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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 10, 2017 7:00am-8:01am BST

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but don't forget you can keep up with us and all our travels in real—time on the road by following us on social media. all the details should be on your screens right now. but, for now, from me ade adepitan, and all the travel show team here in sweden, it's hej, hej. hello, this is breakfast, with ben thompson and rachel burden. florida starts to the feel the force of hurricane irma. as the huge storm approaches, residents are urged to go to emergency shelters. millions of floridians will see major hurricane impacts, with deadly, deadly, deadly storm surges, and life—threatening wind. in cuba, there has been widespread damage, but so far no reports of any fatalities. a million people had been evacuated. good morning, it is
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sunday ten september. also ahead: manchester arena reopens, amid tight security, three months after the terror attack. it's the overriding emotion of hope, just to show that the event's opening again, and what the terrorists did will not overcome us. in sport: captainjoe root calls on his england team to do something special in the ashes this winter, after wrapping up a series win over west indies. and louise has the weather. good morning. a north—west south—east split this sunday. it looks as though we will see heavy rain and strong wind across north—west england, that will drift south and east. but, for southern and eastern england, it should stay dry during the daylight hours. good morning. first, our main story: hurricane—force winds have begun to batter southern florida,
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as irma approaches. more than six million people have been told to evacuate, and water levels are rising at the coast, where a huge storm surge is expected. irma had weakened to a category—three hurricane, but is likely to strengthen before it makes landfall in the next few hours. florida's governor has warned it will be deadly, and president trump has urged people to seek shelter. this is a storm of enormous destructive power, and we ask everyone in the storm path to heed all instructions, get out of its way. government officials, i know you're working so hard, you never worked like this, and i appreciate your bravery. property is replaceable, but lives are not. safety has to come first. don't worry about it, just get out of its way. we are here on the bbc news channel
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until 9:00am this morning, but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one, as it is time for match of the day. 14,000 people attended the re—opening of the manchester arena last night less than four months after 22 people were killed in a terrorist attack at the venue. noel gallagher, rick astley and peter kay were among the performers at the we are manchester show. a bbc investigation has discovered that the bodies of more than 400 children could be buried in a mass grave close to an orphanage in lanarkshire. the children were residents of the smyllum care home, which was run by catholic nuns until it closed in 1981. our social affairs correspondent, michael buchanan, reports. this is st mary's roman catholic cemetery. small and well—kept. but in the far corner, a mass grave. an investigation by the sunday post
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newspaper has found that at least 400 children are believed to be buried here. most died of natural causes, like tb and pneumonia at a nearby care home run by nuns. francis mccaw was staying at the home when he died in 1961. we are told that he is one of the children in the graves. 120,150... at least 120. that's what we've been hearing. the smylum care home closed in 1981. it had been open for 117 years. in 2004, the nuns who ran it acknowledged that some children who had died there had been buried at st mary's but say the records were too poor to say how many. those death records were key to find out what happened.
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when we find out who died at smylum, we can start asking where they have been buried. the more we ask this question, the more we are astonished to be told that there are virtually no burial records for any of the names on that list. the daughters of charity did not comment on ourfindings. they say the ongoing scottish child abuse enquiry was the most relevant forum in which to investigate the care home. rohingya muslim rebels in myanmar have declared a unilateral one—month ceasefire, saying they want to ease the humanitarian crisis in the country. rebel attacks on security forces triggered a two—week military campaign, during which nearly 300,000 rohingyas fled to neighbouring bangladesh. soldiers have been accused of carrying out killings and burning villages. kim jong—un has attended a celebration to congratulate the scientists behind last weekposmac powerful nuclear teststopmac state
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television showed the leader greeting crowds and enjoying the entertainmentstopmac the regimeposmac nuclear activities have faced widespread condemnationstopmac egyptian archaeologists have discovered the tomb of a royal goldsmith that they say is more than 3,000 years old. it was found on the bank of the river nile in the city of luxor. among the items inside are the mummies of a woman and her two adult children, along with a statue. authorities say they hope the find will lead them to more ancient a rtefa cts . i don't know if you were watching last night but... the 15th series of strictly come dancing began began last night as the celebrity contestants were matched with their professional partners. new head judge, shiley ballas, also made her debut, following len goodman's retirement. tributes were paid to the show‘s former host sir bruce forsyth who died in august at the age of 89. presenters tess daly and claudia winkleman said everyone missed him dearly. what a routine. he would have loved that.
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and his wife, his children, grandchildren and great—grandchildren, everyone, everyone here, we miss him. he was a legend to so many people but to us he was bruce and his hard work and dedication and professionalism helped to make the show what it is today. didn't he do well? 0bviously nobody had a bad word to say about him but you could tell it was entirely genuine, the kind of warmthstopmac the stuff we don't see as viewers, the behind—the—scenes stuffsto p ma c as viewers, the behind—the—scenes stuffstopmac the dancers, the celebrity couples and all that behind—the—scenes stuff helped people. i consider strictly to be the official start of autumn in my life. i decided i could have a hot
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water bottle now strictly was on but other people said the same things. it's the start of autumn. strictly started. talking about much more ferocious weather this morning. florida is bracing itself for the full force of hurricane irma. the storm hit cuba on friday, where officials say it caused significant damage. the storm hit cuba on friday and officials say it caused significant damage. 0ur correspondent, will grant, is in cuba's capital, havana. he's been assessing how the country has been coping. well, it has been an extraordinary experience being in cuba during hurricane irma and now it is reaching, it has reached havana. this is the bbc havana bureau and i'm speaking from inside because we simply cannot go outside any longer.
