in excess of inflation —— pay negotiations. we wa nt to inflation —— pay negotiations. we want to catch up with past losses we re want to catch up with past losses were thomas cook pilots have fallen behind other pilots in the industry and we're asking for better arrangements when thomas cook move pilots around between flights. what the company have offered is a 4% pay
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rise over two years, which just isn't good enough. we've had many days of discussions at acas. u nfortu nately days of discussions at acas. unfortunately the company instead chose to take us to court last week, s0 chose to take us to court last week, so we chose to take us to court last week, so we lost a bit of potential negotiating time and that's why we've ended up on strike today. we regret the disruption to passengers but we think we've pitched this action at a very responsible level. why is 4% over two years not good enough? i've just looked at the latest figures, wages are increasing foremost latest figures, wages are increasing fore m ost by latest figures, wages are increasing foremost by 2.1%. if you work in the public sector your pay doesn't go up 196. public sector your pay doesn't go up 1%. inflation is just public sector your pay doesn't go up 1%. inflation isjust over 2%. you're getting 4% over two years, why isn't that enough? because 4% over why isn't that enough? because 496 over two years why isn't that enough? because 496 over two yea rs is why isn't that enough? because 496 over two years is a real terms pay cut of at least 2%. we're not going to tolerate bad for our members. thomas cook pilots have fallen behind other similar pilots in the
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industry —— tolerate that. they want to recover some of that ground. that is not unreasonable. thomas cook made profit of £172 million, they can made profit of £172 million, they ca n afford made profit of £172 million, they can afford a decent pilot pay rise. will they get much abadi from your passengers? it's a tough time for airlines. —— much sympathy. airlines are struggling with the terrorist threat and volatile oil prices and people are feeling more squeezed so they aren't travelling as much and there is the uncertainty around brexit. all airlines are saying we have to cut costs, why can't thomas cook do that as far as staffing is concerned? we are happy for them to cut costs and be more efficient and offer brilliant holidays at a good price but that doesn't mean pilots have to suffer real terms pay cuts. we can do all the things we need, we can come to a reasonable deal for the pilots and we can get all those
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customers and those passengers flying to their holidays. that's why we pitched today's action at a very responsible level. we've now... i can report we've now agreed five days of talks at acas over the next two weeks and we hope that will result in a better offer coming along the table. thanks, the general secretary of the pilots association. were going to speak to the chief executive of thomas cook airlines in an hourso we executive of thomas cook airlines in an hour so we will put some of those thoughts to him and we've had a statement from thomas cook, apologising for any disruption to the passengers but they are hoping to operate all flights scheduled today but some of the times may have changed so it is worth checking if you are due to fly with thomas cook before 3pm today. more from me after 7am. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, charlie and naga. i
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will start with a picture sent in by a weather watcher of the or borealis. a fantastic display last night of the northern lights large down to a large solar flare. beautiful scenes, clear skies and clear spells through the day but plenty of showers around. that really sums up the day, very changeable. sunny spells, heavy showers and for some it will feel quite breezy so low pressure dominating the weather. at the moment it is sitting to the north—west so the winds will be rattling around the area of low pressure through the day, drawing in the showers and in the south maybe longer spells rain later on so showers could be almost anywhere. some drier interludes, especially in eastern scotland and parts of north—east england through the morning but showers become more widespread through the afternoon with heavy rain in the south. in eastern scotland in the shelter you should see some brighter spells but these showers will become heavier and more persistent at times during
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the afternoon, slow—moving with the odd rumble of thunder and similar in northern ireland so heavy showers, you could see thunderstorms here and there. of the south in northern england and wales, is sunny spells and blustery showers, especially the further west you are and in southern england the rain is heavier, the odd rumble of thunder likely here, brighter skies developing later in the southend west but the wind arrows continue on the map, blowing showers further east this evening and overnight. for many, clear skills tonight and chilly in the early hours of saturday. —— clear skies. cold in the countryside, especially in sheltered eastern areas. through the day tomorrow it is the east and south that start with the best of the sunshine. already showers in the north and west. through the day these showers become more widespread so developing across much of the country. a day of sunny intervals and scattered blustery showers and temperatures
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not doing too badly for the time of year, 15 to 19 degrees. as we work through into the second half of the weekend, a small ridge of high pressure overnight and into the first half of sunday and the next weather front approaches from the atlantic. with that ridge of high pressure, for many sunday will start ona dry pressure, for many sunday will start on a dry and quieter note. some sunshine in eastern parts in particular and later in the day the wind picks up and this wet and windy weather starts to move from west to east across the country. saturday will be the better day in terms of sunny spells. things turning wetter and windier in the western during sunday. sarah, thanks very much. the smell of the sea, the taste of fish and chips, and breathtaking views, there's always been something about the seaside which has drawn many of us to the coast. what many of us to the coast. takes you back, deckchair seagulls, what takes you back, deckchairs, seagulls, ice creams? no. you will never guess it. a frisbee, a bucket and spade? and old bicycle you can't
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ride on the sand. i give up. walking through the sea and feeling there was squelchy oil between my feet. it felt awful so i never went into the sea felt awful so i never went into the sea for years. where were you? hastings. was it oil? it wasn't but it felt like it so i didn't go in the sea for years. and it turns out those happy memories can be good for us. as part of our coastal britain series, breakfast‘s john maguire is taking a trip down memory lane in morecambe for us this morning. i'm sure you have some lovely memories? i do. i'm worried about you, shall we build you in for a therapy session? sounds terrible. many of us have wonderful memories, you mention things like the smell of fish and chips, the call of the goals, the sound of the waves on the beach and the feel of the sound, as long as it not too oily, there's something about the seaside and
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we've heard it all week in our series, something that excites people and draws them back to the coast every time. we often say nostalgia isn't what it used to be but can it be useful looking back and can we take lessons from the past to take them forward to the future? we brought daphne with us, i thought it was a lot bigger on tv when i've been seeing it in the next couple of days but i'm surprised how small it is. she is here, as is the team, looking back but also forward. the past, not a different country but a british seaside town. morecambe in fact. it's 1901 but a british seaside town. morecambe in fact. it's1901 and just look at how busy it is. this footage has recently been released online by the british film institute, one of 160 films from around the british coastline. it shows hordes of holidaymakers and daytrippers. these are the early
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days of mass tourism. jacqueline and derek osborne have made the long drive north from their home in essex each summer for the past 30 years. the feeling we had then, it wasn't brilliant, was it? it wasn't. it a lwa ys brilliant, was it? it wasn't. it always looked like it had seen better days but in subsequent years we have come it has improved a lot. certainly over the last ten to 15 yea rs certainly over the last ten to 15 years it's improved. you quite like the shopping? i love the shopping, i like the scenery as well. the lakes i think like the scenery as well. the lakes ithink our like the scenery as well. the lakes i think our lovely. your sister, doris, she is 90 now and she likes the seafront because it's lovely and flat and it's easy for me to push the wheelchair along. looking back when lee and andrew used to come along the rock pools with us on holiday, he like to climb on the rock pools and falling over and cutting himself badly that time, took him to hospital. and what is it
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about the seaside that draws people back, that evokes such happy memories? researchers at the university of central lancashire are trying to find out. now we're suddenly starting to get data in that nostalgia is good for us, it makes us feel better, it's a great antidote to the stress of everyday life so we want to say to what extent it does impact upon peoples well—being and potentially to their health. the seaside is a perfect place for that because the seaside is something that doesn't change and can trigger nostalgic memories. last weekend, morecambe was packed to the gu nwales weekend, morecambe was packed to the gunwales with around 40,000 people here for the vintage by the sea festival. a modern take on an old theme. the designer wayne hemingway, born and bred here, is one of the organisers. there's a massive movement for british people especially the young to rediscover
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the british seaside, it's four of them forward thinking, people want to come here and it to be busy. all round the country there are coastal events springing up. nostalgia is pa rt events springing up. nostalgia is part of it because it brings the intergenerational thing and to bring that kind of busy feeling back to a coastal town, we can start to bring the coastline back again. so the big challenge for many hours seaside towns is to find a way to celebrate and conserve the best of the past while also looking to the future. morecambe bay looking after us this morning, wonderful vistas here although we've had some wind and rain but it has sorted itself out. we can speak to doctor david from the university of central lancashire, an expert in tourism. it is that magic silver bullet, isn't it? how do we revitalise and fall in love with our seaside towns again? we need to repackage the traditions of the seaside town, seaside
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heritage, places like the midland hotel behind us, keep those traditions and heritage but make them fit for the 21st—century. it is a case of being influenced by the past and developing that and making it fit for the consumers. who does that, where do the ideas come from? and crucially, where does the money come from? the government has started to recognise the importance of investing in the coast because i think it has been underinvested in for a while now with the coastal communities fund. there are various projects around the country. there are companies that are now brave enough and have the confidence to invest in the coast, urban splash have invested in the midland hotel here. we have companies like travel lodge investing in coastal locations and butlins has basically sold out because they have recognised the value of the coast, they kept the traditions and realised people want seaside holidays like their
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grandparents had but better. good stuff. doctor david jarrett, thanks very much. the message from david and all seaside towns we feature this week and anyone's around the british coast will say the classic, water's lovely, come on in! speak to you later. looks marvellous but cold. has the bracing feel to it this morning. lovely! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. oxford street has reopened after an electrical explosion caused panic during yesterday evening's rush hour. police say one man was injured in what they describe as a small power network explosion. cordons were put in place, blocking traffic and pedestrians, but has now been lifted. some eyewitnesses say they saw fla mes some eyewitnesses say they saw flames ten feet high. suddenly ijust heard that massive explosion and, like, flame and also a lot of smoke
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and itjust smells very like a plastic and very artificial smell. everyone was shouting, "bomb, bomb." over £1 million of taxpayers' money is spent clearing up fly tipping each year in essex, the council has said. it's launched a campaign to crack down on incidents like this in basildon, just one of the 17,000 clear—ups recorded by the council last year. it says the money could have been better spent on vital services. for the first time, transport for london has been able to track the movements of people using the tube by collecting their wi—fi data. the anonymous data was harnessed during a four—week trial at the end of last year. tfl says that no personal information was collected, and hopes that it will help provide better information on journeys in the future. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube there is a good service on all lines this morning. on the roads, and in brentford, a lane is blocked into town on the a4 great west road at harlequin avenue due to an accident.
