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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 11, 2017 3:00pm-4:01pm BST

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he people would have done it. he ducked under live wires and trudged through puddles ofjet fuel, under live wires and trudged through puddles of jet fuel, only under live wires and trudged through puddles ofjet fuel, only steps away from sparks and vicious flame. in the pitch black, he began calling out people in need of help. isaac heard faint voices and he wanted to a nswer heard faint voices and he wanted to answer those faint voices. one by one he kept carrying people out of the burning rubble and he kept going back into the smouldering darkness calling out to anyone who was alive. he saved as many as 20 people who had followed his voice. he carried eight himself. for nearly 36 hours isaac kept on saving lives, serving our nation and protecting
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oui’ serving our nation and protecting our safety in our hour of need. and today isaac continues to do exactly that. isaac still works at the pentagon, now as a sergeant. he is on duty right now and he is he hasjoined us is on duty right now and he is he has joined us today for the ceremony. and this morning all of us and all of america thank isaac for his service. where is isaac? applause thank you. thank you, isaac. thank you. applause to isaac and to every first
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responder and survivor of the attack you carry, on the legacy of the friends you lost, you keep alive the memory of those who perished and you make america proud. very, very proud. to the family members with us today, i know that it's with a pained and heavy heart that you come back to this place, but by doing so, by choosing to persevere through the grief, the sorrow, you honour your heroes. you renew grief, the sorrow, you honour your heroes. you renew oui’ grief, the sorrow, you honour your heroes. you renew our courage grief, the sorrow, you honour your heroes. you renew our courage and you strengthen all of us. you really do. you strengthen all of us. here on the westside of the pentagon, terrorists tried to break our resolve. it's not going to happen. but where they left a mark, with fire and rubble, americans defiantly
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raised the stars and stripes, our beautiful flag, that for more than two centuries has graced our ships, flown in our skies and led our brave heroes to victory after victory in battle. the flag that binds us all together as americans, who cherish our values, and protect our way of life. the flag that reminds us today of who we are, what we stand for, and why we fight. woven into that beautiful flag is the story of our resolve. we have overcome every challenge, every single challenge, eve ryo ne challenge, every single challenge, everyone of them. we've triumphed over every evil and we mained united as one nation under god. america does not bend. we do not waiver and
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we will never ever yield. so here at this memorial, with hearts both sad and determined, we honour every hero who keeps us safe and free and we pledge to work together to fight together, and to overcome together every enemy and obstacle that's ever in our path. our values will endure. our people will thrive. our nation will prevail and the memory of our loved ones will never ever die. thank you. may god bless you. may god forever bless the great, united states of america. thank you very much. thank you. thank you. applause so president trump presiding over
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his first 9/11 commemoration in office. a solemn moment marking 16 yea rs office. a solemn moment marking 16 years almost to the minute since planes struck the world trade center in new york, the pnt gone building and flight 93 coming down in a field in pen vilvainia. and flight 93 coming down in a field in pen vil vainia. joined by the first lady melania trump and paying tribute to those who lost their lives and to the families of those attending today's ceremony. all this coming as the trump administration grapples with the death and destruction caused by the hurricane, hurricane irma in the us state of florida. the us state of florida has been battered by hurricane irma which has destroyed more homes and caused widespread damage. at least four people have been killed and more than half of all homes and businesses in the state are without power. parts of miami are under water. the hurricane has swept
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up from the caribbean, where it killed dozens of people, and wreaked terrible damage. hurricane irma has been downgraded toa hurricane irma has been downgraded to a tropical storm. daniela relph reports. naples on florida's west coast, known for its beaches and golf courses, but not today. here taking the brunt of hurricane irma. the storm may have been downgraded, but it doesn't feel like that for much of florida. it's really, really dangerous outside, to be honest with you. watching from the inside as water gushes through the streets and into some buildings. in the distance is the ocean, the coast of biscayne bay near miami, but water has breached all the defences, surging through the entire area. despite dire warnings, miami itself seems to have dodged the worst of the weather, but the city is deserted, the wind intense, the rain torrential.