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we're boarded in the building, miraculously we still have electricity but much of the rest of the building does not have that. as you can see behind me, the window is flexing with the winds that are buffeting the city and it is raining very, very hard out there. that, of course, is nothing in comparison to what cubans further east on the island have already experienced. these are just the last vestiges, really, of hurricane irma as she moves out of cuban territory and into clearwater between cuba and the united states before making landfall in florida. but we are still feeling the effects of the sheer magnitude of this storm. 0ut east along the northern coastal zone, whole villages were hit very hard by the storm, we understand that some were largely submerged underwater. others have had roofs ripped off. scores of houses, many of the roughly1 million people who were evacuated from the area, may have no homes to go to. for now, from here in bbc havana bureau, it feels really
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like the time to hunker down, batten down the hatches and wait out the remnants of this massive storm. that's the view from cuba. hurricane irma is expected to make landfall in florida in the coming hours. ron anderson lives in lakeland, near tampa. he also runs a disaster management company and used to help officials organise evacuations. we can speak to him now. thanks forjoining us, i know it's a difficult time for everyone. can you tell us what you are experiencing 110w tell us what you are experiencing now and how the preparations are going? good morning. here in lakeland going? good morning. here in la keland the wind going? good morning. here in lakeland the wind gusts probably haven't reached 25 mph yet but the storm is located around 250 miles
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south of us so i think it is close. we're expecting a lot of wind to occui’ we're expecting a lot of wind to occur here in lakeland. we will not get any storm surge over here but neighbouring communities in tampa will. we are just reading that the hurricane has now been upgraded again toa hurricane has now been upgraded again to a category four hurricane andi again to a category four hurricane and i know if you're living in the path of the storm that makes little difference as to weather it is a three or a four but nonetheless, a significant change that could affect you? yes, it could. the winds are the early large and those types of wind at speed will cause damage to homes. how do you prepare, what preparations have you made? we store food, water, gas, generators and board up the windows, hunker down and wait for it to pass. we're at a point when we heard from authorities that the time to evacuate has passed
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so that the time to evacuate has passed so for people like yourselves who are there, what can you do, where can you go? i'll be staying here at home. typically the people that evacuate are those that will be affected by the storm surge only. we hide from the wind, we run from the water. its central florida where i'm located and most people haven't evacuated. we've seen a lot of pictures of people who have already evacuated, those likely to be affected by the flooding, what kind of advice and help has been available for people? in the introduction we talked about you being able to help with the evacuation. the state agencies in charge of our disaster response, our departments of transportation, our law enforcement officers work together to make sure it is a smooth evacuation. there were some long lines, a lot of traffic backups during the evacuation but this is the largest one we've ever had and it has gone really smooth. we were
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really impressed with the way the traffic flowed out of here. we've had almost 6.5 million people evacuate in their homes. had almost 6.5 million people evacuate in their homeslj had almost 6.5 million people evacuate in their homes. i wanted to talk about that because clearly the authorities are preparing for the worst and as we've seen its so far been relatively smooth. you touched on how impressed you were that people got out, is that a general feeling among the people living there that those who wanted to leave have been able to? yes, yes it is. 0ur governor has made it this mission to make sure that anyone who wa nted mission to make sure that anyone who wanted to get out would be taken ca re of wanted to get out would be taken care of and moved out. as we touched on, expected to make landfall within the next few hours. that's the point when you will all take shelter. what happens after, where do you even start to assess the damage and getting back to normal? it's a very long process. those who stayed home will get out and start immediately
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cleaning up their own properties. luck all government officials, federal officials will be in town to survey the damage and implement damage assessments and then the contractors will move in and start removing debris from the streets and the roadways and emergency crews will restore power. it will be a long process to recover. we talk about this being unprecedented, i don't know how long you've lived there, but have you ever seen anything like this before? i'm in this business, i've been through probably 35 or a0 hurricanes. i'm not seeing anything that i haven't typically seen before. 0k, ron, really good to talk to you, ron hazarded, a resident in lakeland, florida. —— ron anderson. hazarded, a resident in lakeland, florida. -- ron anderson. those aerial pictures of the hurricane are astonishing. bolellli is, you been keeping track of it and its journey
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across the caribbean —— louise. iam free! the latest update, literally in the last half—hour, about hurricane irma, it has been upgraded to a category a. as it moved across the archipelago and across northern cuba it got ripped up a little bit. it was starting to turn quite ragged but was moving over the warmer waters. it is around 70 miles to the south—west of florida at the moment, and it has strengthened a little. now, if this happens, it will be first time in history that we are going to see two category a hurricanes making impact at the same time. it is going to push it across lunchtime and move step steadily north. the storm surge will come as a hurricane moves further north and sta rts a hurricane moves further north and starts to bring the wins in the offshore. closer to home, an area of