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new southgate, a lane is closed on the a406 north circular westbound between bounds green road and colney hatch lane due to a burst water main. gatwick airport, heavy traffic on the a23 due to an accident at north terminal roundabout. congestion back to m23. in bexleyheath, albion road is closed westbound between townley road and church road. let's have a check on the weather now. hello, good morning. it's going to feel an awful lot more like autumn today. quite windy at times. plenty of cloud, very little in the way of brightness and there will be some showery outbreaks of rain on and off through the day too. quite a blustery start, a mild start to the day and some places seeing quite a bit of dry weather through the morning, especially in eastern areas and a bit of early brightness to the north as well but that rain in not too far away and having said that it will be raining all the time and drier spells through the day and that rain
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will become more widespread. into the afternoon, maybe some embedded thunderstorms, the rain will ease down a touch and temperatures largely academic because it will feel quite cool in that rain. a cool night tonight, the rain will play away in the rush—hour, clear skies, single figures away from the towns and so a chilly start to the weekend but saturday, a nice day of weather. yes, some showers developing in the afternoon but for much of the morning it will be dry and maybe even some spells of sunshine and highs of 19. likewise on sunday will get off to a drier and brighter start but for the second half of the day will start to see some outbreaks of patchy rain, turning heavier into the evening and it will turn windy. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. more than one million people have been hit by hurricane irma in the carribean. the british virgin islands are the latest to report major damage and deaths. the governor declares a state of emergency.
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all of us have been afflicted by hurricane irma, some more than others. apart from the structural damage there have sadly been reports of casualties and fatalities. it's predicted another 26 million people are at risk from the giant storm in the coming days. major tourism areas in cuba and florida are being evacuated. good morning. it's friday, 8 september. also today, a warning of race bias in the british justice system — a government—backed report says prosecution against some offenders should be dropped. in the last few hours pilots working for thomas cook airlines have gone on strike, the first industrial action by uk pilots in 40 years. i'll be asking the airline's
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boss what's gone wrong. in sport, big ben is still striking, at lord's at least. ben stokes takes six wickets on a crazy day at lords, with both the west indies and then england suffering batting collapses in the third and deciding test. and our bbc breakfast chat has made it right around the british coastline to hear. —— deckchair. we are in morecambe, talking about the soldier. what draws people back to the early and british seaside year after yea r? the early and british seaside year after year? —— brilliant. an autumnal feeling to the forecast. some sunshine, but also plenty of showers. i will bring you all the details for the uk forecast, as well asa details for the uk forecast, as well as a look at hurricane irma and where it is going next in the next 15 minutes. the path of destruction brought by hurricane irma has now affected more than one million people across the caribbean. at least 14 people have been killed
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and a state of emergency has been declared at the british virgin islands. overnight, the british overseas territory of turks and caicos has been pummelled by the storm, leaving tourists and residents with no option but to take shelter. the hurricane is projected to move to the bahamas and cuba, where mass evacuations are underway, before it reaches florida at the weekend. andy moore reports. this is what it's like to look out of your hotel room in the turks & caicos, knowing one of the strongest storms in recent memory is heading your way. starting to hear the noise of the wind as well through the doors and the windows. and from all around us really. but we're not even close to the worst bit yet, which is a bit scary. on the british virgin islands, there have been an unknown number of deaths. with communications severely disrupted, the governor issued this audio message, declaring a state of emergency. all of us have been affected by irma, and some more than others. apart from the structural damage,
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there have been reports of casualties and fatalities. i'm truly heartbroken by this news. our thoughts and prayers are with each and every one of you. at least one person is known to have died in the british territory of anguilla where residents sheltered in their homes for safety. we were in the bath with a mattress above us, that's how we managed to keep safe and dry. i think a lot of people were in a similar situation. we've seen houses with cars that have been picked up and thrown through the house. barbuda was one of the first islands to be hit by irma. it's now less than 48 hours away from the impact of a second hurricane. jose has sustained wind speeds of 120 mph and it looks likely to gain in strength over the next day or two. andy moore, bbc news. with the hurricane moving towards
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cuba and florida, holidaymakers in the region are being told to follow local advice. andy moore is outside the foreign office this morning. give us a sense of what is being said about what people can do, those people who are in those places, in the firing line? well, we understand there are something like 10,000 richest tourists on the island of cuba. —— british. some have been moved to other areas. the advice now from the travel companies is to stay inside your hotel, that is the safest place, because these buildings are designed to withstand hurricanes. some tourists in florida are being flown home early. there are being flown home early. there are no tourist is going out to florida, or there won't be, because all the international airports there are shutting down on the weekend. there was some criticism of the government response in connection to aid getting there, equipment and help and supplies, coming out to
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some of those very badly affected areas. what is happening now? first of all, there are £32 million earmarked in disaster relief, and then there is the military assets either in the regional rhomb away there. we have a royal fleet auxiliary ship, mounts bay, that is off anguilla. that is already delivering aid to the island. it has helicopters aboard. the first element task group will set out from raf brize norton today. these are gigantic loadmaster transport aircraft, some of those will have helicopters aboard. —— globemaster. and then we have the flagship of the royal navy with helicopters aboard, setting out from the mediterranean and heading towards the caribbean, although it will take about ten days or two weeks to arrive in the affected area. andy, thank you. young offenders from ethnic minority backgrounds will become "the next generation of adult criminals" unless the justice system is reformed, according to a review led by the mp david lammy.
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the inquiry makes a series of recommendations. these include allowing some prosecutions to be deferred, or even dropped, if suspects get treatment for issues such as drug or alcohol problems. in 80 minutes we will be speaking to the author of that report, the mp david lammy. an earthquake with a magnitude of 8.0 has hit southern mexico. the quake struck 75 miles off the pacific coast, southwest of the town of tres picos, but buildings shook in mexico city hundreds of miles away. there are no reports so far of any major damage or casualties. the government is accusing labour of a "cynical" attempt to block the eu withdrawal bill. the bill paves the way for leaving the european union in march 2019. labour and other opposition parties have promised to vote against it next week, insisting that it gives sweeping powers to ministers but reduces mps to spectators. our political correspondent chris mason joins us from westminster. chris, how do you think this might be resolved? you have been looking notjust at
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the intricacies of the bill, but the tension is building up a twin the parties? yes, good morning. antioch intricacies and plenty of tensions. what this boils down to is what kind of flavour of brexit the different mps want to try to reflect the will of the country. and how that should be delivered. so, there was a lot of concern articulated by labour mps. we spoke about this yesterday, the so—called henry viii powers. this is not mps forming a judgement on the former monarch‘s less than good approach to long—term relationships. instead, the use of ancient powers which critics say isn't allowing its brexit plans to be adequately scrutinised. government argues it is no different than the mechanism by which eu law has become uk law for the last generation. the other thing thatis the last generation. the other thing that is at the heart of all of this, asi
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that is at the heart of all of this, as i say, is what brexit looks like when it actually happens. we saw disagreement yesterday within the conservative party, and that carries on this morning, with a letterfrom some conservative mps saying they do not want to be kept in the eu by stealth. other, more pro— european conservatives, it responded it was inappropriate of some of their collea g u es inappropriate of some of their colleagues to be undermining the government, something those letter writers dispute. so politics existed all some along with brexit, between brussels and london. now it exists and it is backing turbocharge here at westminster. —— back in. and it is backing turbocharge here at westminster. -- back in. we will be speaking a lot more about this, i'm sure. thank you, chris. the nobel prize winner, malala yousafzai, has called on the leader of myanamar, aung san suu kyi, to protect the country's rohingya muslim minority. more than 160,000 rohingyas have fled to bangladesh since unrest erupted two weeks ago. ms suu kyi has been widely criticised for failing to condemn the violence. a 13—year—old girl from somerset,
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whose organs were donated after her death, has saved or transformed the lives of eight patients. that's a record for a single donor in the uk. jemima layzell collapsed with a brain aneurysm and died four days later in hospital. five of the patients who received life—saving transplants of her organs were children. jemima's story is part of an nhs campaign appealing for more donors. there are thousands of people waiting for a transplant. three people a day die. if you would be willing to accept an organ you should be willing to donate an organ, and that is what we are asking people to consider, and make a decision that they will support organ donation. it is amazing, isn't it? for her family, it must be some comfort, it is extraordinary, or those people who have benefited. we have one more story to bring you. for the second time this week, you may remember that we showed you pictures of bats the inevitably nuisance, perhaps. they are still making the headlines.