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the top of this crane blown away in the storm. what's left dangles in the strong winds. power cuts are widespread and a curfew remains across much of the state of florida. the normal rhythm of life has been suspended. we'll do our best to try to make sure we help all the citizens of this community to adjust and try to get them back to a sense of normalcy. with so many areas abandoned, looting has been a major problem. here the targets are sports shops, boxes of trainers piled into cars. the police say they won't tolerate criminal activity and a number of arrests have been made. hurricane irma wreaked havoc through the caribbean before reaching florida, none more so than on saint martin. today a group of dutch tourist in were evacuated
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to a nearby island, still traumatised by their experience. translation: we are alive so we should be happy with that. it wasn't nice. i've never experienced anything like it. translation: five days without water, electricity and supplies, that's a long time. i've left but others haven't. they've lost their whole existence. across the caribbean, a major relief and rescue operation is under way. here the french military are bringing humanitarian aid to communities who have been cut off for days. hundreds of british troops have also been deployed to uk territories in the region. we're now seeing the final show of strength from hurricane irma. these are the overnight scenes from tampa in florida, where her presence was still felt, but she has lost her bite and is now far less powerful. the danger isn't quite over,
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but hurricane irma will continue to weaken as it heads north into georgia. in the last few minutes president trump given his thoughts and condolences for those caught in the aftermath of hurricane irma. before we begin i'd like to send our nation's prayers to everyone in the path in hurricane irma and through eve ryo ne path in hurricane irma and through everyone suffering through the devastation of hurricane harvey. these are storms of catastrophic severity and we're marshalling the full resources of the federal government to help our fellow americans in florida, albapl that, georgia, texas, louisiana and tennessee and all of those wonder places and states in harm's way. when americans are in need, americans pull together and we are
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one country and when we face hardship, we emerge, closer, stronger and more determined than ever. let's get an update from miami — major richard rand is from the north the north miami beach police department. this is the moment when you assess just how bad it was? a big difference today compared to yesterday. here i am standing in a parking lot. as you can see behind mea parking lot. as you can see behind me a tree has fallen. this isjust one example of what we're dealing with around the city. it's an incredible, it was a large tree. it snapped in half. it's in parking lot as you can see behind me. this is what we are a finding all over the city. you know, south florida is really lucky. we were expecting a big back and here we get a kids cheeseburger, we're blessed. what about power? are you ok for things
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like that? i think we may have lost the line. can you still hear me? i'm wondering if you have still got power and how you are able to clear things up? so we have a report of power lines down throughout our citiment we are working with florida power and light. our officers, citiment we are working with florida powerand light. our officers, our boots are on the ground. we are out surveying the damage. behind me is an example of one of the trees that went down overnight and you know what a beautiful day it is today in south florida. what an extremely different atmosphere we have. as you remember yesterday, we were talking in the background, it was wind, heavy rain and it was horrific. now it's a beautiful day in florida, we are dealing with the heat, humidity and just cleaning up down here. are dealing with the heat, humidity andjust cleaning up down here. one of the most distressing aspects of this is the looting, i don't know what your reaction is when you see
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it going on? i think it is a disgrace. however, here in the north end, with awful us getting together, all the law enforcement agencies joining together, we have not had a problem or any reports of looting in north miami beach because of the effo rts north miami beach because of the efforts of our law enforcement team. so the next few days, what are the priorities? it is just clearing so the next few days, what are the priorities? it isjust clearing up, is it? well, it's not only clearing up, but it's returning back to some normal see. people want to come home. people want to get back to work. children want to get back to school. ourjob is to make sure they do itand school. ourjob is to make sure they do it and do it in a safe manner. we get the streets cleared and power restored and restored order and justice and get back to normal. when people say hurricane irma, what were your memories, what will you say?” would say heavy winds, heavy rains,
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long hours. working in very tough conditions. and i was able to share it with my friends at the bbc! a whole new conversation, but we haven't got time. thank you very much. thank you. for the first time, energy from offshore wind power in the uk is now much cheaper than electricity from new nuclear power stations — that's according to new government figures. environmental groups say it shows the government should prioritise investing in the growing offshore industry. but nuclear firms say the uk still needs a mix of low carbon energy especially when wind power is not available. joining me now is professor michael grubb — professor of international energy and climate change policy at ucl. your reaction to this report. it is positive, isn't it? not a report. it is the contract prices agreed with the companies that are going to build the on—shore wind farms. i think it is hard to overstate the
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importance of this for two big reasons. one, it's quite dramatic cost reductions in what many said was going to be the most difficult and expensive of the renewables. the other is it opens up for britain a huge resource, off—shore, it means that renewables for the next half century a re that renewables for the next half century are likely to be the economic value equivalent of oil and gas for the past half century. you say it is difficult to overstate, so when they say the clean energy revolution has begun, is this where we are? the clean energy revolution is with us. what about those who say that's very well, but we need the back—up of nuclear power because there are days when the wind, the sunjust ain't there are days when the wind, the sun just ain't going to produce for us? well, you certainly need a mix. it is going to be very much up for grabs what the mix looks like. but what we do know is that renewable energy will be a mainstay of it. wind has pros and cons. there is a lot more wind in winter when we need it most. the co in is it doesn't blow all the time, but first to