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low pressure here is producing some pretty strong winds for the uk, and some pretty intense showers of the course of the day to day. we start off across central and south—eastern areas on a chilly night. we have seen a areas on a chilly night. we have seen a little bit of mist and fog but there will be some sunshine. likely to stay dry during daylight hours across the south—east. cloud thickening and nuisance rain for the south—west and wales. this is 10am for those getting up, and across the great north run it may start off dry but there will be bits of showery rain as we go through the morning. the front clears through, but there will be a cluster squally, sharp showers into the far north—west. we can't rule those out into newcastle, but we suspect not bad conditions for running at the great north run, if it won't be too hot, and hopefully not too wet. the wet weather will set out to the north and west. some squally and intense downpours continuing through scotla nd downpours continuing through scotland and northern ireland. it will feel dismal under the cloud and
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rain. the weather front further south moving its way across wales and the midlands. a bit of a nuisance into the afternoon, and brightening up high in the west and staying largely dry into the south—east. 12 to 15 for much of the far north, 17 or 18 in the south—east. that pushes its way overnight and then we see gales for a time across the bristol channel and a real cluster of showers. this is the story for much of monday. in the working week tom showery and cool scenario for early september, and a little quieter on tuesday. and louise keeping track of hurricane irma. less than four months on from the bomb attack that left 22 people dead, 1a,000 people attended the reopening of the manchester arena last night. the we are manchester show included performances from the likes of noel gallagher, peter kay and rick astley. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson was there. # so, sally can wait... manchester arena, united in song,
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headliner noel gallagher leading the capacity crowd in don't look back in anger, which became an anthem of unity after the terror attack in may. # don't look back in anger. # don't look back in anger, i heard you say #. earlier, outside the venue, it was all rather different. there was heightened security, with armed police and longer—than—usual searches on the way in. that was not stopping those going from having fun, even if many were experiencing mixed emotions. obviously there is a little bit of fear but not as much as excitement. the overriding emotion of hope just to show that the events open again and what the terrorists did will not overcome us. this family had bought
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tickets for the show, despite having been in the foyer when the terrorist bomb went off. scary, nervous but we're here for the 22 people what died. we need to make memories. inside, the first people to sit in these seats since the bomb exploded in may. before the concert, greater manchester's mayor read the names of the 22 victims. and then the poets started proceedings. we should give something back. tonight, we will. always remember. never forget. the eclectic lineup also featured peter kay. and i was here on the opening night, 16 july 1995. i were working.
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afterwards, the consensus was that it had been a very special night. buzzing. we came together... whata gig! i can't believe everyone's come together like this. absolutely incredible. theyjust made you proud to be mancunian. and as for the langridge family, on their return to the arena? how was walking through the foyer? nerve racking. but we had to do it. we will be coming back so we had to do it. this is the first of many journeys back. this concert had two goals — to raise money for a permanent memorialfor those who died, and also to show that manchester arena is open for business. both were achieved. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. it is time now for a look at the newspapers. record producer steve levine is here to tell us what has caught his eye.
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we will speak to him in a minute. we will slip through the front pages first of all, the daily star starting with the impact of hurricane irma. 0ne family in particular living on one of the british virgin islands, with children, managing to escape. they hunker down in one particular room, and according to the paper, the house was almost entirely destroyed but for this one room. they consider themselves to be extremely lucky, but that is just one story among the millions who have been affected by this particular hurricane. 0n the front of the observer, the same story. the one highlighted is the news that 2 million families faced a £50 per week cut in income, that is asa £50 per week cut in income, that is as a result of welfare cuts, crippling rent rises, looming inflation. this is a rather bleak assessment of the poorest families in britain. a study by the local
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government association says 8a% of thoseit government association says 8a% of those it studied would lose £50 a week or more, particularly those with children or couples. 0n the daily telegraph, pictures from strictly last night, their lead story concerns an apparent attempt by the conservative party to bring back younger voters, saying they will be reviewing the interest rates on student loans, possibly looking at cutting them, this after the paper says young voters abandoned the conservatives in droves at the election afterjeremy corbyn promised to scrap tuition fees. and on the front of the sunday times, blair gets tough on migrants, tony blair gets tough on migrants, tony blair demanding tough new immigration rules, arguing that the open borders he presided over as prime minister are no longer appropriate. tony blair has put his name toa appropriate. tony blair has put his name to a report asking for eu migrants that come to britain to register on arrival, so they can be counted when they arrive and then
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counted when they arrive and then counted when they leave. it says those who fail to register would be banned from doing basic things like renting a home or opening a bank account. we arejoined by the record producer steve levine to have a look inside. not surprising your first story concerns one significant figure in the music industry. this is a great story, actually. well, growing up in the 1970s, as a teenager, he was just one of my heroes. and his record producer, and this story is absolutely fantastic. we all hear negative stories about sierra leone and childhood soldiers, but using his legacy, they have set up a school to teach young kids about record production, songwriting, and there is a picture of what the school of light. it is fantastic. the idea is to drop the guns and pick up guitars and instruments. and that really is a great story, because music really does inspire people, and when kids learn, i do