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catch him, derry! catch him! in case you didn't see it, this is a video which has gone viral, really. we ran this last week. it was a family's attempt to remove that from its kitchen. scientists have done some work and have discovered more about how i houses could actually harm bats. this is because they use a sonar bats. this is because they use a sonar system of clicks when they fly, sonar system of clicks when they fly, to avoid bumping into things. but when you have smooth surfaces plateglass windows, they create a blind spot which causes them to crash. i'm sure the panic didn't help either. it is now seven in 11 a.m.. we have the weather coming up and the sports later on. a significant report today looks at whether the criminal justice a significant report today looks at whether the criminaljustice system is biased against people from ethnic minority communities. the author is a labourmp, david minority communities. the author is a labour mp, david lammy, whojoins us now. a labour mp, david lammy, whojoins us now. thank you for your time. this is a significant report. lots
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of people have been waiting a long time to see its results. it covers a bottle territory. one of the conclusions you have come to is that there is still overt racial prejudice in the criminaljustice system. prejudice in the criminaljustice syste m. ca n prejudice in the criminaljustice system. can you help people with an example of how that is manifesting itself, in a practical sense? something that is visible? as part of the review, i commissioned some work from a women's organisation called agenda, and they went to a particular women's prison, they spoke to the ethnic minority women there, and there was a lot of evidence of overt discrimination, racial slurs, something you would wa nt to racial slurs, something you would want to associate with the past, and many of those women felt intimidated. so i did see examples, particularly within our prison system, of overt discrimination. i think it is right to say that there are good prisons and bad prisons, and there are parts of the criminal justice system which i didn't see
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any disproportionate treatment, and i would pick the crown prosecution service as one of those institutions, and our jury service as one of those institutions, and ourjury system, also, has a system which felt there when i looked at the analysis. help us when i looked at the analysis. help us with this one. you have to people, say. one is white, one is black orfrom people, say. one is white, one is black or from and if it minority background. they have committed a crime. the problem you are addressing is what happens next to them in the criminaljustice system. give us a sense of where that disparity starts to emerge?” give us a sense of where that disparity starts to emerge? i think the way to think about it is a young black or muslim man sitting in a police cell had a bad experience with the police, obviously, we know theissues with the police, obviously, we know the issues around stop—and—search and arrest rates for black and minority ethnic communities. the young man then gets a duty solicitor given to him by the state. he doesn't trust the individual very much, he has never met them before. he gives a no comment interview,
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very uncooperative in the police cell. he then goes, he then opts not to go through the magistracy court. he wants a jury, because he thinks he will get a fairer treatment than having a singlejudge. basically, it compounds a situation where you end up compounds a situation where you end up with a not guilty plea. it is painful for victims, especially victims of crime who have to go through a long trial. it costs a fortune in the system. and if he is found guilty he has a longer sentence. so i have been looking at the system right from that point of arrest, right through to the end, and we have now created a situation in our country where 41% of our youth prison system, that is young people, as young as ten and is all those 18, being from a black or minority ethnic background. i mean, thatis minority ethnic background. i mean, that is more than double the amount of black and ethnic minority young people in our country. that is a significant issue and it suggests
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that our adult prison population will grow as well if we do not try to do something about this. are looking at how the papers are reporting your report this morning, andi reporting your report this morning, and i want some clarification, you say cases against some black defendants should be dropped —— i'm looking. what does that mean in relation to one defendant who is black orfrom relation to one defendant who is black or from an ethnic minority background or another who is white, what does that mean? i'm not suggesting anything for one group and not another. what i'm saying is that because of the issues of trust that because of the issues of trust that exist, there is a tendency to plead not guilty whatever the circumstances. i looked at a pilot we've done in this country called operation turning point in the west midlands, i've looked at the systems in california and new zealand and
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i'm suggesting deferred prosecution, not asking for first and second time offences for the individual to decide whether they are guilty or not but intervening with the problems, deal with the drugs, deal with the family background, deal with the family background, deal with the family background, deal with the anger management and education, intervene and save the system money, save the victims going through this lengthy trial and grip the problem such that you don't have the problem such that you don't have the reoffending rates that we are seeing in first and second time offences. that's what i'm suggesting. that would work for eve ryo ne suggesting. that would work for everyone but it would have a particular effect on black and ethnic minority communities where there's a tendency because of low levels of to plead not guilty whatever the circumstances. can i just ask, given the scale of your report and the scale of the problem, how deep—seated is it within the system ? how deep—seated is it within the system? what confidence do you have your report will make a difference to anyone appearing in front of a court or going through the criminal
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justice system tomorrow, next week, next year or in five years time? this is a cross—party moment. in the end i have been asked by two conservative prime ministers to lead this review. i'm a labour mp. the review was welcomed byjeremy corbyn and my recommendations this morning i see walk and by the labour party as well so we've got a cross—party consensus that we've got a real problem. it's costing taxpayers a fortune. we can close 12 prisons if we didn't have this disproportionality so i hope there's a consensus to move forward, the government act on my recommendations. i'm not going anywhere, i'm a jobbing member of parliament and i will be making sure we see these recommendations implemented if we don't want to see the wasted lives we have at the moment. david lammy, the author of the report into the criminaljustice
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system as it is affecting black and ethnic minority groups. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: hurricane irma continues to cause destruction across the caribbean as the british virgin islands declare a state of emergency. uk government deploys more troops and pledges to increase its relief fund for the british territories affected to £200 million. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. sarah, we've been talking to eyewitnesses in the area in antigua, in various islands who have been hit by these two hurricanes so far, irma being very destructive but also the threat ofjose. we've got three hurricanes at the moment, an unusual situation. this one, katia, is furtherwest moment, an unusual situation. this one, katia, is further west so that will impact eastern parts of mexico bringing flooding and landslides but
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it isn't in the same region as these two. and irma has been catastrophic so two. and irma has been catastrophic so far. jose is likely to follow but it won't affect the same regions, probably heading towards the leeward islands and four areas that really could do without another hurricane. les concentrate on the major category five hurricane, irma. you can see the central eye of the storm, a vast hurricane, still producing winds of 160 mph with higher gusts than that so it's not just the winds, it's the heavy rainfall and storm surge, could be as high as 15 to 20 feet. it's moving across the turks & caicos islands and it will head close to cuba, to the south of the bahamas, before pushing northwards towards the central florida in time for the weekend. probably still a major category four hurricane. still catastrophic damage to come from irma with jose following on
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catastrophic damage to come from irma withjose following on behind. in the uk, a much quieter picture. a day of sunshine and showers. breezy, and of autumnal feel as we head day of sunshine and showers. breezy, and of autumnalfeel as we head over the next few days with low pressure in charge —— an autumnal. that is in the north—west and we see winds coming around the area of low pressure bringing us showers. brighter weather to be enjoyed between the showers today for eastern scotland this morning. in towards the southern england we likely to see heavier and more persistent rain developing as it goes east through the day and we could have some thunder around as well. this afternoon some showers in scotla nd well. this afternoon some showers in scotland could be quite heavy and slow moving with thunderstorms mixed in. could be some surface water lying around and for northern ireland, some heavy showers but not raining all the time. some brightness to be enjoyed. temperatures mainly in the mid teens for most and feeling cool with the breeze and showers. sunshine for northern england, the midlands, heavy rain this afternoon towards the london region to the isle of
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wight. for the south—west of england, we should see some brightness breaking through later but we continue to see blustery showers this evening. they will ease away overnight so many become dry tonight with clear spells. still quite windy and showery in the west but further east you have clearer temperatures just a about holding up in towns and cities but cold in the countryside. saturday brings blustery showers across the west but drier weather in the east at first and three the day the showers become more widespread. another day of sunshine and showers tomorrow and temperatures between 15 to 19. on sunday we see the next area of low pressure and that will bring some wet and windy weather that spreads in from the west, especially later on on sunday. back to you both. thanks very much, sarah. if your baby or child was choking on a sweet, would you know what to do to help them? if the answer is no, then you aren't alone. new research suggests three out of four parents in the uk would not be able to
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save their baby, that's according to the british red cross. james beech is a first aid trainer and hejoins us now. good morning. good morning. there is the point when you are dealing with a small person, a fragile body, and they are choking, you don't instinctively with an adult... you would be happy to slap them on the back hard but you don't want to shake or hurt a child, what should you do? i will talk you through it. the main point to get across is you should do something and your correct, you wouldn't want to hit them as hard as... if charlie was choking now you would hit them hard, if the baby was, you would do it less hard. let's do the scenario, you are having dinner and the baby is in the high chair and starts... perhaps coughing initially and then you realise. when they are coughing
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you realise. when they are coughing you need to remember they can get it out themselves, when they stop its dangerous. you need to pick them up and we are looking at a child that is under the age of one here. we need to make sure we are supporting their heads. you need to support ahead and then you will pop them down like that and if you see, you've got ahead lower than their bottoms of gravity is on your side to help dislodge anything. then you are going to do what naga said, use the heel of your hand and hit them firmly on their back. hopefully by doing that you are going to find the object comes away. people can hear that, that is a considerable impact you are making? it has to be firm. you're supporting the head but what you are trying to do is dislodge whatever is blocked to come out so your baby can breathe again. it could be quite scary but it's