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underline, five years ago when i was in the energy regulator, our estimates were that off—shore wind would cost about 15 pence a unit. that's roughly the price that you pay when the electricity comes out of your plug. today's contract prices went down to six, that's a dramatic reduction, well over half in about five years. so the cost of back—up, which is absolutely needed, it could be gas, it could be storage, it could be nuclear, the difficulty is nuclear is not great at ramping up and down, that's what is going to be played for now. we don't need things that will run 2a hours a day because they will need to flex with the wind. what about the technology, the storage which is going to be crucial? we are finding that with cars? that the issue is once you have created the energy, how do you store it not and lose it? are we getting to a point, you say sixpence is what it will cost, does that only go one way? is it only going o to get cheaper and cheaper? it is hard to see why it would get more expensive when it is a
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relatively new industry. we talking about big industrial scales, but it is early stages in terms of the scale of what could be rolled out. normal industries reckon they can continue to engineer the costs down, as this grows in scale, the question of what it does imply for the rest of what it does imply for the rest of the system, the batteries that are required or otherforms of storage or increasingly gas which is running at high efficiency, but just, you know, in the intervals when it is most needed, that's the shape of electricity that we are looking at. today it is looking cheaper than most people thought even a few years ago. a historic moment? i think it is. this auction will be the thing that people point to to say, do you know what, the energy revolution really did happen and this was the moment we knew it was working. thank you very much for coming in. thank you. the headlines: hurricane irma sweeps up florida's
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west coast leaving more deaths and destruction in its wake. parts of miami are underwater. at least four people have died in florida. a crucial vote will take place in the commons tonne on britain's exit from the eu. more than 300,000 muslim rohingya have fled myanmar. the human rights chief warned the situation is a textbook example of ethnic cleansing. in sport, crystal palace's manager has been sacked. the former england, fulham and liverpool manager roy hodgson is expected to take over at palace. chris froome may consider racing in
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the giro de italia. the brexit secretary, david davis, has warned mps that voting against the eu withdrawal bill would amount to backing a "chaotic" exit from the european union. the commons will vote late tonight, after another day of debate on legislation, which will convert all existing eu laws into domestic ones. labour says it will oppose the bill, claiming it represents a "power grab". our political correspondent chris mason reports. it's the planned new law that will provide the legal toolkit to implement brexit. after a day of debate last week, more debate this afternoon, this evening and into the night. without this bill and without this legislation, as cross—party committees have recognised, there would be significant legal uncertainty and we wouldn't be in the best place to get a deal between the uk and the eu on market access. so this bill, whether you support or oppose
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leaving the eu, it's a bill people should support because it provides us with continuity and stability and the best chance of getting a good deal through this process. last week, when the brexit secretary made the case for the bill, oppositions mps and some conservatives said it gave the government too much power. labour say they accept the result of the eu referendum, but... our position is, we'll oppose the bill tonight because we want parliamentary scrutiny. we want democratic accountability of an elected government in how it reacts to the result of the referendum, and that is why we are voting the way we are tonight and i urge all colleagues to do the same. the government's confident it will get its way tonight. those conservatives who don't like the look of this bill are likely to back it now and grumble later, but there are some labour mps who are nervous about what opposing this will look like. by saying you want to kill it at birth at the beginning of its passage through parliament, i think that sends out the wrong
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message about our attitude to the result in 2016 and how we want to effectively ensure a smooth brexit. today is just the latest debate and vote here on brexit. even after the leaves on the trees are long gone, the issue of our withdrawal from the eu will still dominate. our chief political correspondent vicki young is at westminster for us. have you got your sleeping bag with you? it could be a long night. i'm not sure i will be here for the votes. they are coming at midnight. no signs at the moment of a rebellion though on the government's side despite disquiet from can haves as well as labour who are going to vote against it. this is a power grab by the government. they are
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using this as an excuse so they can change policy? no, they're not. it is about making sure as we leave the european union, all the european law is on the british statute book so we have a very smooth exit. we made it clear if you want to change any of that law and you want to alter policies, it will be done through primary legislation and like we have got to put a new immigration system in place, we will have a bill to do that. so you have got to have the bill if you're in the going to have a chaotic exit and labour's position doesn't make sense. it is one thing to say they want to change the bill in detail, but that's not what they are proposing today. they're propose to go vote it vote it —— vote it down. if they were, you would have a chaotic brexit. even senior figures on your backbenches, dominic grieve called it monstrous? there are people in the house on both sides who think there should be changes to the detail of the legislation. and they have said if they didn't get