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quite a lot of teaching myself, and when you get kids from quite poor parts of the uk, they start playing music and developing their songwriting skills, a whole new world opens up to them. on the other thing that people may not know, bolan himself, in his will, many people know about his tax affairs. they were offshore, because the tax rules of the uk in the 1970s were so harsh. nevertheless, the board who looked after his affairs, one of his request was that his royalties would help the next generation, so they are using some of his royalties to help next generation. it is a fantastic legacy, so whenever you hear t—rex record on the radio or television, a portion of those royalties help the next generation. so this is just such a brilliant story. let's have a look on the front of the sunday telegraph. this is interesting, given that during
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the general election we saw a lot of younger voters moving towardsjeremy corbyn's position of scrapping tuition fees. a sense that theresa may may recalculate how people pay back their student loan.|j may may recalculate how people pay back their student loan. i think regardless of whether they are trying to fish for votes, it is fair to say that the loan rates are causing quite a lot of grief. both my children went to university, and they have suffered with the debt. people leave university with massive debts, and invariably it is the pa rents debts, and invariably it is the parents who end up paying for it. there is a tendency to think it should be lower, or at least at market rate, but in some cases it is about 6%. in a sense it is like getting a bank loan, and that was never the intention. i think student fees should be scrapped but even if there is an argument that student fees should exist, they should be, as you say, zero rate interest or absolutely commercial rates, not credit card rates or loanshark rates. i know this from anecdotal evidence, the way that the loan
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companies deal with the students is really aggressive. and when you are a student, you should be enjoying the life of being a student. it is fairto the life of being a student. it is fair to say that students do get... the other side of the argument, of course, is that students benefit from this education, they get better paid jobs, so it is only right and just that they in some way pay for that can contribute towards it. we knew that university funding as it stood was unsustainable. that is why fees were introduced in the first place. that is absolutely true, and in my own daughters' case, they have better jobs as in my own daughters' case, they have betterjobs as a result of going to university, but the issue of the rate is not fair and the majority of pa rents rate is not fair and the majority of parents end up paying a rate if they can. and it just parents end up paying a rate if they can. and itjust isn't there. while they are going about it to try and win votes, the principal might actually stimulate the argument, and hopefully more ministers from all parties will say this isn't good. there needs to be a discussion around it because there has been a
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drop—off in the application rate as well. paper passports on the way out. well, we use our phones for literally everything, and i think this looks like a good plan to digitise the drivers license and passport. it is interesting, ijust came through the airport recently and even with the new chip, the queueis and even with the new chip, the queue is ridiculous because people use it the wrong way around. in the london underground you are in and out in seconds. as the article says, it will help prevent fraud, because there is still a lot of fraud with physical passports. there will be a lot of distrust of doing it digitally, because it will still prove that you are the person holding the passport. it will use the finger print technology of the phone, which is also good. idea is that thing where you use your thumb print. iam that thing where you use your thumb print. i am a digital, modern guide —— i use the thing. the other thing is that the geo— tracking will work as well, a physical passport doesn't
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show where you are. can you switch that off, though? you can, but maybe the apt for the passport will not allow it to be switched off. are you allow it to be switched off. are you a strictly man? —— the app. allow it to be switched off. are you a strictly man? -- the app. every year my husband says this is rubbish and we end up watching it. what i love about it as a record producer is having a live band on a live tv show. that band is fantastic. i have worked with many of those players in the studio. lands ellington i have worked with as a session musician, he isa worked with as a session musician, he is a singer. the band are really good. i also very recently used the horn section. they are absolutely on top of their game, and maybe people don't realise how great the arrangements are. when you take a regular four quarters song, most pop songs rm four quarters, and you have to change it, the time signature has
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to change it, the time signature has to change. those arrangements are so clever, to make a regular pop song appeared to be a latin or whatever. that is a great point. it is a sign that they have done so well, that you don't notice. to change a song to 3-a you don't notice. to change a song to 3—a or 6—8, it is quite an art. the bands to follow that and to emulate the performances of the originals, it is great entertainment andi originals, it is great entertainment and i love it. thank you very much, come back in an hour. the andrew marr programme is on bbc one this morning at 8:30am. andrew, what have you got coming up? that is absolutely the crucial point, this is a four quarters political programme, but we are on at 8:30am with lots of guests. they include the secretary general of nato talking about north korea and the russian threat. sir michael fallon, the defence secretary, responding to complaints that reason has been rather slow after those
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hurricanes in the caribbean. 0ther guests will be talking about brexit and much more, we have some wonderful music for you, but above all, folks, 8:30 a.m.. stay with us. headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and rachel burden. coming up before 8am, louise will have the weather. but first a summary of this morning's main news. irma has intensified into a category four hurricane as it approaches southern florida, with winds reaching 130mph. more than six million people have been told to evacuate and water levels are rising at the coast, where a huge storm surge is expected. florida's governor has warned that it will be deadly. president trump has urged people to seek shelter. this is a storm of enormous destructive power, and we ask everyone in the storm path to heed all instructions,