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important people learn this skill because this is causing a little bit of bruising on their back potentially, that is a much lesser thing than the baby not breathing so this is a really important. what if that doesn't work? if it doesn't work, you try up to five times, you wa nt to work, you try up to five times, you want to turn the baby the other way up, want to turn the baby the other way keep want to turn the baby the other way orting want to turn the baby the other way up, keep supporting ahead, keep it lower than their bottom but they are facing you and you will place two fingers in the centre of their chest. between the ribs? right in the centre of their chest, between their nipples is the best way to think of it and you are going to push firmly downwards and what you are trying to do here is to force airout of their are trying to do here is to force air out of their lungs and again tried to dislodge whatever it is thatis tried to dislodge whatever it is that is caught. a simple skill to learn and what we are encouraging people to do, it is world first a day tomorrow and we would like pa rents day tomorrow and we would like parents in particular to learn a
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first aid skills, why not start with this? at any stage do you check in the mouth to see if anything is stuck in the back of the throat? we wouldn't recommend putting your fingers in the mouth but if you can see something clearly and you can safely get it out with your fingers you could try that but the main message is to start with this effective technique. by doing the back blows there is strong evidence to suggest that should work. what happens if after both those methods the baby is still choking, or if something has come out and the baby is still distressed, what should you do then? call 999 at that point, if you have tried five of each of those skills and you want to call 999 and you're going to carry on going between the back blows and the chest thrusts until help arrives. when you're in that position, all my instincts are that i... that movement you did before it is much firmer than i would have thought you
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we re firmer than i would have thought you were going to say. i'm going like that and you word... with the heel of your hand like that as well. that bit of your hand —— you would. bit in between the shoulder blades at the top. in between the shoulder blades at the top and inbetweener nipples on the front. younger child? leaning them forward, hitting them on the back or an ab thrust. if you wa nt to on the back or an ab thrust. if you want to learn the skill you can go on world first a day's website and you can see the videos and you can down a free first aid app from the red cross or you can come on one of our courses. i do wish your baby would cheer up a little bit. has he got a would cheer up a little bit. has he gota name? would cheer up a little bit. has he got a name? anne. this is junior. just been choking, can't be too happy! lovely to see you. if you wa nt to
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happy! lovely to see you. if you want to watch a demonstration on what to do if the baby is joking then we have the video on our facebook and twitter pages. won't ta ke facebook and twitter pages. won't take you long to watch it. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. oxford street has reopened after an electrical explosion caused panic during yesterday evening's rush hour. police say one man was injured in what they describe as a small power network explosion. cordons were put in place, blocking traffic and pedestrians, but has now been lifted. some eyewitnesses say they saw flames ten feet high. suddenly ijust heard that massive explosion and, like, flame and also a lot of smoke and itjust smells very like a plastic and very artificial smell. everyone was shouting, "bomb, bomb." over £1 million of taxpayers' money is spent clearing up fly tipping each year in essex, the council has said. it's launched a campaign to crack down on incidents like this
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in basildon, just one of the 17,000 clear—ups recorded by the council last year. it says the money could have been better spent on vital services. for the first time, transport for london has been able to track the movements of people using the tube by collecting their wi—fi data. the anonymous data was harnessed during a four—week trial at the end of last year. tfl says that no personal information was collected, and hopes that it will help provide better information on journeys in the future. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube there is a good service on all lines this morning. on the roads, and in brentford, a lane is blocked into town on the a4 great west road at harlequin avenue due to an accident. new southgate, a lane is closed on the a406 north circular westbound between bounds green road and colney hatch lane due to a burst water main. gatwick airport, heavy traffic on the a23 due to an accident at north terminal roundabout. let's have a check
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on the weather now. hello, good morning. it's going to feel an awful lot more like autumn today. quite windy at times. plenty of cloud, very little in the way of brightness and there will be some showery outbreaks of rain on and off through the day too. quite a blustery start, a mild start to the day and some places seeing quite a bit of dry weather through the morning, especially in eastern areas and a bit of early brightness to the north as well but that rain in not too far away and having said that it will be raining all the time and drier spells through the day and that rain will become more widespread. into the afternoon, maybe some embedded thunderstorms, the rain will ease down a touch and temperatures largely academic because it will feel quite cool in that rain. a cool night tonight, the rain will play away in the rush—hour, clear skies, single figures away from the towns and so a chilly start to the weekend but saturday,
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a nicer day of weather. yes, some showers developing in the afternoon but for much of the morning it will be dry and maybe even some spells of sunshine and highs of 19. likewise on sunday we'll get off to a drier and brighter start but for the second half of the day will start to see some outbreaks of patchy rain, turning heavier into the evening and it will turn windy. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the time is 7:30 a.m..1.2 million people have now been affected iv destructive trail of hurricane irma, according to the international red cross. overnight the storm progressed into haiti and the turks and caicos islands. the british virgin islands are the latest to report major damage and death. the
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government there has reported a state of emergency. the government says the first military flight to the caribbean will leave from raf brize norton this morning with military personnel, russians and water on board. earlier on brea kfast, water on board. earlier on breakfast, the department for international developer to set it was time to get a there is quickly as possible. some of the islands on the northern leeward side were badly hit. that is anguilla and barbuda, and as faras hit. that is anguilla and barbuda, and as far as we know, the british virgin islands have also been really badly hit. there has been to indicate and is issues with those places, and we are hoping to get in on to the ground tomorrow to the british virgin islands. the ship, the mounts bay, was in anguilla today and delivered the first assistance. they are also moving to the research virgin islands to get a better picture of the need to there. an earthquake with a magnitude of eight has hit southern mexico. the quake struck 75 miles off the pacific coast, southwest of the town of tres picos.
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but buildings shook in mexico city hundreds of miles away. there are no reports so far of any major damage or casualties. —— reuters news is reporting that at least two people are dead. as an army warning centre said hazardous waves could be possible within the next three hours. —— the tsunami warning centre. young offenders from ethnic minority backgrounds will become "the next generation" of adult criminals unless the justice system is reformed, according to a review led by the mp david lammy. the report makes more than 30 recommendations including allowing some prosecutions to be deferred or even dropped if suspects get treatment for issues such as drug or alcohol problems. we have now created a situation in our country were 41% of our youth prison system, that is, young people
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as young as ten and as old as 18, is from a black or minority ethnic background. i mean, that is more than double the amount of black and ethnic minority young people in our country. that is a significant issue and it suggests that our adult prison population will grow as well if we do not try and do something about this. the government is accusing labour of a "cynical" attempt to block the eu withdrawal bill. the bill paves the way for leaving the european union in march 2019. labour and other opposition parties have promised to vote against it next week insisting it gives sweeping powers to ministers and reduces mps to spectators. the brexit secretary david davis claimed britons "will not forgive" labour if they try to "delay or destroy" the process of leaving the eu. a 13—year—old girl from somerset, whose organs were donated after her death, has saved or transformed the lives of eight patients — that's a record for a single donor in the uk. jemima layzell collapsed with a brain aneurysm and died four days later in hospital. five of the patients who received
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life—saving transplants of her organs were children. jemima's story is part of an nhs campaign appealing for more donors. there are thousands of people waiting for a transplant, three people per day dying. if you would be willing to accept an organ you should be willing to donate, and thatis should be willing to donate, and that is what we are asking people to consider, and make that decision that they will support organ donation. the royal navy's second aircraft carrier will be formally named after the prince of wales today. work on the ship has been halted for the naval tradition which dates back thousands of years and combines a celebration with a solemn blessing. the naming will be carried out by the duchess of cornwall, with a bottle of whisky to be smashed against the carrier at the ceremony at rosyth dockyard in fife. now, i use a type of person who when you take the train to work, you are co nsta ntly
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you take the train to work, you are constantly on your phone or your tablet? —— are you the type. or do you enjoy the view. these passages in germany were treated to some initial -- in germany were treated to some initial —— passengers in germany we re initial —— passengers in germany were treated to some unusual sites. what are they doing? it is all part ofan what are they doing? it is all part of an artistic theatrical show called moving countryside, taking place alongside the tracks. you would look out the window to look out about, wouldn't you? that is wonderful, isn't it? that was a traffic light in the middle of a field, with somebody on a bicycle waiting for the lights to turn red. it is art. the moving shrubbery was my favourite. you would wonder whether it was just an optical illusion, or whether you had been up to late the night before. a bit like lord of the rings. what do you have for us? well, the cricket is a headline writer's dream. big ben
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still striking in london at lord's. england's ben stokes, reached a new career high, taking 6 wickets forjust 22 runs on the first day of the third and deciding test against west indies at lord's. he took apart the windies' middle order, restricting them to a total of 123, but poor batting from his team—mates has put his side in trouble. the wickets tumbled last night. england resume this morning on 46 for 4. obviously we still have to score ru ns to obviously we still have to score runs to try to get ahead of them, but i think it will be one of those wickets where there is a period of plays and is misses and not scoring too much, but if we can get 100 past their scoring we will fancy ourselves. there will be two new faces in the women's us open final. unseeded sloane stephens held her nerve overnight to beat venus williams in three sets in new york. the defeat means 37—year old venus misses out on returning to the us open final, 15 years after her last.