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that, they would find it difficult to support it at its final stage, but the point is they don't want to not support it tonight, they want it to proceed and they want the house to proceed and they want the house to look at it in some detail and we have seen labour mps, to look at it in some detail and we have seen labour mp5, i have heard caroline flint make the point that she is not going to vote against the bill. she says the right thing for all mp5 is to respect the will of the british people and make sure the bill goes on the statute book so we have a smooth brexit, but if you don't like the detail, we can have the debate later on. it is important we have the legislation so we can make sure that businesses and individuals are clear about the position on the day we leave the european union. going alongside here, the bill, are the negotiations. are you happy with progress that's being made? do you detect any progress has been made?” think below the headlines there has beena fair think below the headlines there has been a fair bit of progress over the summer. there has been progress on for example discussing the rights of eu citizens in britain and british citizens overseas. there was a lot
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of discussion, no conclusions, but a lot of discussion about the border between northern ireland and the irish republic and there has been discussion, but no agreement on whether we do or don't owe any money to the european union. so, we're going to see a lot of working taking place over the next few months. but we have made considerable progress, but i'm afraid my familiarity with european negotiations, thinking about when david cameron was negotiating the deal last time, is a lot of work and a lot of the discussion and agreement doesn't happen until we get until the end and that's what will happen this time. there seems to have some movement about a transition deal. we heard the chancellor talk about it and we heard liam fox talk about it. do you think that's where we're going to end up where there is not much change and people won't notice much change and people won't notice much of a change until a couple of yea rs much of a change until a couple of years when we have left in 2019? the prime minister was clear in her lancaster house speech when she set
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out the government's policy that there would be an implementation period. she was clear right from the beginning you can't go from being in the eu to being fully outside itover night. you need the implementation period. there is a discussion about practical measures about how quickly you can have that new immigration system in place. how quickly you put in place other systems and also we won't know what systems are required for example with trade until we know what the final trade deal will be. so there is going to be an implementation period and clearly one of the things for david davis and his team to thrash out is for how long and what the terms of that should be, but we need to make sure we respect the result of the referendum and get control of our laws and our immigration system and the amount of machine we pay to the eu so that doesn't continue in the future. mark harper thank you very much indeed. mps are set for a very long night. the first, i suspect, much indeed. mps are set for a very long night. the first, isuspect, of many to come. what time does the debate resume? i think it is in the next ten minutes. see you in the
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next ten minutes. see you in the next ten minutes. see you in the next ten minutes! just looking at the screen. we think so. mark harper says yes. great. well, there we are. see you then. thank you. a man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after a woman's body was found at the bestival music festival in dorset. the body of the 25—year—old from london was found in a wooded area, on the edge of the festival site at lulworth castle. richard lister gave us an update. a postmortem is due to be carried out. dorset police are hoping it will give them more information about how the woman died. a man has been arrested. he is due to be interviewed under caution. as the investigation is carried out, the police have sealed off part of the site on the lulworth estate to allow a forensic examination to take placement they are working closely with the festival organisers and they are asking for anybody who may
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have relevant information toll come forward. this festival is firmly established and it is known for being a family—friendly festival. 30,000 people were there yesterday, but part of the site has been sealed off. and it is the focus of a murder inquiry. the parents of a six year old child are threatening to sue their sons' school after boys were allowed to come to class wearing dresses. nigel and sally rowe have taken their son out of his church of england primary school on the isle of wight because one of his class mates comes to school some days as a girl and others as a boy. they'd already decided to home school his eight year old brother because the same thing happened in his class. the school at the centre of this story on the isle of wight is not being identified, to protect all the children involved including the children of nigel and sally rowe, the parents who have now withdrawn their six—year—old son. they say he was confused when another male pupil came to school wearing a dress. they say it's wrong to encourage very young children to embrace
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transgenderism and that it offends their christian values. we want to protect our children and we want a good dialogue now about it so it's notjust pushed into schools and accepted. we are concerned about how it could influence other children. we don't know, as sally said, what the full ramifications of that could be. it is just too young. let childrenjust be children. the church of england school wrote to the couple urging them to accept it when male pupils came to school in dresses. the school has the backing of the diocese of portsmouth, who say that: campaigners for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights say mr and mrs rowe have misjudged this, as children with gender
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issues need sympathy to avoid being bullied. i have a child who took a lot of bullying on my behalf and that bullying was exactly the same, it was parents saying, "we have a right to have an opinion", and they told their children their opinion, and having told their children their opinion, their children thought it was open season on bullying my son. mr and mrs rowe, who are devout christians here on the isle of wight, say they have received lots of hate messages on social media. but they say this is about parents' rights and those christian values, both of which they now want tested in the courts. two years ago, the couple withdrew another of their sons when a male arrived hearing a dress. they say they are not trans phobic. it is time for a weather forecast.