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get out of its way. government officials, i know you're working so hard, you never worked like this, and i appreciate your bravery. property is replaceable, but lives are not. safety has to come first. don't worry about it, just get out of its way. meanwhile, cuba is counting the cost after the storm battered its north coast. the government says it caused significant damage and cut off power to large areas. more than a million cubans were evacuated and there are reports of villages being engulfed by storm surges, with whole communities left homeless. at least five people are known to have died in the british virgin islands as a result of hurricane irma. 0ur correspondent, laura bicker, is there and sent this update. we've just flown over the virgin islands and i can tell you that some of the devastation is very difficult to witness. houses look like they have been blown apart in places. 0nce prized possessions are now scattered and in ruins. you can see the effect of that
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20 foot storm surge. boats lie littered right around the islands and where they have been and moored together they have been crushed and sent flying into pieces. there has been criticism here of the british government's response to this crisis. i can tell you that the royal army engineers are here. they are assessing this runway as a priority and that is because they need to get aid in and people out. there has also been concern about looting that i am being told by the deputy governor that they are trying to get things under control. there is still a lot of work to do here. 1a,000 people attended the re—opening of the manchester arena last night less than four months after 22 people were killed in a terrorist attack at the venue. noel gallagher, rick astley and peter kay were among the performers at the we
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are manchester show. a bbc investigation has found more than a00 children could be buried in a mass grave, close to an orphanage in lanarkshire. the children, who mostly died from disease such as tb and pneumonia, had all been residents at the smyllum care home. it was run by catholic nuns until it closed in 1981. it was previously thought closer to 150 children were buried at the site. kim jong—un has attended a celebration to congratulate the scientists behind last weekposmac powerful nuclear teststopmac state television showed the leader greeting crowds and enjoying the entertainmentstopmac the regime's nuclear activities have faced widespread condemnation. egyptian archaeologists have discovered the tomb of a royal goldsmith that they say is more than 3,000 years old. it was found on the bank of the river nile in the city of luxor. among the items inside are the mummies of a woman and her two adult children, along with a statue. authorities say they hope the find
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will lead them to more ancient a rtefa cts . talking about one semi— ancient a rtefa ct, talking about one semi— ancient artefact, jimmy anderson is a treasure. a national treasure. he's not that ancient to be fair. he's been playing for so long doing brilliantly for a very long time. 5015t brilliantly for a very long time. 501st wicket on friday but he kept going yesterday adding more and more and forjoe root, celebrating there, two series played, two won, fantastic for the new england captain, building towards a big ashes series at the end of the year and that's when this captaincy will be really tested but yesterday a really good day for england. good morning. england captainjoe root says his players have the opportunity to do something special in the ashes this winter after they wrapped up a 2—1 series win over the west indies. james anderson completed an impressive summer with seven wickets in the windies second innings. it left england with a total of 107 to chase to win the third test, losing just one wicket in the process and while some
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questions remain over parts of the batting line up — the result does give root optimism ahead of the tour to australia. we have plenty of time now to start planning and thinking even more than we have done before about the challenges that lie ahead. it's a great opportunity for this group of players to go do something special down there. if we continue to take the same approach and attitude that we have had across this summer, we will have a really good chance. barring mishap, misfortune or a miracle, chris froome will win cycling's vuelta a espana, this afternoon and become only the third rider to win that and the tour de france in the same year. the team sky rider extended his lead on the penultimate stage with his rivals struggling on the final climb. today's stage is largely a procession into madrid. it'll be the first time froome has won the vuelta and the first time any rider has done the rare double since the spanish tour was placed after the french one in the calendar in 1995. manchester city have drawn level on points with manchester united at the top of the premier league.
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city thrashed ten—man liverpool 5—0 while united dropped points at stoke city. patrick gearey rounds up yesterday's premier league action. seasons change fast. just ask meteorologists, mancunians or managers. 0blak liverpool had been going so well but for all the casts around their attacking there are still groans at the back. it looked so still groans at the back. it looked so simple for manchester city's aguero to run in the opening goal. sadie mane's challenge on ederson was seen as sadie mane's challenge on ederson was seen as unacceptable you reckless by the referee. mane was sent off, ederson stretchered off. was patched up, liverpool weren't. it finished 5—0, quite some scoreline for manchester city and quite some statement. there were some signs of promise for manchester united, it all seemed to be going to the mourinho master plan when lukaku eventually put them to—1 up against stoke but not long later and in the match they forgot about
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choupo—moting. 2—2, two points dropped, the perfect start is over. ka nte knows dropped, the perfect start is over. kante knows leicester's pitch well, he covered most of it in the season they won the league. he won another match on it yesterday for this new team, 2—1. tottenham's harry kane is an autumn bloomer, he hasn't scored for them in august but in september they fly in it and by accident. that was this 100th for spurs and he later added a second in an impressive 3—0 at everton. 3—0 to arsenal at bournemouth, danny welbeck got a couple and that's more than the cherries have managed in the league all season. it's all been a little slower to get going on the south coast but this from gross was bright and's burst premier league goal and it set up their first premier league wind, west brom on the wrong side of that bit of history. —— first premier league goal. —— win. patrick gearey, bbc news. so confirmation of those results, elsewhere watford beat southampton two nil to go fourth in the table.