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i'm super happy to be in a grand slam final, i wasn't playing well, just wasn't playing well. there are moments when you have to dig deep and figure out how to get the ball on the court and have a big game. i can't be tentative in figuring out how to get that ball in. she played great defence. i haven't played her in a long time, clearly she's seen me playing many, many times, but i haven't seen her play as much. i'm super happy to be in a grand slam final, and to do it here, obviously my home slam, it's even more special. i think this is what every player dreams about. and unfortunately — fortunately but unfortunately — i had to play venus. but having four americans in the semifinals, i think that says a lot about american tennis and where we are right now. waiting for sloane stephens in the final will be fellow american madison keys — she beat coco vandeweghe in just over an hour in straight sets. it means it will be the first time since the williams sisters met in 2002 that flushing meadows has
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hosted a women's final featuring two american players. we've seen the last of players like alex oxlade—chamberlain moving between premier league clubs once the season starts. clubs have voted to close next summer's transfer window, before the campaign. it will close at 5:00 on the thursday evening before the season. manchester united and manchester city were among five clubs who voted against the proposal. the window overseas will remain the same, so players could still leave their clubs, after the deadline in england closes. everton manager ronald koeman said he is very disappointed at wayne rooney's drink—driving charge and the player will be "dealt with internally at the appropriate time." rooney is currently on bail ahead of a hearing on september 18th. koeman also confirmed that the former england captain will play for everton against tottenham on saturday. i am very disappointed at this
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situation regarding wayne rooney. we have spoken, that was last tuesday, and the chairman, bill kenwright, spoke also to wayne about this situation. in line with any disciplinary matter, this will be dealt with internally by the club. britain's chris froome has extended his overall lead at the vuelta a espana. the tour de france winner attacked inside the final mile of stage 18, to claw back 20 seconds on his nearest rival, vincenzo nibali. he now leads the italian by more than 90 seconds. meanwhile, things aren't going so well on the tour of britain for team sky. geraint thomas could only finish 8th on the 10—mile individual time trial in clacton. that leaves him 9th overall, 19 seconds behind lars boom, who won the stage to take the overall lead from sky's elia viviani.
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in super league, st helens kept their top four hopes alive with a dramatic 18—16 late win at wakefield. jonnie lomax with the winning try — withjust three minutes remaining, mark percival converted. saints are up to fifth, one point behind wakefield with two to play. now, he's walked away unscathed from motorbike crashes at 80 miles per hour, but cal crutchlow is a doubt for this weekend's misano motogp because of a savage piece of cheese. the cheese! the parmesan? you can demonstrate. he was cutting this earlier this week and he severed tendon, which is important when you are riding a motorbike. and you want charlie to demonstrate! have the health and safety people cleared
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this? i think so. health and safety people cleared this? ithink so. most health and safety people cleared this? i think so. most people probably great they are parmesan. i know that dan walker nearly lost a finger once when he was grating parmesan. you can't grate it with a knife. that is a very blunt knife, too. people do slice it, and have shavings. i use a potato peeler. you don't want about, just a bit of cheese. in my experience, the problem with the parmesan is this is when you have a big piece like this and you have a greater it is fine, because obviously your hands are some distance from the cheese. it is when you get down to the last little corner and then you get your finger. absolutely. it is the latest in a long line of czar sporting injuries in the kitchen. you remember dave beasant, he in the kitchen. you remember dave beasa nt, he dropped in the kitchen. you remember dave beasant, he dropped a jar of salad cream in his foot. ivan letty got a fractured cheek and from chicken wings. chicken wings? they were
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thrown at him. it was not his fault. kurt broadford was in hospital because of exploding poached eggs. you have to be careful in the kitchen. well, he has learnt his lesson of the parmesan. very tasty, parmesan. let's hope cal crutchlow is ok on the weekend. absolutely. thank you. the first strike by uk pilots in 40 years has started a few hours ago. thomas cook airline pilots are unhappy over pay. ben has more. yes, the 12—hour strike started at 3:00 this morning and will last until 3:00 this afternoon. the pilots at thomas cook airlines are unhappy over low pay rises and the action involves 450 pilots. the airline says it's still planning to operate all scheduled flights today, but it has changed some departure times. earlier we spoke to brian strutton, the general secretary of the union, the british airline pilots association, which has called the strike.
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he said it was time for thomas cook to treat its members better. thomas cook pilots have fallen behind other similar pilots in the industry. they want to recover some of us lost ground. none of that is unreasonable. thomas cook airlines have made profits of £172 million. they can afford a decent pay rise for their pilots. that is the view of the union. let's speak to christoph debus, the chief executive of the airline. the union says you can afford it. and you? affordability is always key if you are talking about pay rises. we work in an extremely competitive environment. everybody knows that cost control with the rise of the low—cost carrier is key. we want to offer a great bike, which we do at
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thomas cook. we have to manage our costs. we have offered our pilots a pay rise, 1.75% in year 1, two .25% in year2. on pay rise, 1.75% in year 1, two .25% in year 2. on top of automatic increments of 1.8%. i think that shows that it is clearly above inflation. so i think this is a reasonable offer in very challenging times. it shows that we are willing to talk. we have moved three times in the negotiation. balpa hasn't moved at all. we ask balpa to come backin moved at all. we ask balpa to come back in the best interests of our customers and the business to revolt —— resolve this dispute. customers and the business to revolt -- resolve this dispute. if you look at public sector pay, rising but 1% and being capped at that, and if you look at everybody else's pay, capped at 2%, it seems like a good deal. why are they not happy? it's an extremely fair deal, you mention the numbers and in comparison it's extremely fair. if
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you compare our pilot wages with other airlines, you have to compare it with the relevant ones. most our flights... low—cost carriers have lower levels than has. our pay levels are very competitive in that regard and we pay the highest pension contribution. we have a good package for our pilots. we have been growing and creating new promotions and we are overall and attractive employer. what was your last pay rise? it was zero because i didn't get a pay rise this year. let's talk about the industry, its important prices and costs are being kept low, you have to cut costs to compete, there's also saw challenges for the industry, is it fair you ask the pilots to pay for that? in our industry it's always a combination. we always want to provide affordable high—quality holidays for our customers. we live in a competitive
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environment, with the devaluation of the pound, we pay costs in us dollars like fuel. we have to be very careful. i totally respect our employees all our employees deserve a pay rise and i think you see from our offer we are willing to get a pay rise —— give a pay rise but it has to be appropriate, reasonable and affordable. i don't think if you stack everything up, this is 10%. it doesn't fit into the times which we are living in. it's the first pilots strike in 40 years, do you get a sense of the anger they feel? what happens if they don't come back to the negotiating table and they say we won't work for what you are offering? we are a group of 22,000 employees, i get so much feedback from other employees who said stay firm in this dispute because you are offering a reasonable offer. this morning all flights have departed on time, you can see there are also many pilots who love what they do,
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flying the aircraft, bringing our customers safely to their destination so i think it has to be affordable and fair for everyone. we wa nt to affordable and fair for everyone. we want to resolve that and we hope they will come back to the table. you said you have had to change the flight you said you have had to change the flight times slightly but most if not all are leaving as planned. this morning all flights have left on time or even ahead of time.” morning all flights have left on time or even ahead of time. i want to talk about the hurricane, we've been talking about events in the caribbean. what are your plans to get people back safely? i know you're not sending people over but what are your plans? the customer is our key principle. what we did on wednesday, we have sent our specialist assistant team to the dominican republic and cuba, which are the most impacted. we have got people in cuba out of a dangerous area. it's not in the path of the hurricane. on the weekend we will
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send empty aircraft to bring customers back and we are currently in our crisis team, which is working ona in our crisis team, which is working on a 24—hour basis. we are monitoring the situation. it might be that we have to delay further flights, we delayed one from yesterday to today, we will delay one potentially. good to talk to you. the chief executive of thomas cook airlines. can i ask a question? the pilots strike has started? yes. who is buying the planes? pilots are coming in, non—union members and other pilots who might be in the union but don't support the strike. are they thomas cook pilots? yes, they are the anyone's allowed to fly they are the anyone's allowed to fly the planes. thanks very much. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. it is quite mixed at