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a mixture of sunny spells and showers today. we have got a blustery north—westerly breeze. some of the showers as we move through the afternoon across england and wales have the potential to be heavy. the odd rumble of thunder is not out of the question. eastern england and eastern scotland becoming drier with clear spells. overnight lows of between ten celsius and 13 celsius. where we have the clear skies, we will see some sunshine first thing tomorrow morning, but it will fill in as we move through the day as across england and wales. a few showers from the word go. the chance of seeing a shower the further east you are, unlikely. we will start to see rain creeping into northern ireland and western wales and the south—west of england as we move into the late afternoon and early evening. that's thanks to this area of low pressure that's going quickly make its way across as we move through tomorrow
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night. it will bring heavy bursts of rain. we could see localised flooding for parts of northern ireland and south—west scotland. we will see fairly gusty winds. stay tuned to the forecast. hello. this is bbc news with simon mccoy. the headlines: president trump has described hurricane irma as a storm of "catastrophic severity" as he pledged full government resources to deal with its aftermath. in florida, at least four people have been killed and more than half of all homes and businesses are without power. when americans are really need, americans pull together, and we are one country. and when we face our challenge, we emerge stronger, closer and more united than ever. the president was commemorating the anniversary of 9/11 — appearing alongside the first lady to pay tribute to the nearly 3,000 who died in the us terror
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attacks 16 years ago. officials in cuba say at least ten people have been killed by hurricane irma, which battered the island at the weekend, flooding the streets of havana. the majority of the victims died in collapsed buildings. the government has warned mps that voting against the brexit bill this evening would amount to backing a "chaotic" exit from the european union. the bill is meant to convert eu legislation to uk law — but labour says it's a power—grab by the government. now time for the sport. olly foster is there. thank you. it is the shortest managerial reign in the premier league and the worst start to a season in 90 years. frank de boer was sacked by crystal palace today, less than 24—hour is after the chairman urged everyone connected to the club to stick together. we can get more on this
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from the former team coach. it all seems very sudden, this. yes, they lost the first four games but we understand the decision was made before they lost to burnley yesterday? it is the kiss of death when the chairman gives you his backing. it is never a dull moment at palace. we had tony pulis leaving at palace. we had tony pulis leaving a couple of seasons ago, alan pardew comes in hoping for some stability. and then sam allardyce left. no one really knew why he left. palace have never had a foreign manager. then it looks like a change of philosophy, a change of ideals and obviously with frank coming in, you think they will give him time, they will back him.
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to have him sacked after four games onafour to have him sacked after four games on a four defeats and no goals, it seems like a panic to me. it is good fodderfor a pub seems like a panic to me. it is good fodder for a pub quiz, seems like a panic to me. it is good fodderfor a pub quiz, the shortest reign and the worst start to a premier league season. but who is at fault here? there has been a very high turnover of managers at crystal palace. i really don't know. it is not something the club wants or needs. although the club has been in the premier league for the last four yea rs, the premier league for the last four years, the turnover of managers is a real concern. you need stability, you need direction. the academy needs addressing. this transfer window, i really thought there would bea window, i really thought there would be a big clear out, they would back frank and let him bring in six, seven or eight signings but it did not happen. to be sat here now, it is all a bit of a circus. obviously, the talk is now roy hodgson will
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come in who is another ex—england manager, vast and experienced. we have been through holloway, alla rdyce, have been through holloway, allardyce, pardew, very strong pragmatic english managers and roy would fill that bill. he has been very well regarded at the clubs he has been to. it perhaps did not go well for england? yes, at west brom he did a good job. england did not go well. we have memories of england being knocked out of the world cup and roy resigning, a very forlorn figure. with the new breed of young, upcoming, in—your—face managers that we see in the premier league today, i'm not sure that is the best direction to go to. i would love to see someone like gary neville being given a chance. maybe have roy hodgson and ray lewington as number
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two and three. bring in some experience behind him and have a go. we will see. all will be revealed. john salako, thank you for your thoughts on the news that frank de boer has been sacked by crystal palace. chris froome might attempt the grand tour trouble. yesterday he added the vuelta a espa na tour trouble. yesterday he added the vuelta a espana to his tour de france title. he is not ruling out the curator tanya —— giro d'italia next may. here's a complete athlete. he is rounded. boy oh boy is this quy he is rounded. boy oh boy is this guy a winner. he blends personality that he has got with this ability to eke out a way wins. he ekes it out all the time. i think hejust eke out a way wins. he ekes it out all the time. i think he just wears his competitors out and they do not