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later today burnley play crystal palace and swansea are at home to newcastle. aberdeen missed the chance to go top of the scottish premiership, as they were held to a goalless draw by hearts hearts actually had the better of the chances at murrayfield but found the dons goalkeeper joe lewis and crossbar against them. aberdeen move level on points with celtic but behind on goal difference. elsewhere motherwell beat kilmarnock for their third league win in a row. rangers were comfortable winners over dundee. and there were draws between ross county and partick thistle and stjohnstone and hibernian. with serena williams out having just given birth to her first child, american tennis has found a new star after sloane stephens won the us open for her first grand slam title. the world number 83 thrashed fellow american madison keys in straight sets at flushing meadows. the win is all the more impressive give that stephens only recently returned from nearly a year out injured earlier this summer. there was some british success as jamie murray and partner martina hingis claimed the mixed doubles title.
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it's their second grand slam of the year after also winning wimbledon. and alfie hewett and gordon reid won the wheelchair doubles titles — while andy lapthorne and his american partner david wagner took the wheelchair quad doubles title. and finally we wish a happy retirement to henry blofeld. the commentator has called his final ball after a5 years with test match special. this is the moment he said goodbye for one last time. and that, ladies and gentlemen, is the end of the. thank you all for listening. it's been wonderful talking to you will. you say you miss me, i will miss you something dreadful. i must not fall over when i hand over to the next commentator. it's going to be ed smith, how lovely. macro balls it's been wonderful hearing from you, henry —— applause. he was given a standing ovation and
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a special lap of honour at lord's. he was even invited into the england dressing room afterwards as well. a great day for henry blofeld. never a man knowingly underdressed. he is the charming, charming to listen to and deal with. eight release wonderful man with a beautiful voice —— a really wonderful man. wonderful man with a beautiful voice -- a really wonderful man. he will be sorely missed. he did well to hold it together, there were quite a few tears in the commentary box. he was professional to the end. the almost looks camouflaged in the green jacket. he almost looks camouflaged in the greenjacket. he will be missed. thank you very much —— he almost looks camouflaged. the world's biggest half—marathon gets under way in the north—east of england later this morning. 57,000 people are expected to take part in this year's great north run. 0ur reporter, allison freeman, is in newcastle this morning. what's it like there this morning? amazing support they get every year,
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how are the conditions looking? the sun has just come how are the conditions looking? the sun hasjust come up how are the conditions looking? the sun has just come up and it's starting to get busier but it is still not the explosion of colour we're going to see in a couple of hours when those 57,000 people are lining up down there on the start line ready to take part in what has become the world's biggest half marathon. leading those runners out is going to be the legend that is mo farah but the great north run really isn't about the elite runners, it's more about those personal stories, the personal challenges people are facing and one of the people taking pa rt facing and one of the people taking part today is doctor brenda whittle in front of me now and we are going to talk to her in a second but first we are going to talk to ruth, who has been working alongside brendan, she's from a residential home where brenda lives. tell me about her story. brenda is an inspirational woman. she spent years and years studying, completed her third degree, ph.d. in chemistry, and was
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ready to set off and pursue her life career, which she had been training for, and she suddenly became very unwell, which left her in hospital unable to walk or talk. the doctors in fact told her parents the chances are she would never walk or talk again. they didn't know what brenda was like. she is such a determined woman. she's managed to get herself back to the stage she's in now where she is able to walk some steps, she's clearly able to communicate and the idea is she will get out of the chair at the end of the race and crossed the finish line to raise funds for the home so amazing. brenda, let's have a quick chat with you, how are you feeling about today? very excited. i really need today? very excited. i really need to do this. you are really excited about the date. someone who will be running along with you is stood behind you not looking that nervous yet, chloe, you have worked a lot with brenda, what other challenges brenda will face today? probably the
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steps at the end but she has worked so steps at the end but she has worked so hard this past year, she's been phenomenal. we've worked about a year now in the gym, we go every week together to build up her strength and the progress like i say has been amazing and she's only going to get better and when the doctors said she couldn't do it, everyday we go she is determined more than ever to push that further, we had trips and falls and bruises and whatever but we have fought back and whatever but we have fought back and she is what she is today because of teamwork and we have done it together. you mentioned teams, how many of you will be along the route with brenda or running? 16 have signed up, we have split in half, half are linked and half are pushing brenda. we will take it in turns to push her —— half are running. brenda. we will take it in turns to push her -- half are running. are you worried about anything along the route, it will be quite challenging for you to push render? i'm going to be out of breath! it will be fine, we will work together and push each