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the moment, it feels like summer has gone and we are into autumn? that's right, we have some unsettled autumnal weather on the cards but it's not going to be a complete washout. where you see the sun come through this time of year, temperatures doing reasonably well but through the course of today it's that real mix of sunshine, showers and it is quite blustery as well. low pressure, certainly in charge at the moment, sitting out to the north—west of the uk, and we have the winds rattling around that area of low pressure so bringing scattered showers and some longer spells of rain, especially in parts of southern england through the day. heading into the afternoon, scattered showers across scotland and northern ireland, some will be quite heavy and slow moving. you could have the odd rumble of thunder around and temperatures generally in the mid—teens. heading our way south across the country, again that mix of sun sunny spells, plenty of showers and in some parts of
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southern england could merge into longer spells of rain. don't be surprised if you see some thunderstorms. towards the south—west of england, you should see a bit of brightness breaking through in between the showers. onto this evening, we're going to see the showers tending to ease away. they will continue in the north and west for a time but in eastern areas you will see clearer spells. by early saturday, temperatures holding on in double figures in the towns and cities but colder than that in the countryside. on saturday it is western parts continuing to see the breezy, showery weather but further east and you're more likely to stay dry. having said that, during the afternoon showers become once again afternoon showers become once again a bit more widespread. another day of sunshine and showers and temperatures of between 15 and 18. into the second half of the weekend, a small ridge of high pressure. sunday for many of us should start
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ona dry sunday for many of us should start on a dry note but it won't last all that long. the next area of low pressure brings wet and windy weather initially towards the north—west on sunday, that will creep these words later in the day but i think probably towards the south—east you should have a relatively good deal of drier and slightly brighter weather but temperatures nothing to write home about and feeling chilly with the breeze and showers. a bit of an u nsettled breeze and showers. a bit of an unsettled story over the next few days. thanks very much. let's see what the weather conditions are like. this is morecambe. this week we have seen all types of weather, some days have been beautiful, today has a slightly more brisk look to it, a bit nippy in morecambe bay. stunning nevertheless. john maguire is there. with those views come great memories of taking lovely walks down the beach. john, that's what you're talking about today? that's right. we are calling this whether eclectic
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because we've had pretty much a bit of everything this morning. wonderful views at morecambe bay and steve, the cameraman, is giving you a panoramic view. here's the midland hotel, recently refurbished, looking up hotel, recently refurbished, looking up north to the lake district, you get that thing in this country, mountains behind the seat. out of the vast expanse of morecambe bay you could see wind farms in the distance. a lovely spot. the seaside is so magical. it's the boomerang effect, why do we keep coming back chris when i we found out why you love the seaside. my my favourite memory is jumping my favourite memory isjumping off the rocks. my favourite memory is watching the kids jumping the rocks. my favourite memory is watching the kidsjumping off the rocks with my heart in my mouth knowing they're having fun. what was yours, love? possibly being
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in south shields a couple of weeks ago performing beauty and the beast. she's in character. it's good that, that, isn't it? the only thing i remember of the coast is having barbecues after getting results and stuff like that. to cheer you up after results. whenever things gone wrong it's nice to go down to the water and just, sort of, chill. falling in from a fairly high cliff. my my favourite memory is when leon took me to the coast in devon for the first time. within the uk. i've never been before so the coast is absolutely beautiful. i did and realise how gorgeous the coast actually is. me and my sister making sandcastles andi me and my sister making sandcastles and i knocked them all over. my
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my favourite memory of being at the seaside was only a few weeks ago when i got engaged to my girlfriend in devon and we swam out to a rock in the middle of the sea and i thought i'd like to marry this lady so hopefully you at home joined us in going, ah, when he told us about getting engaged. morecambe bay looking eclectic and lively, is it the sight, sound and smell that brings us back? what about the future? matt smith is from the centre for entrepreneurs. how do we regenerate our formerly beloved seaside towns and ensure they have a vibrant seaside towns and ensure they have a vibra nt future? seaside towns and ensure they have a vibrant future? we think it's the entrepreneurs that help build the seaside towns in the victorian era and they will help them revive by bringing ideas, investment and jobs. it sounds easy, one assumes it's
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not. what is the key, what is the secret? every seaside town needs a unique selling point. what sets aside realfrom unique selling point. what sets aside real from llandudno, unique selling point. what sets aside realfrom llandudno, what sets aside realfrom llandudno, what sets aside morecambe from other places. padstow is known for food, newquay for sport, blackpool for its nightlife, what will attract people to every seaside town and how can the local authority and the businesses help build that? that's crucial, that council by in, making sure the cash is there but making sure the cash is there but making sure the cash is there but making sure the council will get on board as well? you need the entrepreneurial drive of the elected councillors and officials, they need to like saying yes to businesses and to like saying yes to businesses and to entrepreneurs with their ideas. thanks very much. fascinating to hear your views this morning and to hear your views this morning and to hear about the future of our once beloved now still very much appreciated coastal towns. we're
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going to come back later to talk more about the future of these places and we will also meet some of our coastal champions, you've been nominating them, some of the people that make a real difference around the fantastic british coastline. talk later. look forward to it. thanks very much. this is the shot from the drone. looks fantastic. almost like the weather conditions up almost like the weather conditions up why look different to the ground because it looks much brighter.” wonder if it is as good where you are this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. oxford street has reopened after an electrical explosion caused panic during yesterday evening's rush hour. police say one man was injured in what they describe as a small power network explosion. cordons were put in place, blocking traffic and pedestrians, but has now been lifted. some eyewitnesses say they saw flames ten feet high. suddenly ijust heard that massive explosion and,
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like, flame and also a lot of smoke and itjust smells very like a plastic and very artificial smell. everyone was shouting, "bomb, bomb." over £1 million of taxpayers' money is spent clearing up fly tipping each year in essex, the council has said. it's launched a campaign to crack down on incidents like this in basildon, just one of the 17,000 clear—ups recorded by the council last year. it says the money could have been better spent on vital services. for the first time, transport for london has been able to track the movements of people using the tube by collecting their wi—fi data. the anonymous data was harnessed during a four—week trial at the end of last year. tfl says that no personal information was collected, and hopes that it will help provide better information on journeys in the future. let's have a look at the travel situation now.
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on the tube there is a good service on all lines this morning. on the roads, and in brentford, a lane is blocked into town on the a4 great west road at harlequin avenue due to an accident. new southgate, a lane is closed on the a406 north circular westbound between bounds green road and colney hatch lane due to a burst water main. gatwick airport, heavy traffic on the a23 due to an accident at north terminal roundabout. congestion back to m23. in bexleyheath, albion road is closed westbound between townley road and church road. let's have a check on the weather now. hello, good morning. it's going to feel an awful lot more like autumn today. quite windy at times. plenty of cloud, very little in the way of brightness and there will be some showery outbreaks of rain on and off through the day too. quite a blustery start, a mild start to the day and some places seeing quite a bit of dry weather through the morning, especially in eastern areas and a bit of early brightness to the north as well but that rain
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in not too far away and having said that it will be raining all the time and drier spells through the day and that rain will become more widespread. into the afternoon, maybe some embedded thunderstorms, the rain will ease down a touch and temperatures largely academic because it will feel quite cool in that rain. a cool night tonight, the rain will clear away in the rush—hour, clear skies, single figures away from the towns and so a chilly start to the weekend but saturday, a nicer day of weather. yes, some showers developing in the afternoon but for much of the morning it will be dry and maybe even some spells of sunshine and highs of 19. likewise on sunday we'll get off to a drier and brighter start but for the second half of the day will start to see some outbreaks of patchy rain, turning heavier into the evening and it will turn windy. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. hello.