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know how to beat him. it is something to be admired. that is it. iamon something to be admired. that is it. iam on my something to be admired. that is it. i am on my bike now. will perry will be with you for the next hour and beyond. the pace will be a bit different! thank you. more now on our top story. hurricane irma has brought intense rain, violent winds and tornadoes to the west coast of florida as it continues its trail of destruction. it's just been downgraded to a tropical storm since hitting the florida keys yesterday, but forecasters say it remains very powerful. these pictures were filmed in miami yesterday — and show how strong the winds were. on the line is kristi davison who fled her home in tampa with her children and pets. she's currently in orlando waiting to see when it's safe to return and access the damage. is the feeling now the worst is over? very much so. ironically, i think our damage here in orlando is worse than what i am hearing from my
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neighbourhood at home. we have no power here in orlando and trees are down. roads are blocked. at home, a p pa re ntly down. roads are blocked. at home, apparently electricity never went off in my house. that is the gamble you make. you never know if you should stay or go. luckily, everybody is safe and fine and it is still very windy here. we are just seeing some pictures that you took showing the wind and the results of it. iam intrigued. you have a showing the wind and the results of it. i am intrigued. you have a dog, two cats and two ferrets, is that right? that is correct. my friend had her two sons and we also brought her 99—year—old mother—in—law so we had quite the caravan to orlando, trying to get to a comfortable place in case it would be bad in south tampa. we could not deal with
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incoming water in those circumstances. it must be very difficult right now, knowing that there is your home, presumably others in the area also evacuated, you are just desperate to get back and see it for yourself? absolutely. and we don't have much access to news, only because our phones are all dying and we have not had a chance to check in. people are co nsta ntly chance to check in. people are constantly beeping and checking in. ijust want constantly beeping and checking in. i just want to be home. constantly beeping and checking in. ijust want to be home. i know we are going to have a traffic nightmare on interstate four which is the one road to get back from orlando to tampa. i am sure everyone is in the same situation. the authorities are saying don't leave yet. they have to clear the roads. i don't know what the road conditions are that i am hearing it is pretty good. we really dodged a bullet here. the eye of the storm came up between tampa and orlando. so nobody
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was greatly hurt which is wonderful. iam not was greatly hurt which is wonderful. i am not hearing that there is a lot of injury, just property damage. but of injury, just property damage. but of course i don't know what happened in south florida yet. sure, but in terms of you and your family the news is good and the worst is over. but you must have been terrified to make that decision to leave your home? it was absolutely gut—wrenching. we have never left in that situation in all my years in florida which is most of my life. we left on saturday night in the dark at the last minute, because we were afraid of the storm surge and the storm was not moving the way that we thought, that the forecasters thought, that the forecasters thought that it would. we basically waited until what was the last moment. we got to orlando on
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saturday night because we did not wa nt to saturday night because we did not want to be in a situation where we we re want to be in a situation where we were on the roads when the winds we re were on the roads when the winds were picking up. traffic was heavy but steady, no delays. i think we made the right decision, but it is ironic that actually at home the power is on, cable is working and here we are in the dark and have to get the debris out of the way, but thatis get the debris out of the way, but that is okayed. yes, it could be a lot worse. you live in florida, there is another hurricane on its way. they have already started naming the hurricanes for next season. is there a moment where you think you might want to live somewhere else?... think you might want to live somewhere else? . .. we think you might want to live somewhere else?... we were having that discussion because we were thinking wherein the world would you go that you would avoid some of catastrophe? no, we have not thought of moving. we did say we would purchase more insurance. that is the ha rd purchase more insurance. that is the hard part. we have hurricane
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insurance but flood insurance is a different matter and actually, they met in the knighted states, they decide if you need flood insurance or not —— fema in the united states. we do not have flood insurance. if the hurricane caused flooding, we would be out of luck. we will make other decisions now. url k, the dog is ok, the cats are ok and the ferrets, everybody is all right?... everybody is all right and the dog has just everybody is all right and the dog hasjustjumped everybody is all right and the dog has just jumped in the everybody is all right and the dog hasjustjumped in the pool so i need to go and get her! i need to let go! thank you. let's cross live to westminster now where mps in the house of commons are to continue debating the brexit bill. it may not be desirable to preserve
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the charter on fundamental rights. it is so clearly dependent on eu law and institutions. what i am saying is we need to be sure that its effect is captured and to do otherwise would mean the backstop on equality rights is removed and that is not the status quo that the secretary of state is demanding. there are many examples i could use to demonstrate and if i had time i would be talking about the importance to particularly pregnant workers. and we need to make sure that if we don't have a clear statement in this bill on it that you what basis the courts and the law will be based in the future, we may be concerned about on what basis the supreme court would be able to act to stop future acts of parliament... you have just had a taste of that debate.