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other —— push brenda. i'm confident it will be great. no doubt brenda is going to get across the line? she well, 100%. brenda, are you going to get up and walk across the line? definitely! who can argue with that crazy things are going to be live on bbc one from 9:30am. —— who can argue with that? quite a sight to be holed. i remember the billy nerz you get at this time of day when you're about to go —— early nerves. get at this time of day when you're about to go -- early nerves. you just want to start and get on with it -- just want to start and get on with it —— barely nerves. just want to start and get on with it -- barely nerves. i don't think conditions will be too bad but we will find out from louise in a moment. here is louise with a look at this morning's weather. in the last half an hour, hurricane irma has strengthened again. she was a category 3, backup to a category
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4, a category 3, backup to a category a, she is around 70 miles to the south—west of florida, and as i say, expected to make landfall across the florida keys midday hour time, and thenit florida keys midday hour time, and then it will move its way steadily north. we have talked a great deal about hurricane irma's damaging, devastating winds, which will be issue. the eye looks likely to pass to the west of florida, along the coastline, but then we will start to see a storm surge as the winds move offshore. that will bring a significant, 12 feet plus wall of water, which could cause some issues. for us it is an area of low pressure which will cause some issues across the north—west. some really squally showers, but for those taking part in the great north run, not looking too bad. i will come back to that in just the moment. a foggy start across the south and east, here it is likely to stay dry through the day. clouding over a little, with some nuisance rain, really, through the south—west and wales first thing. that will
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gradually drift its way steadily eastwards. the main frontal rain sitting across north—west scotland, but you can see there's peppering of showers, these will be a real issue as we go through the afternoon. some of them heavy and thundery. they should stay away for the great north run. it will start of cloudy with maybe a little bit of light and patchy rain, but not a bad field for being out and running this morning. but the showers will be an issue into the afternoon. some of them heavy, squally, with pale, thunder and these winds really rattling them through at quite a pace. 0ur weather front i then just a band of cloud, and showery rain as it moves out of wales towards the midlands. and as i say, it should stay dry, with perhaps even some afternoon sunshine for a time across the extreme south—east. 18 degrees not out of the question here. 12 to 15 further north, and then the front clears through. we will see gales river tyne overnight through the bristol channel. a really squally set of showers pushing in, driven by stiff,
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north—westerly winds. the start of the new working week looking pretty u nsettled the new working week looking pretty unsettled and showery, but it looks as though things are set to change. more updates throughout the morning on hurricane irma and jose. we will be back later for the latest on events. we will be back with the headlines at 8:00am. but first, it is time for click. this week, we've been to ifa, the massive tech show in berlin. we'll be looking at the big launches and the cool new devices from the fair in a few minutes, and we'll also hear from the people behind them, who, we've noticed are once again mostly men. the lack of women in tech has been
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well documented and it's something we run up against every single day working on click, and it's so frustrating, it's extremely rare for us to turn up at a tech company and for any of the available spokespeople to be female. it's been suggested that the lack of women in tech starts developing early on. kids are going back to school this week on the heels of stats from the latest exam results here in the uk showing that girls are turning away from stem subjects — that's science, technology, engineering and maths. only 20% of those who sat the computer sciences gcse exam this year were girls. for gcse engineering it was 10%. someone who is fighting gender stereotypes is anne—marie imafidon. at 11 years old she took an a—level in computing and by 20 had graduated from oxford in maths and science. so the biggest thing is the social
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norm and it's that awareness of the options that you have, but also the role models and the people that have gone before you. and so you think that maybe it is just for dead white guys to do, and of course there are loads of living guys that are working in science and technology, but also loads of dead women that have created things like wi—fi and bluetooth, of course famously hedy lamarr. the first programme was written by ada lovelace. but there are countless women whose stories we don't here and who we haven't been told. and so that definitely plays on that social norm. anne—marie co—founded stemettes, an organisation on a mission to inspire and help more women into stem careers. she's also filled a house with teenage girls from across europe and turned it into an incubator to foster new stem ideas. my advice for young girls is to look for your tribe and look for groups you can plug into and get involved in. technology is such a social thing to do, you rarely work on your own. i'd love to see a technical female
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character in eastenders or something like that to move the social norm just a little bit so that for the rest of us that whole notion of there being a technical female is something that's notjust that one character in the matrix or whoever it is in that bond movie, but it's something a little bit more mainstream for all of us. of course since i met anne—marie there has at least been one big change on screen that may hopefully influence a whole generation... ..maybe that should be regeneration of geeks. ok, now, as promised, to berlin, to europe's largest tech fair, ifa, where dan simmons has taken cover from the autumnal weather. tunnels of curved tvs lead you from hall 70 to 80. there are 26 here at ifa, some larger than a football pitch, packed with the latest gadgets, gizmos and gardening baskets? this one also uses leds