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this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. more than one million people have been hit by hurricane irma in the carribean. the british virgin islands are the latest to report major damage and deaths. the governor declares a state of emergency. all of us have been affected by irma, some more than others. apart from the structural damage, there have sadly been reports of casualties and fatalities. it's predicted another 26 million people are at risk from the giant storm in the coming days — major tourism areas in cuba and florida are being evacuated. good morning it's friday, 8th september. also this morning: a warning of race bias in the british justice system — a government—backed report warns that young people are particularly affected. pilots working for thomas cook
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airlines have gone on strike. it is the first industrial action by uk pilots in 40 years. i've been hearing from the union and the airline's boss about what has gone wrong. in sport, big ben is still striking — at lords, at least. ben stokes takes six wickets on a crazy day at lords, with both the west indies and then england suffering batting collapses in the third and deciding test. from big brother to the million pound drop, davina mccall has fronted some of tv‘s biggest shows. now, she's tackling some of life's biggest issues — she'll be here to tell us more. we are at the beach this morning. it is the last day of our trip around the uk's coast. this is morecambe bay. it is cloudy at the moment, but what about the rest of the country? sarah can tell us. fairly similar skies across many parts of the country, quite a lot of cloud around bringing heavy showers today. there will be some balances of sunshine in between the showers. we will have a
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full round—up of the uk weather, as well as at hurricane irma. good morning. first, our main story. the path of destruction brought by hurricane irma has now affected more than one million people across the caribbean. at least 14 people have been killed, and a state of emergency has been declared at the british virgin islands. overnight, the british overseas territory of turks and caicos has been pummelled by the storm. the hurricane is projected to move to the bahamas and cuba where mass evacuations are underway, before it reaches florida at the weekend. andy moore reports. this is what it's like to look out of your hotel room in the turks and caicos, knowing that one of the strongest storms in recent memory is heading your way. starting to hear the noise of the wind as well, through the doors and windows. and from all around us, really. but we're not even close to the worst bit yet. which is a bit scary. on the british virgin islands there have been an unknown number of deaths.
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with communications severely disrupted, the governor issued this audio message declaring a state of emergency. all of us have been affected by irma, and some more than others. apart from the structural damage, the have sadly been reports of casualties and fatalities. i am truly heartbroken by this news. my thoughts and prayers are with each and everyone of you. at least one person is believed to have died on the british territory of anguilla, where residents sheltered in the strongest part of their homes for safety. we were in the bath with a mattress above us. that's how we sort of managed to keep safe and dry. i think a lot of people were in a similar situation. we've seen houses with cars that have beenjust picked up and thrown through the house. barbuda was one of the first islands to be hit by irma. it is now less than 48 hours away from the impact of a second hurricane.
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jose has sustained wind speeds of 120 mph and it looks likely to gain in strength over the next day or two. andy moore, bbc news. let's pick up on those people that are affected already, and the fact it has florida and cuba in its sights? there is estimated to be up to 10,000 british holiday—makers on cuba. some of them have been moved away from the coastal resorts. the advice for the others still in the resorts is to stay in their hotels, because those buildings are built to withstand hurricanes like this. as for florida, not many people going there at the moment, nobody heading there at the moment, nobody heading there for the weekend because international airports will be shut down. in terms of the british
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government's aid operation, there had been some criticism that it was slow to get off the mark. what is happening now? teams from the foreign office will be heading out to the region today and they will be offering consular assistance to those hit by the hurricane. they will be working in parallel with the military teams, who will be offering disaster relief. so, we have the royal fleet auxiliary ship already in the area. it is helping citizens of the british territory of anguilla. it has helicopters on board, earth moving equipment and emergency rations. today there will be the first elements of a task group heading out. they will be giant transport aircraft heading out from raf brize norton in oxfordshire. the first plane leaving this morning will have personnel on board. again, relief supplies and water rations. some of the aircraft later on will be carrying helicopters to the region. finally, there is the flagship of the royal navy, hms ocean, which will be
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leaving the mediterranean to head towards the caribbean. that is carrying a lot of helicopters but it will take ten days, two weeks to reach the area. it will then be helping residents recoverfrom not just one hurricane, but, by then, two. an earthquake with a magnitude of eight point four has hit southern mexico. the quake struck 75 miles off the pacific coast, southwest of the town of tres picos. but buildings shook in mexico city hundreds of miles away. reuters news agency are reporting that at least two people are dead. the pacific tsunami warning centre said tsunami waves were hitting mexico, the biggest being more than two feet, and more hazardous waves could be possible "within the next three hours" for the coasts of mexico and surrounding countries. young offenders from ethnic minority backgrounds will become the next generation of adult criminals unless the justice system is generation of adult criminals unless thejustice system is reformed, according to a review led by the mp david lammy. the inquiry makes a
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series of recommendations. these include allowing some prosecutions to be deferred or even dropped if suspects receive treatment for issues such as drug or alcohol problems. noel williams was 11 when he first got involved in gangs. by the age of 13 he was imprisoned for robberies and drug dealing. i'm in and out of the system, been there three times. a lot of bullying goes on and as we say lack of prison staff so they don't pick up on certain things, people are self—harming, if they don't cut their arms they kill themselves... he's now turned his life around but he believes race and ethnicity plays a part in how you're treated and punished within the criminaljustice system. it's unjust, of course it's unjust, and if you look at the sentences we get, they're longer, sentences are harsher and people are coming out not rehabilitated, sometimes they come out and reoffend at an accelerated rate to their counterparts too. the lammy review makes a number of key recommendations, such as removing identifying information about ethnicity when cases are passed from police
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to prosecutors so racial bias doesn't influence charging decisions. i'm very worried about our prison system, i think there are still prisons where there's clearly overt discrimination going on and some of the treatment is just unacceptable. it's one of the largest reviews of its kind and highlights that radical reform is urgently needed to bring fairness to the justice system. elaine dunkley, bbc news. the government is accusing labour of a "cynical" attempt to block the eu withdrawal bill. the bill paves the way for leaving the european union in march 2019. labour and other opposition parties have promised to vote against it next week, insisting that it gives sweeping powers to ministers but reduces mps to spectators. brexit secretary david davis claimed
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britain would not forgive labour if it tries to delay or destroy the process of leaving the eu. more than 160,000 rohingya have fled to bangladesh since unrest erupted there two weeks ago. aung san suu kyihas there two weeks ago. aung san suu kyi has been widely criticised for failing to condemn the violence. a 13—year—old girl from somerset, whose organs were donated after her death, has saved or transformed the lives of eight patients — that's a record for a single donor in the uk. jemima layzell collapsed with a brain aneurysm and died four days later in hospital. five of the patients who received life—saving transplants of her organs were children. jemima's story is part of an nhs campaign appealing for more donors. there are thousands of people waiting for a transplant. three people a day die. if you would be willing to accept an organ you should be willing to donate an organ, and that is what we are asking people to consider, and make a decision that they will support organ donation.
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the royal navy's second aircraft carrier will be formally named after the prince of wales today. work on the ship has been halted for the naval tradition which dates back thousands of years and combines a celebration with a solemn blessing. the naming will be carried out by the duchess of cornwall, with a bottle of whisky to be smashed against the carrier at the ceremony at rosyth dockyard in fife. is that a traditional, whiskey?” is that a traditional, whiskey? i am sure it used to be champagne. possibly because it is in fife? the ministry of defence says that the first aid to the caribbean will leave from raf brize norton this morning. duncan is there. obviously this cannot get there quickly enough? absolutely, those
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preparations are under way. as you say, they are urgently needed in the caribbean. this flight will be taking off about 10am. it is what they call a c17 globemaster. it is capable of carrying 80 tonnes of equipment. we are not sure what that equipment. we are not sure what that equipment is yet. this is very last minute stuff. all they have loaded so minute stuff. all they have loaded so far as some minute stuff. all they have loaded so far as some water. minute stuff. all they have loaded so far as some water. you might be able to see it there. 50 passengers, 50 raf personnel will be on the advance party flight. they are heading to barbados first of all and then they are hoping to get into the british virgin islands after that. it all depends on what capacity they have on the ground to take big aircraft like this. they won't know this until they get into the region. later this morning, a second raf aircraft, voyager, will be leaving at about 11:30am. that will have 180
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passengers on board, raf experts used to tackling these issues in hurricane areas and earthquake areas and the like. people not carrying much kit, they are the experts, the physical comic human side of it. this is the advance flight with the kit. they will team up in the region. —— the physical, human side of it. let's talk more about the relief effort. gemma su is from the university of manchester. simon calder is our travel editor. first, we we re calder is our travel editor. first, we were seeing calder is our travel editor. first, we were seeing some calder is our travel editor. first, we were seeing some of the early preparations. we have heard from people in the region this morning, major issues around communications. really basic stuff, getting in and out, or knowing the scale of the problem? this is really the critical period. we have had a lot of talk about how much money has been pledged by the uk government. it really is a matter of when it is
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going to arrive. we have organisations, local organisations on the ground that need resources to meet immediate needs, water, food and shelter. it is a critical period, a life and death situation. some of the islands we are talking about are bigger islands. we were hearing from one of the experts a little earlier on. some of the island communities are tiny. it's just a few thousand people. they are very re m ote just a few thousand people. they are very remote places. it could take some time to them? that is absolutely true. but it is important to remember that there are local populations. they are the first responders. there will be local organisations which have... well, i'm not sure how much capacity, but there is often the capacity to respond, but it is a matter of getting there as quickly as possible to support and shoulder the burden of responsibility at this time, because it is such a devastating earthquake. time is of the essence. simon, what is happening in terms of flights out of the region, into the