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our chief political correspondent vicki young is at westminster for us. how difficult will it be for the government tonight. could they lose this? i did think they will. this is the second day continuation. there we re the second day continuation. there were seniorfigures like the second day continuation. there were senior figures like dominic greene, the former cabinet minister and former attorney general who described the bill as monstrous because many of them see this as a power grab. they think ministers are being given too much power. the reason this bill is required is because we triggered article 50, we are leaving the european union at the end of march 2019, and the government says we have to be ready for the moment. they have to make sure there is no legal gap. they are transferring over a0 odd years of eu law on to the uk statute book and the government says it needs these particular powers in order to do it quickly. the argument is you cannot discuss every single bit of that, you would not get it through in time
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but labour say you are going to far, too much power to the collective so they will be opposing it. i think they will be opposing it. i think the rebels on the tory side will be few and far between. ken clarke mightabstain. on few and far between. ken clarke might abstain. on the labour side jeremy corbyn ordering his mps to vote against this bill. we have heard from some who backed brexit themselves but others like caroline flint who was remain who said you cannot kill this bill off at this point. i think the trouble for the government will come down the line tonight, albeit a very late vote after midnight tonight, they should get through. thank you. vicki young in westminster. power from offshore wind will be cheaper than that generated by new nuclear plants for the first time, experts are predicting. in the latest auction of government subsidies, firms have said they will build new offshore wind farms for half the cost of two years ago. green groups are saying the record
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low price should sound the death knell for the hinkley c nuclear power plant. let's speak now to dr phil taylor — director at the national centre for energy systems at the university of newcastle. on the face of it, professor, aren't there right, if offshore is going to be so cheap to produce, it is the sensible future? it is certainly an important part of our future. today represents a victory, a huge achievement for the offshore wind industry and also for uk energy policy. we have to put this in perspective and realise that the contracts which have been awarded today only represent 2% of uk energy consumption. there is a lot more electricity generation required and we will need energy generation from lots of different sources and a real mixed energy economy. we cannot do it all with wind. we will also need nuclear, solar, biomass etc. let's
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talk about etc. the focus is on nuclear. there is the cost of building these parts and the offshore wind price is £57 50 per megawatt whereas hinkley cis £57 50 per megawatt whereas hinkley c is £92 50 an hour so on the face of it it does look more expensive. the wind industry has really thrown down the gauntlet to other energy generation sectors to say we can innovate, now you have got to do the same. it is a really big challenge and it should have broad benefits of driving energy costs down across the sector so it is a big day for decarbonisation and energy costs. what is the game changer? is it the storage of energy generated? energy
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storage of energy generated? energy storage does have the potential to bea storage does have the potential to be a big game changer. this is variable in its output driven by weather patterns and if we can store energy at large scale, that allows us energy at large scale, that allows us to produce a buffer between energy production and energy consumption. that will allow us to decarbonise at a lower cost. energy storage is not cheap at the moment. its lifetime is not what we would need it to be. there is a lot of research and energy required to drive it forward and make it deployable at a large scale. you accept the argument that we still need hinkley c? we still need lots more generation as well as wind power and nuclear is a low carbon generation source which looks to be still very important in our future energy mix. professor phil taylor,
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thank you. hundreds of thousands of rohingya muslims have now fled myanmar — formerly known as burma — in the past fortnight to seek refuge across the border in bangladesh. the un human rights commissioner has warned that the situation now looks like a textbook example of ethnic cleansing. many of those refugees have settled in makeshift camps near the city of cox's bazar. sanjoy majumder has been to one of them and sent this report. when you're starving, you get desperate. and then it becomes dangerous. this aid truck's surrounded by a seething mass of rohingyas. the organisers, private donors, too nervous to distribute their supplies. there's no sign of the police, and things begin to turn ugly. fights break out. volunteers try to enforce a sense of order, but it is futile. the rohingya relief operation is slowly but surely spinning out of control. most of it is in the hands of local groups and individuals, entirely out of their depth. you get a sense of the desperation.
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people have just climbed onto this little van, trying their best to get hold of little bags of rice that are being handed out. but it's utterly chaotic, there is no sense of order, there's nobody actually coordinating it. and then look over here. these are clothes that have just been flung on the ground, thrown from the aid trucks as they rush away from the scene. well—meaning but an utterly wasted effort. and too many people are getting left out. translation: i have five people in my family, including two small children. most nights, they just go to bed hungry. this man tries to hand out money to the refugees, and soon realises it is a foolish mistake. unleashing a frenzied response from the mob that soon turns threatening. translation: i live in saudi arabia. i saw on television how
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they are suffering so i came here to give them some money. the international aid groups, including the un, are here, but their operations are restricted to the authorised camps. the tens of thousands of refugees who are outside are entirely dependent on hand—outs from locals. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first — the headlines on bbc news: hurricane irma sweeps up florida's west coast leaving more death and destruction in its wake. more than half of all homes in the state are without power — parts of miami are under water. at least four people have died in florida and ten people have been killed in cuba. a crucial vote will take place in parliament tonight on britain's exit from the eu. the government has urged mps to back the bill, describing it as the means to an ‘orderly departure' from the european union. more than 300,000 muslim rohingyas have now fled myanmar — the un human rights chief has warned the current situation is a "textbook example" of ethnic cleansing.