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but to grow plants. the basket monitors and provides water and nutrients to promote growth, and it's out in november. this year, robots seem to be everywhere. cute ones... this one's got eyes in the back of its head. it's got an hd projector. ..to ones that will help you clean the floor. it's supposed to stop if someone walks in front of it but if it doesn't, at least you get a nice shoeshine. and this multilingual one helps you get to your gate, among other things, when you feed it your boarding card. both started work at seoul airport this summer hoping to impress visitors and raise lg's profile ahead of february's winter olympics. now, this is remarkable, ao0gb sd card. 0nly last year this would have looked like this. we've seen vayyar‘s gadget for diy home improvements that can see through walls earlier this year
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using radio—frequency signals like radar it can also detect family people are in the room and whether they're sitting or lying down. useful for carers to detect falls. and the kit can also see through internal walls, so multiple rooms can be monitored without the need for an invasive camera. this sort of anonymous tracking could be used to smarten up our gadgets too. you can have your tv follow you around, you can have the tv turn off when you get up and get a coffee
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and you can have the coffee machine start making coffee when you leave your room in the morning or even direct the air conditioning or the heating to follow you around or to change in accordance to how many people are inside the room. two new upgrades to consumer 360 cameras. kodak's ak offering is now an all—in—one unit. postproduction has been simplified with an easy—to—use slider to stick the two images together if you don't like the automatic on—board result. and insta360's one can now stream live to facebook or youtube if you down—res from its native ak quality. it also let's you do a sort of director's cut of what you've shot to share with friends, and the clever bullet shot feature let's you go a little bit matrix. and chinese newcomer detu showcased its new low—cost 8k 360 cam, due out in november. twobig phone launches here, lg's v30, which supports super
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high—res sound files at a stunning 2—to—1 ratio 0led display and sony's latest xperia model, which uses the camera's autofocus function to create a 3—d model of anything. normally to do 3—d you would have to go to a professional studio and use lots of cameras but we've brought that into one camera on a smart phone. take that standard 0bj file and basically the possibilities are endless. hmm, with some messaging apps out there already able to make use of these 3—d scans, perhaps they are. there's one over there. where are they? i thought we were in a safe place! oh, no! the release of both apple and google's ar developer kits are creating a bit of a buzz...
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..at a time when augmented reality has been upping its game. well, we started out with augmented reality in books seven years ago and at the time we were using webcams and computers. now the characters that we generate with the digital ar are much richer, they‘ re more complicated, they're more sophisticated. the interactivity we can do with those features is much greater so as arkit and arcore from apple and google come into play later this year, we'll be able to be even more, it's going to be a very exciting journey. if you happen to find yourself on a roof and want to be joined by a dinosaur, then this could come in handy. the best ar experiences are when the virtual object is well placed in a 3—d space
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and its proportions change as you move around it. here, its face is here. the arkit is going to give the cameras on our everyday phones and tablets the capability to perceive depth better. it will do so by tracking objects in a scene through the frame using computer vision and analysis and combining it with data from its motion—sensing hardware. according to google its arkit will also estimate the light coming into a room so that virtual things are placed in the scene and dynamically lit. and if rumours are to be believed, the upcoming iphone will feature a laser sensor to improve its spatial awareness. and qualcomm two weeks ago released this video which shows its new depth sensing chip, showing android devices won't be far behind. right now, the pricing microsoft hololens might provide this experience for the elite few but augmented and mixed reality could be heading to the masses. that's certainly what the aim
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is with this, the $30 zapper zapbox. so, the kit consists of this google cardboard inspired headset, which of course you place your phone inside, and to increase yourfield of view while doing that there is a fisheye lens to attach. now you also got a head strap which means once that's attached you freed up your hands, once your hands are free you're going to be able to hold onto the two controllers so you can interact a bit more with your content and make sure you place things in a suitable environment in the real world, well, here are the markers. they'll ensure the area is accurately mapped so virtual objects can be anchored appropriately. there you go. 0h, there's a rabbit. hello, a rabbit has appeared. right, must get these in my hands. just a shame i found the headset rather uncomfortable to wear. it left me with a bit of a sore nose.
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but if a game of golf isn't for you then maybe this is. thank you. city social‘s foray into the world augmented reality uses the medium to bring their cocktail menu to life. thank you. you have a choice of what genre of art you would like in relation to what cocktail you choose so every cocktail tells a story. before seeing this in the flesh i did struggle to see the point but the detail was beautifully executed. it was creative and i think i personally could have appreciated it more on a food menu. now, the easier for the cut off click this week. the full version is online to you at any time you please. and you can follow us on twitter and facebook, too. thanks for watching and we will see you soon. hello. this is breakfast with ben thompson and rachel burden. florida starts to the feel the force of hurricane irma.
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as the huge storm approaches, residents are urged to go to emergency shelters. millions of floridians will see major hurricane impacts, with deadly, deadly, deadly storm surge and life—threatening wind. in cuba there's been widespread damage but so far no reports of any fatalities. a million people had been evacuated. good morning. it's sunday 10th september. also ahead: manchester arena reopens amid tight security three months after the terror attack.
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