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region? we are concerned about the people living there, obviously, but we need to talk about the tourist destinations, highly popular destinations, highly popular destinations and people are stranded there? there are about 10,000 people in cuba, which is next in line. there have been many concerns, particularly about three islands, off the northern coast of cuba. talking to holiday— makers, off the northern coast of cuba. talking to holiday—makers, they off the northern coast of cuba. talking to holiday— makers, they were very, very worried about what was going to happen. late yesterday, cuban authorities said, right, everybody out. they evacuated everybody out. they evacuated everybody out. they evacuated everybody out to a less vulnerable resort and to have an. there are some flights to the dominican republic today. they were delayed until the storm had passed. people will be coming back on those. british airways, thomas cook
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airlines, sending out a aircraft to bring people back. but flights are still continuing. british airways is flying out to miami this morning. they have said, do not get on this aircraft unless you have somewhere to stay, because many of the hotels are closing down. the tour operators, they all have different policies, confusingly. it is well worth talking to your travel agent or tour operator. you can get your money back if you have a holiday booked? some of them you can. thomas cook is basically saying if you are going to the region, up to and including the weekend, that includes orlando in florida, you can get a full refund or switch to an alternative destination. thomson, the bigger tour operators not being that generous. it is partly because there is no overall government warning, from the foreign office, saying, everybody out of the areas. if there were, there might be a more co—ordinated approach. looking particularly at barbuda yesterday, they are looking at such
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levels of devastation, and loss of life is the first thing that people look at, but beyond that, this is a place that relies so much on tourism, and the notion of how quickly they could try and get things together is a real worry. quickly they could try and get things together is a real worrym is awful, and we have seen in previous events like this on other islands, it can take a decade to rebuild the tourist industry. of course, rebuild the tourist industry. of course , you are rebuild the tourist industry. of course, you are going well beyond the immediate human tragedies to a longer lasting issue of people's livelihoods. there has been much about the reaction from wealthier countries and how quickly eight has been given — do you have a view on this? definitely. there is talk about how much has been pledged and how quickly, but i think there is an absolute responsibility of wealthier nations to step in and take the burden of responsibility. the uk and france in particular? yes, but not just because of them being british
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and french territories, but a level of global social justice and french territories, but a level of global socialjustice that wealthy nations should step in when there are countries that are so vulnerable and have been so devastated, there is a responsibility to help these nations. simon and gemma, thank you for your time this morning. the time is 17 minutes past eight. i'm sure sarah will take a look at the intricacies of how these hurricanes are moving across. we have hurricane jose following hurricane irma. katya is not such a big storm as hurricane irma and hurricanejose. it is the peak of the hurricane season in the moment. you can see the huge size of that
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hurricane here on the satellite image. it is about the same size of france —— the same size as france. it has already caused catastrophic damage, and every is more to come. over the next 24 hours or so, the storm will move towards kumar. the winds of up to 160 mph. the rainfall of half a metre or so, as well as a significant storm surge, so very dangerous conditions, particularly for the more low—lying islands. hurricanejose for the more low—lying islands. hurricane jose looks for the more low—lying islands. hurricanejose looks like it may stay out towards the north—east. but it could hit barbuda and anguilla. lots going on the other side of atlantic. here, unsettled. sunshine, showers and quite breezy out there today, with low pressure driving the
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weather and packing in no shower was from the west. there will be some sunshine between the showers today, but some of them could be quite heavy. some prolonged rain across south wales and southern england at times, particularly the afternoon. it will be a windy in the south. slightly lighter winds for the north, across parts of scotland. the showers will be slow—moving, and there could be some thunderstorms mixed in too, so don't be surprised that there is quite a bit of lying water on the roads. a similar picture across northern ireland and into northern england. a bit of brightness across lincolnshire and the midlands. apart from that, you're likely to see cloudy, wintry conditions with outbreaks of rain. a bit of brightness in between the showers. temperatures are nothing to write home about — mid—teens for most of us. this evening, we continue with the windy, showery picture across north—western parts of the country. further east,
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clearer skies and less windy weather. a fresh start on saturday, particularly towards the east, where we could see temperatures down into single figures. there will be some sunshine to start the day on saturday. showers in the west of the country will drift to the east through the day. sunny spells in between, and temperatures by tomorrow of 15—19dc. these temperatures certainly aren't anything to write home about, but they haven't been for a while, they? there are a little below average, but not too bad. the wind chill makes things feel cooler with the shallows around too. layers are needed! let's go straight to ben and news of the first pilots' strike in 40 yea rs. it is usually cabin crew that walk
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out, this time it is pilots. pilots at thomas cook started a strike this morning. they are unhappy over what they call low pay rises. we have spoken to the union this morning, and they said enough is enough. the airline says it plans to operate all of its scheduled flights using nonunion pilots, but it has had to change some departure times over the course of the day, so check before you fly. the owner of the daily and sunday mirror newspapers is selling the company. trinity mirror prints regional papers as well, but it is thought the deal will need to be signed off by the regulator before it goes ahead. another cyber attack has targeted a credit agency. it is described as a
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colossal breach and it could affect nearly half the us population. it is huge. it could affect people in britain and canada too. more than 140 million customers have had some information stolen in america alone. we are told it is one of the largest attacks on record. interesting times as far as security is concerned. you are up—to—date. more from us later. we've been talking this morning about nostalgic trips to the seaside, and for people who visit morecambe one of their memories may have involve one of our coastal champions. since 1536, the monarch has appointed an official guide to the dangerous quick sands that divide lancashire and cumbria. breakfast'sjohn maguire is there for us and can tell us more. john is in marvellous morecambe this
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morning. good morning to you, guys. it is getting warmer here. charlie the dog has just barked his appreciation. we have been talking and learning over the last week about the sun, the c &. but it is really about people's relationship with the coast. that is what makes it so special to all of us. we have brought along some of our coastal champions this morning. we have dave and jan, who have come up we have dave and jan, who have come up from the wirral. we have bob and carol from coastwatch. we have a villain, lane, bruce, henry, bernie and last but not least, cedric. let's watch the amazing work that cedric does. i'm cedric robinson, the queen's guide to the sands of morecambe bay and i've been doing that for 54 years this year. it's myjob to get everyone across the bay safely.
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in all the years i've been doing it now, i reckon i've taken over 750,000 people. they come again and again. the problem is, these days, these walks are so popular that keeping the numbers down is getting more difficult. i was crossing the sands, sat alongside hrh his royal highness prince philip, with the queen's horses. that was a wonderful event. very memorable. on the way, he said, how on earth do you keep an eye on it, mr robinson? i said, well, the only thing you can do is to live the sands to know them. there are quicksands in the bay, those are the most dangerous things. but also, when the tide comes in, it has a saying, it can come in on the high tides as fast as a horse can gallop. i was bred and born to the sands from a very early age. i've been on the sands all my life. i can read the sands like you can open a morning newspaper and read it.
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when i retire from the sands, that will be the worst day of my life. i just love the sands and... i just love the sands. i enjoy doing it. , ijust live the sands and... and cedric is with us in the flesh. i have been here all of my life come since the age of 14. i am now 84 yea rs since the age of 14. i am now 84 years young and i have been on those sands every day. i have learned to read the sands when you read a newspaper —— like you read a newspaper —— like you read a newspaper when you get up in the morning. it is a big responsibility, really, but i never look at it that way because i am so laid back. i never think of the danger out there, but it is out there for the unwary.
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the bay is one of the most dangerous ones in the world. it is nice to know that you are here to keep us all safe and that nothing would faze you. evelyn, you work at the winter gardens here. we had some footage earlierfrom1901 gardens here. we had some footage earlierfrom 1901 which gardens here. we had some footage earlier from 1901 which showed the winter gardens back then, and you hope it will return to be a jewel in the crown for this resort? we formed the crown for this resort? we formed the friends in 1986, so we have been a pressure group trying to save the building for 31 years. now we have bought the building and it belongs to the preservation trust. why is it important to save a building like that? because we need people to come back into morecambe, and it's one of the things that will draw them in, like the midland hotel, the winter gardens. they are buildings from the past, but you have to use things like this. a building like that, built in 1897, you couldn't recreate
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it, you couldn't afford to. and people now are coming into the winter gardens more and more, so it is helping the town, helping the area. thanks to all the coastal champions. we will hear from area. thanks to all the coastal champions. we will hearfrom more of them later in the programme. as we have been saying all morning, not just about the past in the present, but important to link these wonderful assets to the seaside's future. back to you. ruffled hair there. a little bracing at the seaside, maybe. sorry, we cut him off. you can't comment about a man's hair and not let him reply! we will be back later on, so we will have a chat with john we will be back later on, so we will have a chat withjohn then. it is time to get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. hopefully it looks as lovely as this. this is business live from bbc news with rachel horne and susannah streeter. insuring against nature — as hurricane irma continues to batter the caribbean
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the insurance industry braces for one of its most expensive years on record. live from london, that's our top story on friday the 8th of september. with irma on course to overtake katrina as america's costliest hurricane, we'll look at the spiralling cost of extreme weather — and who pays. also in the programme, the public relations disaster that just keeps spreading. bell pottinger‘s asia unit says it will separate from its british parent after its south africa controversy.
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