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hello, i have the business news. google is appealing against a record 2.a billion euro it has been slapped with a having its own shopping services in internet services to the researchers. it has been ordered to stop the practice by the end of this month. tata steel uk has finally managed to get rid of its 15 billion pound pension fund — after getting the green light from regulators. the move clears the way for the company to merge its european operations — including port talbot steelworks — with those of germany's thyssenkrupp. the pensions fund had been a major stumbling block to the deal. insurance companies are trying to
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work out the cost caused from hurricane irma. it is likely to dent economic growth for america. last month saw a decline in the number of us going shopping on the high street. it's the worst performance of the year. joining me now is diane wehrle insights director from retail experts springboard — which compiled these figures what is going on with the high street? in may we we had people going out post 5pm, enjoying early
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evening activities but that has slowed down now. people are more cautious about visiting high street soap people are really railing back their spending. but surely online is playing a part as well? it is, in the search to be economic and the best bargain, growth in online activity has increased. it is in terms of the pound spent and the volume of transactions have risen. these tend to rise every month year—on—year anyway but the rate of growth has increased. that is significant in relation to people searching out bargains, looking more carefully for best price, looking at where they can get the best offers, so those into play —— those come into play with the decline in our high street activity. what can the high street activity. what can the high street activity. what can the high street do to fight back?
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retailers have had a hot tough time. we almost seem to be moving into a period of economic austerity again. really they need to create high streets and retail environments which are exciting and they are working hard to do that. some retailers have achieved that. there are some retailers which do not match their online offer with their off—line offer. bricks and mortar does not match. that needs to tally up, particularly in terms of price. there have been stories where people go in stores and pay more in the store than online and vice versa. that needs to match. there needs to be an holistic shopping experience which people can get the best out of. thank you. in other business news. south wales is hoping to become a tech hub — for producing cutting edge new computer chips.
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the government is investing £38 million into a production facility in newport. this won't surprise you if you travelled through heathrow last month. the airport saw record numbers of passengers for august — that's 7.5 million people. that's partly because of more people flying to uk destinations — and to the middle east. red faces at apple. details of its latest top secret phones — including the iphone x — have apparently been leaked on two websites. the company is expected to announce its latest models tomorrow. let's have a quick look at the markets. in the us the markets have been encouraged by hurricane irma. the biggest faller is the company behind primark, associated british foods. that is it from me, simon.
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thank you. let's have a look at the weather. lucy martin has the latest. good afternoon. we have mixed fortunes, sunny spells and showers. this photo is from one of our weather watchers in northampton. you can see here on the visible satellite and radar, those showers edging their way is to it as we have moved through the day today. and as we move through the rest of the day we move through the rest of the day we have still got no pressure in charge and you can see the isobars squeezing so it will be fairly breezy. as we move through the rest of the day we have these showers feeding in. they will tend to die out the further east you are, staying further west though. and a fairly breezy night with temperatures falling to an overnight low of ten and 11 celsius. we will
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see some sunshine first thing, particularly the further east you are. you can see at around eight o'clock tomorrow morning we will cease showers for the south—west of england. as we move further east, seeing more in the way of sunshine. as we move further west in two parts of wales, the risk of seeing one or two showers first thing tomorrow morning. a few scattered showers across northern ireland and west scotland. the best chance of brightness is the further east you are tomorrow morning. we will tend to see cloud bubbling up through the day. for eastern parts of scotland and england, the cloud bubbling up through the day. showers are gradually making their way eastwards. more in the way of dry weather around than we have seen today. we will start to see the rain pushing into northern ireland later in the evening. that is the sign of things to come as we see the rain
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making its way across from the west to the east on tuesday night. there will be heavy rain in there. it will be breezy as well. i think we can see some localised flooding for parts of northern ireland and scotla nd parts of northern ireland and scotland and gusts of 75 mph in the central swathes of england. as we move through wednesday we will. to see some sunny spells developing. temperatures around 18 celsius. and a similar story on thursday, a mix of sunny spells and showers. this is bbc news. i'm simon mccoy. the headlines at apm: hurricane irma sweeps up florida's west coast — leaving cities flooded and more than half of all homes without power. president trump says there will be government help. these are storms of catastrophic severity and we're marshalling the full resources of the federal government to help our fellow
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americans in florida, alabama, georgia, texas, louisiana, tennessee and all of those wonder places and states in harm's way. when americans are in need, americans pull together. earlier irma barrelled along the north coast of cuba, leaving ten people dead. many homes in the capital havana have been inundated. and on the anniversary of 9/11, president trump attends ceremonial events to pay tribute to the nearly 3,000 who died.
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